Oracle8i Installation Guide
Release 3 (8.1.7) 64 Bit for Fujitsu Siemens ReliantUNIX

Part Number A89873-01

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2
Pre-installation Tasks

After you have verified that your system meets the requirements described in Chapter 1, use this chapter to help you prepare your system for installing Oracle8i. It contains the following sections:

UNIX System Configuration

Table 2-1 and Table 2-2 summarize the UNIX kernel parameter setting requirements that you must verify before installing Oracle8i. If your system fails to meet any listed requirement, perform the tasks listed as necessary to set up your environment to meet these requirements.

Table 2-1 Shared Memory and Semaphore Parameters  
Parameter  Recommended Value  Description 

SHMMAX 

0.5 *(physical memory present in computer)

 

The maximum size (in bytes) of a single shared memory segment.

Note: This setting does not affect how much shared memory is needed or used by Oracle8i or the operating system. It is used only to indicate the maximum allowable size. This setting also does not affect operating system kernel resources. 

SHMMIN 

The minimum size (in bytes) of a single shared memory segment. 

SEMMNI 

100 

The maximum number of semaphore identifiers in the system. SEMMNI determines the number of semaphore sets that can be created at any one time. 

SHMSEG 

10 

The maximum number of shared memory segments that can be attached by a process. 

SEMMSL 

Equal to or greater than the value of the PROCESSES initialization parameter. 

The maximum number of semaphores that can be in one semaphore set. It should be equal to the maximum number of Oracle processes found in the initsid.ora file. 

SEMMNS 

200 

The maximum number of semaphores in the system. 

SEMOPM  

100 

The maximum number of operations for each semop call. 

SEMVMX 

32767 

The maximum semaphore value. 


Note: If any of the recommended kernel parameter values are less than the current system values, continue to use the current value. The parameter values listed in this table are the requirements for Oracle8i only. If you have other programs that use shared memory and semaphores, you must adjust the values accordingly. You must reboot the system before kernel changes to take affect.
 

Table 2-2 describes UNIX environment requirements.

Table 2-2 UNIX Environment Summary
Environmental Factor  Oracle8i Requirement 

Mount Points
(Storage Devices)  

The Oracle Universal Installer requires only two mount points: one for the software, and one for the database files. A database that complies with Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) requires at least four mount points, all at the same level of the directory structure. One is for the software, three are for database files. 

UNIX Groups for Oracle Roles  

A UNIX group is required for the OSDBA role. This guide assumes that the group is named dba. The OSOPER role may belong to the same group as the OSDBA or to a different group. 

Special UNIX Group for the Installer oraInventory directory 

All users installing Oracle8i products in any Oracle home directory must belong to the same UNIX group. The Installer inventory is shared by all Oracle home directories on a system, and is group writable. Set oinstall to your primary group before installing Oracle8i

UNIX Accounts  

A UNIX account that is dedicated solely to installing and upgrading the Oracle8i system. The account must be a member of the group used by OSDBA.  

Permissions for File Creation  

Use the umask command to set the file creation mask for the oracle account to 022

ORACLE_BASE 

This variable must be set to comply with OFA standards. See "ORACLE_BASE" for additional information. 

Understanding Pre-Installation Setup Tasks

The following setup tasks configure your system and set up the accounts, groups, variables, and permissions required to run Oracle8i. If you do not perform these tasks before the installation, during installation the Installer gives you the option to log on as the root user and run the orainstRoot.sh script. The orainstRoot.sh script performs many of these setup task for you. However, running orainstRoot.sh may not provide a satisfactory environment for your system and needs. Oracle Corporation recommends that you perform these steps manually.

Setup Tasks to Perform as the root User

Log in as the root user and perform the following tasks to set up your environment for Oracle8i:

Configure the UNIX Kernel for Oracle8i

Create Mount Points

Create UNIX Groups for Database Administrators

Create a UNIX Group for the Oracle Universal Installer Inventory

Create a UNIX Account to Own the Oracle Software


Note:

In addition to these setup tasks, you will need root privileges near the start of the installation if the file /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc does not exist. You will also need root privileges near the end of the installation to run the root.sh script. 


Configure the UNIX Kernel for Oracle8i

Follow the steps in this section to configure the UNIX kernel Interprocess Communication (IPC) parameters to accommodate the System Global Area (SGA) structure of Oracle8i. You cannot start up the database if the system does not have enough shared memory to accommodate the SGA. To configure the IPC parameter:

  1. Use the ipcs command to list the system's current shared memory segments, semaphore segments, and their identification number and owner.

  2. Set the kernel parameters to the values listed in Table 2-1:

    The total allowable shared memory is determined by the following formula: 
    SHMMAX * SHMSEG
    
    

    Set the SEMMNS parameter to the sum of the PROCESSES parameter for each Oracle database, adding the largest one twice, then add an additional 10 for each database. For example, consider a system that has three Oracle instances with the PROCESSES parameter in their initsid.ora files set to the following values:

    ORACLE_SID=A, PROCESSES=100
    ORACLE_SID=B, PROCESSES=100
    ORACLE_SID=C, PROCESSES=200
    
    

    Calculate the value of the SEMMNS parameter for this system as follows:

    SEMMNS = [(A=100) + (B=100)] + [(C=200) * 2] + [(# of instances=3) * 10] = 630

    Setting parameters too high for the operating system can prevent the system from booting. Refer to Fujitsu Siemens ReliantUNIX system administration documentation for parameter limits.

    The following lines are examples of additions to the /etc/system file to configure the UNIX kernel with the minimum recommended values:

    set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295
    set shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=1
    set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=700
    set shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=10
    set semsys:seminfo_semmni=700
    set semsys:seminfo_semmsl=100
    set semsys:seminfo_semmns=1000
    set semsys:seminfo_semopm=100
    set semsys:seminfo_semvmx=32767
    
    

    Use the stune utility to configure the UNIX kernel with the recommended values for the system parameters.

  3. Reboot the system if you have modified the kernel, shared memory, or semaphore parameters.

Create Mount Points

Oracle8i requires at least two mount points:

Oracle8i requires at least four mount points when creating an OFA-compliant installation:

All software and database mount point names used for Oracle8i should match the pattern /pm, where p is a string constant and m is a fixed-length key to distinguish between mount points. Table 2-3 shows a sample naming scheme.

Table 2-3 Sample Mount Point Naming Scheme 
Mount Point  Name 

Software 

/u01  

Database 

/u02, /u03, /u04 

See Also:

Optimal Flexible Architecture is described in detail in the Oracle8i Administrator's Reference Release 3 (8.1.7) 64 Bit for Fujitsu Siemens ReliantUNIX

Create UNIX Groups for Database Administrators

During installation, two Oracle roles are created:

Database administrators are granted these roles by virtue of their membership in corresponding UNIX groups. Oracle8i documentation refers to these UNIX groups as the OSDBA and OSOPER groups. Create the groups for these roles before you log in as the oracle user and start the Oracle Universal Installer. You may assign the roles to two separate UNIX groups, or to a single group.

Use a system administration utility to create a group named dba or another name of your choosing. If you plan to assign the SYSOPER role to a separate group, create that group also.

The Oracle Universal Installer gives both Oracle SYSDBA and SYSOPER privileges to members of the dba UNIX group by default. If you perform a Custom installation of Oracle8i, or if the oracle user is not a member of a group called dba, Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to enter the groups that you have created for these roles.

Create a UNIX Group for the Oracle Universal Installer Inventory

Use a system administration utility to create a group named oinstall. The oinstall group owns the Oracle Universal Installer's oraInventory directory after installation. The oracle user account that runs the installation must have the oinstall group as its primary group.

Create a UNIX Account to Own the Oracle Software

The oracle account is the UNIX user account that owns the Oracle8i software after installation. Run Oracle Universal Installer from this user account.

Use a system administration tool to create the oracle account with the following properties:

Table 2-4 Properties of the oracle Account  
Property  Description 

Login name 

Any name, but this guide refers to it as the oracle account. 

Primary GID  

The oinstall group. 

Secondary GID 

The dba group. 

Home directory 

Choose a home directory consistent with other user home directories. The home directory of the oracle account does not have to be the same as the Oracle home directory. 

Login shell 

The default shell can be /usr/bin/sh, /usr/bin/csh, or /usr/bin/ksh. The examples in this guide assume the Bourne shell (/usr/bin/sh). 


Caution:

Use the oracle account for installing and maintaining Oracle software only. Never use it for purposes unrelated to the Oracle8i server. Do not use root as the oracle account. 


On systems with multiple Oracle home directories you can perform multiple Oracle8i installations with the same oracle account, or you can use a separate oracle account for each installation. Each oracle account must have oinstall as its primary group.

Setup Tasks to Perform as the oracle User

Log in to the oracle account and perform the following tasks as required:

Set Permissions for File Creation

Set Environment Variables

Update the Environment for the Current Session

Set Permissions for File Creation

Use the umask command to set the creation mask of the oracle account to 022. This setting ensures that group and other have read and execute permissions, but not write permission, on files installed.

  1. Enter the umask command to check the current setting.

  2. If the umask command does not return 022, set the creation mask to 022 in the.profile or .login file of the oracle account and execute the following command:

    $ umask 022
    

Set Environment Variables

Before starting the Oracle Universal Installer, set all required environment variables, including the DISPLAY and PATH environment variables. Table 2-5 provides a brief summary of the variables listed in this section. Refer to each variable's entry in this section for instructions on setting the variable correctly.


Note:

If an Oracle Server already exists on your system, its settings must have a bearing on the settings that you choose for the new environment. 


Table 2-5 Environment Variable Summary  
Variable  Description  Required? 

DISPLAY 

The name, server number, and screen number of the system where the Oracle Universal Installer displays. 

Yes 

PATH 

Shell's search path for executables. 

Yes 

ORACLE_BASE 

Directory at the top of the Oracle software and administrative file structure. 

No 

ORACLE_HOME 

Directory containing Oracle software for a particular release. 

No 

NLS_LANG 

Language, territory and character set to use when installing. 

No 

ORA_NLS33 

Location of National Language Support character set data. 

No 

ORACLE_SID 

The Oracle server instance identifier to use during installation. 

No 

ORACLE_DOC 

Directory where documentation will be installed. 

No 

DISPLAY

On the system where you want to run the Oracle Universal Installer, set DISPLAY to the system name or IP address, X-server, and screen used by your workstation. Do not use the hostname or IP address of the system where the software is being installed unless you are performing the installation from that system's X-windows console. Use the system name or IP of your own workstation if you are installing from a remote system. If you are not sure what the X-server and screen should be set to, use 0 (zero) for both.

You might get an Xlib error similar to "Failed to connect to server", "Connection refused by server" or "Can't open display" when starting the Installer. If you do, run the following commands on your X workstation:

On the server where you want to install the Oracle database, enter the following:

$ DISPLAY=workstation_name:0.0
$ export DISPLAY

In the session on your workstation, enter the following:

$ xhost +server_host_name
If you are using a PC X server, see your PC X server documentation for instructions on how to configure the PC X server to allow remote X clients to connect.
PATH

Set the shell's search path to include the following directories:

ORACLE_BASE

ORACLE_BASE specifies the directory at the top of the Oracle software and administrative file structure. The value recommended for an OFA configuration is
software_mount_point/app/oracle. For example: /u01/app/oracle. If you are not using an OFA-compliant system, you do not have to set
ORACLE_BASE, but it is highly recommended that you do set it.

ORACLE_HOME

ORACLE_HOME specifies the directory containing the Oracle software for a particular release. The value recommended by the OFA is $ORACLE_BASE/product/release. For example:

/u01/app/oracle/product/8.1.7


Ensure that the value of the ORACLE_HOME environment variable specifies a directory that does not already contain any Oracle software release.

NLS_LANG

Set NLS_LANG if you want to create a database that uses a character set other than US7ASCII (the default).

Oracle supports client/server environments where clients and servers use different character sets. The character set used by a client is defined by the value of the NLS_LANG parameter for the client session. The character set used by a server is its database character set. Data conversion occurs automatically between these character sets if they are different.

See Also:

For more information on National Language Support features, see the Oracle8i Reference. A complete list of valid character sets is available in the Oracle8i National Language Support Guide

ORA_NLS33

This environment variable specifies the directory in which the Oracle *.nlb files are placed. The *.nlb files define languages, territories, character sets, and linguistic sorting orders. Setting this environment variable is necessary only if one Oracle home directory has more than one directory in which *.nlb files are installed.

When ORA_NLS33 is not set, the Oracle software looks for *.nlb files in the $ORACLE_HOME/ocommon/nls/admin/data directory.

See Also:

For more information, see the Oracle8i National Language Support Guide

ORACLE_SID

If you want to create a database during the installation, you can set ORACLE_SID to the value of the Oracle server instance identifier (referred to in this installation guide as the sid). If you choose to create a database during installation, the Installer prompts you to confirm this value.

ORACLE_DOC

ORACLE_DOC specifies the directory where online documentation is installed. See "Accessing Installed Documentation" to determine where documentation is installed if you do not set ORACLE_DOC.

SRCHOME

Should be undefined when running the Installer. If SRCHOME is set, the Installer defaults to the location it specifies as the source of software to install.

TMPDIR

You must specify a directory with at least 100 MB of free space, where the Installer has write permission.

Update the Environment for the Current Session

Using a text editor, add the settings for the environment variables listed in Table 2-5 to the .profile or .login file of the oracle account. When you have finished editing these initialization files, update the environment in the current shell session before beginning installation by entering one of the following commands:

For the Bourne or Korn shell:

$ . ./.profile

For the C shell:

% source .login

Setup Tasks for Oracle Products

Before beginning the installation, review the following sections for products that you intend to install:

Pre-Installation Steps for Oracle Options

The following sections describe pre-installation steps for Oracle Options.

Steps to Perform as the root User

Perform the following steps logged in as the root user.

  1. Make sure you have a UNIX group defined in the /etc/group file on all nodes of the cluster that will serve as the OSDBA group. The OSDBA group name and number (and OSOPER group if you plan to designate one during installation) must be identical for all nodes of a UNIX cluster accessing a single database. The default UNIX group name for the OSDBA and OSOPER groups is dba. A separate group should be created to own the Oracle Universal Installer oraInventory file. This group is referred to as the oinstall group in Oracle documentation. You can give this group any name that you want.

  2. Create a UNIX account on each node of the cluster so that:

    • The account has the oinstall group as the primary group.

    • The account has the dba group as the secondary group.

    • The account is used only to install and update Oracle software.

    • The account has write permissions on remote directories.

  3. Create a mount point directory on each node to serve as the top of your Oracle software directory structure so that:

  4. On the node from which you will run Oracle Universal Installer, set up user equivalence by adding entries for all nodes in the cluster, including the local node, to either the .rhosts file of the oracle account or the /etc/hosts.equiv file.

  5. Exit the root account.

Steps to Perform as the oracle User

Verify user equivalence for the oracle account by performing a remote login (rlogin) to each node in the cluster. If you are prompted for a password, the oracle account has not been given the same attributes on all nodes. The Installer cannot use the rcp command to copy Oracle products to the remote directories without user equivalence.

If you have not set up user equivalence, you must perform Step 4 in the previous section.

Tools and Precompilers

Complete the tasks for the following tools and precompilers before installing them.

Pre-Installation Steps for the Pro*C/C++ Precompiler

Verify that the C compiler executable is included in the PATH setting. Verify that the C compiler is in the PATH setting with the following command:

which cc

Pre-Installation Steps for Pro*FORTRAN Precompiler

Verify that the FORTRAN compiler executable is included in the PATH setting with the following command:

which f77

Networking and System Management Products

The following section describes Oracle8i networking and system management products.

Net8 Server

If Net8 Server is already installed on your system, shut down all listeners before installing Net8. To determine if any listeners are running, enter:

$ lsnrctl status [listener_name]

The listener_name field is required if the listener has a name other than the default, listener.

Shut down a running listener with the following command:

$ lsnrctl stop listener_name

See "Understanding Net8 Configuration" to determine how to install and configure Net8 on your system.

Oracle Supported Protocols

Before installing any protocol, verify that the underlying network is functioning and configured properly.

TCP/IP

The TCP/IP protocol is installed automatically with all Oracle8i Server installations.

Verify that the network is functioning properly by transferring a test file using the ftp utility.

$ ftp remote_server_name
ftp> put test_filename
ftp> get test_filename 

Understanding Net8 Configuration

The Installer asks you to make various choices about Net8 configuration during the installation process. The following sections describe the choices you are asked to make, and how they affect the configuration of Oracle8i. Review these product configuration guidelines to ensure that you make choices that best match your system and your requirements.

Net8 Configuration Assistant is a graphical user interface (GUI) tool that enables you to configure your Oracle client/server network environment. Net8 Configuration Assistant is automatically started from within Oracle Universal Installer for all installation types. You can also manually start it as a stand alone tool.

Depending on the installation type you select, Net8 Configuration Assistant configures the network in one of two ways:

The configuration process creates and modifies network files located in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory.

Server Network Configuration

The following tables describe the network configuration types created by a Typical, Minimal, or Custom installation. Review the following tables and identify the network configuration that best matches your requirements and network configuration expertise.

If you Select...  Then... 

Oracle8i Enterprise Edition or Oracle8i for:

  • Typical

  • Minimal

 

Net8 Configuration Assistant creates a network service name for use when connecting to a database. Net8 Configuration Assistant then automatically creates your Net8 server environment by configuring the following files:

  • listener.ora

    Configures and starts a listener named listener with protocol addresses for both the Oracle8i database using your operating system's preferred protocol (typically TCP/IP on port 1521) and for external procedures using the IPC protocol. It also configures services information for external procedures.

  • sqlnet.ora

    Configures the Net8 Naming domain (set to be the same as the network domain in which your computer is located). This domain is automatically appended to any unqualified network service name given in the connect string. An unqualified network service name does not contain a Net8 Naming domain.

    If you do not define a domain for the system in the Global Database Name field during installation, the system domain setting defaults to the null domain. In that case, Net8 does not define a new domain setting for the NAMES.DIRECTORY_PATH parameter in sqlnet.ora.

  • tnsnames.ora

    Creates a network service name (EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA) in the tnsnames.ora file to use for external procedures.

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant configures additional Net8 Server information in the following files after it successfully creates the Oracle8i database: 

 
  • listener.ora

    Configures static service information for the Oracle8i database in the listener.ora file.

  • At the end of client configuration, Net8 Configuration Assistant prompts you for an Oracle database network service name that is normally the same as your global database name. The tnsnames.ora file is used by clients and distributed database servers to identify potential server destinations. It stores the service names of database addresses.

 

Oracle8i Enterprise Edition or Oracle8i Custom installation (and then select Net8 Server and Net8 Client)

 

Net8 Configuration Assistant first prompts you to:

  • Configure the directory service access. Enter a directory server type and location, and verify that the administrative context from which the server can look up, create, and modify network service names. You are prompted for this information if you have never configured this ORACLE_HOME for directory service access.

  • Create listeners and select network protocols to use for database connections.

 

 

  • Select the naming methods to use when connecting to the database. By default, the Installer configures the Local naming method and localized management network model. Under a localized management network configuration model, network addresses are mapped in the tnsnames.ora file on each node. Other naming methods within this model are Host naming, and External naming (using third-party naming services). Under a centralized management network configuration model, the Oracle Names naming method is available. In this configuration, an Oracle Names Server stores client configuration profiles in one location. See the Net8 Administrator's Guide for more information on naming methods, and on other issues connected with the installation and configuration of naming services.

Depending on the naming method you use, Net8 Configuration Assistant automatically creates the Net8 server environment by configuring the following files:

 

 

  • listener.ora

    Configures a listener with the name and protocol address that you choose. It also configures a protocol address and static service information for external procedures.

  • sqlnet.ora

    Configures the server's domain as the default domain (the domain in which your computer is located). This domain is automatically appended to any unqualified name. It also configures the naming methods the server uses to resolve a name to a connect descriptor.

  • tnsnames.ora

    Creates a network service name entry to use for external procedure connections.

  • ldap.ora

    Configures directory service access by identifying the directory server type. It might also identify the location and the administrative context.

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant automatically configures additional Net8 server information in the listener.ora file during the creation of the Oracle8i database.

 

Client Network Configuration

The type of network configurations created with the client installation types and the amount of user input required are described in the following table. Review the following selections before starting Oracle Universal Installer. Identify the network configuration that best matches your network requirements and configuration expertise.

If You Select These Installation Types...  Then... 

Any Oracle8i client installation type. 

Net8 Configuration Assistant first prompts you to select one of the following naming methods to provide access to your Oracle8i database:

  • Local Naming

    Specify a network service name to resolve network addresses. This name is configured and stored in configuration files on each individual client.

  • Directory Naming

    Specify an Oracle Names Server or third-party naming service to resolve service names and network addresses. This enables client connections to Oracle8i databases using information registered with the naming service when the databases were created.

Depending on what you select, you are prompted to provide additional information.

Net8 Configuration Assistant then automatically creates your Net8 client environment by configuring the following files:

  • tnsnames.ora

    Specifies a network service name (if Local naming was selected).

 

 

  • ldap.ora

    Configures naming service access by identifying the directory server type (if Directory naming was selected). It may also identify the location and the administrative context of the naming service.

 

 

  • sqlnet.ora

    Configures the naming methods a client uses to resolve a name to a connect descriptor. It also configures the client's domain as the default domain (the domain in which your computer is located). This domain is automatically appended to any unqualified network service name given in the connect string. An unqualified network service name does not contain a network domain.

    If you have not defined a domain for the client in the Global Database Name field during installation, the system domain setting defaults to the null domain. In that case, Net8 does not define a new domain setting for the NAMES.DIRECTORY_PATH parameter in sqlnet.ora.

For more information on installation, configuring service names, and client configuration, see the Net8 Administrator's Guide. 

Identifying Your Database Environment

Oracle Universal Installer enables you to configure your Oracle8i database to operate in one of the following environments. To identify which type of database environment is appropriate for your needs, see Table 2-6:

Table 2-6 Oracle8i Database Environment Descriptions
Environment  Description 

Online Transaction Processing (OLTP)  

Many users perform large numbers of concurrent transactions, where each transaction is a relatively simple operation processing a small amount of data. Billing databases, such as those commonly found on Internet commerce sites, are the most common example of this database type.

Transactions consist of reading (SELECT statements), writing (INSERT and UPDATE statements), and deleting (DELETE statements) data in database tables.  

Warehousing, or Decision Support System (DSS) 

Users perform numerous complex queries that access and process large volumes of data.

These queries (typically read-only) range from a simple query of a few records to numerous complex queries that sort thousands of records from many different tables. Historical databases are the most common example of this database type. Warehousing environments are also known as Decision Support System (DSS) environments. 

Multipurpose 

Both types of database use are given support with this database environment configuration. Select this environment if average database use will be varied. 

Your database environment selection affects the values for the following database settings:

Selecting a Database Creation Method

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant is a GUI tool that enables you to create an Oracle8i database for an OLTP, Warehousing, or Multipurpose environment. Oracle Database Configuration Assistant automatically starts from within Oracle Universal Installer when you choose to create an Oracle8i database during installation. You can also run it as a stand alone tool.


Note:

This chapter describes running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant from within Oracle Universal Installer. See "Oracle Assistants" for information on running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant as a stand alone tool. 


Each installation type of Oracle8i Enterprise Edition enables you to create an Oracle8i database. The types of databases (OLTP, Warehousing, and Multipurpose) created with the Typical, Minimal, and Custom installation types and the amount of user input required are described in the following table. Review these selections and identify the database that best matches your database requirements and your database creation expertise.

If You Perform These Steps...  Then... 
  1. Select the Typical installation type.

 

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant automatically starts at the end of Oracle8i installation and creates a pre-configured, ready-to-use multipurpose starter database with:

  • Default initialization parameters.

  • Automatic installation and configuration of Oracle options and interMediaFoot 1.

  • Advanced replication capabilities.

  • Database configuration of dedicated server modeFoot 2.

  • Archiving mode of NOARCHIVELOG.

You only need to provide the global database name and SID when prompted. You can reset database character sets with the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant. For more information on database character sets, see Oracle8i National Language Support Guide. 

1 Oracle Database Configuration Assistant configures options that were installed through Oracle Universal Installer.
2 See Chapter 5 of Oracle8i Administrator's Guide for a description of dedicated server mode and multi-threaded server mode (also known as shared server mode).

If You Perform These Steps...  Then... 
  1. Select the Minimal installation type.

  2. Select "Yes" when prompted to create a starter database.

    Note: If you select "No", all server products are installed, including the database software, but no database is created during installation. Oracle Corporation recommends that you allow the Installer to create a starter database to verify installation, and also to use as a model for understanding Oracle naming conventions, roles, and default users and their privileges. If you choose not to install the starter database, you can create your database later by manually running Oracle Database Configuration Assistant or by using a SQL script. See the Oracle8i System Administrator's Guide for instructions.

 

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant automatically starts at the end of Oracle8i installation and creates the same Oracle8i database that a Typical installation creates, but without installing Oracle options or interMedia. 

If You Perform These Steps...  Then... 
  1. Select the Custom installation type.

  2. Select Oracle Server and additional products in the Available Products window.

  3. Select "Yes" when prompted to create a starter database.

 

Oracle Database Configuration Assistant guides you through the creation of a database fully customized to match your selected environment (OLTP, warehousing, or multipurpose) and database configuration mode (dedicated server or Multi-threaded Server). You can automatically or manually configure options and interMedia components (if installed) and advanced replication (if selected).

Select this option only if you are experienced with advanced database creation procedures, such as customizing:

  • Data, control, and redo log file settings

  • Tablespace and extent sizes

  • Database memory parameters

  • Archiving modes, formats, and destinations

  • Trace file destinations

  • Character set values

 

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