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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Performance and Tuning Guide
11g Release 1 (11.1.1.7.0)

Part Number E10108-13
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5 Understanding the Oracle Dynamic Monitoring Service

This chapter provides an overview and features available in the Oracle Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS).

5.1 About Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS)

The Oracle Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) enables Oracle Fusion Middleware components to provide administration tools, such as Oracle Enterprise Manager, with data regarding the component's performance, state and on-going behavior. Fusion Middleware Components push data to DMS and in turn DMS publishes that data through a range of different components. Specifically, DMS is used by Oracle WebCache, Oracle HTTP Server (OHS), Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF), WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF), and JDBC. DMS measures and reports metrics, trace events and system performance and provides a context correlation service for these components.

5.1.1 Understanding Common DMS Terms and Concepts

This section defines common DMS terms and concepts related to the following:

5.1.1.1 DMS Tracing and Events

Table 5-1 provides a list of DMS tracing and event terminology.

Table 5-1 DMS Tracing and Event Terminology

DMS Term Definition

Condition

A condition is the logic behind a condition filter. It determines which events may pass through a filter, based on the rules defined in the condition. Every condition filter has zero or one root condition, but conditions may include AND or OR arguments together to create compound conditions. The single root condition can describe a relatively complex rule.

Two types of condition exist:

  • Noun Type Condition - operates on the name of the noun type associated with a sensor or noun event.

  • Context Condition - operates on the values currently set within the current Execution Context.

For more information on using conditions, see Section 5.7, "DMS Tracing and Events".

Destination

A destination implements a mechanism for reacting to events that are passed to it. For example, a destination could log events to a file, another could send transformed copies of event to the JRockit Flight Recorder, yet another might render information gleaned from incoming events as data in an MBean.

Event Route

An event route connects a filter to a destination. Event routes may be enabled or disabled. For event tracing to be activated for a specific filter, one or more event routes must exist for that filter and must be enabled.

Filter

An event tracing filter selectively passes a subset of all possible DMS runtime events. Filters can be configured with rules that determine which events are passed and which are blocked.

For example it is possible to define filters to:

  • Only pass sensor updates that are made when the execution context has a key-value pair of "role"-"admin"

  • Only pass sensor updates from nouns of type "JDBC_Statement"

For more information on using filters, see Section 5.7, "DMS Tracing and Events".

Listener

A DMS listener is also known as the destination. See Section 5.7.2, "Configuring Destinations" for more information.


5.1.1.2 DMS Nouns

DMS nouns organize performance data. Sensors, with their associated metrics, are organized in an hierarchy according to nouns. Nouns enable you to organize DMS metrics in a manner comparable to a directory structure in a file system. For example, nouns can represent classes, methods, objects, queues, connections, applications, databases, or other objects that you want to measure.

A noun type is a name that reflects the set of metrics being collected.

5.1.1.2.1 General DMS Naming

A noun name is a simple string, not including a delimiter. For example, BasicBinomial is a noun name. A noun full name consists of the noun name with the namespace and localpart. The noun name is preceded by the full name of its parent, and a delimiter. /dmsDemo/BasicBinomial/"{http://mynamespace/}JAXWSHelloService" is a noun full name.

A sensor name is a simple string, not including the "." or the derivation. For example, computeSeries, loops, and lastComputed are sensor names.

A sensor full name consists of the sensor name, preceded by the name of its associated noun, and a delimiter. Examples: /dmsDemo/BasicBinomial/computeSeries, /dmsDemo/BasicBinomial/loops, /dmsDemo/BasicBinomial/lastComputed.

A DMS metric name consists of a sensor name plus the "." character plus the metric. For example, computeSeries.time, loops.count, and lastComputed.value are valid DMS metric names.

Note:

The suffixes .time, .count, and .value are immutable. Sensor and noun names, however, can be modified as needed.

5.1.1.2.2 General DMS Naming Conventions and Character Sets

DMS names should be as compact as possible. When you define noun and sensor names, avoid special characters such as white space, slashes, periods, parenthesis, commas, and control characters.

Table 5-2 shows DMS replacement for special characters in names.

Table 5-2 Replacement for Special Characters in DMS Names

Character DMS Replacement Character

Space character

Underscore character: _

Period character: .

Underscore character: _

Control character

Underscore character: _

Less than character: <

Open parenthesis: (

Greater than character: >

Close parenthesis: )

Ampersand: &

Caret: ^

Double quote: "

Backquote: '

Single quote: '

Backquote: '


Note:

Oracle Fusion Middleware includes several built-in metrics. The Oracle Fusion Middleware built-in metrics do not always follow the DMS naming conventions.

5.1.1.2.3 Noun and Noun Type Naming Conventions

The following conventions are used when naming noun and noun types:

  • A noun name should be unique.

  • A noun name should identify a specific entity of interest.

  • Noun types should have names that clearly reflect the set of metrics being collected. For example, Servlet is the type for a noun under which the metrics that are specific to a given servlet fall.

  • Noun type names should start with a capital letter to distinguish them from other DMS names. All nouns of a given type should contain the same set of sensors.

  • The noun naming scheme uses a '/' as the root of the hierarchy, with each noun acting as a container under the root, or under its parent noun.

5.1.1.3 DMS Sensors

DMS sensors measure performance data and enable DMS to define and collect a set of metrics. Certain metrics are always included with a sensor and other metrics are optionally included with a sensor.

DMS has three different kinds of sensors:

5.1.1.3.1 DMS PhaseEvent Sensors

A DMS PhaseEvent sensor measures the time spent in a specific section of code that has a beginning and an end. Use a PhaseEvent sensor to track time in a method or in a block of code.

DMS can calculate optional metrics associated with a PhaseEvent, including the average, maximum, and minimum time that is spent in the PhaseEvent sensor.

Table 5-3 lists the metrics available with PhaseEvent sensors.

Table 5-3 DMS PhaseEvent Sensor Metrics

Metric Description

sensor_name.time

Specifies the total time spent in the phase sensor_name.

Default metric: time is a default PhaseEvent sensor metric.

sensor_name.completed

Specifies the number of times the phase sensor_name has completed since the process was started.

Optional metric

sensor_name.minTime

Specifies the minimum time spent in the phase sensor_name, for all the times the sensor_name phase completed.

Optional metric

sensor_name.maxTime

Specifies the maximum time spent in the phase sensor_name, for all the times the sensor_name phase completed.

Optional metric

sensor_name.avg

Specifies the average time spent in the phase sensor_name, computed as the (total time)/(number of times the phase completed).

Optional metric

sensor_name.active

Specifies the number of threads in the phase sensor_name, at the time the DMS statistics are gathered (the value may change over time).

Optional metric

sensor_name.maxActive

Specifies the maximum number of concurrent threads in the phase sensor_name, since the process started.

Optional metric


5.1.1.3.2 DMS Event Sensors

A DMS event sensor counts system events. Use a DMS event sensor to track system events that have a short duration, or where the duration of the event is not of interest but the occurrence of the event is of interest.

Table 5-4 describes the metric that is associated with an event sensor.

Table 5-4 DMS Event Sensor Metrics

Metric Description

sensor_name.count

Specifies the number of times the event has occurred since the process started, where sensor_name is the name of the Event sensor as specified in the DMS instrumentation API.

Default: count is the default metric for an event sensor. No other metrics are available for an event sensor.


5.1.1.3.3 DMS State Sensors

A DMS state sensor tracks the value of Java primitives or the content of a Java object. Supported types include integer, double, long, and object. Use a state sensor when you want to track system status information or when you need a metric that is not associated with an event. For example, use state sensors to track queue lengths, pool sizes, buffer sizes, or host names. You assign a precomputed value to a state sensor.

Table 5-5 describes the state sensor metrics. State sensors support a default metric value, as well as optional metrics. The optional minValue and maxValue metrics only apply for state sensors if the state sensor represents a numeric Java primitive (of type integer, double, or long).

Table 5-5 DMS State Sensor Metrics

Metric Description

sensor_name.value

Specifies the metric value for sensor_name, using the type assigned when sensor_name is created.

Default: value is the default State metric.

sensor_name.count

Specifies the number of times sensor_name is updated.

Optional metric

sensor_name.minValue

Specifies the minimum value for sensor_name since startup.

Optional metric

sensor_name.maxValue

Specifies the maximum value this sensor_name since startup.

Optional metric


5.1.1.3.4 Sensor Naming Conventions

The following list describes DMS sensor naming conventions:

  • Sensor names should be descriptive, but not redundant. Sensor names should not contain any part of the noun name hierarchy, or type, as this is redundant.

  • Sensor names should avoid containing the value for the individual metrics.

  • Where multiple words are required to describe a sensor, the first word should start with a lowercase letter, and the following words should start with uppercase letters. Example: computeSeries

  • In general, avoid using a "/" character in a sensor name. However, there are cases where it makes sense to use a name that contains "/". If a "/" is used in a noun or sensor name, then when you use the sensor in a string with DMS methods, you need to use an alternative delimiter, such as "," or "_", which does not appear anywhere in the path; this enables the "/" to be properly understood as part of the noun or sensor name rather than as a delimiter.

    For example, a child noun can have a name such as:

    examples/jsp/num/numguess.jsp
    

    and you can look this up using the string:

    ,default,WEBs,defaultWebApp,JSPs,example/jsp/num/numguess.jsp,service
    

    where the delimiter is the "," character.

  • Event sensor and PhaseEvent sensor names should have the form verbnoun. Examples: activateInstance and runMethod. When a PhaseEvent monitors a function, method, or code block, it should be named to reflect the task performed as clearly as possible.

  • The name of a state sensor should be a noun, possibly preceded by an adjective, which describes the semantics of the value which is tracked with this state sensor. Examples: lastComputed, totalMemory, port, availableThreads, activeInstances

  • To avoid confusion, do not name sensors with strings such as ".time", ".value", or ".avg", which are names of sensor metrics, as shown in Table 5-3, Table 5-4, and Table 5-5.

5.2 Understanding DMS Availability

DMS functionality is available on all certified Java EE servers. This includes both the runtime features and supporting commands. Also, several features of DMS will operate in JSE applications and standalone C applications.

For more information, see the Oracle Fusion Middleware Certification Matrix at http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/ias/files/fusion_certification.html.

5.3 Understanding DMS Architecture

DMS consists of the following features:

Figure 5-1 shows the components of DMS and how they interact with other Oracle Fusion Middleware components. Arrows show the direction in which information flows from one component to the next.

Figure 5-1 DMS Interactions with Oracle Fusion Middleware Components

Description of Figure 5-1 follows
Description of "Figure 5-1 DMS Interactions with Oracle Fusion Middleware Components"

5.4 Viewing DMS Metrics

Oracle Fusion Middleware components are instrumented with DMS metrics in order to collect information that developers, system administrators, and support analysts can use to analyze system performance or monitor system status. The Fusion Middleware Control online help provides information on each of the specific metrics. See Section 4.2.1, "Viewing Performance Metrics Using Fusion Middleware Control" for information on accessing metric information.

The Oracle Fusion Middleware metrics come from various sources and locations. They include MBean attributes and DMS metrics. They also come from non-Java EE servers, such as Oracle HTTP servers and Oracle WebCache.

The following sections describe how to use various tools to view the DMS metrics:

5.4.1 Viewing Metrics Using the Spy Servlet

The Spy Servlet is part of the DMS Application that is deployed by default on JRF-extended installations. The Spy Servlet is launched from http://<host>:<port>/dms/Spy. The default port for WebLogic is 7001.

The DMS Application's web archive file is dms.war, and can be found in the same directory as dms.jar: oracle_common/modules/oracle.dms_11.1.1/dms.war.

For more information see Section 4.6, "DMS Spy Servlet".

Note:

The Spy Servlet is secured using standard Java EE declarative security in the web-application's web.xml file, and will only grant access to the Spy Servlet to members of the Administrator's group.

5.4.2 Viewing Metrics with WLDF (WebLogic Diagnostic Framework)

You can use WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF) to harvest DMS metrics from DMS metric MBeans. You can also use WLDF to monitor changes to the attribute value of an MBean. For more information see "Configuring the Harvester for Metric Collection" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuring and Using the Diagnostics Framework for Oracle WebLogic Server.

5.4.3 Viewing metrics with WLST (Oracle WebLogic Server)

DMS provides three commands to view metrics in WLST:

Use this command... To do this...

displayMetricTableNames

List the names of the available metric tables.

displayMetricTables

Show the content of the DMS metric tables.

dumpMetrics

Display metrics in the internal format. Valid formats for the dumpMetrics command include raw, xml and pdml.


As well as displaying textual output, theses commands also return a structured object or single value that you can use in a script to process.

For more information on using these commands, see Section 4.5.1.1, "Using WLST Commands for System Components".

5.4.4 Viewing metrics with JConsole

To provide a standards-based way to access metrics, DMS exposes them through MBeans. An MBean will be created and registered for each typed noun with the runtime MBean Server. The DMS sensors contained by the noun are exposed as the attributes of the MBean. Exposing the DMS metrics as MBeans allows administrators to use tools such as JConsole (the Java monitoring and management console), and other Java Management Extension (JMX) clients, to access the DMS metrics.

MBeans also allow for integration with other Oracle diagnostics software such as WLDF (WebLogic Diagnostics Framework), which is described in Section 5.5. The noun name and noun type are exposed as the name and type properties of the metric MBean object name. The MBean domain name is "oracle.dms". The object name also reflects the DMS noun hierarchy.

Note:

You can use JConsole to view DMS generated MBeans on a Java EE server either locally or remotely. DMS generates an MBean for each Java DMS noun that has a valid noun type. It does not generate MBeans for the non-Java EE component's metrics and the DMS nouns that have no noun types. Each DMS metric contained under the noun is mapped to an attribute in the metric MBean.

5.4.5 Viewing metrics with Oracle Enterprise Manager

Oracle Fusion Middleware automatically and continuously measures data regarding the component's performance, state and on-going behavior. The metrics are automatically enabled; there is no need to set options or perform any extra configuration to collect them. For more information see Section 4.2.1, "Viewing Performance Metrics Using Fusion Middleware Control".

5.4.6 Viewing metrics using WSADMIN (IBM WebSphere)

The following commands can be used with IBM WebSphere to display the following:

Use this command... To do this...

OracleDMS.displayMetricTableNames()

List the names of the available metric tables.

OracleDMS.displayMetricTables()

Show the content of the DMS metric tables.

OracleDMS.dumpMetrics()

Display metrics in the internal format. Valid formats include raw, xml and pdml.


For more information on using IBM WebSphere, see "Managing Oracle Fusion Middleware on IBM WebSphere" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Third-Party Application Server Guide.

5.5 Accessing DMS Metrics with WLDF

The WebLogic Diagnostics Framework (WLDF) provides a diagnostic feature that allows MBean attributes to be harvested and monitored for specific conditions. This provides a proactive way of monitoring activity in your environment and creating E-mail and JMX notifications when a condition is triggered.

The following steps describe how to configure WLDF to send an E-mail notification using the WebLogic Administration Console:

  1. Select an existing or create a new Diagnostics Module from the Diagnostics screen.

  2. Click on the Watches and Notifications tab.

  3. Click New.

  4. Enter a Watch Name and click Next.

  5. Enter the text as the Watch Rule and click Next.

    (${ServerRuntime//[NOUNTYPE]oracle.dms:name=/starWars/alliance,type=NounType//forceBalance_value} = 'BAD')
    
  6. Select Use a manual reset alarm and click Next. The manual reset option means that once an E-mail is triggered, you must reset the watch using the WebLogic Administration Console.

  7. Select the E-mail notification type and click Finish.

It is also possible to configure WLDF to collect the MBean data for offline storage and analysis. This is achieved by configuring a WLDF Diagnostic Module to collect specific MBean attributes, and can be done so using the WebLogic Administration Console.

For more information on using WLDF to harvest and monitor MBean data see Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuring and Using the Diagnostics Framework for Oracle WebLogic Server.

5.6 DMS Execution Context

The DMS execution context is the mechanism by which requests (such as HTTP or RMI requests) can be uniquely identified and thus tracked as they flow through the system. It also provides a means by which context information can be communicated between cooperating Fusion Middleware components involved in fulfilling requests.

5.6.1 DMS Execution Requests and Sub-Tasks

The DMS execution context has been developed with the understanding that a single request (or task) may form the root of a tree of sub-tasks that are coordinated to complete the request or root task. Consider the following examples of requests and their associated sub-tasks:

  1. An HTTP request sent directly to Oracle WebLogic Server from a browser:

    • Root task only on Oracle WebLogic Server

  2. An HTTP request sent through Oracle HTTP Server (acting as a reverse proxy) to Oracle WebLogic Server:

    • Root task on Oracle HTTP Server

    • Single sub-task on Oracle WebLogic Server

  3. An HTTP request sent from Oracle HTTP Server (acting as a reverse proxy) to Oracle WebLogic Server that then requires invocation of two remote web services from Oracle WebLogic Server in order to fulfill the request:

    • Root task on Oracle HTTP Server

    • Single sub-task on Oracle WebLogic Server

    • Two sub-sub-tasks, one on each web service

A DMS execution context is composed of the following:

  • A unique identifier, the ECID

    The Execution Context ID (ECID) is unique for each new root task and is shared across the tree of tasks associated with the root task.

  • A relationship identifier, the RID

    The Relationship ID (RID) is an ordered set of numbers that describes the location of each task in the tree of tasks. The leading number is usually a zero. A leading number of 1 indicates that it has not been possible to track the location of the sub-task within the overall sub-task tree.

  • A set of name-value pairs by which globally relevant data can be shared among Oracle Fusion Middleware components.

The following three scenarios illustrate how ECID and RID are used when an HTTP request is sent from Oracle HTTP Server (acting as a reverse proxy) to an Oracle WebLogic Server and the server requires invocation of two remote web services from Oracle WebLogic Server.

  1. Root task on Oracle HTTP Server:

    • New ECID = B5C094FA...BE4AE8

    • Root RID = 0

  2. Single sub-task on Oracle WebLogic Server:

    • Same ECID = B5C094FA...BE4AE8

    • Sub-task RID = 0:1

  3. Two Sub-tasks, one on each web service:

    • First web service invoked

      Same ECID = B5C094FA...BE4AE8

      Sub-task RID = 0:1:1

    • Second web service invoked

      Same ECID = B5C094FA...BE4AE8

      Sub-task RID = 0:1:2

5.6.2 DMS Execution Context Usage

The most immediate benefits of the DMS execution context are realized when attempting to correlate log messages between servers. The Oracle standard format for logging involves a field dedicated to the ECID. Once the ECID is known, when its read from an ERROR level log message for example, it is possible to locate all other log messages associated with that task by querying the log files for messages containing that ECID.

The following example shows a very specific case of using the command:

displayLogs(ecid="B5C094FA...BE4AE8");

In this example, any log files with messages that contain the ECID B5C094FA...BE4AE8 will be displayed.

5.6.3 DMS Execution Context Communication

Figure 5-2 shows the components that cooperate in order to communicate the DMS execution context between each other. Arrows pointing to a component indicate the protocols that are inspected for incoming context information. Outgoing arrows show protocols to which context information is added. It is possible for a single component to send requests to itself, passing context information in that request.

Figure 5-2 DMS Execution Context Communication Protocols

Description of Figure 5-2 follows
Description of "Figure 5-2 DMS Execution Context Communication Protocols"

5.7 DMS Tracing and Events

Starting with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.3.0), DMS can selectively trace the following:

The configuration that controls which of these types of events are traced, and how those events are processed, is recorded in the dms_config.xml file. The DMS trace configuration is split into three parts:

  1. Filter Configuration

    Defines the rules that select the events that are of interest

  2. Destination Configuration

    Defines how the events are used

  3. eventRoute Configuration

    Defines which filters are wired to which destinations

A filter can be associated with one or more destinations thus granting the administrator the ability to define a filter rule once and have the resulting subset of all possible events processed on one or more different destinations.

The configuration can be modified using the DMS configuration MBean or WLST commands at runtime; this makes the DMS tracing feature invaluable for diagnosing issues within a specific time period or collecting specific data at a specific time for a specific set of criteria.

For more information, see "Configuring Selective Tracing Using WLST" in Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.

The following types of filter rules are supported:

5.7.1 Configuring the DMS Event System

Configuration is recorded in each server's dms_config.xml file. MBean updates can be made at runtime using command line interface (CLI) commands and through the Event Configuration Mbean. Configuration updates are applied to the running system in a thread safe, but non-atomic, manner.

The object name of the DMS Event configuration MBean is: oracle.dms.event.config:name=DMSEventConfigMBean,type=JMXEventConfig

To review the current state of your system's DMS event configuration, use the following command:

listDMSEventConfiguration([server=<server>])

The resulting output will look similar to this:

Event routes:
        FILTER      :  auto662515911
        DESTINATION :  destination1
        ENABLED     :  true
        FILTER      :  filter0
        DESTINATION :  q
        ENABLED     :  true
Filters with no event route:
  Fred
 
Destinations with no event route:
  des4
 

5.7.1.1 Adding and Editing Filters

Filters define the rules that select which events are considered for tracing.

The following example shows how to add a filter that selects all events related to JDBC operations:

addDMSEventFilter(id='myJDBCFilter', props={'condition': 'NOUNTYPE sw JDBC_'})

Or:

addDMSEventFilter(id='myJDBCFilter', props={'condition': 'NOUNTYPE startsWith JDBC_'})

This filter assumes that all DMS sensor updates associated with JDBC operations are performed on nouns of types whose names begin "JDBC_".

If the rule must be modified, the filter may be updated as shown in the following example:

updateDMSEventFilter(id="myJDBCFilter", props={'condition': 'NOUNTYPE startsWith JDBC_ OR NOUNTYPE startsWith MDS_'});

As of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11.1.1.6.0, the following shortened convenience operators have been added. Operators can be specified using either the shortened or longer name.

Note that operators with an underscore have been deprecated in favor of the ODL format, which is to use mixed case. For example, not_equals becomes notEquals or ne. The old format will still work, but is discouraged.

Noun Type Operators

equals, eq

notEquals, ne

contains

in

startsWith, sw

 

Context Operators

equals, eq

notequals, ne

isnull

isnotnull

startswith, sw

contains

lt

gt


Example:

addDMSEventFilter(id='mdsbruce', name='MyFilter', props={'condition':
'NOUNTYPE eq MDS_Connections AND CONTEXT user ne bruce'})
 
addDMSEventFilter(id='mdsbruce', name='MyFilter', props={'condition':
'NOUNTYPE equals MDS_Connections AND CONTEXT user notequals bruce'}) 

For more information about the syntax used to describe a filter's rule (the condition property), refer to the WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference or the command help.

5.7.1.2 Adding and Editing Destinations

Destinations encapsulate logic for responding to events. For example, a basic destination will log the event, a different destination may transform an event and pass it to another system for further processing.

The following example shows how to add a destination that will log events:

addDMSEventDestination(id="myLoggerDestination", class="oracle.dms.trace2.runtime.LoggerDestination", props={"loggerName":"myLogger"});

Note that merely adding the destination is not sufficient for events to be logged; to log the events, you must associate a filter with a destination using an eventRoute, and the eventRoute must be enabled (default).

The types of destination available, and their configuration options, are described in Section 5.7.2. The following example shows how to edit an existing destination:

updateDMSEventDestination(id="myLoggerDestination", props={"loggerName":"myTraceLogger"});

5.7.1.3 Adding and Editing Event Routes

The following example shows how to join the filter and destination created above:

addDMSEventRoute(filterid='myJDBCFilter', destinationid='myLoggerDestination') 

Note that you can invoke addDMSEventRoute without an explicit filterId. In these scenarios, all events are passed to the destination without filtering.

To remove a filter or destination, you must first remove the event routes associated with the filter or destination (even if the event route is disabled). For example, if you wanted to remove myJDBCFilter, you would first need to remove the eventRoute created in the previous example, and then remove the filter as shown in the following example:

removeDMSEventRoute(filterid='myJDBCFilter', destinationid='myLoggerDestination') 
removeDMSEventFilter(id='myJDBCFilter')

5.7.1.4 Compound Operations

It is possible to create a filter and an eventRoute based on that filter using a single command (rather than using two separate commands as shown in Section 5.7.1.3). Note, however, that the destination to be used by the event route must already be defined:

enableDMSEventTrace (destinationid='myLoggerDestination', condition='NOUNTYPE starts_with JDBC_')

In the example above, enableDMSEventTrace automatically creates a filter with the specified condition, and also creates and enables an event route using the new filter and the nominated destination. The output is shown in the following example:

Filter "auto605449842" using Destination "myLoggerDestination" added, and event-route enabled for server "AdminServer"

5.7.2 Configuring Destinations

DMS offers the following types of destinations:

5.7.2.1 LoggerDestination

Description

The LoggerDestination writes each event to the associated logger.

Implementing Class

oracle.dms.trace2.runtime.LoggerDestination

Properties

 

loggerName

The name of the ODL logger to which events will be written.


Instances of logger destinations write events to the named logger at a log level of FINER.

The loggerName property specifies the name of a logger, but the logger does not necessarily have to be described in logging.xml, though it can be. If the logger name refers to a logger that is explicitly named in logging.xml, then the logger is referred to as a static logger (see Section 5.7.2.1.1). If the logger name refers to a logger that is not explicitly named in logging.xml, then the logger is referred to as a dynamic logger (see Section 5.7.2.1.2).

Use in the default configuration: the default configuration defines a logger destination, with an identification of LoggerDestination. This particular instance does not form part of any eventRoute and therefore is not active. It is provided for convenience, and uses a dynamic logger.

5.7.2.1.1 Static Loggers and Handlers

Loggers are the objects to which log records are presented. Log handlers are the objects through which log records are written to log files.

For complete control over the log file to which DMS trace data is written, define the logger named in the logger destination in logging.xml. Doing this allows you to explicitly define the name of the log file, the maximum size, format, file rotation and policies.

Oracle recommends using commands (like the example below) to update the configuration.

setLogLevel(logger="myTraceLogger", level="FINER", addLogger=1);
 
configureLogHandler(name="my-trace-handler", addToLogger=["myTraceLogger"], path="/tmp/myTraceLogFiles/trace", maxFileSize="10m", maxLogSize="50m", handlerType="oracle.core.ojdl.logging.ODLHandlerFactory", addHandler=1, useParentHandlers=0);
 
configureLogHandler(name="my-trace-handler", propertyName="useSourceClassandMethod", propertyValue="false", addProperty=1);

For more information on logging configuration, see "Managing Log Files and Diagnostic Data" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.]

The use of the optional property useSourceClassandMethod set to FALSE prevents the 'SRC_CLASS' and "SRC_METHOD' from appearing in every message and will marginally improve performance by reducing file output times.

For static loggers, consider setting the useParentHandlers parameter to FALSE, otherwise duplicate event messages will be logged to [server]-diagnostics.log, and shown in a log query.

See Section 5.7.3, "Understanding DMS Event Output" for more information about interpreting logger output.

5.7.2.1.2 Dynamic Loggers and Handlers

If the named logger has no associated handler defined in logging.xml, then the logger destination will dynamically create a handler object that will write to a file in the server's default log output directory. (Instances of logger destinations write events to the named logger at a log level of FINER.) The file name will be the logger's name followed by "-event.log". For instance, in the example in Section 5.7.2.1.1, DMS events would be written to "myTraceLogger-event.log".

5.7.2.1.3 Default Locations of the logging.xml File

The logging.xml file can typically be found in one of the following platform locations:

Platform Server Location

Oracle WebLogic Server

AdminServer

ORACLE_HOME/Middleware/user_projects/domains/base_domain/config/fmwconfig/servers/AdminServer/logging.xml

WAS ND

OracleAdminServer

ORACLE_HOME/Middleware/was_profiles/DefaultTopology/DefaultServer/config/cells/DefaultCell/nodes/<nodename>/servers/OracleAdminServer/fmwconfig/logging.xml


5.7.2.1.4 Using a CLI Command to Query the Trace Log File

If the logger destination's logger and handler are defined in logging.xml then you can take advantage of the displayLogs() command to conveniently access logged trace data without having to manually locate or search for it.

Examples:

  • To display all the log messages for the myTraceLogger:

    displayLogs(query='MODULE equals myTraceLogger')
    
  • To display only the log messages for myTraceLogger which have an ECID of '0000HpmSpLWEkJQ6ub3FEH194kwB000004':

    displayLogs(query='MODULE equals myTraceLogger and ECID equals 0000HpmSpLWEkJQ6ub3FEH194kwB000004')
    
  • To display only the log messages for myTraceLogger which have an ECID of '0000HpmSpLWEkJQ6ub3FEH194kwB000004' in the last 10 minutes:

    displayLogs(query='MODULE equals myTraceLogger and ECID equals 0000HpmSpLWEkJQ6ub3FEH194kwB000004', last=10)
    
  • To display all the log messages from a dynamic logger the log's file name must be included:

    displayLogs(disconnected=1, log=DOMAIN_ROOT+"/servers/AdminServer/logs/myTraceLogger-event.log")
    

5.7.2.2 MBean Creator Destination

Description

The MBean creator destination make nouns accessible as MBeans, exposing their metrics as attributes, for access via WLDF, JConsole, etc.

Implementing Class

oracle.dms.jmx.MetricMBeanFactory


Use in the default configuration: An instance of the MBean Creator destination is configured and active by default, and will create MBeans for all nouns created in the server.

By associating an instance of this destination type with a filter based on a noun-type rule, it is possible to expose (as MBeans) only those noun types that are of interest to the administrator.

Although it is possible to modify the configuration associated with an MBean creator destination at runtime, it must be understood that the reinitialization process for this type of destination may impact performance. Frequent runtime reconfiguration is therefore discouraged.

Note that WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF) can be used to harvest DMS metrics exposed by the MBean creator destination. For more information about WLDF, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuring and Using the Diagnostics Framework for Oracle WebLogic Server.

5.7.2.2.1 Metric MBean Object Name

The noun name and noun type are exposed as the name and type properties of the metric MBean object name. The MBean domain name is "oracle.dms". The object name also reflects the DMS noun hierarchy.

For example if the noun's full path name is:

/oracle/dfw/ofm/base_domain/AdminServer

and the noun type is DFW_Incident, the object name of the MBean representing the noun is

oracle.dms:Location=AdminServer,name=/oracle/dfw/ofm/base_domain/AdminServer,type=DFW_Incident.

5.7.2.3 HTTP Request Tracker Destination

Description

The HTTP Request Tracker destinations maintains a list of active HTTP requests, and makes the requests accessible to other Diagnostic Framework (DFW) components.

Implementing Class

oracle.dms.event.HTTPRequestTrackerDestination

Properties

 

excludeHeaderNames

Comma separated list of header names to exclude from tracking


Use in the default configuration: An instance of the HTTP request tracker destination is enable by default. In the case of a DFW incident being generated the active HTTP request list will be dumped automatically, allowing an administrator to correlate the failure with a specific request.

For each HTTP request the following information will be dumped:

  • URI (such as /webcenter/home)

  • Start time of the request

  • ECID

  • Query string

  • HTTP Headers

When the HTTP request tracker is not enabled the HTTP Request Dump will output the following:

HTTP Requests are not being tracked. To enable HTTP request tracking enable the DMS oracle.dms.event.HTTPRequestTrackerDestination in dms_config.xml
5.7.2.3.1 Executing the HTTP Request Tracker Dump

The information being maintained by the HTTP request tracker can be accessed manually. In order to execute the dump that reports the HTTP request information the WLST executeDump command can be used, when connected to a server, as follows:

> executeDump(name="http.requests")
Active Requests:
 
StartTime: 2009-12-14 02:24:41.870
ECID: 0000IMChyqEC8xT6uBf9EH1B9X9^000009,0
URI: /myApp/Welcome.jsp
QueryString: 
Headers:
   Host: myHost.myDomain.com:7001
   Connection: keep-alive
   User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US) AppleWebKit/532.5 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/4.0.249.30 Safari/532.5
   Accept: application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5
   Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
   Cookie: ORA_MOS_LOCALE=en%7CGB; s_nr...
   Accept-Language: en-GB,en-US;q=0.8,en;q=0.6
   Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3

5.7.2.4 JRockit Flight Recorder Destination

The JRockit Flight Recorder (JFR) records information regarding the runtime status and behavior of the JRockit JVM. JFR also exposes an API through which third party events can be reported. JFR is available in JRockit R28 and beyond.

By themselves DMS traces and JFR traces only show part of the picture of the actions being performed in the server. DMS integration with JFR enhances the diagnostic information available to administrators and developers as follows:

  1. Application level events and JVM level events can be reported as a single sequence therefore avoiding the need to combine such events from separate log files based only on timestamp (which may not tick over fast enough to accurately order events created at or around the same time).

  2. Recent DMS activity can be dumped, retroactively, from the JVM at will.

  3. Recent DMS and JVM events can be dumped to disk in the event of a fatal error that causes the JVM to exit gracefully.

  4. The DMS ECID can be used to correlate activity relating to the same request, or unit of work, across the span of a JFR recording.

  5. The DMS ECID can be used to collect diagnostic information from all systems involved with an event, or series of events, recorded by JFR.

5.7.2.4.1 Dynamically Derived JFR Event Types – Names, Values and Descriptions

A DMS noun type will be associated with a JFR InstantEvent event type:

  • The name of the JFR event type for a noun type will be the noun type's name with the suffix “ state”.

  • The path of the JFR event type for a noun type will be “dms/” followed by the producer-name, followed by the event type name.

  • Event sensors will not contribute any values to the noun type's JFR event type.

  • The values of the JFR event for a noun type are described in Table 5-6:

    Table 5-6 Values of the JFR Event for a Noun Type

    Value Name Description Relational Notes

    ECID

    The Execution Context ID (ECID) associated with the action.

    Yes

     

    RID

    The RID associated with the action.

    Yes

     

    <noun type> name

    The full path of the noun.

     

    This field will be populated with the full path of the noun. The field's name assumes that the noun_type meaningfully categorizes all objects being measured by the nouns of that type.

    <state-sensor-name>

    The value of the state sensor.

    No

    Each state sensor belonging to the noun will contribute one of these values to the instant event. There may be more that one value in each noun.

    event name

    The name of the event sensor that was updated, left null otherwise.

    No

    The event name field is required for being able to count the number of times a DMS event sensor has been updated in a recording (event sensors do not contribute values to an event type).


A DMS phase sensor will be associated with a JFR DurationEvent event type:

  • The name of the JFR event type for a phase sensor belonging to a noun of a particular noun type will be the noun type's name following by the phase sensor's name.

  • The path of the JFR event for a noun type will be “dms/” followed by the producer-name, followed by the event type name.

  • The values of the duration event will be as above (except for the sensorName value). For example the “stop” of a phase event will result in a JFR duration event being reported to JFR that contains the state information of the phase event's parent noun.

Several DMS objects allow integrators to add descriptions. Descriptions from DMS objects will be used as follows:

  • Noun type description will be used in creation of the JFR event type

  • State and event sensor descriptions will not be applied – there is nowhere to apply them.

  • Phase sensor descriptions will be applied to their JFR event type.

5.7.2.4.2 Examples of Dynamically Derived Producers and Events

Table 5-7 provides examples for the rules described in Section 5.7.2.4.1:

Table 5-7 Examples of Dynamically Derived Producers and Events

DMS JRockit Flight Recorder (JFR)

Noun type:

JDBC_Connection

Noun path:

/JDBC/Driver/CONNECTION_7

Sensors:

CreateStatement (P)

CreateNewStatement (P)

DBWaitTime (P)

JDBC_Connection_Url (S)

JDBC_Connection_Username (S)

Where:

P: Phase Sensor

S : State Sensor

E : Event Sensor

Producer Name: JDBC

The Producer Name is based on the leading component of the noun path.

Event Type 1

Event Type Name: JDBC_Connection State

<noun type> State

Event Type Path: dms/JDBC/JDBC_Connection_State

dms/<leading component of noun path>/<noun type>/_State

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • JDBC_Connection name

    Value will be the full path of the noun

  • JDBC_Connection_Url

    Value will be that of the state sensor of this name at the time of the event

  • JDBC_Connection_Username

    Value will be that of the state sensor of this name at the time of the event

  • Event Name

    Value will be one of the following:

    • The name of the DMS event sensor whose activation caused this JFR event instance

    • Null if this JFR event instance was created for a state sensor update

 

Producer Name: JDBC

Event Type 2

Event Type Name: JDBC_Connection CreateStatement

Event Type Path:

dms/JDBC/JDBC_Connection_CreateStatement

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • JDBC_Connection name

  • JDBC_Connection_Url

  • JDBC_Connection_Username

 

Producer Name: JDBC

Event Type 3

Event Type Name: JDBC_Connection CreateNewStatement

Event Type Path:

dms/JDBC/JDBC_Connection_CreateNewStatement

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • JDBC_Connection name

  • JDBC_Connection_Url

  • JDBC_Connection_Username

 

Producer Name: JDBC

Event Type 4

Event Type Name: JDBC_Connection DBWaitTime

Event Type Path:

dms/JDBC/JDBC_Connection_DBWaitTime

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • JDBC_Connection name

  • JDBC_Connection_Url

  • JDBC_Connection_Username

Noun type:

webcenter_lifecycle

Noun path:

/oracle/webcenter/webcenter/lifecycle

Sensors:

ProcessingTime (P)

status (S)

successCount (E)

Where:

P: Phase Sensor

S : State Sensor

E : Event Sensor

Producer Name: webcenter

Event Type 1

Event Type Name: webcenter_lifecycle State

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • webcenter_lifecycle name

  • status

  • event name

Producer Name: webcenter

Event Type 2

Event Type Name: webcenter_lifecycle ProcessingTime

Fields:

  • ECID

  • RID

  • webcenter_lifecycle name

  • status


5.7.3 Understanding DMS Event Output

Table 5-8 describes the fields that make up a DMS event. Field elements are separated by ":" (with a few exceptions). Sample events are provided to illustrate the position of the field within an actual event string.

Table 5-8 Event Formatting Descriptions

Applicable Events Field Number Name Description

All

1

Version number

The version number of the event format

For example:

v1:1280737384058:HTTP_REQUEST:STOP:/MyWebApp/emp

All

2

Event time

The time at which the event occurred

For example:

v1:1280737384058:HTTP_REQUEST:STOP:/MyWebApp/emp

All

3

Source object type

The type of object on which an action was performed to produce the event including:

  • NOUN

  • EVENT_SENSOR

  • STATE_SENSOR

  • PHASE_SENSOR

  • EXECUTION_CONTEXT

  • HTTP_REQUEST

For example:

v1:1280737384058:HTTP_REQUEST:STOP:/MyWebApp/emp

All

4

Action type

The type of action that resulted in the generation of this event. A given source object type may not necessarily produce events for every action type:

  • CREATE

  • UPDATE

  • DELETE

  • START

  • STOP

  • ABORT

For example:

v1:1280737384058:HTTP_REQUEST:STOP:/MyWebApp/emp

Nouns

5

Noun type

The name of the noun type

For example:

v1:1281344803506:NOUN:CREATE:JDBC_Connection:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1

6

Noun path

The full path identifying the noun to which the sensor belongs

For example:

v1:1281344803506:NOUN:CREATE:JDBC_Connection:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1

All Sensor Types

5

Noun type

The name of the noun type to which this sensor belongs

For example:

v1:1280503318973:STATE_SENSOR:UPDATE:JDBC_Connection:LogicalConnection:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:State.ANY:LogicalConnection@13bed086

6

Sensor name

The name of the sensor

For example:

v1:1280737383069:PHASE_SENSOR:STOP:JDBC_Connection:DBWaitTime:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:1280737382950:1280737383069

7

Noun path

The full path identifying the noun to which the sensor belongs

For example:

v1:1280737383069:PHASE_SENSOR:STOP:JDBC_Connection:DBWaitTime:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:1280737382950:1280737383069

Phase Sensor Types

8

Start token

The start token of the phase.

For example:

v1:1280737383069:PHASE_SENSOR:STOP:JDBC_Connection:DBWaitTime:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:1280737382950:1280737383069

9

Stop token

The end token of the phase.

For example:

v1:1280737383069:PHASE_SENSOR:STOP:JDBC_Connection:DBWaitTime:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:1280737382950:1280737383069

State Sensor Types

8

State value type

The type of value held by the state sensor including:

  • State.DOUBLE

  • State.INTEGER

  • State.LONG

  • State.OBJECT

  • State.ANY

For example:

v1:1280503318973:STATE_SENSOR:UPDATE:JDBC_Connection:LogicalConnection:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:State.ANY:LogicalConnection@13bed086

9

State value

The value of the state represented in string form.

For example:

v1:1280503318973:STATE_SENSOR:UPDATE:JDBC_Connection:LogicalConnection:/JDBC/JDBC Data Source-0/CONNECTION_1:State.ANY:LogicalConnection@13bed086

HTTP Requests

5

URI

Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) identifies the resource upon which to apply the request.

For example:

v1:1280737382889:HTTP_REQUEST:START:/myWebApp/showEmployees

v1:1280737384058:HTTP_REQUEST:STOP:/myWebApp/showEmployees

Execution Context

5

ECID,RID

The context identifier (composed of ECID and RID separated by a comma).

For execution context events the complete substring starting at the first character after the fourth event field separator (":") records the ECID,RID identifiers - the context identifiers may contain ":" but these should not be interpreted as event field separators.

For example:

v1:1280737384058:EXECUTION_CONTEXT:STOP:bc4fd0668f79d507:367c127f:12a23f2013c:-8000-0000000000000f73,0


5.7.4 Understanding DMS Event Actions

Table 5-9 shows the action types that can be performed on source object types.

Table 5-9 Actions Performed on Source Object Types


Create Update Delete Start Stop Abort

Noun

Yes

-

Yes

-

-

-

Event Sensor

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

-

-

Phase Sensor

Yes

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

State Sensor

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

-

-

Execution Context

-

-

-

Yes

Yes

-

Http Request

-

-

-

Yes

Yes

-


5.8 DMS Best Practices

The use of DMS metrics can have an impact on application performance. When adding metrics, consider the following: