7.5. Networking

7.5.1. Configuring a Dedicated iSCSI Network
7.5.2. Configuring Link Aggregation
7.5.3. Configuring a VLAN

The following is a list of the types of network traffic created by Oracle VDI. The list is ordered by bandwidth requirements, with highest bandwidth requirement listed first:

  1. iSCSI traffic between VirtualBox and Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization hosts and storage hosts

  2. RDP traffic between Oracle VDI hosts and virtualization hosts

  3. ALP traffic between Sun Ray Clients and Oracle VDI hosts

  4. RDP traffic between the RDP clients and Oracle VDI hosts or virtualization hosts

  5. Database replication traffic between the master and slave database hosts in an Oracle VDI Center, or between the primary Oracle VDI host and the external database, if an external database is used

  6. SSH and HTTPS traffic between Oracle VDI hosts and storage hosts, or between Oracle VDI hosts and virtualization hosts

By default the SSH traffic used for storage management and the iSCSI traffic used for virtual disks use the same network interface. For reasons such as security considerations, routing requirements, or traffic shaping, you might want to configure the iSCSI traffic to use a separate network interface. See Section 7.5.1, “Configuring a Dedicated iSCSI Network”.

It is best practice to use link aggregation (also known as trunking or link bonding) for virtualization hosts and storage hosts. This results in a balanced use of the physical network interfaces, a better network throughput, as well as in the ability to keep an aggregated interface active if a physical interface goes down. To use link aggregation, you need a switch that supports the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). See Section 7.5.2, “Configuring Link Aggregation”

VLANs provide a way to tag and isolate network traffic and can improve performance and security. See Section 7.5.3, “Configuring a VLAN” .

Link aggregation and VLANs can be used independently or together by tagging an aggregated link with a VLAN ID.

For Sun Ray Clients, see the following sections in the Sun Ray Software Administration Guide for details of how to improve network performance:

7.5.1. Configuring a Dedicated iSCSI Network

You can use a dedicated iSCSI network to separate the storage management traffic from the iSCSI traffic used for virtual disks.

The dedicated iSCSI network interface must be configured before the first virtual disk is created on the storage host.

Oracle VDI Manager Steps

  1. In Oracle VDI Manager, go to Desktop Providers.

  2. Select a desktop provider.

  3. Go to the Storage tab.

  4. Select a storage host and click Edit.

    The Edit Storage wizard is displayed.

  5. Complete the steps of the Edit Storage wizard until you reach the Select ZFS Pool step.

  6. On the Select ZFS Pool step, select a different network from the iSCSI Interface list.

  7. Click Finish.

Command Line Steps

  • Edit the network address interface to use for ISCSI.

    /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda provider-storage-setprops -s storage-host -p \
    iscsi-interface=interface-ip-address provider-name
    

    For example:

    /opt/SUNWvda/sbin/vda provider-storage-setprops -s storage1.example.com -p \
    iscsi-interface=192.168.50.1 vbox1.example.com

7.5.2. Configuring Link Aggregation

Link aggregation (also known as trunking or link bonding) is a mechanism for combining one or more network interfaces to provide better throughput and failover capabilities. To use link aggregation, you need a switch that supports the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). The following provides separate configuration examples for Oracle Solaris and Oracle Linux platforms.

Steps for Oracle Solaris Platforms

In the following steps, you aggregate devices e1000g0 and e1000g1. You can list the available devices on your system using the dladm command:

# dladm show-dev
e1000g0 link: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full
e1000g1 link: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full
e1000g2 link: down speed: 0 Mbps duplex: half
e1000g3 link: down speed: 0 Mbps duplex: half

Interfaces e1000g0 and e1000g1 are connected to ports 0 and 1 respectively on the switch.

For further information about link aggregation, refer to the documentation for your Oracle Solaris release.

  1. Identify the switch ports that each network interface in the aggregation uses.

    In this example, ports 0 and 1 are used.

  2. Configure the switch to use aggregation (LACP) on ports 0 and 1.

    Consult the switch's documentation for instructions on how to do this.

  3. Create the aggregation.

    Consult the dladm man page for more information on the parameters below. The policy (-P L3) must match the policy you configured for the switch ports. The last parameter, '1', indicates the aggregation key.

    # dladm create-aggr -P L3 -l active -T short -d e1000g0 -d e1000g1 1

    You can view the aggregated device with dladm show-link and dladm show-aggr.

    # dladm show-link
    e1000g0 type: non-vlan mtu: 1500 device: e1000g0
    e1000g1 type: non-vlan mtu: 1500 device: e1000g1
    e1000g2 type: non-vlan mtu: 1500 device: e1000g2
    e1000g3 type: non-vlan mtu: 1500 device: e1000g3
    aggr1 type: non-vlan mtu: 1500 aggregation: key 1
    #
    # dladm show-aggr
    key: 1 (0x0001) policy: L3 address: 0:14:4f:40:d2:4a (auto)
    device address speed duplex link state
    e1000g0 0:14:4f:40:d2:4a 0 Mbps half down standby
    e1000g1 80:9c:4c:0:80:fe 0 Mbps half down standby
  4. To make the device persistent, create a hostname file with the IP address assigned to the device, and reboot.

    # echo "192.168.1.101" > /etc/hostname.aggr1
    # reboot -- -r
  5. After the system is rebooted, verify that the device is plumbed and available.

    # ifconfig -a
  6. If this is an existing Oracle VM VirtualBox host, refresh the networks in Oracle VDI Manager.

    Navigate to the Oracle VM VirtualBox desktop provider's Network tab and click Refresh.

    If you have more than one network or subnet, ensure that the correct network is selected in the Settings tab for each pool.

Steps for Oracle Linux Platforms

In the following steps, you aggregate devices eth1 and eth2.

You can list the available devices on your system using the ifconfig command.

For further information about link aggregation, refer to the documentation for your Oracle Linux release.

Interfaces eth1 and eth2 are connected to ports 1 and 2 respectively on the switch.

  1. Identify the switch ports that each network interface in the aggregation uses.

    In this example, ports 1 and 2 are used.

  2. Configure the switch to use aggregation (LACP) on ports 1 and 2.

    Consult the switch's documentation for instructions on how to do this.

  3. Create the aggregation.

    Create a file ifcfg-bond0 in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts with the following content:

    DEVICE=bond0
    BOOTPROTO=none
    ONBOOT=yes 
    IPADDR=aggregation-IP
    NETMASK=aggregation-netmask
    GATEWAY=aggregation-gateway
    
  4. Configure the eth1 and eth2 interfaces to use the aggregation.

    Edit the ifcfg-eth1 configuration file so that it contains only the following lines:

    DEVICE=eth1
    BOOTPROTO=none
    ONBOOT=yes
    MASTER=bond0
    SLAVE=yes

    Edit the ifcfg-eth2 configuration file so that it contains only the following lines:

    DEVICE=eth2
    BOOTPROTO=none
    ONBOOT=yes
    MASTER=bond0
    SLAVE=yes

    In the interface configuration file, you can just comment out lines that are not needed.

  5. Set up the kernel module parameters for the aggregation.

    Add the following lines to /etc/modprobe.conf:

    alias bond0 bonding
    options bond0 miimon=100 mode=balance-rr

    This sets the balancing mode to round robin and checks the card every 100 milliseconds. For other options, refer to /usr/share/doc/iputils-20020927/README.bonding.

  6. Restart the host.

  7. Use the ifconfig command to check that the bond0 interface is listed.

  8. Check the bonding status.

    cat /proc/net/bonding/bond0
  9. If this is an existing Oracle VM VirtualBox host, refresh the networks in Oracle VDI Manager.

    Navigate to the Oracle VM VirtualBox provider's Network tab and click Refresh.

    If you have more than one network or subnet, ensure that the correct network is selected in the Settings tab for each pool.

7.5.3. Configuring a VLAN

VLANs provide a way to tag and isolate network traffic and can improve performance and security. Either a physical network interface or a link aggregation can be tagged with a VLAN ID.

Steps for Oracle Solaris Platforms

Oracle Solaris currently supports the following interface types for VLANs: ce, bge, xge, e1000g.

For further information, refer to the documentation for your Oracle Solaris release.

  1. Configure the switch ports used by the interfaces in the machine for the corresponding VLAN IDs (VIDs).

    Consult your switch documentation for instructions on how to do this.

  2. Calculate the physical point of attachment (PPA).

    Each VLAN interface has a physical point of attachment (PPA) which needs to be calculated using the following formula: driver-name + VID * 1000 + device-instance.

    To calculate the PPA for e1000g0:

    driver-name = e1000g
    VID = 123
    device-instance = 0
    
    e1000g + 123 * 1000 + 0 = e1000g123000

    To calculate the PPA for aggr1:

    driver-name = aggr
    VID = 123
    device-instance = 1
    
    aggr + 123 * 1000 + 1 = aggr123001
  3. With the PPA at hand, plumb the interface.

    # ifconfig e1000g123000 plumb 192.168.1.101 up
  4. Make the changes persistent.

    # echo "192.168.1.101" > /etc/hostname.e1000g123000
    # ifconfig -a
  5. If this is an existing Oracle VM VirtualBox host, refresh the networks in Oracle VDI Manager.

    Navigate to theOracle VM VirtualBox desktop provider's Network tab and click Refresh.

    If you have more than one network/subnet ensure that the correct network is selected in the Settings tab for each pool.

Steps for Oracle Linux Platforms

In the following example VLAN ID (VID) 3 is used with the physical interface eth0.

  1. Configure the switch ports used by the interfaces in the machine for the corresponding VIDs.

    Consult your switch documentation for instructions on doing this.

  2. Create the new VLAN interface.

    DEVICE=eth0.3
    BOOTPROTO=static
    ONBOOT=yes
    IPADDR=VLAN-IP
    NETMASK=VLAN-netmask
    VLAN=yes
    
  3. Bring up the new interface.

    # ifup eth0.3
  4. Use the ifconfig command to check that the eth0.3 interface is listed.

  5. If this is an existing Oracle VM VirtualBox host, refresh the networks in Oracle VDI Manager.

    Navigate to the Oracle VM VirtualBox desktop provider's Network tab and click Refresh.

    If you have more than one network/subnet ensure that the correct network is selected in the Settings tab for each pool.