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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Business Process Composer User's Guide for Oracle Business Process Management
11g Release 1 (11.1.1.7)

Part Number E15177-11
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14 Communicating with other Processes and Services

This chapter describes functionality of Business Process Composer related to technical implementation of a BPMN process. The functionality described in this chapter is generally performed by a process developer.

This chapter includes the following sections:

14.1 Defining Process Input and Output

When you add operations to a BPMN process, you are defining points in the process that other processes or services can use to communicate with it. The communication between processes and other processes or services generally requires an input and returns an output. The flow events that you use you to define the BPMN process operations enable you to define input and output arguments. These input and output arguments define the process input and output.

14.1.1 How to Define the Input Arguments for a Process

When you create a process that begins with a message start event, you must define the input arguments to that are passed to that process.

To define the input arguments for a process:

  1. Add a message start event to your process.

  2. Right-click on the message start event, the select Properties.

  3. Click the Implementation tab.

  4. Select Define Interface.

  5. Click the Add icon.

  6. Determine the type of data object.

  7. Click OK.

14.1.2 How to Define Data Associations for a Message Start Event

After you have defined the input arguments to your process, you must map them to data objects in your process.

To define data associations for a message start event:

  1. Select the message start event of your process.

  2. Click Data Associations.

  3. Drag the data objects from the list on the right-hand side to the text boxes listed under Outputs.

  4. Click Apply.

14.1.3 How to Define the Output Arguments for a Process

When you create a process that contains message end events, you must define the output arguments for each end event. These are the output arguments for the process.

To define the output arguments for a process:

  1. Add a message end event to your process.

  2. Right-click on the message end event, then select Properties.

  3. Click the Implementation tab.

  4. Select Define Interface.

  5. Click the Add icon.

  6. Determine the type of data object.

  7. Click OK.

14.1.4 How to Define Data Association for a Message End Event

After you have defined the output arguments for your process, you must map them to the data objects in your process.

To define data associations for a message end event:

  1. Select a message end event in your process.

  2. Click Data Associations.

  3. Drag the data objects from the list on the right-hand side to the text boxes listed under Inputs.

  4. Click Apply.

14.2 Defining Conversations

The following sections describe how to edit conversations using Business Process Composer. For complete information see Oracle BPM Modeling and Implementation Guide.

14.2.1 Introduction to Conversations

Conversations group the message exchange between two or more processes. The message exchange between processes is called collaboration. Within a project you can define multiple conversations that you can reuse amongst the processes in that project.

Collaboration diagrams allows you to view the process flow together with the interactions your process has with other participants in the conversation.

Your BPM project defines a conversation by default. If you do not want to define multiple conversations you must use this default conversation to gather all the message exchange amongst the processes in your project.

You can only define one default conversation per project. However you can modify your project to use a different default conversation than the one it uses by default.

The different types of conversations allow you to specify the different types of interaction your process can establish with other processes or services. The following list describes the different types of conversations:

  • Define Interface: use this type to define the operations that other services and processes can invoke to interact with a BPMN process.

  • Use Interface: use this type to configure your process to use an interface from a component in the Business Catalog.

  • Process Call: use this type to invoke another BPMN process.

  • Service Call: use this type to invoke a service defined in your BPM project.

14.2.2 Working with Conversations

The following sections describe how to define and configure conversations using Business Process Composer.

14.2.2.1 How to define a conversation

  1. Open your process.

  2. Click the Edit Conversation button in the process editor toolbar.

  3. Click the Add Conversation button.

  4. Provide a name for the conversation.

  5. Select the type of conversation you want to define.

  6. Click OK.

14.2.2.2 How to set the default conversation

  1. Open your process.

  2. Click the Edit Conversation button in the process editor toolbar.

  3. Select a conversation from the list, then click the Edit button.

  4. Click the Default Conversation checkbox.

  5. Click OK.

14.2.2.3 How to define a conversation for a BPMN flow object

  1. Open your process

  2. Right-click one of the following types of BPMN flow objects:

    • Message events (throw and catch)

    • Send and receive tasks

    • Service tasks

    You can only define conversations these BPM flow objects.

  3. Select Implement.

  4. In the Implementation tab, click the Browse button next to the Conversation text field.

  5. Select a conversation from the list, then click OK.

14.2.2.4 How to view a collaboration diagram

To view the collaboration diagram for a process, click the View Collaboration button in the process editor toolbar.

Note:

In collaboration view, you cannot make changes to the process. To return to normal process editing, click the View Collaboration button again.

14.3 Working with Services

The following sections describe how to create services using Business Process Composer.

14.3.1 How to Create New Services in the Business Catalog

Business Process Composer enables you to create new services in the business catalog. These services are based on standard Web Services.

Services based on web services are defined using a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) file. A WSDL file is an XML file used to describe how web services are implemented. When creating a new service using Business Process Composer, you can specify a WSDL file stored local on your machine or one that is available.

Process developers are responsible for providing a WSDL file or URL location.

To create a new service:

  1. Open the project where you want to create a new service.

  2. From the main menu, select New then New Service.

  3. Provide the following information:

    • Name: Defines the name of the service as it appears in the business catalog.

    • Type: Defines the type of service being created.

    • WSDL: The source of the WSDL used to create the new service can be one of the following:

      • URL: Specifies the remote URL of the WSDL.

      • File: Specifies either a WSDL or ZIP file on your local file system.

        If using a ZIP file, it can include only WSDL and XSD files. The WSDL file should have valid references.

    • Port Type: Port type specifies the service used. A WSDL file exposes one or more port types.

    • Callback Type: Determines the call back type used for this web service. This is only applicable to asynchronous services.

    • Transaction Participation:

    • Version:

  4. Click OK.