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Oracle® Communications Order and Service Management Installation Guide
Release 7.2.2

E35412-06
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5 Installing and Configuring WebLogic Server

This chapter provides information about the installation and configuration of Oracle WebLogic Server that is specific to Oracle Communications Order and Service Management (OSM). For complete installation instructions and general information about installing and configuring WebLogic Server, see the Oracle WebLogic Server documentation.

Installing Oracle WebLogic Server Software and ADF

Before you can create a WebLogic domain and install OSM, you must install WebLogic Server on all machines that will participate in your domain. The installation directory must be the same on all machines.

Note:

See Table 2-1, "OSM Required Software" for WebLogic Server version and patch information.

The Oracle WebLogic Server software is included in the OSM software media pack. You download the OSM software from the Oracle software delivery Web site:

http://edelivery.oracle.com/

The Generic version of WebLogic with Coherence provided requires that the supported version of Java be installed before WebLogic is installed. If you are using a 64-bit operating system, Oracle recommends using a 64-bit JDK with the OSM WebLogic server instance to increase performance. This allows WebLogic to take advantage of the available RAM on the server to create and use more Java objects. When you are not using the version of Java included with WebLogic, you should set the following environment variables before running the WebLogic installer:

  • JAVA_HOME: Set this to the location of the supported Java version

  • PATH: Add JAVA_HOME/bin to the beginning of the PATH variable

See the Oracle WebLogic installation instructions for information on how to install Oracle WebLogic Server.

The Oracle WebLogic Server software must be installed with the Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF).

During WebLogic Server installation, when prompted for the Installation Type, select Complete.

Install any necessary patches before creating the domain. Download the patch from My Oracle Support, unzip it, and follow the instructions in the README.txt file that is included with the patch.

Configuring WebLogic Server

Once you have installed the WebLogic software, you must create a domain for the OSM application.

Note:

If you are installing WebLogic Server on Solaris and you plan to choose JMS File Store (as opposed to JMS JDBC Store) for JMS message persistence during the OSM installation, do not locate the JMS Persistent Store data file on a ZFS file system. Locating the persistent store on a ZFS file system can impact the JMS messaging subsystem's performance. By default, the JMS file store is located in the domain directory, so Oracle recommends that the domain directory be located on a UFS file system. If your business needs require that the WebLogic Server domain be located on a ZFS file system, you should modify the domain configuration to locate the file store on a UFS file system. See the WebLogic Server documentation for more information about this configuration.

When creating your domain you must select Oracle JRF. This is required for OSM as it makes use of ADF. You must also ensure that you create your domain using the version of the Java Development Kit (JDK) that is supported by OSM (see Table 2-1, "OSM Required Software" for more information). The JDK version supported by OSM may not be the same version of the JDK that comes with WebLogic. See the WebLogic Server documentation for more information about the version of Java included with the supported version of WebLogic Server (if Java is included in the installer for your platform).

WebLogic Deployment Options

You can install OSM into a domain with any one of the following basic WebLogic server configurations.

  • Single administration server: You can configure your WebLogic domain to have one administration server without any managed servers. This configuration is appropriate for most development and test environments. However, performance testing and staging environments should use the same server configuration as the production environment.

  • Administration server with a single managed server: You can configure your WebLogic domain to have a single managed server in addition to the administration server. This configuration is appropriate for non-highly-available production environments. Having the administration traffic on the administration server and the application traffic on the managed server ensures that critical administration operations (such as starting and stopping servers, changing a server's configuration, and deploying applications) do not compete with high-volume application traffic on the same network connection.

    To create a domain for this type of configuration, you create a managed server during the domain creation and target all of the deployments to the managed server. You do this by selecting the following options in the Select Optional Configuration window in the domain creation wizard:

    • Managed Servers, Clusters, and Machines

    • Deployments and Services

  • Administration server with multiple managed servers: You can configure your WebLogic domain to have an administration server with multiple managed servers. This configuration is also called a WebLogic cluster, and is appropriate for all environments that need high availability.

    Create a WebLogic cluster using the Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard. See "Installing OSM in a Clustered Environment" for detailed instructions.

WebLogic Configuration Tasks

The following tasks can be performed either before or after the installation of OSM, but Oracle recommends performing them before the OSM install.

Configuring WebLogic for 32-bit Java

The following flag should be set to increase runtime performance and ensure that Coherence does not generate errors.

To configure WebLogic properly for 32-bit Java on UNIX or Linux operating systems:

  1. Back up and edit the WLS_home/common/bin/commEnv.sh file in a text editor.

  2. Search for the following text in the file:

    JAVA_VM=-client
    
  3. Scroll down a few lines until you see the following two lines in a row:

    Sun)
      JAVA_VM=-client
    

    Note:

    Sun here refers to the Java vendor, not the operating system, so edit the line underneath Sun regardless of your operating system.
  4. Change the second line to read:

      JAVA_VM=-server
    
  5. Save and close the file.

To configure WebLogic properly for 32-bit Java on Windows operating systems:

  1. Back up and edit the WLS_home/common/bin/commEnv.cmd file in a text editor.

  2. Search for the following text in the file:

    set JAVA_VM=-client
    
  3. Change the line containing that text to read:

    set JAVA_VM=-server
    
  4. Save and close the file.

For details about additional JVM flags not discussed here, see Java HotSpot VM Options:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/vmoptions-jsp-140102.html

Configuring WebLogic for 64-bit Java on Solaris

Because 64-bit Java on Solaris also includes a 32-bit JVM, there are settings that you need to change for WebLogic to make use of 64-bit Java.

To set up WebLogic to use 64-bit Java on Solaris:

  1. Back up and edit the WLS_home/common/bin/commEnv.sh file in a text editor.

  2. Find the following line in the file:

    JAVA_USE_64-BIT=false
    
  3. Change the value of the variable:

    JAVA_USE_64-BIT=true
    
  4. Find the following line in the file:

    SUN_ARCH_DATA_MODEL="32"
    
  5. Change the value of the variable:

    SUN_ARCH_DATA_MODEL="64"
    
  6. Save and close the file.

Changing the Memory Settings for Non-Clustered WebLogic Servers

If you are working in a non-clustered UNIX or Linux WebLogic Server environment, use the following instructions to increase the memory settings. If you are working in a clustered environment, see "Configuring the WebLogic Server Domain for an OSM Cluster" for information about changing memory settings.

To increase the memory settings on UNIX or Linux:

  1. Back up and edit the domain_home/bin/setDomainEnv.sh file in a text editor.

  2. Find the section in the file that starts with the following line:

    XMS_SUN_64BIT="256"
    
  3. Change the following values to at least 2048. They are all located in the same section.

    XMS_SUN_64BIT="2048"
    XMS_SUN_32BIT="2048"
    XMX_SUN_64BIT="2048"
    XMX_SUN_32BIT="2048"
    
  4. Save and close the file.

To increase the memory settings on Windows:

  1. Back up and edit the domain_home/bin/setDomainEnv.cmd file in a text editor.

  2. Find the section in the file that starts with the following line:

    set XMS_SUN_64BIT="256"
    
  3. Change the following values to at least 2048. They are all located in the same section.

    Note:

    The target values are suitable if your system has more than 4 GB of memory and you are running Windows 7 with the 64-bit Java 6 Development Kit. Otherwise, smaller values are more appropriate.
    set XMS_SUN_64BIT="2048"
    set XMS_SUN_32BIT="2048"
    set XMX_SUN_64BIT="2048"
    set XMX_SUN_32BIT="2048"
    
  4. Save and close the file.

Configuring Garbage Collection for the JVM

Oracle recommends enabling one of the parallel or concurrent garbage collectors when using very large heaps to avoid long pauses in the execution of your Java application. These collectors attempt to minimize the overhead of collection time by either collecting garbage concurrent with the execution of your Java application or by using multiple CPUs during collections.

For more information about the parallel garbage collector see the following Web site:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/gc-tuning-6-140523.html#par_gc

For more information about the concurrent garbage collector see the following Web site:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/gc-tuning-6-140523.html#cms

Because garbage collection has an impact on performance, a JDK provides several flags to help fine-tune garbage collection algorithm for OSM. For example, the Oracle Java VM garbage collection ergonomics feature can automatically optimize garbage collection algorithm parameters based on the underlying hardware, the application, and specified goals such as the maximum pause time and throughput. The ergonomics feature helps to automate garbage collection parameter configuration. For more information, see Java SE 6 HotSpot Virtual Machine Garbage Collection Tuning.