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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Oracle SOA Suite, WebCenter Portal, and ADF
11g Release 1 (11.1.1.8.0)

Part Number E10127-09
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3 Oracle SOA Suite, WebCenter, and ADF Information for 10g Users

This chapter provides an overview of the Oracle SOA Suite, WebCenter, and ADF software available in Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g.

The following sections compare the architecture and directory structure of these technologies in 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) and in Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g:

3.1 Information for Oracle ADF Users

In Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3), Oracle provided the Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF), an end-to-end application framework that builds on Java EE standards and open-source technologies to simplify and accelerate implementing service-oriented applications.

The development and runtime environment required to deploy and manage ADF applications is similar in many ways to the environment required for other Java EE applications. For information about the types of Java EE environments available in 10g and instructions for upgrading those environments to Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g, refer to the Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Java EE.

The difference between a typical Java EE environment and an environment that supports ADF applications is the availability of the ADF runtime libraries:

Figure 3-1 compares how Oracle ADF applications are supported in OC4J and in Oracle WebLogic Server. Note that the Oracle WebLogic Server domain can be extended with the Java Runtime Files (JRF) domain template, which includes the required Oracle ADF libraries, as well as other important Oracle-specific technologies.

Figure 3-1 Support for Oracle ADF Applications in OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server

Description of Figure 3-1 follows
Description of "Figure 3-1 Support for Oracle ADF Applications in OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server"

For more information about extending your domain to support Oracle ADF, see Chapter 17, "Scaling Your Environment," in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide.

Note that unlike Oracle Application Server 10g, Oracle HTTP Server is not automatically installed and configured to route requests to Oracle WebLogic Server. Instead, you install Oracle HTTP Server and Oracle Web Cache in a separate Oracle home using the WebTier and Utilities CD-ROM. For more information, see "Upgrading a Java EE and Web Server Environment" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Guide for Java EE.

3.2 Information for Oracle SOA Suite Users

Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) provided installation options that allowed you to install and configure the Oracle Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) system components (except for Oracle BAM) as part of the Oracle Application Server installation. You could then use Oracle JDeveloper to develop and deploy SOA applications on the OC4J instances where the SOA components were installed.

Similarly, for Oracle Fusion Middleware, you can install and configure an Oracle WebLogic Server domain that supports the Oracle SOA infrastructure and system components, including Oracle BAM.

For more information, refer to the following sections:

3.2.1 Comparing Oracle SOA Suite on OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server

Figure 3-2 shows how the SOA system components are installed as part of an OC4J 10g instance and compares that to how the SOA components are installed on a managed server when you install and configure the Oracle Fusion Middleware Oracle SOA Suite 11g.

Note that the SOA system components require a set of SOA schemas, which you install using the Repository Creation Utility (RCU). For more information about the schemas installed by RCU, refer to the Oracle Fusion Middleware Repository Creation Utility User's Guide.

Figure 3-2 Oracle SOA Suite Installed on an OC4J Instance and an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain

Description of Figure 3-2 follows
Description of "Figure 3-2 Oracle SOA Suite Installed on an OC4J Instance and an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain"

3.2.2 Comparing the Oracle SOA Suite Directory Structure on OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server

When you install and configure the Oracle SOA Suite, you create a Oracle WebLogic Server domain that has been extended to support the SOA system components. The resulting files on disk consist of the SOA domain directory structure, as well as the SOA Oracle home, which contains the SOA component binary and support files, and the Oracle Common home, which contains Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control and the Java Required Files (JRF).

The SOA Oracle home must be installed inside the Middleware home; the Oracle common is installed automatically.

This is in contrast to the single Oracle home that was created during an Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) installation.

Figure 3-3 shows the directory structure that results from installing and configuring the Oracle SOA Suite domain.

Figure 3-3 The Directory Structure of an Oracle Fusion Middleware SOA Suite Installation

Description of Figure 3-3 follows
Description of "Figure 3-3 The Directory Structure of an Oracle Fusion Middleware SOA Suite Installation"

3.2.3 Upgrading an Oracle SOA Suite Enterprise Deployment

The instructions in this guide provide the steps for upgrading a basic Oracle SOA Suite environment. After reviewing the content of this guide, you should be able to transfer this knowledge to a more complex production environment.

For specific information about setting up a production environment that takes advantage of clustering and high availability, refer to the Oracle Fusion Middleware Enterprise Deployment Guide for Oracle SOA Suite.

For an overview of the high-level tasks you must perform when upgrading an enterprise deployment, see "Planning an Enterprise Deployment Upgrade" in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Planning Guide.

3.2.4 About Oracle BAM and Oracle B2B in Oracle Application Server 10g and Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g

Unlike the other Oracle SOA Suite components, Oracle BAM 10g and Oracle B2B were installed an configured separately.

Oracle BAM was supported on the Microsoft platform only, and Oracle B2B was installed on a separate server from the other Oracle SOA Suite 10g components.

For Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g, Oracle BAM 11g and Oracle B2B 11g are integrated with the other Oracle SOA Suite components. Oracle BAM can be deployed as part of the same Oracle WebLogic Server domain, and Oracle B2B is installed and configured automatically with the other Oracle SOA Suite components.

3.3 Information for Oracle WebCenter Users

Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) provided installation options that allowed you to install and configure the WebCenter system components as part of an Oracle Application Server install. You could then use Oracle JDeveloper to develop and deploy WebCenter applications on the OC4J instances where the WebCenter system components were installed.

Similarly, for Oracle Fusion Middleware, you can install and configure a Oracle WebLogic Server domain that supports the WebCenter system components.

Refer to the following sections for more information:

3.3.1 New Product Names for Oracle WebCenter and Oracle Enterprise Content Management Suite

Release Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 1 (11.1.1.8.0) onward, Oracle WebCenter and Oracle Universal Content Management have been rebranded. Table 3-1 provides a mapping of the old product names and terminology with the new ones.

Table 3-1 Mapping Old and New Terminologies

Release 10g Name New Name from Release 11.1.1.8.0 Onward

Product Name Changes

 

Oracle WebCenter

Oracle WebCenter Portal

Oracle Universal Content Management

Oracle WebCenter Content

Oracle Content Server

Oracle WebCenter Content Server (short name Content Server)

Oracle WebCenter Discussions

Oracle WebCenter Portal's Discussion Server

Feature Name Changes in Documentation

 

WebCenter application

Portal Framework application/Framework application

WebCenter domain

WebCenter Portal domain


3.3.2 Comparing Oracle WebCenter on OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server

Figure 3-4 shows the how the Oracle WebCenter system components are installed as part of an OC4J 10g instance and compares that to how the Oracle WebCenter components are installed on a managed server when you install and configure the Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g.

Note that the WebCenter system components require a set of WebCenter schemas, which you install using the Repository Creation Utility (RCU). For more information about the schemas installed by RCU, refer to the Oracle Fusion Middleware Repository Creation Utility User's Guide.

Figure 3-4 Oracle WebCenter Installed on OC4J and on Oracle WebLogic Server

Description of Figure 3-4 follows
Description of "Figure 3-4 Oracle WebCenter Installed on OC4J and on Oracle WebLogic Server"

3.3.3 Comparing the Oracle WebCenter Directory Structure on OC4J and Oracle WebLogic Server

When you install and configure Oracle WebCenter, you create an Oracle WebLogic Server domain that has been extended to support the WebCenter system components. The resulting files on disk consist of the WebCenter domain directory structure, as well as the WebCenter Oracle home, which contains the WebCenter binary and support files. The WebCenter Oracle home, like the SOA Oracle home, must reside inside the Middleware Oracle home.

This is contrast to the single Oracle home that was created during an Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 (10.1.3) installation.

Figure 3-5 shows the directory structure that results from installing and configuring the Oracle SOA Suite domain.

Figure 3-5 The Directory Structure of an Oracle Fusion Middleware WebCenter Installation

Description of Figure 3-5 follows
Description of "Figure 3-5 The Directory Structure of an Oracle Fusion Middleware WebCenter Installation "