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Reference for Oracle GoldenGate for Windows and UNIX

MACRO

Valid For

Extract and Replicat

Description

Use the MACRO parameter to create an Oracle GoldenGate macro. See Administering Oracle GoldenGate for Windows and UNIX for more information about using macros, including how to invoke them properly.

Default

None

Syntax

The following must be used in the order shown:

MACRO #macro_name
PARAMS (#param_name [, ...])
BEGIN
macro_body
END;
MACRO

Starts the macro specification.

#

The macro character. Macro and parameter names must begin with a macro character. Anything in the parameter file that begins with the macro character is assumed to be either a macro or a macro parameter.

The default macro character is the pound (#) character, as in the following examples:

MACRO #macro1
PARAMS (#param1, #param2)

You can change the macro character with the MACROCHAR parameter.

macro_name

The name of the macro. Macro names must be one word with alphanumeric characters (underscores are allowed) and are not case-sensitive. Each macro name in a parameter file must be unique. Do not use quotes, or else the macro name will be treated as text and ignored.

PARAMS

Starts a parameter clause. A parameters clause is optional. The maximum size and number of parameters is unlimited, assuming sufficient memory is available.

param_name

Describes a parameter to the macro. Parameter names are not case-sensitive. Do not use quotes, or else the parameter name will be treated as text and ignored.

Every parameter used in a macro must be declared in the PARAMS statement, and when the macro is invoked, the invocation must include a value for each parameter.

Example 1 shows a macro that takes parameters.

You can create macros without parameters, such as a macro for frequently used commands. See Example 2.

You can use other macros as parameters. See Example 3.

BEGIN

Begins the macro body. Must be specified before the macro body.

macro_body

The body of the macro. The size of the macro body is unlimited, assuming sufficient available memory. A macro body can include any of the following types of statements:

  • Simple parameter statements, as in:

    COL1 = COL2
    
  • Complex statements, as in:

    COL1 = #val2
    
  • Invocations of other macros, as in:

    #colmap(COL1, #sourcecol)
    
END;

Concludes the macro definition. The semicolon is required to complete the definition.

Examples

Example 1   

The following example defines a macro that takes parameters.

MACRO #make_date
PARAMS (#year, #month, #day)
BEGIN
@DATE('YYYY-MM-DD', 'CC', @IF(#year < 50, 20, 19),
'YY', #year, 'MM', #month, 'DD', #day)
END;
Example 2   

The following example defines a macro that does not require parameters.

MACRO #option_defaults
BEGIN
GETINSERTS
GETUPDATES
GETDELETES
INSERTDELETES
END;
Example 3   

The following example defines a macro named #assign_date that calls another macro named #make_date.

MACRO #assign_date
PARAMS (#target_col, #year, #month, #day)
BEGIN
#target_col = #make_date (#year, #month, #day)
END;
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Reference for Oracle GoldenGate for Windows and UNIX

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