JavaScript is required to for searching.
Skip Navigation Links
Exit Print View
Sun ZFS Storage 7000 System Administration Guide
search filter icon
search icon

Document Information

Preface

1.  Introduction

2.  Status

3.  Configuration

Configuration

Introduction

Initial

Initial Configuration

Prerequisites

Summary

BUI

Configuring Management Port

CLI

Performing Initial Configuration with the CLI

Network

Network Configuration

Devices

Datalinks

Interfaces

IP MultiPathing (IPMP)

Performance and Availability

Routing

Routing Entries

Routing Properties

BUI

Configuration

Addresses

Routing

CLI

Tasks

BUI

CLI

InfiniBand Upgrade Procedures for Q3.2010

Storage

Introduction

Configure

Configuration Rules and Guidelines

Verification

Allocation on SAS-1 Systems

Allocation on SAS-2 Systems

Profile Configuration

Import

Add

Unconfig

Scrub

Tasks

BUI

SAN

SAN

Terminology

Targets and Initiators

Target and Initiator Groups

BUI

CLI

Terms

SAN Terminology

FC

Fibre Channel

Target Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Performance Considerations

Troubleshooting

Queue Overruns

Link-level Issues

BUI

Changing modes of FC ports

Viewing discovered FC ports

Creating FC Initiator Groups

Associating a LUN with an FC initiator group

CLI

Changing modes of FC ports

Viewing discovered FC ports

Creating FC Initiator Groups

Associating a LUN with an FC initiator group

Scripting Aliases for Initiators and Initiator Groups

FCMPxIO

Configuring FC Client Multipathing

Configuring Solaris Initiators

Configuring Windows Initiators

Windows Tunables - Microsoft DSM Details

Configuring Linux Initiators

Configuring VMware ESX Initiators

Troubleshooting

See Also

iSCSI

Introduction

Target Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator Configuration

Planning Client Configuration

Solaris iSCSI/iSER and MPxIO Considerations

Troubleshooting

Observing Performance

BUI

Creating an Analytics Worksheet

CLI

Adding an iSCSI target with an auto-generated IQN

Adding an iSCSI target with a specific IQN and RADIUS authentication

Adding an iSCSI initiator which uses CHAP authentication

Adding an iSCSI target group

Adding an iSCSI initiator group

SRP

Introduction

Target configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator configuration

Observing Performance

Multipathing Considerations

Linux with OFED SRP Initiator

OFED 1.5 Issues

VMWare 4.0

Path Selection Plugin (psp)

Storage Array Type Plugin (satp)

VMWare ESX 4.0 Issues

BUI

iSER Target Configuration

SRP Target Configuration

CLI

Users

Introduction

Roles

Authorizations

Properties

Users

Roles

BUI

CLI

Tasks

BUI

CLI

Generic

Preferences

Introduction

BUI

CLI

SSH Public Keys

Alerts

Introduction

Actions

Send Email

Send SNMP trap

Send Syslog Message

Resume/Suspend Dataset

Resume/Suspend Worksheet

Execute Workflow

Threshold Alerts

BUI

CLI

Tasks

BUI

Cluster

Clustering

Features and Benefits

Drawbacks

Terminology

Subsystem Design

Cluster Interconnect I/O

Resource Management Concepts

Takeover and Failback

Configuration Changes in a Clustered Environment

Clustering Considerations for Storage

Clustering Considerations for Networking

Clustering Considerations for Infiniband

Redundant Path Scenarios

Preventing 'Split-Brain' Conditions

Estimating and Reducing Takeover Impact

Setup Procedure

Node Cabling

JBOD Cabling

BUI

Unconfiguring Clustering

4.  Services

5.  Shares

6.  Analytics

7.  Integration

Glossary

Cluster

Clustering

The Sun ZFS Storage 7000 supports cooperative clustering of appliances. This strategy can be part of an integrated approach to availability enhancement that may also include client-side load balancing, proper site planning, proactive and reactive maintenance and repair, and the single-appliance hardware redundancy built into all Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series appliances. Because the clustering feature relies on shared access to storage resources, it is available only on the Sun ZFS Storage 7310, 7320, 7410, and 7420. You will be unable to configure clustering on other appliance models, or if the two heads are not of the same model. Note that the new 7420 (with 2Ghz or 2.40GHz CPUs) is based on the same platform and can be clustered with the existing 7420 (with 1.86GHz or 2.00GHz CPUs).

This section is presented in several segments, beginning with background material helpful in the planning process. Understanding this material is critical to performing the configuration and maintenance tasks described in later segments and more generally to a successful unified storage deployment experience.

Features and Benefits

It is important to understand the scope of the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series clustering implementation. The term 'cluster' is used in the industry to refer to many different technologies with a variety of purposes. We use it here to mean a metasystem comprised of two appliance heads and shared storage, used to provide improved availability in the case in which one of the heads succumbs to certain hardware or software failures. A cluster contains exactly two appliances or storage controllers, referred to for brevity throughout this document as heads. Each head may be assigned a collection of storage, networking, and other resources from the set available to the cluster, which allows the construction of either of two major topologies. Many people use the terms active-active to describe a cluster in which there are two (or more) storage pools, one of which is assigned to each head along with network resources used by clients to reach the data stored in that pool, and active-passive to refer to which a single storage pool is assigned to the head designated as active along with its associated network interfaces. Both topologies are supported by the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 System. The distinction between these is artificial; there is no software or hardware difference between them and one can switch at will simply by adding or destroying a storage pool. In both cases, if a head fails, the other (its peer) will take control of all known resources and provide the services associated with those resources.

As an alternative to incurring hours or days of downtime while the head is repaired, clustering allows a peer appliance to provide service while repair or replacement is performed. In addition, clusters support rolling upgrade of software, which can reduce the business disruption associated with migrating to newer software. Some clustering technologies have certain additional capabilities beyond availability enhancement; the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series clustering subsystem was not designed to provide these. In particular, it does not provide for load balancing among multiple heads, improve availability in the face of storage failure, offer clients a unified filesystem namespace across multiple appliances, or divide service responsibility across a wide geographic area for disaster recovery purposes. These functions are likewise outside the scope of this document; however, the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 product family and the data protocols if offers support numerous other features and strategies that can improve availability:

Additional information about other availability features can be found in the appropriate sections of this document.

Drawbacks

When deciding between a clustered and standalone Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series configuration, it is important to weigh the costs and benefits of clustered operation. It is common practice throughout the IT industry to view clustering as an automatic architectural decision, but this thinking reflects an idealized view of clustering's risks and rewards promulgated by some vendors in this space. In addition to the obvious higher up-front and ongoing hardware and support costs associated with the second head, clustering also imposes additional technical and operational risks. Some of these risks can be mitigated by ensuring that all personnel are thoroughly trained in cluster operations; others are intrinsic to the concept of clustered operation. Such risks include:

These costs and risks are fundamental, apply in one form or another to all clustered or cluster-capable products on the market (including the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series), and cannot be entirely eliminated or mitigated. Storage architects must weigh them against the primary benefit of clustering: the opportunity to reduce periods of unavailability from hours or days to minutes or less in the rare event of catastrophic hardware or software failure. Whether that cost/benefit analysis will favor the use of clustering in a Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series deployment will depend on local factors such as SLA terms, available support personnel and their qualifications, budget constraints, the perceived likelihood of various possible failures, and the appropriateness of alternative strategies for enhancing availability. These factors are highly site-, application-, and business-dependent and must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Understanding the material in the rest of this section will help you make appropriate choices during the design and implementation of your unified storage infrastructure.

Terminology

The terms defined here are used throughout the document. In most cases, they are explained in greater context and detail along with the broader concepts involved. The cluster states and resource types are described in the next section. Refer back to this section for reference as needed.

Subsystem Design

The clustering subsystem incorporated into the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series consists of three main building blocks (see Illustration 1). The cluster I/O subsystem and the hardware device provide a transport for inter-head communication within the cluster and are responsible for monitoring the peer's state. This transport is used by the resource manager, which allows data service providers and other management subsystems to interface with the clustering system. Finally, the cluster management user interfaces provide the setup task, resource allocation and assignment, monitoring, and takeover and failback operations. Each of these building blocks is described in detail in the following sections.

image:Image

Cluster Interconnect I/O

All inter-head communication consists of one or more messages transmitted over one of the three cluster I/O links provided by the CLUSTRON hardware (see illustration below). This device offers two low-speed serial links and one Ethernet link. The use of serial links allows for greater reliability; Ethernet links may not be serviced quickly enough by a system under extremely heavy load. False failure detection and unwanted takeover are the worst way for a clustered system to respond to load; during takeover, requests will not be serviced and will instead be enqueued by clients, leading to a flood of delayed requests after takeover in addition to already heavy load. The serial links used by the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series appliances are not susceptible to this failure mode. The Ethernet link provides a higher-performance transport for non-heartbeat messages such as rejoin synchronization and provides a backup heartbeat.

All three links are formed using ordinary straight-through EIA/TIA-568B (8-wire, Gigabit Ethernet) cables. To allow for the use of straight-through cables between two identical controllers, the cables must be used to connect opposing sockets on the two connectors as shown below in the section on cabling.

image:Image Clustered heads never communicate using external service or administration network interfaces, and the interconnects form a secure private network. Messages fall into two general categories: regular heartbeats used to detect the failure of a remote head, and higher-level traffic associated with the resource manager and the cluster management subsystem. Heartbeats are sent, and expected, on all three links; they are transmitted continuously at fixed intervals and are never acknowledged or retransmitted as all heartbeats are identical and contain no unique information. Other traffic may be sent over any link, normally the fastest available at the time of transmission, and this traffic is acknowledged, verified, and retransmitted as required to maintain a reliable transport for higher-level software.

Regardless of its type or origin, every message is sent as a single 128-byte packet and contains a data payload of 1 to 68 bytes and a 20-byte verification hash to ensure data integrity. The serial links run at 115200 bps with 9 data bits and a single start and stop bit; the Ethernet link runs at 1Gbps. Therefore the effective message latency on the serial links is approximately 12.2ms. Ethernet latency varies greatly; while typical latencies are on the order of microseconds, effective latencies to the appliance management software can be much higher due to system load.

Normally, heartbeat messages are sent by each head on all three cluster I/O links at 50ms intervals. Failure to receive any message is considered link failure after 200ms (serial links) or 500ms (Ethernet links). If all three links have failed, the peer is assumed to have failed; takeover arbitration will be performed. In the case of a panic, the panicking head will transmit a single notification message over each of the serial links; its peer will immediately begin takeover regardless of the state of any other links. Given these characteristics, the clustering subsystem normally can detect that its peer has failed within:

All of the values described in this section are fixed; as an appliance, the Sun ZFS Storage System does not offer the ability (nor is there any need) to tune these parameters. They are considered implementation details and are provided here for informational purposes only. They may be changed without notice at any time.

Resource Management Concepts

The resource manager is responsible for ensuring that the correct set of network interfaces is plumbed up, the correct storage pools are active, and the numerous configuration parameters remain in sync between two clustered heads. Most of this subsystem's activities are invisible to administrators; however, one important aspect is exposed. Resources are classified into several types that govern when and whether the resource is imported (made active). Note that the definition of active varies by resource class; for example, a network interface belongs to the net class and is active when the interface is brought up. The three most important resource types are singleton, private, and replica.

Replicas are simplest: they are never exposed to administrators and do not appear on the cluster configuration screen (see Illustration 4). Replicas always exist and are always active on both heads. Typically, these resources simply act as containers for service properties that must be synchronized between the two heads.

Like replicas, singleton resources provide synchronization of state; however, singletons are always active on exactly one head. Administrators can choose the head on which each singleton should normally be active; if that head has failed, its peer will import the singleton. Singletons are the key to clustering's availability characteristics; they are the resources one typically imagines moving from a failed head to its surviving peer and include network interfaces and storage pools. Because a network interface is a collection of IP addresses used by clients to find a known set of storage services, it is critical that each interface be assigned to the same head as the storage pool clients will expect to see when accessing that interface's address(es). In Illustration 4, all of the addresses associated with the PrimaryA interface will always be provided by the head that has imported pool-0, while the addresses associated with PrimaryB will always be provided by the same head as pool-1.

Private resources are known only to the head to which they are assigned, and are never taken over upon failure. This is typically useful only for network interfaces; see the discussion of specific use cases in that section below. image:Image

Several other resource types exist; these are implementation details that are not exposed to administrators. One such type is the symbiote, which allows one resource to follow another as it is imported and exported. The most important use of this resource type is in representing the disks and flash devices in the storage pool. These resources are known as disksets and must always be imported before the ZFS pool they contain. Each diskset consists of half the disks in an external storage enclosure; a clustered storage system may have any number of disksets attached (depending on hardware support), and each ZFS pool is formed from the storage devices in one or more disksets. Because disksets may contain ATA devices, they must be explicitly imported and exported to avoid certain affiliation-related behaviors specific to ATA devices used in multipathed environments. Representing disks as resources provides a simple way to perform these activities at the right time. When an administrator sets or changes the ownership of a storage pool, the ownership assignment of the disksets associated with it is transparently changed at the same time. Like all symbiotes, diskset resources do not appear in the cluster configuration user interface.

Resource
icon
Omnipresent
Taken over on failure
SINGLETON
image:Unlock
No
Yes
REPLICA
None
Yes
N/A
PRIVATE
image:Lock
No
No
SYMBIOTE
None
Same as parent type
Same as parent type

When a new resource is created, it is initially assigned to the head on which it is being created. This ownership cannot be changed unless that head is in the AKCS_OWNER state; it is therefore necessary either to create resources on the head which should own them normally or to take over before changing resource ownership. It is generally possible to destroy resources from either head, although destroying storage pools that are exported is not possible. Best results will usually be obtained by destroying resources on the head which currently controls them, regardless of which head is the assigned owner.

Most configuration settings, including service properties, users, roles, identity mapping rules, SMB autohome rules, and iSCSI initiator definitions are replicated on both heads automatically. Therefore it is never necessary to configure these settings on both heads, regardless of the cluster state. If one appliance is down when the configuration change is made, it will be replicated to the other when it rejoins the cluster on next boot, prior to providing any service. There are a small number of exceptions:

The basic model, then, is that common configuration is transparently replicated, and administrators will assign a collection of resources to each appliance head. Those resource assignments in turn form the binding of network addresses to storage resources that clients expect to see. Regardless of which appliance controls the collection of resources, clients are able to access the storage they require at the network locations they expect.

Takeover and Failback

Clustered head nodes are in one of a small set of states at any given time:

State
icon
CLI/BUI Expression
Description
UNCONFIGURED
image:Status: Disabled
Clustering is not configured
A system that has no clustering at all is in this state. The system is either being set up or the cluster setup task has never been completed.
OWNER
image:Status: On
Active (takeover completed)
Clustering is configured, and this node has taken control of all shared resources in the cluster. A system enters this state immediately after cluster setup is completed from its user interface, and when it detects that its peer has failed (i.e. after a take-over). It remains in this state until an administrator manually executes a fail-back operation.
STRIPPED
image:Status: Off
Ready (waiting for failback)
Clustering is configured, and this node does not control any shared resources. A system is STRIPPED immediately after cluster setup is completed from the user interface of the other node, or following a reboot, power disconnect, or other failure. A node remains in this state until an administrator manually executes a fail-back operation.
CLUSTERED
image:Status: On
Active
Clustering is configured, and both nodes own shared resources according to their resource assignments. If each node owns a ZFS pool and is in the CLUSTERED state, then the two nodes form what is commonly called an active-active cluster.
-
image:Enable
Rejoining cluster ...
The appliance has recently rebooted, or the appliance management software is restarting after an internal failure. Resource state is being resynchronized.
-
Unknown (disconnected or restarting)
The peer appliance is powered off or rebooting, all its cluster interconnect links are down, or clustering has not yet been configured.

Transitions among these states take place as part of two operations: takeover and failback.

Takeover can occur at any time; as discussed above, takeover is attempted whenever peer failure is detected. It can also be triggered manually using the cluster configuration CLI or BUI. This is useful for testing purposes as well as to perform rolling software upgrades (upgrades in which one head is upgraded while the other provides service running the older software, then the second head is upgraded once the new software is validated). Finally, takeover will occur when a head boots and detects that its peer is absent. This allows service to resume normally when one head has failed permanently or when both heads have temporarily lost power.

Failback never occurs automatically. When a failed head is repaired and booted, it will rejoin the cluster (resynchronizing its view of all resources, their properties, and their ownership) and proceed to wait for an administrator to perform a failback operation. Until then, the original surviving head will continue to provide all services. This allows for a full investigation of the problem that originally triggered the takeover, validation of a new software revision, or other administrative tasks prior to the head returning to production service. Because failback is disruptive to clients, it should be scheduled according to business-specific needs and processes. There is one exception: Suppose that head A has failed and head B has taken over. When head A rejoins the cluster, it becomes eligible to take over if it detects that head B is absent or has failed. The principle is that it is always better to provide service than not, even if there has not yet been an opportunity to investigate the original problem. So while failback to a previously-failed head will never occur automatically, it may still perform takeover at any time.

When you set up a cluster, the initial state consists of the node that initiated the setup in the OWNER state and the other node in the STRIPPED state. After performing an initial failback operation to hand the STRIPPED node its portion of the shared resources, both nodes are CLUSTERED. If both cluster nodes fail or are powered off, then upon simultaneous startup they will arbitrate and one of them will become the OWNER and the other STRIPPED.

During failback all foreign resources (those assigned to the peer) are exported, then imported by the peer. A pool that cannot be imported because it is faulted will trigger reboot of the STRIPPED node. An attempt to failback with a faulted pool can reboot the STRIPPED node as a result of the import failure.

Configuration Changes in a Clustered Environment

The vast majority of appliance configuration is represented as either service properties or share/LUN properties. While share and LUN properties are stored with the user data on the storage pool itself (and thus are always accessible to the current owner of that storage resource), service configuration is stored within each head. To ensure that both heads provide coherent service, all service properties must be synchronized when a change occurs or a head that was previously down rejoins with its peer. Since all services are represented by replica resources, this synchronization is performed automatically by the appliance software any time a property is changed on either head.

It is therefore not necessary – indeed, it is redundant – for administrators to replicate configuration changes. Standard operating procedures should reflect this attribute and call for making changes to only one of the two heads once initial cluster configuration has been completed. Note as well that the process of initial cluster configuration will replicate all existing configuration onto the newly-configured peer. Generally, then, we derive two best practices for clustered configuration changes:

  1. Make all storage- and network-related configuration changes on the head that currently controls (or will control, if a new resource is being created) the underlying storage or network interface resources.

  2. Make all other changes on either head, but not both. Site policy should specify which head is to be considered the master for this purpose, and should in turn depend on which of the heads is functioning and the number of storage pools that have been configured. Note that the appliance software does not make this distinction.

The problem of amnesia, in which disjoint configuration changes are made and subsequently lost on each head while its peer is not functioning, is largely overstated. This is especially true of the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series, in which no mechanism exists for making independent changes to system configuration on each head. This simplification largely alleviates the need for centralized configuration repositories and argues for a simpler approach: whichever head is currently operating is assumed to have the correct configuration, and its peer will be synchronized to it when booting. While future product enhancements may allow for selection of an alternate policy for resolving configuration divergence, this basic approach offers simplicity and ease of understanding: the second head will adopt a set of configuration parameters that are already in use by an existing production system (and are therefore highly likely to be correct). To ensure that this remains true, administrators should ensure that a failed head rejoins the cluster as soon as it is repaired.

Clustering Considerations for Storage

When sizing a Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series system for use in a cluster, two additional considerations gain importance. Perhaps the most important decision is whether all storage pools will be assigned ownership to the same head, or split between them. There are several trade-offs here, as shown in the table below. Generally, pools should be configured on a single head except when optimizing for throughput during nominal operation or when failed-over performance is not a consideration. The exact changes in performance characteristics when in the failed-over state will depend to a great deal on the nature and size of the workload(s). Generally, the closer a head is to providing maximum performance on any particular axis, the greater the performance degradation along that axis when the workload is taken over by that head's peer. Of course, in the multiple pool case, this degradation will apply to both workloads.

Note that in either configuration, any ReadZilla devices can be used only when the pool to which they are assigned is imported on the head that has been assigned ownership of that pool. That is, when a pool has been taken over due to head failure, read caching will not be available for that pool even if the head that has imported it also has unused ReadZillas installed. For this reason, ReadZillas in an active-passive cluster should be configured as described in the Storage Configuration documentation. This does not apply to LogZilla devices, which are located in the storage fabric and are always accessible to whichever head has imported the pool.

Variable
Single Node ownership
Multiple pools owned by different heads
Total throughput (nominal operation)
Up to 50% of total CPU resources, 50% of DRAM, and 50% of total network connectivity can be used to provide service at any one time. This is straightforward: only a single head is ever servicing client requests, so the other is idle.
All CPU and DRAM resources can be used to provide service at any one time. Up to 50% of all network connectivity can be used at any one time (dark network devices are required on each head to support failover).
Total throughput (failed over)
No change in throughput relative to nominal operation.
100% of the surviving head's resources will be used to provide service. Total throughput relative to nominal operation may range from approximately 40% to 100%, depending on utilization during nominal operation.
I/O latency (failed over)
ReadZilla is not available during failed-over operation, which may significantly increase latencies for read-heavy workloads that fit into available read cache. Latency of write operations is unaffected.
ReadZilla is not available during failed-over operation, which may significantly increase latencies for read-heavy workloads that fit into available read cache. Latency of both read and write operations may be increased due to greater contention for head resources. This is caused by running two workloads on the surviving head instead of the usual one. When nominal workloads on each head approach the head's maximum capabilities, latencies in the failed-over state may be extremely high.
Storage flexibility
All available physical storage can be used by shares and LUNs.
Only the storage allocated to a particular pool can be used by that pool's shares and LUNs. Storage is not shared across pools, so if one pool fills up while the other has free space, some storage may be wasted.
Network connectivity
All network devices in each head can be used while that head is providing service. In the 7410C, up to three expansion slots plus 4 built-in network devices can be used concurrently to provide connectivity to the single pool.
Only half of all network devices in each head can be used while that head is providing service. Therefore each pool can be connected to only half as many physically disjoint networks.

A second important consideration for storage is the use of pool configurations with no single point of failure (NSPF). Since the use of clustering implies that the application places a very high premium on availability, there is seldom a good reason to configure storage pools in a way that allows the failure of a single JBOD to cause loss of availability. The downside to this approach is that NSPF configurations require a greater number of JBODs than do configurations with a single point of failure; when the required capacity is very small, installation of enough JBODs to provide for NSPF at the desired RAID level may not be economical.

Clustering Considerations for Networking

Network device, datalink, and interface failures do not cause the clustering subsystem to consider a head to have failed. To protect against network failures – whether inside or outside the appliance – IPMP and/or LACP should be used instead. These network configuration options, along with a broader network-wide plan for redundancy, are orthogonal to clustering and are additional components of a comprehensive approach to availability improvement.

image:Image

Network interfaces may be configured as either singleton or private resources, provided they have static IP configuration (interfaces configured to use DHCP can only be private; the use of DHCP in clusters is discouraged). When configured as a singleton resource, all of the datalinks and devices used to construct an interface may be active on only one head at any given time. Likewise, corresponding devices on each head must be attached to the same networks in order for service to be provided correctly in the failed-over state. A concrete example of this is shown in Illustration 5. When constructing network interfaces from devices and datalinks, it is essential to proper cluster operation that each singleton interface have a device with the same identifier and capabilities available on both heads. Since device identifiers depend on the device type and the order in which it is first detected by the appliance, any two clustered heads MUST have identical hardware installed. Furthermore, each slot in both heads must be populated with identical hardware, and slots must be populated in the same order on both heads. Your qualified Sun reseller or service representative can assist in planning hardware upgrades that will meet these requirements.

A route is always bound explicitly to a single network interface. Routes are represented within the resource manager as replicas, but can become active only when the interfaces they are bound to are operational. Therefore, a route bound to an interface that is currently in standby mode (exported) will have no effect until that interface is activated during the process of takeover. This becomes important when two pools are configured and must be made available to a common subnet. In this case, if that subnet is home to a router that should be used by the appliances to reach one or more other networks, then a separate route (for example, a second default route), must be configured and bound to each of the active and standby interfaces attached to that subnet.

It is often advantageous to assign each clustered head an IP address – most likely on a dedicated management network – to be used only for administration, and to designate as a private resource the interface on which this address is configured. This ensures that it will be possible to reach any functioning head from the management network, even if it is currently in the AKCS_STRIPPED state and awaiting failback. This is especially important if services such as LDAP and Active Directory are in use that require access to other network resources even when the head is not itself providing service. If this is not practical, it is especially important that the service processor be attached to a reliable network and/or serial terminal concentrator so that the head can be managed using the system console. If neither of these actions is taken, it will be impossible to manage or monitor a newly-booted head until failback has completed. Conversely, the need may also arise to monitor or manage whichever head is currently providing service (or service for a particular storage pool). This is most likely to be useful when it is necessary to modify some aspect of the storage itself; e.g., to modify a share property or create a new LUN. This can be achieved either by using one of the service interfaces to perform administrative tasks or by allocating a separate singleton interface to be used only for the purpose of managing the pool to which it is matched. In either case, the interface should be assigned to the same head as the pool it will be used to manage.

Clustering Considerations for Infiniband

Like a network built on top of ethernet devices, an Infiniband network needs to be part of a redundant fabric topology in order to guard against network failures inside and outside of the appliance. The network topology should include IPMP to protect against network failures at the link level with a broader plan for redundancy for HCAs, switches and subnet managers.

image:Image

To ensure proper cluster configuration, each head must be populated with identical HCAs in identical slots. Furthermore, each corresponding HCA port must be configured into the same partition (pkey) on the subnet manager with identical membership privileges and attached to the same network. To reduce complexity and ensure proper redundancy, it is recommended that each port belong to only one partition in the Infiniband sub-network. Network interfaces may be configured as either singleton or private resources, provided they have static IP configuration. When configured as a singleton resource, all of the IB partition datalinks and devices used to construct an interface may be active on only one head at any given time. A concrete example of this is shown in the illustration above. Changes to partition membership for corresponding ports must happen at the same time and in a manner consistent with the clustering rules above. Your qualified Sun reseller or service representative can assist in planning hardware upgrades that will meet these requirements.

Redundant Path Scenarios

The following illustration shows HCA port link redundancy on the 7110. Redundancy at the port level is such that if any single IB port fails, none of the other ports have interrupted service.

image:Image

The following illustration shows cluster configuration on the 7410 for host redundancy.

image:Image

The following illustration shows cluster configuration for subnet manager redundancy. Greater redundancy is achieved by connecting two dual-port HCAs to a redundant pair of server switches.

image:Image

Preventing 'Split-Brain' Conditions

A common failure mode in clustered systems is known as split-brain; in this condition, each of the clustered heads believes its peer has failed and attempts takeover. Absent additional logic, this condition can cause a broad spectrum of unexpected and destructive behavior that can be difficult to diagnose or correct. The canonical trigger for this condition is the failure of the communication medium shared by the heads; in the case of the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series appliances, this would occur if the cluster I/O links fail. In addition to the built-in triple-link redundancy (only a single link is required to avoid triggering takeover), the appliance software will also perform an arbitration procedure to determine which head should continue with takeover.

A number of arbitration mechanisms are employed by similar products; typically they entail the use of quorum disks (using SCSI reservations) or quorum servers. To support the use of ATA disks without the need for additional hardware, the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series uses a different approach relying on the storage fabric itself to provide the required mutual exclusivity. The arbitration process consists of attempting to perform a SAS ZONE LOCK command on each of the visible SAS expanders in the storage fabric, in a predefined order. Whichever appliance is successful in its attempts to obtain all such locks will proceed with takeover; the other will reset itself. Since a clustered appliance that boots and detects that its peer is unreachable will attempt takeover and enter the same arbitration process, it will reset in a continuous loop until at least one cluster I/O link is restored. This ensures that the subsequent failure of the other head will not result in an extended outage. These SAS zone locks are released when failback is performed or approximately 10 seconds has elapsed since the head in the AKCS_OWNER state most recently renewed its own access to the storage fabric.

This arbitration mechanism is simple, inexpensive, and requires no additional hardware, but it relies on the clustered appliances both having access to at least one common SAS expander in the storage fabric. Under normal conditions, each appliance has access to all expanders, and arbitration will consist of taking at least two SAS zone locks. It is possible, however, to construct multiple-failure scenarios in which the appliances do not have access to any common expander. For example, if two of the SAS cables are removed or a JBOD is powered down, each appliance will have access to disjoint subsets of expanders. In this case, each appliance will successfully lock all reachable expanders, conclude that its peer has failed, and attempt to proceed with takeover. This can cause unrecoverable hangs due to disk affiliation conflicts and/or severe data corruption.

Note that while the consequences of this condition are severe, it can arise only in the case of multiple failures (often only in the case of 4 or more failures). The clustering solution embedded in the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series appliances is designed to ensure that there is no single point of failure, and to protect both data and availability against any plausible failure without adding undue cost or complexity to the system. It is still possible that massive multiple failures will cause loss of service and/or data, in much the same way that no RAID layout can protect against an unlimited number of disk failures. image:Image

Fortunately, most such failure scenarios arise from human error and are completely preventable by installing the hardware properly and training staff in cluster setup and management best practices. Administrators should always ensure that all three cluster I/O links are connected and functional (see illustration), and that all storage cabling is connected as shown in the setup poster delivered with your appliances. It is particularly important that two paths are detected to each JBOD (see illustration) before placing the cluster into production and at all times afterward, with the obvious exception of temporary cabling changes to support capacity increases or replacement of faulty components. Administrators should use alerts to monitor the state of cluster interconnect links and JBOD paths and correct any failures promptly. Ensuring that proper connectivity is maintained will protect both availability and data integrity if a hardware or software component fails. image:Image

Estimating and Reducing Takeover Impact

There is an interval during takeover and failback during which access to storage cannot be provided to clients. The length of this interval varies by configuration, and the exact effects on clients depends on the protocol(s) they are using to access data. Understanding and mitigating these effects can make the difference between a successful cluster deployment and a costly failure at the worst possible time.

NFS (all versions) clients typically hide outages from application software, causing I/O operations to be delayed while a server is unavailable. NFSv2 and NFSv3 are stateless protocols that recover almost immediately upon service restoration; NFSv4 incorporates a client grace period at startup, during which I/O typically cannot be performed. The duration of this grace period can be tuned in the Sun ZFS Storage 7000 family of appliances (see illustration); reducing it will reduce the apparent impact of takeover and/or failback. image:Image

iSCSI behavior during service interruptions is initiator-dependent, but initiators will typically recover if service is restored within a client-specific timeout period. Check your initiator's documentation for additional details. The iSCSI target will typically be able to provide service as soon as takeover is complete, with no additional delays.

SMB, FTP, and HTTP/WebDAV are connection-oriented protocols. Because the session states associated with these services cannot be transferred along with the underlying storage and network connectivity, all clients using one of these protocols will be disconnected during a takeover or failback, and must reconnect after the operation completes.

While several factors affect takeover time (and its close relative, failback time), in most configurations these times will be dominated by the time required to import the diskset resource(s). Typical import times for each diskset range from 15 to 20 seconds, linear in the number of disksets. Recall that a diskset consists of one half of one JBOD, provided the disk bays in that half-JBOD have been populated and allocated to a storage pool. Unallocated disks and empty disk bays have no effect on takeover time. The time taken to import diskset resources is unaffected by any parameters that can be tuned or altered by administrators, so administrators planning clustered deployments should either:

Note that while diskset import usually comprises the bulk of takeover time, it is not the only factor. During the pool import process, any intent log records must be replayed, and each share and LUN must be shared via the appropriate service(s). The amount of time required to perform these activities for a single share or LUN is very small – on the order of tens of milliseconds – but with very large share counts this can contribute significantly to takeover times. Keeping the number of shares relatively small - a few thousand or fewer - can therefore reduce these times considerably.

Failback time is normally greater than takeover time for any given configuration. This is because failback is a two-step operation: first, the source appliance exports all resources of which it is not the assigned owner, then the target appliance performs the standard takeover procedure on its own assigned resources only. Therefore it will always take longer to failback from head A to head B than it will take for head A to take over from head B in case of failure. This additional failback time is much less dependent upon the number of disksets being exported than is the takeover time, so keeping the number of shares and LUNs small can have a greater impact on failback than on takeover. It is also important to keep in mind that failback is always initiated by an administrator, so the longer service interruption it causes can be scheduled for a time when it will cause the lowest level of business disruption.

Note: Estimated times cited in this section refer to software/firmware version 2009.04.10,1-0. Other versions may perform differently, and actual performance may vary. It is important to test takeover and its exact impact on client applications prior to deploying a Sun ZFS Storage 7000 series clustered appliance in a production environment.

Setup Procedure

When setting up a cluster from two new appliances, perform the following steps:

  1. Connect power and at least one Ethernet cable to each appliance.

  2. Cable together the cluster interconnect controllers as described below under Node Cabling. You can also proceed with cluster setup and add these cables dynamically during the setup process.

  3. Cable together the HBAs to the shared JBOD(s) as shown in the JBOD Cabling diagrams in the setup poster that came with your Sun ZFS Storage system.

  4. Power on both appliances - but do not begin configuration. Select only one of the two appliances from which you will perform configuration; the choice is arbitrary. This will be referred to as the primary appliance for configuration purposes. Connect to and access the serial console of that appliance, and perform the initial tty-based configuration on it in the same manner as you would when configuring a standalone appliance. Note: Do not perform the initial tty-based configuration on the secondary appliance; it will be automatically configured for you during cluster setup.

  5. On the primary appliance, enter either the BUI or CLI to begin cluster setup. Cluster setup can be selected as part of initial setup if the cluster interconnect controller has been installed. Alternately, you can perform standalone configuration at this time, deferring cluster setup until later. In the latter case, you can perform the cluster configuration task by clicking the Setup button in Configuration->Cluster.

  6. At the first step of cluster setup, you will be shown a diagram of the active cluster links: you should see three solid blue wires on the screen, one for each connection. If you don't, add the missing cables now. Once you see all three wires, you are ready to proceed by clicking the Commit button.

  7. Enter the appliance name and initial root password for the second appliance (this is equivalent to performing the initial serial console setup for the new appliance). When you click the Commit button, progress bars will appear as the second appliance is configured.

  8. If you are setting up clustering as part of initial setup of the primary appliance, you will now be prompted to perform initial configuration as you would be in the single-appliance case. Note: all configuration changes you make will be propagated automatically to the other appliance. Proceed with initial configuration, taking into consideration the following restrictions and caveats:

  9. # Network interfaces configured via DHCP cannot be failed over between heads, and therefore cannot be used by clients to access storage. Therefore, be sure to assign static IP addresses to any network interfaces which will be used by clients to access storage. If you selected a DHCP-configured network interface during tty-based initial configuration, and you wish to use that interface for client access, you will need to change its address type to Static before proceeding.

  10. # Best practices include configuring and assigning a private network interface for administration to each head, which will enable administration via either head over the network (BUI or CLI) regardless of the cluster state.

  11. # If routes are needed, be sure to create a route on an interface that will be assigned to each head. See the previous section for a specific example.

  12. Proceed with initial configuration until you reach the storage pool step. Each storage pool can be taken over, along with the network interfaces clients use to reach that storage pool, by the cluster peer when takeover occurs. If you create two storage pools, each head will normally provide clients with access to the pool assigned to it; if one of the heads fails, the other will provide clients with access to both pools. If you create a single pool, the head which is not assigned a pool will provide service to clients only when its peer has failed. Storage pools are assigned to heads at the time you create them; the storage configuration dialog offers the option of creating a pool assigned to each head independently. Note: The smallest unit of storage that may be assigned to a pool is half a JBOD. Therefore, if you have only a single JBOD and wish to create two pools, you must use the popup menu to select Half of your JBOD for each pool. Additionally, it is not possible to create two pools if you have attached only a single half-populated JBOD. If you choose to create two pools, there is no requirement that they be the same size; any subdivision of available storage is permitted.

  13. After completing basic configuration, you will have an opportunity to assign resources to each head. Typically, you will need to assign only network interfaces; storage pools were automatically assigned during the storage configuration step.

  14. Commit the resource assignments and perform the initial fail-back from the Cluster User Interface, described below. If you are still executing initial setup of the primary appliance, this screen will appear as the last in the setup sequence. If you are executing cluster setup manually after an initial setup, go to the Configuration/Cluster screen to perform these tasks. Refer to Cluster User Interface below for the details.

Node Cabling

Clustered head nodes must be connected together using the cluster interconnect controller. This device is installed in slot PCIe0 in the Sun Storage 7310 and ZFS Storage 7320. The cluster controller is installed in slot PCIe5 in the Sun Storage 7410 and slot PCIeC in the ZFS Storage 7420.

image:Image

The controller provides three redundant links that enable the heads to communicate: two serial links (the outer two connectors) and an Ethernet link (the middle connector).

Using straight-through Cat 5-or-better Ethernet cables, (three 1m cables ship with your cluster configuration), connect the head node according to the diagram at left.

The cluster cabling can be performed either prior to powering on either head node, or can be performed live while executing the cluster setup guided task. The user interface will show the status of each link, as shown later in this page. You must have established all three links before cluster configuration will proceed.

JBOD Cabling

You will need to attach your JBODs to both appliances before beginning cluster configuration. See Installation: Cabling Diagrams or follow the Quick Setup poster that shipped with your system.

BUI

The Configuration->Cluster view provides a graphical overview of the status of the cluster card, the cluster head node states, and all of the resources.

image:Status Dashboard

The interface contains these objects:

The interface contains these buttons:

Button
Description
Setup
If the cluster is not yet configured, execute the cluster setup guided task, and then return to the current screen. See above for a detailed description of this task.
Unconfig
Upgrade a node to standalone operation by unconfiguring the cluster. See below for a detailed description of this task.
Apply
If resource modifications are pending (rows highlighted in yellow), commit those changes to the cluster.
Revert
If resource modifications are pending (rows highlighted in yellow), revert those changes and show the current cluster configuration.
Failback
If the current appliance (left-hand side) is the OWNER, fail-back resources owned by the other appliance to it, leaving both nodes in the CLUSTERED state (active/active).
Takeover
If the current appliance (left-hand side) is either CLUSTERED or STRIPPED, force the other appliance to reboot, and take-over its resources, making the current appliance the OWNER

Unconfiguring Clustering

Unconfiguring clustering is a destructive operation that returns one of the clustered storage controllers to its factory default configuration and reassigns ownership of all resources to the surviving peer. There are two reasons to perform cluster unconfiguration:

  1. You no longer wish to use clustering; instead, you wish to configure two independent storage appliances.

  2. You are replacing a failed storage controller with new hardware or a storage controller with factory-fresh appliance software (typically this replacement will be performed by your service provider).

The steps for unconfiguring a cluster are as follows:

  1. Select the storage controller that will be reset to its factory configuration. Note that if replacing a failed storage controller, you can skip to step 3, provided that the failed storage controller will not be returned to service at your site.

  2. From the system console of the storage controller that will be reset to its factory configuration, perform a factory reset.

  3. The storage controller will reset, and its peer will begin takeover normally. Prior to allowing the factory-reset storage controller to begin booting (i.e., prior to progressing beyond the boot menu), power it off and wait for its peer to complete takeover.

  4. Detach the cluster interconnect cables (see above) and detach the powered-off storage controller from the cluster's external storage enclosures.

  5. On the remaining storage controller, click the Unconfig button on the Configuration -> Clustering screen. All resources will become assigned to that storage controller, and the storage controller will no longer be a member of any cluster.

The detached storage controller, if any, can now be attached to its own storage, powered on, and configured normally. If you are replacing a failed storage controller, attach the replacement to the remaining storage controller and storage and begin the cluster setup task described above.

Note: If your cluster had 2 or more pools, ownership of all pools will be assigned to the remaining storage controller after unconfiguration. In software versions prior to 2010.Q1.0.0, this was not a supported configuration; if you are running an older software version, you must do one of: destroy one or both pools, attach a replacement storage controller, perform the cluster setup task described above, and reassign ownership of one of the pools to the replacement storage controller, or upgrade to 2010.Q1.0.0 or a later software release which contains support for multiple pools per storage controller.