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Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Administration Guide
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Document Information

Using This Documentation

Part I Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Software

Chapter 1 Overview of the Oracle VM Server for SPARC Software

About Oracle VM Server for SPARC and Oracle Solaris OS Versions

Hypervisor and Logical Domains

Logical Domains Manager

Roles for Domains

Command-Line Interface

Virtual Input/Output

Virtual Network

Virtual Storage

Virtual Console

Resource Configuration

Persistent Configurations

Oracle VM Server for SPARC Physical-to-Virtual Conversion Tool

Oracle VM Server for SPARC Configuration Assistant

Oracle VM Server for SPARC Management Information Base

Chapter 2 Installing and Enabling Software

Required Oracle VM Server for SPARC Software Components

Installing Oracle VM Server for SPARC Software on a New System

Updating the Oracle Solaris OS

Upgrading the System Firmware

Downloading the Logical Domains Manager

How to Download the Logical Domains Manager Software (Oracle Solaris 10)

Installing the Logical Domains Manager

Automatically Installing the Logical Domains Manager Software (Oracle Solaris 10)

Manually Installing the Logical Domains Manager Software

How to Manually Install the Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Software (Oracle Solaris 10)

Enabling the Logical Domains Manager Daemon

How to Enable the Logical Domains Manager Daemon

Upgrading a System That Is Already Using Oracle VM Server for SPARC

Upgrading the Oracle Solaris OS

Saving and Restoring Autosave Configuration Directories

How to Save and Restore Autosave Directories

Saving and Restoring the Logical Domains Constraints Database File

Preserving the Logical Domains Constraints Database File When Using the Oracle Solaris 10 Live Upgrade Feature

Upgrading the Logical Domains Manager and the System Firmware

How to Stop All Domains Running on the Platform, Except the Control Domain

Upgrading to Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Software

How to Upgrade to the Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Software (Oracle Solaris 10)

How to Upgrade to the Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 Software (Oracle Solaris 11)

Factory Default Configuration and Disabling Domains

How to Remove All Guest Domains

How to Remove All Domain Configurations

How to Restore the Factory Default Configuration

How to Disable the Logical Domains Manager

How to Remove the Logical Domains Manager

How to Restore the Factory Default Configuration From the Service Processor

Chapter 3 Oracle VM Server for SPARC Security

Delegating the Management of Logical Domains by Using Rights

Using Rights Profiles and Roles

Managing User Rights Profiles

How to Assign a Rights Profile to a User

Assigning Roles to Users

How to Create a Role and Assign the Role to a User

Logical Domains Manager Rights Profile Contents

Controlling Access to a Domain Console by Using Rights

How to Control Access to All Domain Consoles by Using Roles

How to Control Access to All Domain Consoles by Using Rights Profiles

How to Control Access to a Single Console by Using Roles

How to Control Access to a Single Console by Using Rights Profiles

Enabling and Using Auditing

How to Enable Auditing

How to Disable Auditing

How to Review Audit Records

How to Rotate Audit Logs

Using Domain Console Logging

How to Enable or Disable Console Logging

Service Domain Requirements for Domain Console Logging

Chapter 4 Setting Up Services and the Control Domain

Output Messages

Creating Default Services

How to Create Default Services

Initial Configuration of the Control Domain

How to Configure the Control Domain

Rebooting to Use Domains

How to Reboot

Enabling Networking Between the Control/Service Domain and Other Domains

How to Configure the Virtual Switch as the Primary Interface

Enabling the Virtual Network Terminal Server Daemon

How to Enable the Virtual Network Terminal Server Daemon

Chapter 5 Setting Up Guest Domains

Creating and Starting a Guest Domain

How to Create and Start a Guest Domain

Installing Oracle Solaris OS on a Guest Domain

How to Install the Oracle Solaris OS on a Guest Domain From a DVD

How to Install the Oracle Solaris OS on a Guest Domain From an Oracle Solaris ISO File

How to Use the Oracle Solaris JumpStart Feature on an Oracle Solaris 10 Guest Domain

Chapter 6 Setting Up I/O Domains

I/O Domain Overview

General Guidelines for Creating an I/O Domain

Creating a Root Domain by Assigning PCIe Buses

How to Create an I/O Domain by Assigning a PCIe Bus

Creating an I/O Domain by Assigning PCIe Endpoint Devices

Direct I/O Hardware and Software Requirements

Current Direct I/O Feature Limitations

Planning PCIe Endpoint Device Configuration

Rebooting the Root Domain

Making PCIe Hardware Changes

How to Create an I/O Domain by Assigning a PCIe Endpoint Device

Creating an I/O Domain by Assigning PCIe SR-IOV Virtual Functions

SR-IOV Overview

SR-IOV Hardware and Software Requirements

Current SR-IOV Feature Limitations

Static SR-IOV

Static SR-IOV Software Requirements

Dynamic SR-IOV

Dynamic SR-IOV Software Requirements

Dynamic SR-IOV Configuration Requirements

Enabling I/O Virtualization

How to Enable I/O Virtualization for a PCIe Bus

Planning for the Use of PCIe SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Using Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Ethernet SR-IOV Hardware Requirements

Ethernet SR-IOV Limitations

Planning for the Use of Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Ethernet Device-Specific and Network-Specific Properties

Creating Ethernet Virtual Functions

How to Create an Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Function

Destroying Ethernet Virtual Functions

How to Destroy an Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Function

Modifying Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Functions

How to Modify an Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Function

Adding and Removing Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Functions on I/O Domains

How to Add an Ethernet SR-IOV Virtual Function to an I/O Domain

How to Remove an Ethernet Virtual SR-IOV Function From an I/O Domain

Advanced SR-IOV Topics: Ethernet SR-IOV

Advanced Network Configuration for Virtual Functions

Booting an I/O Domain by Using an SR-IOV Virtual Function

SR-IOV Device-Specific Properties

Creating VNICs on SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Using an SR-IOV Virtual Function to Create an I/O Domain

How to Create an I/O Domain by Assigning an SR-IOV Virtual Function to It

Using InfiniBand SR-IOV Virtual Functions

InfiniBand SR-IOV Hardware Requirements

Creating and Destroying InfiniBand Virtual Functions

How to Create an InfiniBand Virtual Function

How to Destroy an InfiniBand Virtual Function

Adding and Removing InfiniBand Virtual Functions on I/O Domains

How to Add an InfiniBand Virtual Function to an I/O Domain

How to Remove an InfiniBand Virtual Function From an I/O Domain

Adding and Removing InfiniBand Virtual Functions to Root Domains

How to Add an InfiniBand Virtual Function to a Root Domain

How to Remove an InfiniBand Virtual Function From a Root Domain

Advanced SR-IOV Topics: InfiniBand SR-IOV

Listing InfiniBand SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Identifying InfiniBand SR-IOV Functions

Using Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Fibre Channel SR-IOV Hardware Requirements

Fibre Channel SR-IOV Requirements and Limitations

Fibre Channel Device Class-Specific Properties

World-Wide Name Allocation for Fibre Channel Virtual Functions

Creating Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Functions

How to Create a Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Function

Destroying Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Functions

How to Destroy a Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Function

Modifying Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Functions

How to Modify a Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Function

Adding and Removing Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Functions on I/O Domains

How to Add a Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Function to an I/O Domain

How to Remove a Fibre Channel SR-IOV Virtual Function From an I/O Domain

Advanced SR-IOV Topics: Fibre Channel SR-IOV

Accessing a Fibre Channel Virtual Function in a Guest Domain

SR-IOV: Rebooting the Root Domain

Using Non-primary Root Domains

Non-primary Root Domain Requirements

Non-primary Root Domain Limitations

Enabling I/O Virtualization for a PCIe Bus

Managing Direct I/O Devices on Non-primary Root Domains

Managing SR-IOV Virtual Functions on Non-primary Root Domains

Chapter 7 Using Virtual Disks

Introduction to Virtual Disks

Virtual Disk Identifier and Device Name

Managing Virtual Disks

How to Add a Virtual Disk

How to Export a Virtual Disk Back End Multiple Times

How to Change Virtual Disk Options

How to Change the Timeout Option

How to Remove a Virtual Disk

Virtual Disk Appearance

Full Disk

Single-Slice Disk

Virtual Disk Back End Options

Read-only (ro) Option

Exclusive (excl) Option

Slice (slice) Option

Virtual Disk Back End

Physical Disk or Disk LUN

How to Export a Physical Disk as a Virtual Disk

Physical Disk Slice

How to Export a Physical Disk Slice as a Virtual Disk

How to Export Slice 2

File and Volume Exporting

File or Volume Exported as a Full Disk

How to Export a File as a Full Disk

How to Export a ZFS Volume as a Full Disk

File or Volume Exported as a Single-Slice Disk

How to Export a ZFS Volume as a Single-Slice Disk

Exporting Volumes and Backward Compatibility

Summary of How Different Types of Back Ends Are Exported

Guidelines for Exporting Files and Disk Slices as Virtual Disks

Using the Loopback File (lofi) Driver

Directly or Indirectly Exporting a Disk Slice

Configuring Virtual Disk Multipathing

Virtual Disk Multipathing and Virtual Disk Timeout

How to Configure Virtual Disk Multipathing

CD, DVD and ISO Images

How to Export a CD or DVD From the Service Domain to the Guest Domain

How to Export an ISO Image From the Control Domain to Install a Guest Domain

Virtual Disk Timeout

Virtual Disk and SCSI

Virtual Disk and the format Command

Using ZFS With Virtual Disks

Configuring a ZFS Pool in a Service Domain

Storing Disk Images With ZFS

Examples of Storing Disk Images With ZFS

Creating a Snapshot of a Disk Image

Using Clone to Provision a New Domain

Cloning a Boot Disk Image

How to Create a Snapshot of a Disk Image of an Unconfigured System

Using Volume Managers in an Oracle VM Server for SPARC Environment

Using Virtual Disks With Volume Managers

Using Virtual Disks With Solaris Volume Manager

Using Virtual Disks When VxVM Is Installed

Using Volume Managers With Virtual Disks

Using ZFS With Virtual Disks

Using Solaris Volume Manager With Virtual Disks

Using VxVM With Virtual Disks

Chapter 8 Using Virtual Networks

Introduction to a Virtual Network

Oracle Solaris 10 Networking Overview

Oracle Solaris 11 Networking Overview

Maximizing Virtual Network Performance

Hardware and Software Requirements

Configuring Your Domains to Maximize the Performance of Your Virtual Network

Virtual Switch

Virtual Network Device

Inter-Vnet LDC Channels

Controlling the Amount of Physical Network Bandwidth That Is Consumed by a Virtual Network Device

Network Bandwidth Limitations

Setting the Network Bandwidth Limit

Virtual Device Identifier and Network Interface Name

How to Find Oracle Solaris OS Network Interface Name

Assigning MAC Addresses Automatically or Manually

Range of MAC Addresses Assigned to Domains

Automatic Assignment Algorithm

Duplicate MAC Address Detection

Freed MAC Addresses

Using Network Adapters With Domains

How to Determine Whether a Network Adapter Is GLDv3-Compliant (Oracle Solaris 10)

Configuring a Virtual Switch and the Service Domain for NAT and Routing

Configuring NAT on an Oracle Solaris 10 System

How to Set Up a Virtual Switch to Provide External Connectivity to Domains (Oracle Solaris 10)

Configuring NAT on an Oracle Solaris 11 System

How to Set Up a Virtual Switch to Provide External Connectivity to Domains (Oracle Solaris 11)

Configuring IPMP in an Oracle VM Server for SPARC Environment

Configuring Virtual Network Devices Into an IPMP Group in a Domain

Configuring and Using IPMP in the Service Domain

Using Link-Based IPMP in Oracle VM Server for SPARC Virtual Networking

How to Configure Physical Link Status Updates

Configuring and Using IPMP in Releases Prior to Logical Domains 1.3

Configuring IPMP in the Guest Domain

Configuring IPMP in the Service Domain

How to Configure a Host Route for Probe-Based IPMP

Using VLAN Tagging

Port VLAN ID

VLAN ID

How to Assign VLANs to a Virtual Switch and Virtual Network Device

How to Install a Guest Domain When the Install Server Is in a VLAN

Using NIU Hybrid I/O

How to Configure a Virtual Switch With an NIU Network Device

How to Enable or Disable Hybrid Mode

Using Link Aggregation With a Virtual Switch

Configuring Jumbo Frames

How to Configure Virtual Network and Virtual Switch Devices to Use Jumbo Frames

Compatibility With Older (Jumbo-Unaware) Versions of the vnet and vsw Drivers (Oracle Solaris 10)

Oracle Solaris 11 Networking-Specific Feature Differences

Chapter 9 Migrating Domains

Introduction to Domain Migration

Overview of a Migration Operation

Software Compatibility

Security for Migration Operations

Migrating a Domain

Performing a Dry Run

Performing Non-Interactive Migrations

Migrating an Active Domain

Domain Migration Requirements for CPUs

Migration Requirements for Memory

Migration Requirements for Physical I/O Devices

Migration Requirements for Virtual I/O Devices

Migration Requirements for PCIe Endpoint Devices

Migration Requirements for PCIe SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Migration Requirements for NIU Hybrid I/O

Migration Requirements for Cryptographic Units

Delayed Reconfiguration in an Active Domain

Migrating While an Active Domain Has the Power Management Elastic Policy in Effect

Operations on Other Domains

Migrating a Domain From the OpenBoot PROM or a Domain That Is Running in the Kernel Debugger

Migrating Bound or Inactive Domains

Migration Requirements for Virtual I/O Devices

Migration Requirements for PCIe Endpoint Devices

Migration Requirements for PCIe SR-IOV Virtual Functions

Monitoring a Migration in Progress

Canceling a Migration in Progress

Recovering From a Failed Migration

Migration Examples

Chapter 10 Managing Resources

Resource Reconfiguration

Dynamic Reconfiguration

Delayed Reconfiguration

Resource Allocation

CPU Allocation

How to Apply the Whole-Core Constraint

How to Apply the Max-Cores Constraint

Interactions Between the Whole-Core Constraint and Other Domain Features

CPU Dynamic Reconfiguration

Dynamic Resource Management

Configuring the System With Hard Partitions

Checking the Configuration of a Domain

Configuring a Domain With CPU Whole Cores

How to Create a New Domain With CPU Whole Cores

How to Configure an Existing Domain With CPU Whole Cores

How to Configure the Primary Domain With CPU Whole Cores

Interaction of Hard Partitioned Systems With Other Oracle VM Server for SPARC Features

CPU Dynamic Reconfiguration

CPU Dynamic Resource Management

Power Management

Domain Reboot or Rebind

Assigning Physical Resources to Domains

How to Remove the physical-bindings Constraint

How to Remove All Non-Physically Bound Resources

Managing Physical Resources on the Control Domain

Restrictions for Managing Physical Resources on Domains

Using Memory Dynamic Reconfiguration

Adding Memory

Removing Memory

Partial Memory DR Requests

Memory Reconfiguration of the Control Domain

Decrease the Control Domain's Memory

Dynamic and Delayed Reconfiguration

Memory Alignment

Memory Alignment for Active Domains

Memory Alignment for Bound Domains

Memory Alignment for Inactive Domains

Adding Unaligned Memory

Memory DR Examples

Using Power Management

Using Dynamic Resource Management

Listing Domain Resources

Machine-Readable Output

Flag Definitions

Utilization Statistic Definition

Viewing Various Lists

Listing Constraints

Chapter 11 Managing Domain Configurations

Managing Domain Configurations

Available Configuration Recovery Methods

Restoring Configurations By Using Autosave

Autorecovery Policy

How to Modify the Autorecovery Policy

Saving Domain Configurations

Restoring Domain Configurations

How to Restore a Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm add-domain)

How to Restore a Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm init-system)

Chapter 12 Handling Hardware Errors

Hardware Error-Handling Overview

Using FMA to Blacklist or Unconfigure Faulty Resources

Recovering Domains After Detecting Faulty or Missing Resources

Degraded Configuration

Enabling Recovery Mode

Marking Domains as Degraded

Marking I/O Resources as Evacuated

Chapter 13 Performing Other Administration Tasks

Entering Names in the CLI

Connecting to a Guest Console Over the Network

Using Console Groups

How to Combine Multiple Consoles Into One Group

Stopping a Heavily Loaded Domain Can Time Out

Operating the Oracle Solaris OS With Oracle VM Server for SPARC

OpenBoot Firmware Not Available After the Oracle Solaris OS Has Started

Performing a Power Cycle of a Server

Result of Oracle Solaris OS Breaks

Results From Halting or Rebooting the Control Domain

Using Oracle VM Server for SPARC With the Service Processor

Configuring Domain Dependencies

Domain Dependency Examples

Dependency Cycles

Determining Where Errors Occur by Mapping CPU and Memory Addresses

CPU Mapping

Memory Mapping

Example of CPU and Memory Mapping

Using Universally Unique Identifiers

Virtual Domain Information Command and API

Part II Optional Oracle VM Server for SPARC Software

Glossary

Index

File and Volume Exporting

A file or volume (for example from ZFS or Solaris Volume Manager) is exported either as a full disk or as single-slice disk depending on whether the slice option is set.

File or Volume Exported as a Full Disk

If you do not set the slice option, a file or volume is exported as a full disk. In that case, virtual disk drivers (vds and vdc) forward I/O from the virtual disk and manage the partitioning of the virtual disk. The file or volume eventually becomes a disk image containing data from all slices of the virtual disk and the metadata used to manage the partitioning and disk structure.

When a blank file or volume is exported as full disk, it appears in the guest domain as an unformatted disk; that is, a disk with no partition. Then you need to run the format command in the guest domain to define usable partitions and to write a valid disk label. Any I/O to the virtual disk fails while the disk is unformatted.


Note - You must run the format command in the guest domain to create partitions.

How to Export a File as a Full Disk

  1. From the service domain, create a file (fdisk0 for example) to use as the virtual disk.
    service# mkfile 100m /ldoms/domain/test/fdisk0

    The size of the file defines the size of the virtual disk. This example creates a 100-Mbyte blank file to get a 100-Mbyte virtual disk.

  2. From the control domain, export the file as a virtual disk.
    primary# ldm add-vdsdev /ldoms/domain/test/fdisk0 fdisk0@primary-vds0

    In this example, the slice option is not set, so the file is exported as a full disk.

  3. From the control domain, assign the disk to a guest domain.

    For example, assign the disk (fdisk) to guest domain ldg1.

    primary# ldm add-vdisk fdisk fdisk0@primary-vds0 ldg1
  4. After the guest domain is started and running the Oracle Solaris OS, verify that the disk is accessible and is a full disk.

    A full disk is a regular disk with eight slices.

    The following example shows how to list the disk, c0d5, and verify that it is accessible and is a full disk.

    ldg1# ls -1 /dev/dsk/c0d5s*
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s0
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s1
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s2
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s3
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s4
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s5
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s6
    /dev/dsk/c0d5s7

How to Export a ZFS Volume as a Full Disk

  1. Create a ZFS volume to use as a full disk.

    The following example shows how to create a ZFS volume, zdisk0, to use as a full disk:

    service# zfs create -V 100m ldoms/domain/test/zdisk0

    The size of the volume defines the size of the virtual disk. This example creates a 100-Mbyte volume to result in a 100-Mbyte virtual disk.

  2. From the control domain, export the corresponding device to that ZFS volume.
    primary# ldm add-vdsdev /dev/zvol/dsk/ldoms/domain/test/zdisk0 \
    zdisk0@primary-vds0

    In this example, the slice option is not set so the file is exported as a full disk.

  3. From the control domain, assign the volume to a guest domain.

    The following example shows how to assign the volume, zdisk0, to the guest domain ldg1:

    primary# ldm add-vdisk zdisk0 zdisk0@primary-vds0 ldg1
  4. After the guest domain is started and running the Oracle Solaris OS, verify that the disk is accessible and is a full disk.

    A full disk is a regular disk with eight slices.

    The following example shows how to list the disk, c0d9, and verify that it is accessible and is a full disk:

    ldg1# ls -1 /dev/dsk/c0d9s*
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s0
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s1
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s2
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s3
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s4
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s5
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s6
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s7

File or Volume Exported as a Single-Slice Disk

If the slice option is set, then the file or volume is exported as a single-slice disk. In that case, the virtual disk has only one partition (s0), which is directly mapped to the file or volume back end. The file or volume only contains data written to the virtual disk with no extra data like partitioning information or disk structure.

When a file or volume is exported as a single-slice disk, the system simulates a fake disk partitioning which makes that file or volume appear as a disk slice. Because the disk partitioning is simulated, you do not create partitioning for that disk.

How to Export a ZFS Volume as a Single-Slice Disk

  1. Create a ZFS volume to use as a single-slice disk.

    The following example shows how to create a ZFS volume, zdisk0, to use as a single-slice disk.

    service# zfs create -V 100m ldoms/domain/test/zdisk0

    The size of the volume defines the size of the virtual disk. This example creates a 100-Mbyte volume to get a 100-Mbyte virtual disk.

  2. From the control domain, export the corresponding device to that ZFS volume, and set the slice option so that the volume is exported as a single-slice disk.
    primary# ldm add-vdsdev options=slice /dev/zvol/dsk/ldoms/domain/test/zdisk0 \
    zdisk0@primary-vds0
  3. From the control domain, assign the volume to a guest domain.

    The following shows how to assign the volume, zdisk0, to guest domain ldg1.

    primary# ldm add-vdisk zdisk0 zdisk0@primary-vds0 ldg1
  4. After the guest domain is started and running the Oracle Solaris OS, you can list the disk (c0d9, for example) and see that the disk is accessible and is a single-slice disk (s0).
    ldg1# ls -1 /dev/dsk/c0d9s*
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s0
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s1
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s2
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s3
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s4
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s5
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s6
    /dev/dsk/c0d9s7

Exporting Volumes and Backward Compatibility

Summary of How Different Types of Back Ends Are Exported

Back End
No Slice Option
Slice Option Set
Disk (disk slice 2)
Full disk

Export the entire disk.

Single-slice disk

Export only slice 2

Disk slice (not slice 2)
Single-slice disk

A slice is always exported as a single-slice disk.

Single-slice disk
File
Full disk
Single-slice disk
Volume, including ZFS, Solaris Volume Manager, or VxVM
Full disk
Single-slice disk

Guidelines for Exporting Files and Disk Slices as Virtual Disks

This section includes guidelines for exporting a file and a disk slice as a virtual disk.

Using the Loopback File (lofi) Driver

Using the loopback file (lofi) driver to export a file as a virtual disk adds an extra driver layer and affects performance of the virtual disk. Instead, you can directly export a file as a full disk or as a single-slice disk. See File and Volume Exporting.

Directly or Indirectly Exporting a Disk Slice

To export a slice as a virtual disk either directly or indirectly (for example through a Solaris Volume Manager volume), ensure that the slice does not start on the first block (block 0) of the physical disk by using the prtvtoc command.

If you directly or indirectly export a disk slice which starts on the first block of a physical disk, you might overwrite the partition table of the physical disk and make all partitions of that disk inaccessible.