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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Getting Started With JAX-WS Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server
11g Release 1 (10.3.6)

Part Number E13758-06
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2 Use Cases and Examples

This chapter describes common use cases and examples for WebLogic Web services using Java API for XML-based Web services (JAX-WS).

This chapter includes the following sections:

Each use case provides step-by-step procedures for creating simple WebLogic Web services and invoking an operation from a deployed Web service. The examples include basic Java code and Ant build.xml files that you can use in your own development environment to recreate the example, or by following the instructions to create and run the examples in an environment that is separate from your development environment.

The use cases do not go into detail about the processes and tools used in the examples; later chapters are referenced for more detail.

Note:

For best practice examples demonstrating advanced Web service features, see "Roadmaps for Developing Web Service Clients" and "Roadmaps for Developing Reliable Web Services and Clients" in Programming Advanced Features of JAX-WS Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Creating a Simple HelloWorld Web Service

This section describes how to create a very simple Web service that contains a single operation. The Java Web Service (JWS) file that implements the Web service uses just the one required JWS annotation: @WebService. A JWS file is a standard Java file that uses JWS metadata annotations to specify the shape of the Web service. Metadata annotations were introduced with JDK 5.0, and the set of annotations used to annotate Web service files are called JWS annotations. WebLogic Web services use standard JWS annotations. For a complete list of JWS annotations that are supported, see "Web Service Annotation Support" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

The following example shows how to create a Web service called HelloWorldService that includes a single operation, sayHelloWorld. For simplicity, the operation returns the inputted String value.

  1. Set your WebLogic Server environment.

    Open a command window and execute the setDomainEnv.cmd (Windows) or setDomainEnv.sh (UNIX) script, located in the bin subdirectory of your domain directory. The default location of WebLogic Server domains is MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domainName, where MW_HOME is the top-level installation directory of the Oracle products and domainName is the name of your domain.

  2. Create a project directory, as follows:

    prompt> mkdir /myExamples/hello_world
    
  3. Create a src directory under the project directory, as well as subdirectories that correspond to the package name of the JWS file (shown later in this procedure):

    prompt> cd /myExamples/hello_world
       prompt> mkdir src/examples/webservices/hello_world
    
  4. Create the JWS file that implements the Web service.

    Open your favorite Java IDE or text editor and create a Java file called HelloWorldImpl.java using the Java code specified in Sample HelloWorldImpl.java JWS File.

    The sample JWS file shows a Java class called HelloWorldImpl that contains a single public method, sayHelloWorld(String). The @WebService annotation specifies that the Java class implements a Web service called HelloWorldService. By default, all public methods are exposed as operations.

  5. Save the HelloWorldImpl.java file in the src/examples/webservices/hello_world directory.

  6. Create a standard Ant build.xml file in the project directory (myExamples/hello_world/src) and add a taskdef Ant task to specify the full Java classname of the jwsc task:

    <project name="webservices-hello_world" default="all">
      <taskdef name="jwsc"
               classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />  
    </project>
    

    See Sample Ant Build File for HelloWorldImpl.java for a full sample build.xml file that contains additional targets from those described in this procedure, such as clean, undeploy, client, and run. The full build.xml file also uses properties, such as ${ear-dir}, rather than always using the hard-coded name for the EAR directory.

  7. Add the following call to the jwsc Ant task to the build.xml file, wrapped inside of the build-service target:

    <target name="build-service">
        <jwsc
          srcdir="src"
          destdir="output/helloWorldEar">
             <jws file="examples/webservices/hello_world/HelloWorldImpl.java"
               type="JAXWS"/>
        </jwsc>
      </target>
    

    The jwsc WebLogic Web service Ant task generates the supporting artifacts, compiles the user-created and generated Java code, and archives all the artifacts into an Enterprise Application EAR file that you later deploy to WebLogic Server. You specify the type of Web service (JAX-WS) that you want to create using type="JAXWS".

  8. Execute the jwsc Ant task by specifying the build-service target at the command line:

    prompt> ant build-service
    

    See the output/helloWorldEar directory to view the files and artifacts generated by the jwsc Ant task.

  9. Start the WebLogic Server instance to which the Web service will be deployed.

  10. Deploy the Web service, packaged in an Enterprise Application, to WebLogic Server, using either the Administration Console or the wldeploy Ant task. In either case, you deploy the helloWorldEar Enterprise application, located in the output directory.

    To use the wldeploy Ant task, add the following target to the build.xml file:

    <taskdef name="wldeploy"
               classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
      <target name="deploy">
        <wldeploy action="deploy" 
                  name="helloWorldEar" source="output/helloWorldEar"
                  user="${wls.username}" password="${wls.password}"
                  verbose="true"
                  adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
                  targets="${wls.server.name}" />
      </target>
    

    Substitute the values for wls.username, wls.password, wls.hostname, wls.port, and wls.server.name that correspond to your WebLogic Server instance.

    Deploy the WAR file by executing the deploy target:

    prompt> ant deploy
    
  11. Test that the Web service is deployed correctly by invoking its WSDL in your browser:

    http://host:port/HelloWorldImpl/HelloWorldService?WSDL
    

    You construct the URL using the default values for the contextPath and serviceUri attributes. The default value for the contextPath is the name of the Java class in the JWS file. The default value of the serviceURI attribute is the serviceName element of the @WebService annotation if specified. Otherwise, the name of the JWS file, without its extension, followed by Service. For example, if the serviceName element of the @WebService annotation is not specified and the name of the JWS file is HelloWorldImpl.java, then the default value of its serviceUri is HelloWorldImplService.

    These attributes will be set explicitly in the next example, Creating a Web Service With User-Defined Data Types. Use the hostname and port relevant to your WebLogic Server instance.

You can use the clean, build-service, undeploy, and deploy targets in the build.xml file to iteratively update, rebuild, undeploy, and redeploy the Web service as part of your development process.

To run the Web service, you need to create a client that invokes it. See Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application for an example of creating a Java client application that invokes a Web service.

Sample HelloWorldImpl.java JWS File

package examples.webservices.hello_world;
// Import the @WebService annotation
import javax.jws.WebService;
@WebService(name="HelloWorldPortType", serviceName="HelloWorldService")
/**
 * This JWS file forms the basis of simple Java-class implemented WebLogic
 * Web Service with a single operation: sayHelloWorld
 */
public class HelloWorldImpl {
  // By default, all public methods are exposed as Web Services operation
  public String sayHelloWorld(String message) {
  try {
    System.out.println("sayHelloWorld:" + message);
  } catch (Exception ex) { ex.printStackTrace(); }

    return "Here is the message: '" + message + "'";
  }
}

Sample Ant Build File for HelloWorldImpl.java

The following build.xml file uses properties to simplify the file.

<project name="webservices-hello_world" default="all">
  <!-- set global properties for this build -->
  <property name="wls.username" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.password" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.hostname" value="localhost" />
  <property name="wls.port" value="7001" />
  <property name="wls.server.name" value="myserver" />
  <property name="ear.deployed.name" value="helloWorldEar" />
  <property name="example-output" value="output" />
  <property name="ear-dir" value="${example-output}/helloWorldEar" />
  <property name="clientclass-dir" value="${example-output}/clientclasses" />
  <path id="client.class.path">
    <pathelement path="${clientclass-dir}"/>
    <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef name="jwsc"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
  <taskdef name="clientgen"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
  <taskdef name="wldeploy"
    classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
  <target name="all" depends="clean,build-service,deploy,client" />
  <target name="clean" depends="undeploy">
    <delete dir="${example-output}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="build-service">
    <jwsc
      srcdir="src"
      destdir="${ear-dir}">
      <jws file="examples/webservices/hello_world/HelloWorldImpl.java" 
          type="JAXWS"/>
    </jwsc>
  </target>
  <target name="deploy">
    <wldeploy action="deploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      source="${ear-dir}" user="${wls.username}"
      password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="undeploy">
    <wldeploy action="undeploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      failonerror="false"
      user="${wls.username}" password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="client">
    <clientgen
      wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/HelloWorldImpl/HelloWorldService?WSDL"
      destDir="${clientclass-dir}"
      packageName="examples.webservices.hello_world.client"
      type="JAXWS"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="${clientclass-dir}" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="**/*.java"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="src" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="examples/webservices/hello_world/client/**/*.java"/>
  </target>
  <target name="run">
    <java classname="examples.webservices.hello_world.client.Main" 
          fork="true" failonerror="true" >
      <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
      <arg 
 line="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/HelloWorldImpl/HelloWorldService"  />
    </java> </target>
</project>

Creating a Web Service With User-Defined Data Types

The preceding use case uses only a simple data type, String, as the parameter and return value of the Web service operation. This next example shows how to create a Web service that uses a user-defined data type, in particular a JavaBean called BasicStruct, as both a parameter and a return value of its operation.

There is actually very little a programmer has to do to use a user-defined data type in a Web service, other than to create the Java source of the data type and use it correctly in the JWS file. The jwsc Ant task, when it encounters a user-defined data type in the JWS file, automatically generates all the data binding artifacts needed to convert data between its XML representation (used in the SOAP messages) and its Java representation (used in WebLogic Server).The data binding artifacts include the XML Schema equivalent of the Java user-defined type.

The following procedure is very similar to the procedure in Creating a Simple HelloWorld Web Service. For this reason, although the procedure does show all the needed steps, it provides details only for those steps that differ from the simple HelloWorld example.

  1. Set your WebLogic Server environment.

    Open a command window and execute the setDomainEnv.cmd (Windows) or setDomainEnv.sh (UNIX) script, located in the bin subdirectory of your domain directory. The default location of WebLogic Server domains is MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domainName, where MW_HOME is the top-level installation directory of the Oracle products and domainName is the name of your domain.

  2. Create a project directory:

    prompt> mkdir /myExamples/complex
    
  3. Create a src directory under the project directory, as well as subdirectories that correspond to the package name of the JWS file (shown later in this procedure):

    prompt> cd /myExamples/complex
       prompt> mkdir src/examples/webservices/complex
    
  4. Create the source for the BasicStruct JavaBean.

    Open your favorite Java IDE or text editor and create a Java file called BasicStruct.java, in the project directory, using the Java code specified in Sample BasicStruct JavaBean.

  5. Save the BasicStruct.java file in the src/examples/webservices/complex subdirectory of the project directory.

  6. Create the JWS file that implements the Web service using the Java code specified in Sample ComplexImpl.java JWS File.

    The sample JWS file uses several JWS annotations: @WebMethod to specify explicitly that a method should be exposed as a Web service operation and to change its operation name from the default method name echoStruct to echoComplexType; @WebParam and @WebResult to configure the parameters and return values; and @SOAPBinding to specify the type of Web service. The ComplexImpl.java JWS file also imports the examples.webservice.complex.BasicStruct class and then uses the BasicStruct user-defined data type as both a parameter and return value of the echoStruct() method.

    For more in-depth information about creating a JWS file, see Chapter 4, "Programming the JWS File."

  7. Save the ComplexImpl.java file in the src/examples/webservices/complex subdirectory of the project directory.

  8. Create a standard Ant build.xml file in the project directory and add a taskdef Ant task to specify the fully Java classname of the jwsc task:

    <project name="webservices-complex" default="all">
      <taskdef name="jwsc"
               classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />  
    </project>
    

    See Sample Ant Build File for ComplexImpl.java JWS File for a full sample build.xml file.

  9. Add the following call to the jwsc Ant task to the build.xml file, wrapped inside of the build-service target:

    <target name="build-service">
      <jwsc
        srcdir="src"
        destdir="output/ComplexServiceEar" >
        <jws file="examples/webservices/complex/ComplexImpl.java" 
           type="JAXWS">
           <WLHttpTransport
            contextPath="complex" serviceUri="ComplexService"
            portName="ComplexServicePort"/>
         </jws>
        </jwsc>
    </target>
    

    In the preceding example:

    • The type attribute of the <jws> element specifies the type of Web service (JAX-WS or JAX-RPC).

    • The <WLHttpTransport> child element of the <jws> element of the jwsc Ant task specifies the context path and service URI sections of the URL used to invoke the Web service over the HTTP/S transport, as well as the name of the port in the generated WSDL. For more information about defining the context path, see "Defining the Context Path of a WebLogic Web Service" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

  10. Execute the jwsc Ant task:

    prompt> ant build-service
    

    See the output/ComplexServiceEar directory to view the files and artifacts generated by the jwsc Ant task.

  11. Start the WebLogic Server instance to which the Web service will be deployed.

  12. Deploy the Web service, packaged in the ComplexServiceEar Enterprise Application, to WebLogic Server, using either the Administration Console or the wldeploy Ant task. For example:

    prompt> ant deploy
    
  13. Deploy the Web service, packaged in an Enterprise Application, to WebLogic Server, using either the Administration Console or the wldeploy Ant task. In either case, you deploy the ComplexServiceEar Enterprise application, located in the output directory.

    To use the wldeploy Ant task, add the following target to the build.xml file:

    <taskdef name="wldeploy"
               classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
      <target name="deploy">
        <wldeploy action="deploy" 
                  name="ComplexServiceEar" source="output/ComplexServiceEar"
                  user="${wls.username}" password="${wls.password}"
                  verbose="true"
                  adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
                  targets="${wls.server.name}" />
      </target>
    

    Substitute the values for wls.username, wls.password, wls.hostname, wls.port, and wls.server.name that correspond to your WebLogic Server instance.

    Deploy the WAR file by executing the deploy target:

    prompt> ant deploy
    
  14. Test that the Web service is deployed correctly by invoking its WSDL in your browser:

    http://host:port/complex/ComplexService?WSDL
    

To run the Web service, you need to create a client that invokes it. See Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application for an example of creating a Java client application that invokes a Web service.

Sample BasicStruct JavaBean

package examples.webservices.complex;
/**
 * Defines a simple JavaBean called BasicStruct that has integer, String,
 * and String[] properties
 */
public class BasicStruct {
  // Properties
  private int intValue;
  private String stringValue;
  private String[] stringArray;
  // Getter and setter methods
  public int getIntValue() {
    return intValue;
  }
  public void setIntValue(int intValue) {
    this.intValue = intValue;
  }
  public String getStringValue() {
    return stringValue;
  }
  public void setStringValue(String stringValue) {
    this.stringValue = stringValue;
  }
  public String[] getStringArray() {
    return stringArray;
  }
  public void setStringArray(String[] stringArray) {
    this.stringArray = stringArray;
  }
  public String toString() {
    return "IntValue="+intValue+", StringValue="+stringValue;
  }
}

Sample ComplexImpl.java JWS File

package examples.webservices.complex;
// Import the standard JWS annotation interfaces
import javax.jws.WebMethod;
import javax.jws.WebParam;
import javax.jws.WebResult;
import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding;
// Import the BasicStruct JavaBean
import examples.webservices.complex.BasicStruct;
// Standard JWS annotation that specifies that the portType name of the Web
// Service is "ComplexPortType", its public service name is "ComplexService",
// and the targetNamespace used in the generated WSDL is "http://example.org"
@WebService(serviceName="ComplexService", name="ComplexPortType",
            targetNamespace="http://example.org")
// Standard JWS annotation that specifies this is a document-literal-wrapped
// Web Service
@SOAPBinding(style=SOAPBinding.Style.DOCUMENT,
             use=SOAPBinding.Use.LITERAL,
             parameterStyle=SOAPBinding.ParameterStyle.WRAPPED)
/**
 * This JWS file forms the basis of a WebLogic Web Service.  The Web Services
 * has two public operations:
 *
 *  - echoInt(int)
 *  - echoComplexType(BasicStruct)
 *
 * The Web Service is defined as a "document-literal" service, which means
 * that the SOAP messages have a single part referencing an XML Schema element
 * that defines the entire body.
 */
public class ComplexImpl {
  // Standard JWS annotation that specifies that the method should be exposed
  // as a public operation.  Because the annotation does not include the
  // member-value "operationName", the public name of the operation is the
  // same as the method name: echoInt.
  //
  // The WebResult annotation specifies that the name of the result of the
  // operation in the generated WSDL is "IntegerOutput", rather than the
  // default name "return".   The WebParam annotation specifies that the input
  // parameter name in the WSDL file is "IntegerInput" rather than the Java
  // name of the parameter, "input".
  @WebMethod()
  @WebResult(name="IntegerOutput",
             targetNamespace="http://example.org/complex")
  public int echoInt(
      @WebParam(name="IntegerInput",
                targetNamespace="http://example.org/complex")
      int input)
  {
    System.out.println("echoInt '" + input + "' to you too!");
    return input;
  }
  // Standard JWS annotation to expose method "echoStruct" as a public operation
  // called "echoComplexType"
  // The WebResult annotation specifies that the name of the result of the
  // operation in the generated WSDL is "EchoStructReturnMessage",
  // rather than the default name "return".
  @WebMethod(operationName="echoComplexType")
  @WebResult(name="EchoStructReturnMessage",
             targetNamespace="http://example.org/complex")
  public BasicStruct echoStruct(BasicStruct struct)
  {
    System.out.println("echoComplexType called");
    return struct;
  }
}

Sample Ant Build File for ComplexImpl.java JWS File

The following build.xml file uses properties to simplify the file.

<project name="webservices-complex" default="all">
  <!-- set global properties for this build -->
  <property name="wls.username" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.password" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.hostname" value="localhost" />
  <property name="wls.port" value="7001" />
  <property name="wls.server.name" value="myserver" />
  <property name="ear.deployed.name" value="complexServiceEAR" />
  <property name="example-output" value="output" />
  <property name="ear-dir" value="${example-output}/complexServiceEar" />
  <property name="clientclass-dir" value="${example-output}/clientclass" />
  <path id="client.class.path">
    <pathelement path="${clientclass-dir}"/>
    <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef name="jwsc"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
  <taskdef name="clientgen"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
  <taskdef name="wldeploy"
    classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
  <target name="all" depends="clean,build-service,deploy,client"/>
  <target name="clean" depends="undeploy">
    <delete dir="${example-output}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="build-service">
    <jwsc
      srcdir="src"
      destdir="${ear-dir}"
      keepGenerated="true"
      >
      <jws file="examples/webservices/complex/ComplexImpl.java"
         type="JAXWS">
         <WLHttpTransport
          contextPath="complex" serviceUri="ComplexService"
          portName="ComplexServicePort"/>
      </jws>
    </jwsc>
  </target>
  <target name="deploy">
    <wldeploy action="deploy"
      name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      source="${ear-dir}" user="${wls.username}"
      password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="undeploy">
    <wldeploy action="undeploy" failonerror="false"
      name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      user="${wls.username}" password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="client">
    <clientgen
      wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService?WSDL"
      destDir="${clientclass-dir}"
      packageName="examples.webservices.complex.client"
         type="JAXWS"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="${clientclass-dir}" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="**/*.java"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="src" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="examples/webservices/complex/client/**/*.java"/>
  </target>
  <target name="run" >
    <java fork="true"
          classname="examples.webservices.complex.client.Main"
          failonerror="true" >
      <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
      <arg line="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService"
 />
    </java>
  </target>
</project>

Creating a Web Service from a WSDL File

Another common use case of creating a Web service is to start from an existing WSDL file, often referred to as the golden WSDL. A WSDL file is a public contract that specifies what the Web service looks like, such as the list of supported operations, the signature and shape of each operation, the protocols and transports that can be used when invoking the operations, and the XML Schema data types that are used when transporting the data. Based on this WSDL file, you generate the artifacts that implement the Web service so that it can be deployed to WebLogic Server. You use the wsdlc Ant task to generate the following artifacts.

Typically, you run the wsdlc Ant task one time to generate a JAR file that contains the generated JWS SEI file and data binding artifacts, then code the generated JWS file that implements the interface, adding the business logic of your Web service. In particular, you add Java code to the methods that implement the Web service operations so that the operations behave as needed and add additional JWS annotations.

After you have coded the JWS implementation file, you run the jwsc Ant task to generate the deployable Web service, using the same steps as described in the preceding sections. The only difference is that you use the compiledWsdl attribute to specify the JAR file (containing the JWS SEI file and data binding artifacts) generated by the wsdlc Ant task.

The following simple example shows how to create a Web service from the WSDL file shown in Sample WSDL File. The Web service has one operation, getTemp, that returns a temperature when passed a zip code.

  1. Set your WebLogic Server environment.

    Open a command window and execute the setDomainEnv.cmd (Windows) or setDomainEnv.sh (UNIX) script, located in the bin subdirectory of your domain directory. The default location of WebLogic Server domains is MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domainName, where MW_HOME is the top-level installation directory of the Oracle products and domainName is the name of your domain.

  2. Create a working directory:

    prompt> mkdir /myExamples/wsdlc
    
  3. Put your WSDL file into an accessible directory on your computer.

    For the purposes of this example, it is assumed that your WSDL file is called TemperatureService.wsdl and is located in the /myExamples/wsdlc/wsdl_files directory. See Sample WSDL File for a full listing of the file.

  4. Create a standard Ant build.xml file in the project directory and add a taskdef Ant task to specify the full Java classname of the wsdlc task:

    <project name="webservices-wsdlc" default="all">
      <taskdef name="wsdlc"
               classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.WsdlcTask"/>
    </project>
    

    See Sample Ant Build File for TemperatureService for a full sample build.xml file that contains additional targets from those described in this procedure, such as clean, undeploy, client, and run. The full build.xml file also uses properties, such as ${ear-dir}, rather than always using the hard-coded name for the EAR directory.

  5. Add the following call to the wsdlc Ant task to the build.xml file, wrapped inside of the generate-from-wsdl target:

    <target name="generate-from-wsdl">
        <wsdlc
            srcWsdl="wsdl_files/TemperatureService.wsdl"
            destJwsDir="output/compiledWsdl"
            destImplDir="output/impl"
            packageName="examples.webservices.wsdlc"
            type="JAXWS"/>
      </target>
    

    The wsdlc task in the examples generates the JAR file that contains the JWS SEI and data binding artifacts into the output/compiledWsdl directory under the current directory. It also generates a partial implementation file (TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java)) of the JWS SEI into the output/impl/examples/webservices/wsdlc directory (which is a combination of the output directory specified by destImplDir and the directory hierarchy specified by the package name). All generated JWS files will be packaged in the examples.webservices.wsdlc package.

  6. Execute the wsdlc Ant task by specifying the generate-from-wsdl target at the command line:

    prompt> ant generate-from-wsdl
    

    See the output directory if you want to examine the artifacts and files generated by the wsdlc Ant task.

  7. Update the generated output/impl/examples/webservices/wsdlc/TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java JWS implementation file using your favorite Java IDE or text editor to add Java code to the methods so that they behave as you want.

    See Sample TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl Java Implementation File for an example; the added Java code is in bold. The generated JWS implementation file automatically includes values for the @WebService JWS annotation that corresponds to the value in the original WSDL file.

    Note:

    There are restrictions on the JWS annotations that you can add to the JWS implementation file in the "starting from WSDL" use case. See "wsdlc" in the WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server for details.

    For simplicity, the sample getTemp() method in TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java returns a hard-coded number. In real life, the implementation of this method would actually look up the current temperature at the given zip code.

  8. Copy the updated TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java file into a permanent directory, such as a src directory under the project directory; remember to create child directories that correspond to the package name:

    prompt> cd /examples/wsdlc
    prompt> mkdir src/examples/webservices/wsdlc
    prompt> cp output/impl/examples/webservices/wsdlc/TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java.java \src/examples/webservices/wsdlc/TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java.java
    
  9. Add a build-service target to the build.xml file that executes the jwsc Ant task against the updated JWS implementation class. Use the compiledWsdl attribute of jwsc to specify the name of the JAR file generated by the wsdlc Ant task:

    <taskdef name="jwsc"
        classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
      <target name="build-service">
        <jwsc
          srcdir="src"
          destdir="${ear-dir}">
          <jws file="examples/webservices/wsdlc/TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java"
               compiledWsdl="${compiledWsdl-dir}/TemperatureService_wsdl.jar"
               type="JAXWS">
             <WLHttpTransport
              contextPath="temp" serviceUri="TemperatureService"
              portName="TemperaturePort">
          </WLHttpTransport>
          </jws>
        </jwsc>
      </target>
    

    In the preceding example:

    • The type attribute of the <jws> element specifies the type of Web services (JAX-WS or JAX-RPC).

    • The <WLHttpTransport> child element of the <jws> element of the jwsc Ant task specifies the context path and service URI sections of the URL used to invoke the Web service over the HTTP/S transport, as well as the name of the port in the generated WSDL.

  10. Execute the build-service target to generate a deployable Web service:

    prompt> ant build-service
    

    You can re-run this target if you want to update and then re-build the JWS file.

  11. Start the WebLogic Server instance to which the Web service will be deployed.

  12. Deploy the Web service, packaged in an Enterprise Application, to WebLogic Server, using either the Administration Console or the wldeploy Ant task. In either case, you deploy the wsdlcEar Enterprise application, located in the output directory.

    To use the wldeploy Ant task, add the following target to the build.xml file:

    <taskdef name="wldeploy"
               classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
      <target name="deploy">
        <wldeploy action="deploy" name="wsdlcEar"
          source="output/wsdlcEar" user="${wls.username}"
          password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
          adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
          targets="${wls.server.name}" />
      </target>
    

    Substitute the values for wls.username, wls.password, wls.hostname, wls.port, and wls.server.name that correspond to your WebLogic Server instance.

    Deploy the WAR file by executing the deploy target:

    prompt> ant deploy
    
  13. Test that the Web service is deployed correctly by invoking its WSDL in your browser:

    http://host:port/temp/TemperatureService?WSDL
    

    The context path and service URI section of the preceding URL are specified by the original golden WSDL. Use the hostname and port relevant to your WebLogic Server instance. Note that the deployed and original WSDL files are the same, except for the host and port of the endpoint address.

You can use the clean, build-service, undeploy, and deploy targets in the build.xml file to iteratively update, rebuild, undeploy, and redeploy the Web service as part of your development process.

To run the Web service, you need to create a client that invokes it. See Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application for an example of creating a Java client application that invokes a Web service.

Sample WSDL File

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<definitions
   name="TemperatureService"
   targetNamespace="http://www.xmethods.net/sd/TemperatureService.wsdl"
   xmlns:tns="http://www.xmethods.net/sd/TemperatureService.wsdl"
   xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
   xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
   xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" >
   <types>
      <xsd:schema 
         targetNamespace="http://www.xmethods.net/sd/TemperatureService.wsdl"
         xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" >
          <xsd:element name="getTempRequest">
             <xsd:complexType>
                <xsd:sequence>
                   <xsd:element name="zip" type="xsd:string"/>
                </xsd:sequence>
             </xsd:complexType>
          </xsd:element>
          <xsd:element name="getTempResponse">
             <xsd:complexType>
                <xsd:sequence>
                   <xsd:element name="return" type="xsd:float"/>
                </xsd:sequence>
             </xsd:complexType>
          </xsd:element>
      </xsd:schema>
   </types>
   <message name="getTempRequest">
      <part name="parameters" element="tns:getTempRequest"/>
   </message>
   <message name="getTempResponse">
      <part name="parameters" element="tns:getTempResponse"/>
   </message>
   <portType name="TemperaturePortType">
      <operation name="getTemp">
         <input message="tns:getTempRequest"/>
         <output message="tns:getTempResponse"/>
      </operation>
   </portType>
   <binding name="TemperatureBinding" type="tns:TemperaturePortType">
      <soap:binding style="document" 
           transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http"/>
      <operation name="getTemp">
          <soap:operation soapAction=""/>
          <input>
             <soap:body use="literal"/>
          </input>
          <output>
             <soap:body use="literal"/>
          </output>
      </operation>
   </binding>
   <service name="TemperatureService">
      <documentation>
         Returns current temperature in a given U.S. zipcode
      </documentation>
      <port name="TemperaturePort" binding="tns:TemperatureBinding">
         <soap:address 
          location="http://localhost:7001/temp/TemperatureService"/>
      </port>
   </service>
</definitions>

Sample TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl Java Implementation File

package examples.webservices.wsdlc;
import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.xml.ws.BindingType;

/**
 * Returns current temperature in a given U.S. zipcode  
 * This class was generated by the JAX-WS RI.
 * JAX-WS RI 2.2.8-b13684
 * Generated source version: 2.2
 * 
 */
@WebService(
   portName = "TemperaturePort", 
   serviceName = "TemperatureService", 
   targetNamespace="http://www.xmethods.net/sd/TemperatureService.wsdl"
   wsdlLocation = "/wsdls/TemperatureService.wsdl", 
   endpointInterface = "examples.webservices.wsdlc.TemperaturePortType")
@BindingType("http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/http")
public class TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl implements 
  TemperaturePortType
{
    public TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl() { }
    /**
     * 
     * @param zip
     * @return
     *     returns float
     */
    public float getTemp(String zip) {
     return 1.234f;
  }
}

Sample Ant Build File for TemperatureService

The following build.xml file uses properties to simplify the file.

<project default="all">
  <!-- set global properties for this build -->
  <property name="wls.username" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.password" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.hostname" value="localhost" />
  <property name="wls.port" value="7001" />
  <property name="wls.server.name" value="myserver" />
  <property name="ear.deployed.name" value="wsdlcEar" />
  <property name="example-output" value="output" />
  <property name="compiledWsdl-dir" value="${example-output}/compiledWsdl" />
  <property name="impl-dir" value="${example-output}/impl" />
  <property name="ear-dir" value="${example-output}/wsdlcEar" />
  <property name="clientclass-dir" value="${example-output}/clientclasses" />
  <path id="client.class.path">
    <pathelement path="${clientclass-dir}"/>
    <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef name="wsdlc"
           classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.WsdlcTask"/>
  <taskdef name="jwsc"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
  <taskdef name="clientgen"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
  <taskdef name="wldeploy"
    classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
  <target name="all" 
    depends="clean,generate-from-wsdl,build-service,deploy,client" />
  <target name="clean" depends="undeploy">
    <delete dir="${example-output}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="generate-from-wsdl">
    <wsdlc
        srcWsdl="wsdl_files/TemperatureService.wsdl"
        destJwsDir="${compiledWsdl-dir}"
        destImplDir="${impl-dir}"
        packageName="examples.webservices.wsdlc" 
        type="JAXWS"/>
  </target>
  <target name="build-service">
    <jwsc
      srcdir="src"
      destdir="${ear-dir}">
      <jws 
   file="examples/webservices/wsdlc/TemperatureService_TemperaturePortImpl.java"
   compiledWsdl="${compiledWsdl-dir}/TemperatureService_wsdl.jar"
   type="JAXWS">
         <WLHttpTransport
          contextPath="temp" serviceUri="TemperatureService"
          portName="TemperaturePort"/>
      </jws>
    </jwsc>
  </target>
  <target name="deploy">
    <wldeploy action="deploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      source="${ear-dir}" user="${wls.username}"
      password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="undeploy">
    <wldeploy action="undeploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      failonerror="false"
      user="${wls.username}" password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="client">
    <clientgen
      wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/temp/TemperatureService?WSDL"
      destDir="${clientclass-dir}"
      packageName="examples.webservices.wsdlc.client"
      type="JAXWS">
    <javac
      srcdir="${clientclass-dir}" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="**/*.java"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="src" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="examples/webservices/wsdlc/client/**/*.java"/>
  </target>
  <target name="run">
    <java classname="examples.webservices.wsdlc.client.TemperatureClient" 
         fork="true" failonerror="true" >
      <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
      <arg
          line="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/temp/TemperatureService" />
    </java>
  </target>
</project>

Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application

Note:

You can invoke a Web service from any Java SE or Java EE application running on WebLogic Server (with access to the WebLogic Server classpath). Invoking a Web service from stand-alone Java applications that are running in an environment where WebLogic Server libraries are not available is not supported in this release for JAX-WS Web services.

When you invoke an operation of a deployed Web service from a client application, the Web service could be deployed to WebLogic Server or to any other application server, such as .NET. All you need to know is the URL to its public contract file, or WSDL.

In addition to writing the Java client application, you must also run the clientgen WebLogic Web service Ant task to generate the artifacts that your client application needs to invoke the Web service operation. These artifacts include:

The following example shows how to create a Java client application that invokes the echoComplexType operation of the ComplexService WebLogic Web service described in Creating a Web Service With User-Defined Data Types. The echoComplexType operation takes as both a parameter and return type the BasicStruct user-defined data type.

Note:

It is assumed in this procedure that you have created and deployed the ComplexService Web service.

  1. Set your WebLogic Server environment.

    Open a command window and execute the setDomainEnv.cmd (Windows) or setDomainEnv.sh (UNIX) script, located in the bin subdirectory of your domain directory. The default location of WebLogic Server domains is MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domainName, where MW_HOME is the top-level installation directory of the Oracle products and domainName is the name of your domain.

  2. Create a project directory:

    prompt> mkdir /myExamples/simple_client
    
  3. Create a src directory under the project directory, as well as subdirectories that correspond to the package name of the Java client application (shown later on in this procedure):

    prompt> cd /myExamples/simple_client
       prompt> mkdir src/examples/webservices/simple_client
    
  4. Create a standard Ant build.xml file in the project directory and add a taskdef Ant task to specify the full Java classname of the clientgen task:

    <project name="webservices-simple_client" default="all">
      <taskdef name="clientgen"
        classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
    </project>
    

    See Sample Ant Build File For Building Java Client Application for a full sample build.xml file. The full build.xml file uses properties, such as ${clientclass-dir}, rather than always using the hard-coded name output directory for client classes.

  5. Add the following calls to the clientgen and javac Ant tasks to the build.xml file, wrapped inside of the build-client target:

    <target name="build-client">
        <clientgen
          wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService?WSDL"
          destDir="output/clientclass"
          packageName="examples.webservices.simple_client"
          type="JAXWS"/>
        <javac
          srcdir="output/clientclass" destdir="output/clientclass"
          includes="**/*.java"/>
     <javac
        srcdir="src" destdir="output/clientclass"
        includes="examples/webservices/simple_client/*.java"/>
    </target>
    

    The clientgen Ant task uses the WSDL of the deployed ComplexService Web service to generate the necessary artifacts and puts them into the output/clientclass directory, using the specified package name. Replace the variables with the actual hostname and port of your WebLogic Server instance that is hosting the Web service.

    In this example, the package name is set to the same package name as the client application, examples.webservices.simple_client. If you set the package name to one that is different from the client application, you would need to import the appropriate class files. For example, if you defined the package name as examples.webservices.complex, you would need to import the following class files in the client application:

    import examples.webservices.complex.BasicStruct;
    import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexPortType;
    import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexService;
    

    The clientgen Ant task also automatically generates the examples.webservices.simple_client.BasicStruct JavaBean class, which is the Java representation of the user-defined data type specified in the WSDL.

    The build-client target also specifies the standard javac Ant task, in addition to clientgen, to compile all the Java code, including the Java program described in the next step, into class files.

    The clientgen Ant task also provides the destFile attribute if you want the Ant task to automatically compile the generated Java code and package all artifacts into a JAR file. For details and an example, see "clientgen" in the WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

  6. Create the Java client application file that invokes the echoComplexType operation.

    Open your favorite Java IDE or text editor and create a Java file called Main.java using the code specified in Sample Java Client Application.

    The application follows standard JAX-WS guidelines to invoke an operation of the Web service using the Web service-specific implementation of the Service interface generated by clientgen. For details, see Chapter 6, "Invoking Web Services."

  7. Save the Main.java file in the src/examples/webservices/simple_client subdirectory of the main project directory.

  8. Execute the clientgen and javac Ant tasks by specifying the build-client target at the command line:

    prompt> ant build-client
    

    See the output/clientclass directory to view the files and artifacts generated by the clientgen Ant task.

  9. Add the following targets to the build.xml file, used to execute the Main application:

    <path id="client.class.path">
        <pathelement path="output/clientclass"/>
        <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
      </path>
      <target name="run" >
        <java fork="true"
              classname="examples.webservices.simple_client.Main"
              failonerror="true" >
          <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
      </target>
    

    The run target invokes the Main application, passing it the WSDL URL of the deployed Web service as its single argument. The classpath element adds the clientclass directory to the CLASSPATH, using the reference created with the <path> task.

  10. Execute the run target to invoke the echoComplexType operation:

    prompt> ant run
    

    If the invoke was successful, you should see the following final output:

    run:
         [java] echoComplexType called. Result: 999, Hello Struct
    

You can use the build-client and run targets in the build.xml file to iteratively update, rebuild, and run the Java client application as part of your development process.

Sample Java Client Application

The following provides a simple Java client application that invokes the echoComplexType operation. Because the <clientgen> packageName attribute was set to the same package name as the client application, we are not required to import the <clientgen>-generated files.

package examples.webservices.simple_client;
/**
 * This is a simple Java application that invokes the
 * echoComplexType operation of the ComplexService Web service.
 */
public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) { 
    ComplexService test = new ComplexService();
    ComplexPortType port = test.getComplexPortTypePort();
    BasicStruct in = new BasicStruct();
    in.setIntValue(999);
    in.setStringValue("Hello Struct");
    BasicStruct result = port.echoComplexType(in);
    System.out.println("echoComplexType called. Result: " + result.getIntValue() + ", " + result.getStringValue());
  }
}

Sample Ant Build File For Building Java Client Application

The following build.xml file defines tasks to build the Java client application. The example uses properties to simplify the file.

<project name="webservices-simple_client" default="all">
  <!-- set global properties for this build -->
  <property name="wls.hostname" value="localhost" />
  <property name="wls.port" value="7001" />
  <property name="example-output" value="output" />
  <property name="clientclass-dir" value="${example-output}/clientclass" />
  <path id="client.class.path">
    <pathelement path="${clientclass-dir}"/>
    <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef name="clientgen"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
  <target name="clean" >
    <delete dir="${clientclass-dir}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="all" depends="clean,build-client,run" />
  <target name="build-client">
    <clientgen
     type="JAXWS"
     wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService?WSDL"
      destDir="${clientclass-dir}"
      packageName="examples.webservices.simple_client"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="${clientclass-dir}" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="**/*.java"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="src" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="examples/webservices/simple_client/*.java"/>
  </target>
  <target name="run" >
    <java fork="true"
          classname="examples.webservices.simple_client.Main"
          failonerror="true" >
      <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
    </java>
  </target>
</project>

Invoking a Web Service from a WebLogic Web Service

You can invoke a Web service (WebLogic, Microsoft .NET, and so on) from within a deployed WebLogic Web service.

The procedure is similar to that described in Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application except that instead of running the clientgen Ant task to generate the client stubs, you use the <clientgen> child element of <jws>, inside of the jwsc Ant task. The jwsc Ant task automatically packages the generated client stubs in the invoking Web service WAR file so that the Web service has immediate access to them. You then follow standard JAX-WS programming guidelines in the JWS file that implements the Web service that invokes the other Web service.

The following example shows how to write a JWS file that invokes the echoComplexType operation of the ComplexService Web service described in Creating a Web Service With User-Defined Data Types.

Note:

It is assumed that you have successfully deployed the ComplexService Web service.

  1. Set your WebLogic Server environment.

    Open a command window and execute the setDomainEnv.cmd (Windows) or setDomainEnv.sh (UNIX) script, located in the bin subdirectory of your domain directory. The default location of WebLogic Server domains is MW_HOME/user_projects/domains/domainName, where MW_HOME is the top-level installation directory of the Oracle products and domainName is the name of your domain.

  2. Create a project directory:

    prompt> mkdir /myExamples/service_to_service
    
  3. Create a src directory under the project directory, as well as subdirectories that correspond to the package name of the JWS and client application files (shown later on in this procedure):

    prompt> cd /myExamples/service_to_service
       prompt> mkdir src/examples/webservices/service_to_service
    
  4. Create the JWS file that implements the Web service that invokes the ComplexService Web service.

    Open your favorite Java IDE or text editor and create a Java file called ClientServiceImpl.java using the Java code specified in Sample ClientServiceImpl.java JWS File.

    The sample JWS file shows a Java class called ClientServiceImpl that contains a single public method, callComplexService(). The Java class imports the JAX-WS stubs, generated later on by the jwsc Ant task, as well as the BasicStruct JavaBean (also generated by clientgen), which is the data type of the parameter and return value of the echoComplexType operation of the ComplexService Web service.

    The ClientServiceImpl Java class defines one method, callComplexService(), which takes one parameter: a BasicStruct which is passed on to the echoComplexType operation of the ComplexService Web service. The method then uses the standard JAX-WS APIs to get the Service and PortType of the ComplexService, using the stubs generated by jwsc, and then invokes the echoComplexType operation.

  5. Save the ClientServiceImpl.java file in the src/examples/webservices/service_to_service directory.

  6. Create a standard Ant build.xml file in the project directory and add the following task:

    <project name="webservices-service_to_service" default="all">
      <taskdef name="jwsc"
        classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
    </project>
    

    The taskdef task defines the full classname of the jwsc Ant task.

    See Sample Ant Build File For Building ClientService for a full sample build.xml file that contains additional targets from those described in this procedure, such as clean, deploy, undeploy, client, and run. The full build.xml file also uses properties, such as ${ear-dir}, rather than always using the hard-coded name for the EAR directory.

  7. Add the following call to the jwsc Ant task to the build.xml file, wrapped inside of the build-service target:

    <target name="build-service">
      <jwsc
        srcdir="src"
        destdir="output/ClientServiceEar" >
        <jws
          file="examples/webservices/service_to_service/ClientServiceImpl.java"
         type="JAXWS">
                <WLHttpTransport
                 contextPath="ClientService" serviceUri="ClientService"
                 portName="ClientServicePort"/>
         <clientgen
           type="JAXWS"
    wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService?WSDL"
           packageName="examples.webservices.complex" />
        </jws>
      </jwsc>
    </target>
    

    In the preceding example, the <clientgen> child element of the <jws> element of the jwsc Ant task specifies that, in addition to compiling the JWS file, jwsc should also generate and compile the client artifacts needed to invoke the Web service described by the WSDL file.

    In this example, the package name is set to examples.webservices.complex, which is different from the client application package name, examples.webservices.simple_client. As a result, you need to import the appropriate class files in the client application:

    import examples.webservices.complex.BasicStruct;
    import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexPortType;
    import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexService;
    

    If the package name is set to the same package name as the client application, the import calls would be optional.

  8. Execute the jwsc Ant task by specifying the build-service target at the command line:

    prompt> ant build-service
    
  9. Start the WebLogic Server instance to which you will deploy the Web service.

  10. Deploy the Web service, packaged in an Enterprise Application, to WebLogic Server, using either the Administration Console or the wldeploy Ant task. In either case, you deploy the ClientServiceEar Enterprise application, located in the output directory.

    To use the wldeploy Ant task, add the following target to the build.xml file:

    <taskdef name="wldeploy"
               classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
      <target name="deploy">
        <wldeploy action="deploy" name="ClientServiceEar"
          source="ClientServiceEar" user="${wls.username}"
          password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
          adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
          targets="${wls.server.name}" />
      </target>
    

    Substitute the values for wls.username, wls.password, wls.hostname, wls.port, and wls.server.name that correspond to your WebLogic Server instance.

    Deploy the WAR file by executing the deploy target:

    prompt> ant deploy
    
  11. Test that the Web service is deployed correctly by invoking its WSDL in your browser:

    http://host:port/ClientService/ClientService?WSDL
    

See Invoking a Web Service from a Java SE Application for an example of creating a Java client application that invokes a Web service.

Sample ClientServiceImpl.java JWS File

The following provides a simple Web service client application that invokes the echoComplexType operation.

package examples.webservices.service_to_service;

import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.jws.WebMethod;
import javax.xml.ws.WebServiceRef;

// Import the BasicStruct data type, generated by clientgen and used
// by the ComplexService Web Service
import examples.webservices.complex.BasicStruct;

// Import the JAX-WS stubs generated by clientgen for invoking
// the ComplexService Web service.
import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexPortType;
import examples.webservices.complex.ComplexService;

@WebService(name="ClientPortType", serviceName="ClientService",
            targetNamespace="http://examples.org")
public class ClientServiceImpl {
// Use the @WebServiceRef annotation to define a reference to the 
// ComplexService Web service.
  @WebServiceRef()
  ComplexService test;

  @WebMethod()
  public String callComplexService(BasicStruct input, String serviceUrl) 
  {
    // Create a port stub to invoke ComplexService
    ComplexPortType port = test.getComplexPortTypePort();

    // Invoke the echoComplexType operation of ComplexService
    BasicStruct result = port.echoComplexType(input);
    System.out.println("Invoked ComplexPortType.echoComplexType." );
    return "Invoke went okay!  Here's the result: '" + result.getIntValue() + 
           ",  " + result.getStringValue() + "'";
  }
}

Sample Ant Build File For Building ClientService

The following build.xml file defines tasks to build the client application. The example uses properties to simplify the file.

The following build.xml file uses properties to simplify the file.

<project name="webservices-service_to_service" default="all">
  <!-- set global properties for this build -->
  <property name="wls.username" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.password" value="weblogic" />
  <property name="wls.hostname" value="localhost" />
  <property name="wls.port" value="7001" />
  <property name="wls.server.name" value="myserver" />
  <property name="ear.deployed.name" value="ClientServiceEar" />
  <property name="example-output" value="output" />
  <property name="ear-dir" value="${example-output}/ClientServiceEar" />
  <property name="clientclass-dir" value="${example-output}/clientclasses" />
  <path id="client.class.path">
    <pathelement path="${clientclass-dir}"/>
    <pathelement path="${java.class.path}"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef name="jwsc"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.JwscTask" />
  <taskdef name="clientgen"
    classname="weblogic.wsee.tools.anttasks.ClientGenTask" />
  <taskdef name="wldeploy"
    classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.management.WLDeploy"/>
  <target name="all" depends="clean,build-service,deploy,client" />
  <target name="clean" depends="undeploy">
    <delete dir="${example-output}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="build-service">
    <jwsc
        srcdir="src"
        destdir="${ear-dir}" >
       <jws
         file="examples/webservices/service_to_service/ClientServiceImpl.java"
         type="JAXWS">
         <WLHttpTransport
          contextPath="ClientService" serviceUri="ClientService"
          portName="ClientServicePort"/>
         <clientgen
               type="JAXWS"
           wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/complex/ComplexService?WSDL"
                packageName="examples.webservices.complex" />
       </jws>
    </jwsc>
  </target>
  <target name="deploy">
    <wldeploy action="deploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      source="${ear-dir}" user="${wls.username}"
      password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="undeploy">
    <wldeploy action="undeploy" name="${ear.deployed.name}"
      failonerror="false"
      user="${wls.username}"
      password="${wls.password}" verbose="true"
      adminurl="t3://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}"
      targets="${wls.server.name}" />
  </target>
  <target name="client">
    <clientgen
      wsdl="http://${wls.hostname}:${wls.port}/ClientService/ClientService?WSDL"
      destDir="${clientclass-dir}"
      packageName="examples.webservices.service_to_service.client"
      type="JAXWS"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="${clientclass-dir}" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="**/*.java"/>
    <javac
      srcdir="src" destdir="${clientclass-dir}"
      includes="examples/webservices/service_to_service/client/**/*.java"/>
  </target>
  <target name="run">
    <java classname="examples.webservices.service_to_service.client.Main"
          fork="true"
          failonerror="true" >
          <classpath refid="client.class.path"/>
    </java>
  </target>
</project>