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Oracle9i Database Installation Guide
Release 2 (9.2.0.1.0) for Windows
A95493-02
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5 Reviewing Your Installed Starter Database Contents

This chapter describes the contents of the default starter database created through Database Configuration Assistant for the Enterprise Edition, Standard Edition, Personal Edition, or Oracle Internet Directory. Where possible, references to information applicable to the custom database creation method are provided.

This chapter contains these topics:

Usernames and Passwords Overview

Oracle9i installs with a number of default database accounts. Database Configuration Assistant locks and expires all default database accounts upon successful installation with the following exceptions:

You must unlock all other accounts before using them. Oracle Corporation recommends changing all user passwords immediately after installation.

At a minimum, Database Configuration Assistant creates the SYS, SYSTEM, and DBSNMP accounts in all databases. At the end of the database creation process, you are required to change the SYS and SYSTEM passwords. Additional accounts are created depending on the components installed. Unlock accounts and change passwords before using these accounts.

Table 5-2 describes the accounts and passwords.


See Also:

  • "Modifying Oracle Performance Monitor for Windows NT Parameters", of Oracle9i Database Getting Started for Windows, for instructions on how to change the password for Oracle Performance Monitor for WindowsNT

  • Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide for information on Oracle security procedures and security best practices

  • Oracle Enterprise Manager Administrator's Guide for information on security management


Unlocking and Changing Passwords

At the end of installation, several configuration assistants automatically start to create and configure your database and Oracle Net Services environments. One such assistant is the Database Configuration Assistant. When Database Configuration Assistant finishes your database configuration, it displays a screen with your database information and the Password Management button. You are required to change the SYS and SYSTEM passwords on this screen. Use the Password Management button to unlock only the usernames you will use. Oracle Corporation strongly recommends changing the default password immediately after unlocking the username.

To change a password during the database installation and configuration process:

  1. From the Database Configuration Assistant window, choose the Password Management button.

  2. Select the username and clear the check mark.

  3. Enter a new password and confirm the new password for each username.


    Note:

    If a password is unlocked and a new password is not specified, then the password is expired until the next time the account is accessed.

Alternatively, use SQL*Plus to unlock accounts and change passwords any time after the installation process.

To change a password after installation:

  1. Start SQL*Plus:

    C:\> sqlplus /NOLOG
    
  2. Connect as SYSDBA:

    SQL> CONNECT / AS SYSDBA
    
  3. Change the password according to the SQL commands indicated in Table 5-1:

Table 5-1 SQL Commands for Administering Accounts and Passwords

Action SQL Statement

Unlock a password

ALTER USER username ACCOUNT UNLOCK;

Lock a password

ALTER USER username ACCOUNT LOCK;

Change the password of an unlocked account

ALTER USER username IDENTIFIED BY password;

Change the password of a locked account

ALTER USER username IDENTIFIED BY password ACCOUNT UNLOCK;


Granting Limited SYS Database Role Privileges

Any database user can be granted limited SYS database role privileges to use the Oracle Enterprise Manager Diagnostic Pack. Grant users access to these necessary SYS privileges by granting the OEM_MONITOR role. This role is created when the database is installed and is defined in the following SQL script:

\ORACLE_BASE\ORACLE_HOME\rdbms\admin\catsnmp.sql

See Also:

Oracle9i SQL Reference for information on the GRANT statement

Reviewing Usernames and Passwords

Table 5-2 describes the administrative usernames and passwords.

Table 5-2 Administrative Usernames and Passwords

Username Password Description See Also

SYSTEM

User assignedFoot 1 

or

MANAGER

Used for performing database administration tasks. SYSTEM includes the AQ_ADMINISTRATOR_ROLE, DBA, and SALES_HISTORY_ROLE database roles.

Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide


SYS

User assignedFootref 1Foot 2 

or

CHANGE_ON_INSTALLFootref 2

Used for performing database administration tasks.Foot 3 

Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide


ANONYMOUS

ANONYMOUS

Allows HTTP access to Oracle XML DB.

Not applicable

CTXSYS

CTXSYS

The Oracle Text username with CONNECT, DBA, and RESOURCE database roles.

Oracle Text Reference


DBSNMP

DBSNMP

Includes the CONNECT and SELECT ANY DICTIONARY database roles. Run catnsnmp.sql if you want to drop this role and user.

Oracle Intelligent Agent User's Guide


LBACSYS

LBACSYS

The Oracle Label Security administrator username.

Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide


MDSYS

MDSYS

The Oracle Spatial and Oracle Locator administrator username.

Oracle Spatial User's Guide and Reference

ODM

ODM

ODM performs data mining operations. Includes the AQ_USER_ROLE, AQ_ADMINISTRATOR_ROLE, and SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE roles.

  • Oracle9i Data Mining Administrator's Guide

  • Oracle9i Data Mining Concepts

ODM_MTR

MTRPW

ODM_MTR is the account associated with the data repository for data mining sample programs. Includes the SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE role.

  • Oracle9i Data Mining Administrator's Guide

  • Oracle9i Data Mining Concepts

OLAPSYS

MANAGER

OLAPSYS is the identity used to create OLAP metadata structures.

OLAPSYS includes OLAP_DBA, CONNECT, and RESOURCE database roles.

Oracle9i OLAP User's Guide

ORDPLUGINS

ORDPLUGINS

The Oracle interMedia Audio and Video username with CONNECT and RESOURCE database roles. Allows non-native plug-in formats for one session.

Oracle interMedia User's Guide and Reference


ORDSYS

ORDSYS

The Oracle interMedia Audio, Video, Locator, and Image administrator username with CONNECT, JAVAUSERPRIV, and RESOURCE database roles.

Oracle interMedia User's Guide and Reference


OUTLN

OUTLN

Centrally manages metadata associated with stored outlines. Supports plan stability, which enables maintenance of the same execution plans for the same SQL statements. Includes CONNECT and RESOURCE database roles.

  • Oracle9i Database Concepts

  • Oracle9i Database Performance Tuning Guide and Reference

SCOTT

TIGER

Includes CONNECT and RESOURCE database roles.

Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide for Windows


WKSYS

WKSYS

Used for storing Ultra Search system dictionaries and PL/SQL packages. WKSYS includes CONNECT, CTXAPP, DBA, JAVASYSPRIV, JAVAUSERPRIV, and RESOURCE database roles.

Oracle Ultra Search Online Documentation

WMSYS

WMSYS

The WMSYS schema is used to store all the metadata information for Oracle Workspace Manager. WMSYS includes CONNECT, RESOURCE, and WM_ADMIN_ROLE database roles.

Oracle9i Application Developer's Guide - Workspace Manager


XDB

CHANGE_ON_INSTALL

Used for storing Oracle XML DB data and metadata. Includes CONNECT and RESOURCE database roles.

Not applicable


Footnote 1 If you use Database Configuration Assistant to create a database, then you are required to change the SYS and SYSTEM passwords at the end of the configuration process.

Footnote 2 SQL statement must include the privilege AS SYSDBA or AS SYSOPER.

Footnote 3 SYS includes the following database roles: AQ_ADMINISTRATOR_ROLE, AQ_USER_ROLE, CONNECT, CTXAPP, DBA, DELETE_CATALOG_ROLE, EXECUTE_CATALOG_ROLE, EXP_FULL_DATABASE, GATHER_SYSTEM_STATISTICS, HS_ADMIN_ROLE, IMP_FULL_DATABASE, JAVA_ADMIN, JAVADEBUGPRIV, JAVA_DEPLOY, JAVAIDPRIV, JAVAUSERPRIV, JAVASYSPRIV, LOGSTDBY_ADMINISTRATOR, OEM_MONITOR, OLAP_DBA, RECOVERY_CATALOG_OWNER, RESOURCE, SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE, and WKUSER


See Also:

  • "Privileges, Roles, and Security Policies" of Oracle9i Database Concepts

  • "The Oracle Database Administrator" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide

  • "Administering External Users and Roles" of Oracle9i Security and Network Integration Guide


Database Identification Overview

The Oracle9i database is identified by its global database name, which consists of the database name and network domain in which the database is located. The global database name uniquely distinguishes a database from any other database. You create a global database name when prompted in the Oracle Universal Installer Database Identification window during Oracle9i database installation. The global database name takes the form:

database_name.database_domain

For example:

sales.us.acme.com

Where... Is...
sales The name you give your database. The database name portion is a string of no more than eight characters that can contain alpha, numeric, and additional characters. The database name is assigned to the DB_NAME parameter in the init.ora file.
us.acme.com The network domain in which the database is located, making the global database name unique. The domain portion is a string of no more than 128 characters that can contain alpha, numeric, period (.), and additional characters. The domain name is assigned to the DB_DOMAIN parameter in the init.ora file.

The DB_NAME parameter (value sales) and DB_DOMAIN name parameter (value us.acme.com) combine to create the global database name value assigned to the SERVICE_NAMES parameter (value sales.us.acme.com).

The system identifier (SID) identifies a specific Oracle9i instance that references the database. The SID uniquely distinguishes a database instance from any other database instance on the same computer. Multiple Oracle homes enable you to have multiple, active Oracle databases on a single computer. Each database requires a unique global database name, and each database instance on the same computer requires a unique SID.

The SID name is taken from the value you entered for the database name in the Database Identification window, although you had the opportunity to change it. The SID can be up to 64 alphanumeric characters in length.

For example, if the SID and database name for an Oracle database are ORCL, each database file is located in the ORACLE_BASE\oradata\orcl directory and the initialization parameter file is located in the ORACLE_BASE\admin\orcl\pfile directory. The directory orcl is named after the DB_NAME parameter value.

Oracle9i Services on Windows Overview

Two main Oracle services are automatically started after installation:

If you installed Oracle Enterprise Manager components, additional services automatically start:

However, other services for networking or other individual components may not automatically start.


See Also:


Tablespaces and Datafiles Overview

An Oracle9i database is divided into smaller logical areas of space known as tablespaces. Each tablespace corresponds to one or more physical datafiles. Datafiles contain the contents of logical database structures such as tables and indexes. A datafile can be associated with only one tablespace and database.

Table 5-3 list the tablespaces and datafiles in the Oracle9i database. Datafiles are located in the ORACLE_BASE\oradata\DB_NAME directory.


Note:

Unless you specified different names with Database Configuration Assistant, the tablespaces and datafiles described in the following table are also automatically included in the Custom database.

Table 5-3 Tablespaces and Datafiles

Tablespace Datafile Contains...

CWMLITE

CWMLITE01.DBF

OLAP tablespace

DRSYS

Drsys01.dbf

Oracle Text-related Schema objects.

EXAMPLE

EXAMPLE01.DBF

Sample Schema

INDX

indx01.dbf

Indexes associated with the data in the USERS tablespace.

ODM

ODM01.DBF

ODM and ODM_MTR schema objects.

TEMP

Temp01.dbf

Temporary tables and indexes created during the processing of your SQL statement. You may need to expand this tablespace if you are executing a SQL statement that involves a lot of sorting, such as the constructs GROUP BY, ORDER BY, or DISTINCT.

TOOLS

Tools01.dbf

Nothing. This datafile is created for use if the user wants to install any third-party or Oracle tools/components.

SYSTEM

System01.dbf

The data dictionary, including definitions of tables, views, and stored procedures needed by the Oracle9i database. Information in this area is maintained automatically. The SYSTEM tablespace is present in all Oracle databases.

UNDOTBS

UNDOTBS01.DBF

A dedicated tablespaces that stores only undo information when the database is run in automatic undo management mode. An undo tablespace contains one or more undo segments. Undo segments maintain transaction history that is used to roll back, or undo, changes to the database.

All starter databases are configured to run in automatic undo management mode.

USERS

Users01.dbf

Your application data. As you create and enter data into tables, you fill this space with your data.

XDB

xdb01.dbf

Used for storing Oracle XML DB data and metadata.



Note:

If you choose to create a new repository and accept the default settings when running Oracle Enterprise Manager Configuration Assistant, a tablespace named OEM_REPOSITORY and a datafile named oem_repository.ora are also created.


See Also:

  • "Tablespaces, Datafiles, and Control Files" of Oracle9i Database Concepts

  • "Managing Tablespaces" and "Managing Datafiles" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide

  • "Managing Undo Space" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide


Initialization Parameter File Overview

The starter database contains one database initialization parameter file located in the ORACLE_BASE\admin\DB_NAME\pfile directory.

The initialization parameter file, init.ora, must exist for an instance to start. A parameter file is a text file that contains a list of instance configuration parameters. The starter database init.ora file has preconfigured parameters. No edits are required to this file in order to use the starter database.


See Also:

  • "Oracle9i Database Specifications for Windows NT" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide for Windows for a list of Oracle9i database-specific initialization parameters for Windows and their default values

  • Oracle9i Database Reference for more information on initialization parameters


Redo Log Files Overview

The starter database contains three redo log files located in the ORACLE_BASE\oradata\DB_NAME directory.

A redo log can be either an online redo log or an archived redo log. The online redo log is a set of two or more redo log groups that records all changes made to Oracle datafiles and control files. An archived redo log is a copy of an online redo log that has been copied to an offline destination. If the database is in ARCHIVELOG mode and automatic archiving is enabled, then the archive process or processes copy each online redo log to one or more archive log destinations after it is filled.


Note:

The redo logs redo01.log, redo02.log, and redo03.log are also automatically included in the Custom database.


See Also:

  • Oracle9i User-Managed Backup and Recovery Guide

  • "Managing the Online Redo Log" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide


Control Files Overview

The starter database contains three control files located in the ORACLE_BASE\ oradata\DB_NAME directory.

A control file is an administrative file required to start and run the database. The control file records the physical structure of the database. For example, a control file contains the database name, and the names and locations of the database datafiles and redo log files.


Note:

  • The files control01.ctl, control02.ctl, and control03.ctl are also automatically included in the Custom database.

  • Oracle Corporation recommends that you keep at least three control files (on separate physical drives) for each database and set the CONTROL_FILES initialization parameter to list each control file.



See Also:

"Managing Control Files" of Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide for information on setting this initialization parameter value

Rollback Segments Overview

Oracle9i databases are capable of managing their own undo (rollback) segments. Administrators no longer need to carefully plan and tune the number and sizes of rollback segments or decide how to strategically assign transactions to a particular rollback segment. Oracle9i also allows administrators to allocate their undo space in a single undo tablespace with the database taking care of issues such as undo block contention, consistent read retention, and space utilization.


See Also:

  • Oracle9i Database Administrator's Guide

  • Oracle9i User-Managed Backup and Recovery Guide


Data Dictionary Overview

The data dictionary is a protected collection of tables and views containing reference information about the database, its structures, and its users. The data stored in the dictionary includes the following: