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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Command Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server
11g Release 1 (10.3.6)

Part Number E13749-06
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2 Using the Oracle WebLogic Server Java Utilities

Oracle WebLogic Server provides a number of Java utilities and Ant tasks for performing administrative and programming tasks.

To use these utilities and tasks, you must set your CLASSPATH correctly. For more information, see Modifying the Classpath.

Oracle WebLogic Server provides several Java programs that simplify installation and configuration tasks, provide services, and offer convenient shortcuts. The Java utilities provided with Oracle WebLogic Server are all described below. The command-line syntax is specified for all utilities and, for some, examples are provided.

Oracle WebLogic Server also provides a number of Ant tasks that automate common application server programming tasks. The Apache Web site provides other useful Ant tasks as well, including tasks for packaging EAR, WAR, and JAR files. For more information, see http://jakarta.apache.org/ant/manual/.

appc

The appc compiler generates and compiles the classes needed to deploy EJBs and JSPs to Oracle WebLogic Server. It also validates the deployment descriptors for compliance with the current specifications at both the individual module level and the application level. See "appc Reference" in Programming WebLogic Enterprise JavaBeans for Oracle WebLogic Server.

AppletArchiver

The AppletArchiver utility runs an applet in a separate frame, keeps a record of all of the downloaded classes and resources used by the applet, and packages these into either a .jar file or a .cab file. (The cabarc utility is available from Microsoft.)

Syntax

$ java utils.applet.archiver.AppletArchiver URL filename 

Table 2-1 describes the arguments passed to the AppletArchiver utility.

Table 2-1 AppletArchiver Arguments

Argument Definition
URL 

URL for the applet.

filename 

Local filename that is the destination for the .jar/.cab archive.


autotype (deprecated)

Use the autotype Ant task to generate non-built-in data type components, such as the serialization class, for Web Services. The fully qualified name for the autotype Ant task is weblogic.ant.taskdefs.webservices.javaschema.JavaSchema.

For a complete list of Web Services Ant tasks, see "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

BuildXMLGen

Use BuildXMLGen to generate a build.xml file for enterprise applications in the split-directory structure. For complete documentation of this utility, see "Building Applications in a Split Development Directory" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

CertGen

The CertGen utility generates certificates that should only be used for demonstration or testing purposes, not in a production environment.

Syntax

$ java utils.CertGen 
      -certfile <cert_file> -keyfile <private_key_file>
      -keyfilepass <private_key_password>
     [-cacert <ca_cert_file>][-cakey <ca_key_file>]
     [-cakeypass <ca_key_password>]
     [-selfsigned][-strength <key_strength>]
     [-e <email_address>][-cn <common_name>]
     [-ou <org_unit>][-o <organization>]
     [-l <locality>][-s <state>][-c <country_code>]
     [-keyusage [digitalSignature,nonRepudiation,keyEncipherment,
       dataEncipherment,keyAgreement,keyCertSign,
       cRLSign,encipherOnly,decipherOnly]]
     [-keyusagecritical true|false]
     [-subjectkeyid <subject_key_identifier>]
     [-subjectkeyidformat UTF-8|BASE64]
     [-help]

Table 2-2 describes the arguments that are passed to the CertGen utility.

Table 2-2 CertGen Arguments

Argument Definition
-certfile cert_file 
-keyfile private_key_file 

Respectively, the output file names without extensions of the generated public certificate and private key. The appropriate extensions are appended when the pem and der files are created.

-keyfilepass private_key_password 

The password for the generated private key.

-cacert ca_cert_file 
-cakey ca_key_file 
-cakeypass ca_key_password 

Respectively, the public certificate, private key file, and private key password of the CA that will be used as the issuer of the generated certificate. If one or more of these options are not specified, the relevant demonstration CA files will be used: CertGenCA.der and CertGenCAKey.der. The CertGen utility first looks in the current working directory, then in the WL_HOME/lib directory.

-selfsigned

Generates a self-signed certificate that can be used as a trusted CA certificate. If this argument is specified, the ca_cert_filename, ca_key_filename, and ca_key_password arguments should not be specified.

-strength key_strength 

The length (in bits) of the keys to be generated. The longer the key, the more difficult it is for someone to break the encryption.

-e email_address 

The email address associated with the generated certificate.

-cn common_name 

The name associated with the generated certificate.

-ou org_unit 

The name of the organizational unit associated with the generated certificate.

-o organization 

The name of the organization associated with the generated certificate.

-l locality 

The name of a city or town.

-s state 

The name of the state or province in which the organizational unit (ou) operates if your organization is in the United States or Canada, respectively. Do not abbreviate.

-c country_code 

Two-letter ISO code for your country. The code for the United States is US.

-keyusage [digitalSignature,
nonRepudiation,keyEncipherment,
dataEncipherment,keyAgreement,
keyCertSign,cRLSign,
encipherOnly,decipherOnly]

Generate certificate with a keyusage extension, and with bits set according to the comma-separated list of bit names.

Specify a key usage when you want to restrict the operation for a key that could be used for more than one operation.

-keyusagecritical true|false

By default, a keyusage extension is marked critical. To generate a certificate with a non-critical extension, use -keyusagecritical false.

-subjectkeyid subject_key_identifier 

Generates a certificate with the specified subject key identifier.

-subjectkeyidformat UTF-8|BASE64 

The format of the subjectkeyid value; UTF-8 is the default.


Example

By default, the CertGen utility looks for the CertGenCA.der and CertGenCAKey.der files in the current directory, or in the WL_HOME directory, as specified in the weblogic.home system property or the CLASSPATH. Alternatively, you can specify CA files on the command line.

Enter the following command to generate certificate files named testcert with private key files named testkey:

$ java utils.CertGen -keyfilepass mykeypass 
-certfile testcert -keyfile testkey
Generating a certificate with common name return and key strength 1024
issued by CA with certificate from CertGenCA.der file and key from CertGenCAKey.der file

ClientDeployer

You use weblogic.ClientDeployer to extract the client-side JAR file from a Java EE EAR file, creating a deployable JAR file. The weblogic.ClientDeployer class is executed on the Java command line with the following syntax:

java weblogic.ClientDeployer ear-file client 

The ear-file argument is an expanded directory (or Java archive file with a .ear extension) that contains one or more client application JAR files.

For example:

java weblogic.ClientDeployer app.ear myclient

In the preceding example, app.ear is the EAR file that contains a Java EE client packaged in myclient.jar.

Once the client-side JAR file is extracted from the EAR file, use the weblogic.j2eeclient.Main utility to bootstrap the client-side application and point it to a WebLogic Server instance as follows:

java weblogic.j2eeclient.Main clientjar URL [application args] 

For example:

java weblogic.j2eeclient.Main helloWorld.jar t3://localhost:7001 Greetings

clientgen

Use clientgen to generate the client-side artifacts, such as the JAX-RPC stubs, needed to invoke a Web Service. See "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Conversion (deprecated)

WebLogic Server 9.0 does not support conversion or upgrading from a pre-6.0 version of Oracle WebLogic Server. To upgrade from version 6.1 or later, see Upgrade Guide for Oracle WebLogic Server.

dbping

The dbping command-line utility tests the connection between a DBMS and your client machine via a JDBC driver. You must complete the installation of the driver before attempting to use this utility. For more information on how to install a driver, see the documentation from your driver vendor. Also see "Using Third-Party Drivers with WebLogic Server" in Programming JDBC for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Creating a DB2 Package with dbping

With the WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for DB2, you can also use the dbping utility to create a package on the DB2 server. When you ping the database with the dbping utility, the driver automatically creates the default package on the database server if it does not already exist. If the default package already exists on the database server, the dbping utility uses the existing package.

The default DB2 package includes 200 dynamic sections. You can specify a different number of dynamic sections to create in the DB2 package with the -d option. The -d option also sets CreateDefaultPackage=true and ReplacePackage=true on the connection used in the connection test, which forces the DB2 driver to replace the DB2 package on the DB2 server. (See "Using DataDirect Documentation" in Programming JDBC for Oracle WebLogic Server for more information.) You can use the -d option with dynamic sections set at 200 to forcibly recreate a default package on the DB2 server.

Notes:

When you specify the -d option, the dbping utility recreates the default package and uses the value you specify for the number of dynamic sections. It does not modify the existing package.

To create a DB2 package, the user that you specify must have CREATE PACKAGE privileges on the database.

Syntax

$ java utils.dbping DBMS [-d dynamicSections] user password DB 

Table 2-3 describes the arguments that are passed to the dbping command-line utility.

Table 2-3 dbping Arguments

Argument Definition
DBMS 

Varies by DBMS and JDBC driver:

DB2B—WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for DB2

DERBY—Embedded Derby driver

JCONN2—Sybase JConnect 5.5 (JDBC 2.0) driver

JCONN3—Sybase JConnect 6.0 (JDBC 2.0) driver

JCONNECT—Sybase JConnect driver

INFORMIXB—WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for Informix

MSSQLSERVER4—WebLogic jDriver for Microsoft SQL Server

MSSQLSERVERB—WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for Microsoft SQL Server

MYSQL— MySQL's Type 4 Driver

ORACLE—WebLogic jDriver for Oracle

ORACLEB—WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for Oracle

ORACLE_THIN—Oracle Thin Driver

POINTBASE—PointBase Universal Driver

SYBASEB—WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for Sybase

[-d dynamicSections] 

Specifies the number of dynamic sections to create in the DB2 package. This option is for use with the WebLogic Type 4 JDBC Driver for DB2 only.

If the -d option is specified, the driver automatically sets CreateDefaultPackage=true and ReplacePackage=true on the connection and creates a DB2 package with the number of dynamic sections specified.

user 

Valid database username for login. Use the same values you use with isql, sqlplus, or other SQL command-line tools.

For DB2 with the -d option, the user must have CREATE PACKAGE privileges on the database.

password 

Valid database password for the user. Use the same values you use with isql or sqlplus.

DB 

Name and location of the database. Use the following format, depending on which JDBC driver you use:

DB2B—Host:Port/DBName

DERBY—Host:Port/DBName

JCONN2—Host:Port/DBName

JCONN3—Host:Port/DBName

JCONNECT—Host:Port/DBName

INFORMIXB—Host:Port/DBName/InformixServer

MSSQLSERVER4—Host:Port/DBName or [DBName@]Host[:Port]

MSSQLSERVERB—Host:Port/DBName

MYSQL—Host:Port/DBName

ORACLE—DBName (as listed in tnsnames.ora)

ORACLEB—Host:Port/DBName

ORACLE_THIN—Host:Port/DBName

POINTBASE—Host[:Port]/DBName

SYBASEB—Host:Port/DBName

Where:

  • Host is the name of the machine hosting the DBMS.

  • Port is port on the database host where the DBMS is listening for connections.

  • DBName is the name of a database on the DBMS.

  • InformixServer is an Informix-specific environment variable that identifies the Informix DBMS server.


Examples

The following is an example using the Oracle Thin Driver.

C:\>java utils.dbping ORACLE_THIN scott tiger dbserver1:1561:demo

**** Success!!! ****

You can connect to the database in your app using:

java.util.Properties props = new java.util.Properties();
  props.put("user", "scott");
  props.put("password", "tiger");
  props.put("dll", "ocijdbc9");
  props.put("protocol", "thin");
  java.sql.Driver d =
    Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver").newInstance();
  java.sql.Connection conn =
    Driver.connect("jdbc:oracle:thin:@dbserver1:1561:demo", props);

The following is an example using the Derby driver. Derby is an open source relational database management system bundled with WebLogic Server for use by the sample applications and code examples as a demonstration database.

$ java utils.dbping DERBY examples examples localhost:1527/demo
**** Success!!! ****
You can connect to the database in your app using:

  java.util.Properties props = new java.util.Properties();
  props.put("user", "examples");
  props.put("password", "examples");
  java.sql.Driver d =
    Class.forName("org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDriver").newInstance();
  java.sql.Connection conn =
    Driver.connect("jdbc:derby://localhost:1527/demo", props);

ddcreate (deprecated)

This Ant task calls EARInit, which generates an application.xml and a weblogic-application.xml file for an EAR. For more information, see EarInit (deprecated).

DDInit

DDInit is a utility for generating deployment descriptors for applications to be deployed on Oracle WebLogic Server. Target a module's archive or folder and DDInit uses information from the module's class files to create appropriate deployment descriptor files.

In its command-line version, DDInit writes new files that overwrite existing descriptor files. If META-INF or WEB-INF does not exist, DDInit creates it.

Specify the type of Java EE deployable unit (either Web Application or Enterprise Application) for which you want deployment descriptors generated by using the DDInit command specific to the type, as described below.

WebInit

Target a WAR file or a folder containing files that you intend to archive as a WAR file, and WebInit will create web.xml and weblogic.xml files for the module.

prompt> java weblogic.marathon.ddinit.WebInit <module>

EarInit (deprecated)

The EarInit tool is deprecated in this version of Oracle WebLogic Server. As a result, you should not:

  • Use the DDInit utility to generate deployment descriptors for Enterprise applications.

  • Use the ddcreate ant task, which calls EarInit.

Generate an application.xml and a weblogic-application.xml file for an EAR using this command. Target an existing EAR or a folder containing JAR or WAR files you intend to archive into an EAR file.

prompt> java weblogic.marathon.ddinit.EarInit <module>

Deployer

Using the weblogic.Deployer tool, you can deploy Java EE applications and components to WebLogic Servers in a command-line or scripting environment. For detailed information on using this tool, see "weblogic.Deployer Command-Line Reference" in Deploying Applications to Oracle WebLogic Server.

The weblogic.Deployer utility replaces the weblogic.deploy utility, which has been deprecated.

der2pem

The der2pem utility converts an X509 certificate from DER format to PEM format. The .pem file is written in the same directory and has the same filename as the source .der file.

Syntax

$ java utils.der2pem derFile [headerFile] [footerFile]

Table 2-4 describes the arguments that are passed to the der2pem utility.

Table 2-4 der2pem Arguments

Argument Description
derFile 

The name of the file to convert. The filename must end with a .der extension, and must contain a valid certificate in .der format.

headerFile 

The header to place in the PEM file. The default header is "-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----".

Use a header file if the DER file being converted is a private key file, and create the header file containing one of the following:

  • "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----" for an unencrypted private key.

  • "-----BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----" for an encrypted private key.

Note: There must be a new line at the end of the header line in the file.

footerFile 

The header to place in the PEM file. The default header is "-----END CERTIFICATE-----".

Use a footer file if the DER file being converted is a private key file, and create the footer file containing one of the following in the header:

  • "-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----" for an unencrypted private key.

  • "-----END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----" for an encrypted private key.

Note: There must be a new line at the end of the header line in the file.


Example

$ java utils.der2pem graceland_org.der
Decoding
................................................................

Derby

Derby is an open source relational database management system based on Java, JDBC, and SQL standards. It is bundled with WebLogic Server for use by the sample applications and code examples as a demonstration database. For more information about Derby, see http://db.apache.org/derby.

ejbc (deprecated)

See "appc Reference" in Programming WebLogic Enterprise JavaBeans for Oracle WebLogic Server.

EJBGen

EJBGen is an Enterprise JavaBeans 2.0 code generator. You can annotate your Bean class file with javadoc tags and then use EJBGen to generate the Remote and Home classes and the deployment descriptor files for an EJB application, reducing to one the number of EJB files you need to edit and maintain.

See "EJBGen Reference" in Programming WebLogic Enterprise JavaBeans for Oracle WebLogic Server.

encrypt

The weblogic.security.Encrypt utility encrypts cleartext strings for use with Oracle WebLogic Server. The utility uses the encryption service of the current directory, or the encryption service for a specified Oracle WebLogic Server domain root directory.

Note:

An encrypted string must have been encrypted by the encryption service in the Oracle WebLogic Server domain where it will be used. If not, the server will not be able to decrypt the string.

You can only run the weblogic.security.Encrypt utility on a machine that has at least one server instance in an Oracle WebLogic Server domain; it cannot be run from a client.

Note:

Oracle recommends running the utility from the Administration Server domain directory or on the machine hosting the Administration Server and specifying a domain root directory.

Syntax

java [-Dweblogic.RootDirectory=dirname] 
     [-Dweblogic.management.allowPasswordEcho=true] 
       weblogic.security.Encrypt [password]

Table 2-5 describes the arguments that are passed to the weblogic.security.Encrypt utility.

Table 2-5 Encrypt Arguments

Argument Definition
dirname

Optional. Oracle WebLogic Server domain directory in which the encrypted string will be used. If not specified, the default domain root directory is the current directory (the directory in which the utility is being run).

weblogic.management.allowPasswordEcho

Optional. Allows echoing characters entered on the command line. weblogic.security.Encryptexpects that no-echo is available; if no-echo is not available, set this property to true.

password 

Optional. Cleartext string to be encrypted. If omitted from the command line, you will be prompted to enter a password.


Examples

The utility returns an encrypted string using the encryption service of the domain located in the current directory.

java weblogic.security.Encrypt xxxxxx
{AES}yWv/i0qhfM4/IvzoghzjHj/xpJUkQPF8OWuSfh0f0Ss=

The utility returns an encrypted string using the encryption service of the specified domain location.

java -Dweblogic.RootDirectory=./mydomain weblogic.security.Encrypt xxxxxx
{AES}wr86u9Z5DHr+5p7WIbzTDSy4M/sl7EYnX/K5xzcarDQ=

The utility returns an encrypted string in the current directory, without echoing the password.

java weblogic.security.Encrypt
Password:
{AES}LIX8hoiStcAhph0PGCpveouw/0UO0lciODuj+TQh/bs=

getProperty

The getProperty utility gives you details about your Java setup and your system. It takes no arguments.

Syntax

$ java utils.getProperty

Example

$ java utils.getProperty
-- listing properties --
user.language=en
java.home=c:\java11\bin\..
awt.toolkit=sun.awt.windows.WToolkit
file.encoding.pkg=sun.io
java.version=1.1_Final
file.separator=\
line.separator=
user.region=US
file.encoding=8859_1
java.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc.
user.timezone=PST
user.name=mary
os.arch=x86
os.name=Windows NT
java.vendor.url=http://www.sun.com/
user.dir=C:\weblogic
java.class.path=c:\weblogic\classes;c:\java\lib\cla...
java.class.version=45.3
os.version=4.0
path.separator=;
user.home=C:\

host2ior

The host2ior utility obtains the Interoperable Object Reference (IOR) of an Oracle WebLogic Server.

Syntax

$ java utils.host2ior hostname port

ImportPrivateKey

The ImportPrivateKey utility is used to load a private key into a private keystore file.

Syntax

$ java utils.ImportPrivateKey 
      -certfile <cert_file> -keyfile <private_key_file>
     [-keyfilepass <private_key_password>]
      -keystore <keystore> -storepass <storepass> [-storetype <storetype>]
      -alias <alias> [-keypass <keypass>]
     [-help]

Table 2-6 describes the arguments that are passed to the ImportPrivateKey utility.

Table 2-6 ImportPrivateKey Arguments

Argument Definition
cert_file 

The name of the certificate associated with the private key.

private_key_file 

The name of the generated private key file.

private_key_password 

The password for the private key.

keystore 

The name of the keystore file. A new keystore is created if one does not exist.

storepass 

The password for the keystore.

storetype 

The type (format) of the keystore.

The storetype argument, which is the same as that used by the keytool command, specifies the type of Java keystore. The default storetype is jks, defined by the keystore.type property in the java.security file:

keystore.type=jks

You can specify another storetype (for example, pcks12 or nCipher.SWorld) if a configured security provider supports that type.

alias 

The name that is used for looking up the certificate and private key being imported into the keystore.

keypass 

The password of the private key entry being imported into the keystore. If keypass is not specified, the first default is private_key_password, and the second default is storepass.


Note:

If you used CertGen to create a private key file protected by a password (-keyfilepass private_key_password), that password is the one required by ImportPrivateKey to extract the key from the key file and insert the key in the newly created keystore (which will contain both the certificate(s) from cert_file and the private key from private_key_file).

Example

Use the following steps to:

  • Generate a certificate and private key using the CertGen utility

  • Create a keystore and store a private key using the ImportPrivateKey utility

    Note:

    By default, the CertGen utility looks for the CertGenCA.der and CertGenCAKey.der files in the current directory, or in the WL_HOME/server/lib directory, as specified in the weblogic.home system property or the CLASSPATH.

    Alternatively, you can specify CA files on the command line. If you want to use the default settings, there is no need to specify CA files on the command line.

To generate a certificate:

  1. Enter the following command to generate certificate files named testcert with private key files named testkey:

    $ java utils.CertGen -keyfilepass mykeyfilepass 
    -certfile testcert -keyfile testkey
    Generating a certificate with common name return and key strength 1024
    issued by CA with certificate from CertGenCA.der file and key from CertGenCAKey.der file
    
  2. Convert the certificate from DER format to PEM format.

    $ java utils.der2pem CertGenCA.der
    
  3. Concatenate the certificate and the Certificate Authority (CA).

    $ cat testcert.pem CertGenCA.pem >> newcerts.pem
    
  4. Create a new keystore named mykeystore and load the private key located in the testkey.pem file.

    $ java utils.ImportPrivateKey -keystore mykeystore -storepass mypasswd
    -keyfile mykey -keyfilepass mykeyfilepass -certfile newcerts.pem -keyfile
    testkey.pem -alias passalias
    
    No password was specified for the key entry
    Key file password will be used
    
    Imported private key testkey.pem and certificate newcerts.pem
    into a new keystore mykeystore of type jks under alias passalias
    

jhtml2jsp

Converts JHTML files to JSP files. Be sure to inspect the results carefully. Given the unpredictability of the JHTML code, jhtml2jsp will not necessarily produce flawless translations.

The output is a new JSP file named after the original file.

The HTTP servlets auto-generated from JSP pages differ from the regular HTTP servlets generated from JHTML. JSP servlets extend weblogic.servlet.jsp.JspBase, and so do not have access to the methods available to a regular HTTP servlet.

If your JHTML pages reference these methods to access the servlet context or config objects, you must substitute these methods with the reserved words in JSP that represent these implicit objects.

If your JHTML uses variables that have the same name as the reserved words in JSP, the tool will output a warning. You must edit your Java code in the generated JSP page to change the variable name to something other than a reserved word.

Syntax

$ java weblogic.utils.jhtml2jsp [-d directory] filename.jhtml

Table 2-7 describes the argument that is passed to the jhtml2jsp tool.

Table 2-7 html2jsp Arguments

Argument Definition
-d directory 

Optional. The target directory. If the target directory isn't specified, output is written to the current directory.


jspc (deprecated)

JSP-specific compiler task. Use appc.

logToZip

The logToZip utility searches an HTTP server log file, finds the Java classes loaded into it by the server, and creates an uncompressed .zip file that contains those Java classes. It is executed from the document root directory of your HTTP server.

To use this utility, you must have access to the log files created by the HTTP server.

Syntax

$ java utils.logToZip logfile codebase zipfile 

Table 2-8 describes the arguments that are passed to the logToZip utility.

Table 2-8 logToZip Arguments

Argument Definition
logfile 

Required. Fully-qualified pathname of the log file.

codebase 

Required. Code base for the applet, or "" if there is no code base. By concatenating the code base with the full package name of the applet, you get the full pathname of the applet (relative to the HTTP document root).

zipfile 

Required. Name of the .zip file to create. The resulting .zip file is created in the directory in which you run the program. The pathname for the specified file can be relative or absolute. In the examples shown below, a relative pathname is given, so the .zip file is created in the current directory.


Examples

The following example shows how a .zip file is created for an applet that resides in the document root itself, that is, with no code base:

$ cd /HTTP/Serv/docs
$ java utils.logToZip /HTTP/Serv/logs/access "" app2.zip 

The following example shows how a .zip file is created for an applet that resides in a subdirectory of the document root:

C:\>cd \HTTP\Serv
C:\HTTP\Serv>java utils.logToZip \logs\applets\classes app3.zip

MBean Commands

Use the MBean commands (CREATE, DELETE, GET, INVOKE, and SET) to administer MBeans. See "Editing Commands" in WebLogic Scripting Tool Command Reference.

MulticastTest

The MulticastTest utility helps you debug multicast problems when configuring a WebLogic Cluster. The utility sends out multicast packets and returns information about how effectively multicast is working on your network. Specifically, MulticastTest displays the following types of information via standard output:

  1. A confirmation and sequence ID for each message sent out by the current server.

  2. The sequence and sender ID of each message received from any clustered server, including the current server.

  3. A missed-sequenced warning when a message is received out of sequence.

  4. A missed-message warning when an expected message is not received.

To use MulticastTest, start one copy of the utility on each node on which you want to test multicast traffic.

Tip:

Do NOT run the MulticastTest utility by specifying the same multicast address (the -a parameter) as that of a currently running WebLogic Cluster. The utility is intended to verify that multicast is functioning properly before starting your clustered WebLogic Servers.

For information about setting up multicast, see the configuration documentation for the operating system and hardware of the WebLogic Server host machine. For more information about configuring a cluster, see Using Clusters for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Syntax

$ java utils.MulticastTest -n name -a address [-p portnumber]
     [-t timeout] [-s send]

Table 2-9 describes the arguments that are passed to the MulticastTest utility.

Table 2-9 MulticastTest Arguments

Argument Definition
-n name 

Required. A name that identifies the sender of the sequenced messages. Use a different name for each test process you start.

-a address 

The multicast address on which: (a) the sequenced messages should be broadcast; and (b) the servers in the clusters are communicating with each other. (The default is 237.0.0.1.)

-p portnumber 

Optional. The multicast port on which all the servers in the cluster are communicating. (The multicast port is the same as the listen port set for WebLogic Server, which defaults to 7001 if unset.)

-t timeout 

Optional. Idle timeout, in seconds, if no multicast messages are received. If unset, the default is 600 seconds (10 minutes). If a timeout is exceeded, a positive confirmation of the timeout is sent to stdout.

-s send 

Optional. Interval, in seconds, between sends. If unset, the default is 2 seconds. A positive confirmation of each message sent out is sent to stdout.


Example

$ java utils.MulticastTest -N server100 -A 237.155.155.1
Set up to send and receive on Multicast on Address 237.155.155.1 on port 7001
Will send a sequenced message under the name server100 every 2 seconds.
Received message 506 from server100
Received message 533 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 507
Received message 507 from server100
Received message 534 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 508
Received message 508 from server100
Received message 535 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 509
Received message 509 from server100
Received message 536 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 510
Received message 510 from server100
Received message 537 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 511
Received message 511 from server100
Received message 538 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 512
Received message 512 from server100
Received message 539 from server200
   I (server100) sent message num 513
Received message 513 from server100

myip

The myip utility returns the IP address of the host.

Syntax

$ java utils.myip

Example

$ java utils.myip
Host toyboat.toybox.com is assigned IP address: 192.0.0.1

pem2der

The pem2der utility converts an X509 certificate from PEM format to DER format. The .der file is written in the same directory as the source .pem file.

Syntax

$ java utils.pem2der pemFile 

Table 2-10 describes the argument that is passed to the pem2der utility.

Table 2-10 pem2der Arguments

Argument Description
pemFile 

The name of the file to be converted. The filename must end with a .pem extension, and it must contain a valid certificate in .pem format.


Example

$ java utils.pem2der graceland_org.pem
Decoding
................................................................
................................................................
................................................................
................................................................
................................................................

rmic

The WebLogic RMI compiler is a command-line utility for generating and compiling remote objects. Use weblogic.rmic to generate dynamic proxies on the client-side for custom remote object interfaces in your application, and to provide hot code generation for server-side objects. See "Using the WebLogic RMI Compiler" in Programming RMI for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Schema

The Schema utility lets you upload SQL statements to a database using the WebLogic JDBC drivers. For additional information about database connections, see Programming JDBC for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Syntax

$ java utils.Schema driverURL driverClass [-u username]
     [-p password] [-verbose] SQLfile 

Table 2-11 describes the arguments that are passed to the Schema utility.

Table 2-11 Schema Arguments

Argument Definition
driverURL 

Required. URL for the JDBC driver.

driverClass 

Required. Pathname of the JDBC driver class.

-u username 

Optional. Valid username.

-p password 

Optional. Valid password for the user.

-verbose 

Optional. Prints SQL statements and database messages.

SQLfile 

Required. Text file with SQL statements.


Example

The following code shows a Schema command line for the examples.utils package:

$ java utils.Schema
"jdbc:derby://localhost:1527/demo"
"org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDriver" -u examples
-p examples examples/utils/ddl/demo.ddl
 
utils.Schema will use these parameters:
       url: jdbc:derby://localhost:1527/demo
    driver: org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDriver
      user: examples
  password: examples
  SQL file: examples/utils/ddl/demo.ddl

servicegen (deprecated)

The servicegen Ant task takes as input an EJB JAR file or a list of Java classes, and creates all the needed Web Service components and packages them into a deployable EAR file.

Web Services are now a Java EE standard, which has resulted in many changes between 8.1 and 9.0 WebLogic Web Services.

For a complete list of Web Services Ant tasks, see "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

SearchAndBuild

This Ant task executes build.xml files that are included within the FileSet. The task assumes that all of the files defined in FileSet are valid build files, and executes the Ant task of each of them.

Make certain that your FileSet filtering is correct. If you include the build.xml file that SearchAndBuildTask is being called from, you will be stuck in an infinite loop as this task will execute the top level build file—itself—forever.

Example

<project name="all_modules" default="all" basedir=".">
<taskdef name="buildAll"
classname="weblogic.ant.taskdefs.build.SearchAndBuildTask"/>
<target name="all">
<buildAll>
<fileset dir="${basedir}">
<include name="**\build.xml"/>
<exclude name="build.xml"/>
</fileset>
</buildAll>
</target>
</project>

source2wsdd (deprecated)

Generates a web-services.xml deployment descriptor file from the Java source file for a Java class-implemented WebLogic Web Service.

Web Services are now a Java EE standard, which has resulted in many changes between 8.1 and 9.0 WebLogic Web Services.

For a complete list of Web Services Ant tasks, see "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

system

The system utility displays basic information about your computer's operating environment, including the manufacturer and version of your JDK, your CLASSPATH, and details about your operating system.

Syntax

$ java utils.system

Example

$ java utils.system
* * * * * * * java.version * * * * * * *
1.5.0_03
* * * * * * * java.vendor * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * java.class.path * * * * * * *
C:\Oracle\Middleware\wlserver_10.3\server\classes;
C:\dev\src\build\JROCKI~2.0_0\lib\tools.jar;
...
* * * * * * * os.name * * * * * * *
Windows 2000
* * * * * * * os.arch * * * * * * *
x86
* * * * * * * os.version * * * * * * *
5.0 

ValidateCertChain

WebLogic Server provides the ValidateCertChain utility to check whether or not an existing certificate chain will be rejected by WebLogic Server. The utility uses certificate chains from PEM files, PKCS-12 files, PKCS-12 keystores, and JKS keystores. A complete certificate chain must be used with the utility. The following is the syntax for the ValidateCertChain utility:

java utils.ValidateCertChain -file pemcertificatefilenamejava
utils.ValidateCertChain -pem pemcertificatefilenamejava 
utils.ValidateCertChain -pkcs12store pkcs12storefilenamejava
utils.ValidateCertChain -pkcs12file pkcs12filename passwordjava
utils.ValidateCertChain -jks alias storefilename [storePass]

Example of valid certificate chain:

java utils.ValidateCertChain -pem zippychain.pemCert[0]: CN=zippy,
OU=FORTESTINGONLY,O=MyOrganization,L=MyTown,ST=MyState,C=USCert[1]:
 CN=CertGenCAB,OU=FOR TESTINGONLY,O=MyOrganization,L=MyTown,ST=MyState,C=US

Certificate chain appears valid

Example of invalid certificate chain:

java utils.ValidateCertChain -jks mykey mykeystoreCert[0]: CN=corba1,
OU=FOR TESTING ONLY, O=MyOrganization,L=MyTown,ST=MyState,C=US

CA cert not marked with critical BasicConstraint indicating it is a
CACert[1]: CN=CACERT,OU=FOR TESTING ONLY,
 O=MyOrganization,L=MyTown,ST=MyState,C=USCertificate chain is invalid

verboseToZip

When executed from the document root directory of your HTTP server, verboseToZip takes the standard output from a Java application run in verbose mode, finds the Java classes referenced, and creates an uncompressed .zip file that contains those Java classes.

Syntax

$ java utils.verboseToZip inputFile zipFileToCreate 

Table 2-12 describes the arguments that are passed to verboseToZip.

Table 2-12 verboseToZip Arguments

Argument Definition
inputFile 

Required. Temporary file that contains the output of the application running in verbose mode.

zipFileToCreate 

Required. Name of the .zip file to be created. The resulting .zip file is be created in the directory in which you run the program.


Example

$ java -verbose myapplication > & classList.tmp
$ java utils.verboseToZip classList.tmp app2.zip

wlappc

This utility compiles and validates a Java EE EAR file, an EJB JAR file, or a WAR file for deployment.

For more information, see "Building Modules and Applications Using wlappc" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wlcompile

Use the wlcompile Ant task to invoke the javac compiler to compile your application's Java files in a split development directory structure. See "Building Applications in a Split Development Directory" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wlconfig

The wlconfig Ant task enables you to configure a WebLogic Server domain by creating, querying, or modifying configuration MBeans on a running Administration Server instance. For complete documentation on this Ant task, see "Using Ant Tasks to Configure a WebLogic Server Domain" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wldeploy

The wldeploy Ant task enables you to perform Deployer functions (see Deployer) using attributes specified in an Ant task. See "Deploying and Packaging from a Split Development Directory" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wlpackage

You use the wlpackage Ant task to package your split development directory application as a traditional EAR file that can be deployed to WebLogic Server. See "Deploying and Packaging from a Split Development Directory" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wlserver

The wlserver Ant task enables you to start, reboot, shutdown, or connect to a WebLogic Server instance. The server instance may already exist in a configured WebLogic Server domain, or you can create a new single-server domain for development by using the generateconfig=true attribute. For complete documentation on this Ant task, see "Starting Servers and Creating Domains Using the wlserver Ant Task" in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wsdl2Service

The wsdl2Service Ant task is a Web Services tool that takes as input an existing WSDL file and generates the Java interface that represents the implementation of your Web Service and the web-services.xml file that describes the Web Service. See "Developing WebLogic Web Services Starting From a WSDL File: Main Steps" in Getting Started With JAX-WS Web Services for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wsdlgen (deprecated)

The wsdlgen Ant task is a Web Services tool that generates a WSDL file from the EAR and WAR files that implement your Web Service.

Web Services are now a Java EE standard, which has resulted in many changes between 8.1 and 9.0 WebLogic Web Services.

For a complete list of Web Services Ant tasks, see "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.

wspackage (deprecated)

Use the Web Services wspackage Ant task to package the various components of a WebLogic Web Service into a new deployable EAR file and add extra components to an already existing EAR file.

Web Services are now a Java EE standard, which has resulted in many changes between 8.1 and 9.0 WebLogic Web Services.

For a complete list of Web Services Ant tasks, see "Ant Task Reference" in WebLogic Web Services Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server.