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Expression Builder Operators

This topic describes the operators that you can use in Expression Builder, and the order in which they are evaluated.

Arithmetic Operators

The following table describes the purpose of each arithmetic operator and gives an example of how it is used.

Operator

Purpose

Example

+

Add

[<Record Number>] + 1

-

Subtract

[<Record Number>] - 1

-

Negate

[<Revenue>] < -100

*

Multiply

[<Subtotal>] * 0.0625

/

Divide

[<Total Items>] / [<Total Orders>]

^

Exponent

[<Grid Height>] ^ 2

Logical Operators

The following truth table shows the possible results from the logical operators in Expression Builder.

Logical Operator

First Operand

Second Operand

Result

NOT

 

TRUE

 

FALSE

FALSE

 

TRUE

NULL

 

NULL

AND

 

TRUE

TRUE

TRUE

FALSE

FALSE

FALSE

TRUE

FALSE

FALSE

FALSE

TRUE

FALSE

TRUE

NULL

NULL

FALSE

NULL

FALSE

NULL

TRUE

NULL

NULL

FALSE

FALSE

NULL

NULL

NULL

OR

 

TRUE

TRUE

TRUE

FALSE

FALSE

FALSE

TRUE

FALSE

TRUE

FALSE

TRUE

TRUE

TRUE

NULL

TRUE

FALSE

NULL

NULL

NULL

TRUE

TRUE

NULL

FALSE

NULL

NULL

NULL

NULL

Comparison Operators

The following table describes the purpose of each comparison operator and gives an example of how it is used.

Operator

Purpose

Example

=

Tests that the first operand is equal to the second operand.

[<Last Name>] = "Smith"

< >

Tests that the first operand is not equal to the second operand.

[<Role>] <> "End-User"

>

Tests that the first operand is greater than the second operand.

[<Revenue>] > 5000

<

Tests that the first operand is less than the second operand.

[<Probability>] < .7

> =

Tests that first operand is greater than or equal to the second operand.

[<Revenue>] >= 5000

< =

Tests that the first operand is less than or equal to the second operand.

[<Probability>] <= .7

LIKE

Tests that the value of the first operand matches the specified string.

[<Last Name>] LIKE "Smith"

TIP: You can use the asterisk (*) and question mark (?) pattern matching special characters with the LIKE operator.

NOT LIKE

Tests that the value of the first operand does not match the specified string.

[<Last Name>] NOT LIKE "Smith"

or

NOT ([<Last Name>] LIKE "Smith")

NOTE: The parentheses are required in the second example.

TIP: You can use the asterisk (*) and question mark (?) pattern matching special characters with the NOT LIKE operator.

IS NULL

Tests that the operand is null.

[<Last Name>] IS NULL

IS NOT NULL

Tests that the operand is not null.

[<Last Name>] IS NOT NULL

Pattern Matching Special Characters

The following table describes the pattern matching special characters. These special characters can be used with the LIKE and NOT LIKE comparison operators.

Character

Purpose

Example

*

Zero or more characters

[<Last Name>] LIKE "Sm*" returns all records where the [<Last Name>] value starts with the characters Sm, as in Smith, Smythe, Smart, and so on.

[<Last Name>] LIKE "*om*" returns all records where the [<Last Name>] field contains the characters om, as in Thomas, Thompson, Tomlin, and so on.

?

One character

[<First Name>] NOT LIKE "Da?" returns all records where the [<First Name>] value is three characters long and does not start with the letters Da. Records with Ted, Tom, and Sam are returned, but Dax and Dan are not.

NOT ([<First Name>] LIKE "?o?") returns all records where the [<First Name>] value is three characters long and does not have as its middle character o. Records with Ted and Sam are returned, but Tom and Bob are not.

Concatenation Operator

The + (plus) operator is used in emails to concatenate field values and text.

Precedence of Operators

Precedence is the order in which Oracle CRM On Demand evaluates the various operators within a single expression. The following rules apply:

  • Operators with higher precedence are evaluated before operators with lower precedence.
  • Operators with equal precedence are evaluated from left to right.
  • Lower-level numbers indicate higher precedence.
  • The use of parentheses affects the order of precedence within an expression. The expression within parentheses is evaluated before the expression outside the parentheses.

The levels of precedence are listed in the following table.

Level

Operator

1

( )

2

- (negation)

3

^ (exponentiation)

4

* (multiplication), / (division)

5

+ (addition), - (subtraction), NOT logical operator

6

AND logical operator

7

OR logical operator

8

=, <>, >, <, >=, <= comparison operators

Related Topics

See the following topics for related Expression Builder information:


Published 5/4/2012 Copyright © 2005, 2012, Oracle. All rights reserved. Legal Notices.