Skip Headers

Oracle9i Application Server Installation Guide
Release 1 (v1.0.2.2.2) for AIX-Based Systems, Compaq Tru64 UNIX, HP 9000 Series HP-UX, and Linux Intel

Part Number A95909-01
Go To Table Of Contents
Contents
Go To Index
Index

Go to previous page Go to next page

2
Concepts and Preinstallation

This chapter guides you through the basic concepts and preinstallation steps for Oracle9i Application Server. The following topics provide information about Oracle9i Application Server, environment variables settings, configuration options, and starting Oracle Universal Installer:

About Oracle9i Application Server

Oracle9i Application Server is a scalable, secure, middle-tier application server. It enables you to deliver Web content, host Web applications, connect to back-office applications, and access your data on wireless devices. Oracle9i Application Server has four installation options:

Oracle9i Application Server Components

Table 2-1 lists the four installation options for Oracle9i Application Server, and the components that are installed with each option. This is followed by a brief description of each component.

See Also:

Oracle9i Application Server Overview Guide in the Oracle9i Application Server Documentation Library for detailed information about each component. 

Table 2-1 Oracle9i Application Server Components 
Component  Core Edition  Minimal Edition  Standard Edition  Enterprise Edition 

Oracle9iAS Containers for J2EE 

 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Database Cache 

 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Discoverer 

 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Forms Services 

 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Portal 

 

Oracle9iAS Reports Services 

 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Web Cache 

 

 

Oracle9iAS Wireless 

 

Oracle Advanced Security 

 

 

Oracle Business Components for Java (BC4J) 

Oracle Database Client Developer Kit 

 

Oracle Enterprise Java Engine 

 

 

Oracle HTTP Server 

x  

Oracle Internet File System 

 

 

Oracle LDAP Client Kit 

 

Oracle Management Server 

 

 

 

Oracle XML Developer's Kit 

 

Oracle9iAS Containers for J2EE

Oracle9iAS Containers for J2EE (OC4J) run as a JVM that accepts HTTP and RMI connections, which access servlets, JSP Pages, and EJBs. It reads configuration information from a set of XML files that are located under its installation directory. Java applications are deployed using J2EE-compatible EAR, WAR, or EJB JAR files.

Oracle9iAS Database Cache

Oracle9iAS Database Cache improves the performance and scalability of applications that access Oracle databases by storing frequently used data on middle tier machines. With Oracle9iAS Database Cache, your applications can process several times as many requests as their original capacity.

Oracle9iAS Discoverer

Oracle9iAS Discoverer is a business intelligence tool for analyzing data. With Oracle9iAS Discoverer's award-winning user interface, users can access and analyze database data. There are two Oracle9iAS Discoverer components:

Oracle9iAS Forms Services

Oracle9iAS Forms Services deploys Forms applications with database access to Java clients in a Web environment. Oracle9iAS Forms Services automatically optimizes class downloads, network traffic, and interactions with Oracle database. Applications are automatically load-balanced across multiple servers and, therefore, can easily scale to service any number of requests.

Oracle9iAS Portal

Oracle9iAS Portal is a complete solution for building, deploying and monitoring Web database applications and content-driven Web sites. Oracle9iAS Portal enables you to create and view database objects through an easy-to-use HTML-based interface, and provides tools for creating HTML-based interfaces. It also allows you to resolve performance problems using performance tracking facilities, and enables you to manage database security through its interface.

Oracle9iAS Reports Services

Oracle9iAS Reports Services provides an easy-to-use, scalable, and manageable solution for high-quality database publishing and reporting by creating dynamic reports for the Web and across the enterprise. It enables you to implement a multi-tiered architecture for running your reports.

Oracle9iAS Web Cache

Oracle9iAS Web Cache is a server accelerator caching service that improves the performance, scalability, and availability of frequently used e-business Web sites that run on Oracle9i Application Server and Oracle database. By storing frequently accessed URLs in virtual memory, Oracle9iAS Web Cache eliminates the need to repeatedly process requests for those URLs on the Web server, and it caches both static and dynamically-generated HTTP content from one or more applications Web servers.

Oracle9iAS Wireless

Oracle9iAS Wireless is a portal service for delivering information and applications to mobile devices. Using Oracle9iAS Wireless, you can create custom portal sites that use different kinds of content, including Web pages, custom Java applications, and XML-based applications. Oracle9iAS Wireless sites make this diverse information accessible to mobile devices without you having to rewrite the content for each target device platform.

Oracle Advanced Security

Oracle Advanced Security provides a comprehensive suite of security features to protect enterprise networks and securely extend corporate networks to the Internet. It provides a single source of integration with network encryption and authentication solutions, single signon services, and security protocols. By integrating industry standards, it delivers unparalleled security to the Oracle network and beyond.

Oracle Business Components for Java (BC4J)

Oracle Business Components for Java is a 100% Java-compatible, XML-powered framework that enables productive development, portable deployment, and flexible customization of multi-tier, database applications from business components.

Oracle Database Client Developer Kit

The Oracle Database Client Developer Kit contains the following client libraries:

Oracle Enterprise Java Engine

Oracle Enterprise Java Engine is an enterprise-class 100% Java-compatible server environment that supports Enterprise JavaBeans, CORBA, and database stored procedures. Oracle Enterprise Java Engine achieves high scalability through its unique architectural design, which minimizes the burden and complexity of memory management when the number of users increases.

Oracle HTTP Server

Oracle9i Application Server uses the Oracle HTTP Server, which is built on Apache Web server technology. Oracle HTTP Server offers scalability, stability, speed, and extensibility. It also supports Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages, Perl, PL/SQL, and CGI applications. This component also includes the following sub-components:

Oracle Internet File System

Oracle Internet File System is a file system and development platform that stores files in an Oracle database. It provides a mechanism for creating, storing, and managing various types of information, from Web pages to email, from spreadsheets to XML files, in a common repository for users to access and update.

Oracle LDAP Client Kit

LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is the emerging Internet standard for directory services. Oracle LDAP Client Kit supports client interaction with any LDAP-compliant directory server; for example, Oracle Internet Directory. The toolkit provides tools and development libraries to support client calls to directory services, encrypted connections, and enables you to manage your directory data.

Oracle Management Server

Oracle Management Server provides distributed control between the database and Oracle9i Application Server in the network. As a central engine for notifications, it processes all system management tasks and administers the distribution of these tasks across the enterprise. Ensure that you do not have multiple Oracle Management Servers installed on a single machine.

Oracle XML Developer Kit

The Oracle XML Developer Kit (XDK) contains the necessary XML components libraries and utilities to give developers the ability to easily XML-enable applications and Web sites. Oracle XDK supports development in Java, C, C++, and PL/SQL with a collection of libraries, command-line utilities, and tools.

Supplemental Components

The following is a list of the supplemental components that are available with Oracle9i Application Server, version 1.0.2.2.2:


See Also:

Appendix C, "Installing Supplemental Components" for overview and installation instructions. 


Product Availability

Table 2-2 lists the products available for AIX-Based Systems, Compaq Tru64 UNIX, HP 9000 Series HP-UX, and Linux Intel.

Table 2-2 Product Availability on Each Platform
Product  AIX-Based Systems  Compaq Tru64 UNIX  HP 9000 Series HP-UX  Linux Intel 

Oracle9iAS Forms Services 

XFoot 1 

Oracle9iAS Reports Services 

Oracle9iAS Database Cache 

Oracle Management Server 

Oracle Enterprise Manager Client 

Oracle Enterprise Java Engine 

Oracle9iAS Web Cache 

Oracle9iAS Portal 

AIX 4.3.3 onlyFoot 2 

Oracle9iAS Discoverer Viewer 

NTFoot 3 

Oracle9iAS Wireless 

AIX 4.3.3 onlyFoot 4 

Oracle9iAS Containers for J2EE 

XFoot 5 

Oracle Internet File System 

Oracle HTTP Server 

Oracle XML Developer's Kit 

 

Oracle Internet Directory 

Oracle9iAS InterConnect 

Oracle9iAS Unified Messaging 

 

Oracle9iAS E-mail 

Oracle Workflow 

 

Oracle Transparent Gateway for Sybase 

 

Oracle Transparent Gateway for Informix 

 

 

 

Oracle Transparent Gateway for Ingres 

 

 

 

1 X = product available on this platform
2 Oracle9iAS Portal is only available on AIX 4.3.3. AIX 4.3.2 users cannot run this product.
3 NT = Microsoft Windows NT version available for this platform
4 Oracle9iAS Wireless requires JDK 1.2.2 and this is only available on AIX 4.3.3.
5 Oracle9iAS Containers for J2EE is supported with JDK 1.3.1 only.

Preinstallation Tasks

The preinstallation tasks for Oracle9i Application Server are divided into the following parts.

Installation Overview

This section provides an overview of the installation process. Before installing Oracle9i Application Server, review the Release Notes and Release Notes Addendum. You can find the Release Notes Addendum on OTN at:

http://otn.oracle.com

The Oracle9i Application Server installation process is divided into the following three phases:

Preinstallation

During the first phase of installation, the users completes the following tasks:

Installation

During the second phase, the Oracle Universal Installer guides the user through the installation screens. Depending on the install type, the user will require the information listed in Table 2-3.

Table 2-3 Installation Information 
Component  Core Edition  Minimal Edition  Standard Edition  Enterprise Edition 

Oracle home directory 

UNIX group name 

OSDBA group 

 

 

 

OSOPER group 

 

 

 

Origin database hostname 

 

Origin database port number 

 

Origin database SID  

 

Set user name for Oracle9iAS Wireless schema on the origin database 

 

Set password for Oracle9iAS Wireless schema on the origin database 

 

SYS password for the origin database 

 

SYSTEM password for the origin database 

 

SYSDBA user name for the origin database 

 

 

 

SYSDBA password for the origin database 

 

 

 

Oracle EJE database global name 

 

 

 

Oracle EJE database SID 

 

 

 

During installation, the user has the following configuration options:

If you are installing Enterprise Edition, the components are installed into two Oracle homes. The first Oracle home contains components that use the 8.1.7 database libraries. The other Oracle home contains components that use the 8.0.6 database libraries. The installer will prompt you to enter a path for both Oracle homes.

Postinstallation

During the final phase of the installation process, the user is provided with the following information:

Setting Environment Variables

Before installing Oracle9i Application Server on UNIX platforms, verify that the PATH, ORACLE_HOME, and library path environment variables for your platform are not set in any command shell initialization files, for example.cshrc for the C shell and.bashrc for the bash shell. Table 2-4 lists the names of the library path environment variable for each platform.


Table 2-4 Library Path Environment Variable
Platform  Library Path Environment Variable 

AIX-Based Systems 

LIBPATH 

Compaq Tru64 UNIX 

LD_LIBRARY_PATH 

HP 9000 Series HP-UX 

SHLIB_PATH 

Linux Intel 

LD_LIBRARY_PATH 


Note:

Be sure your PATH, LD_LIBRARY_PATH, and CLASSPATH does not exceed 1,024 bytes as that might generate errors such as "Word too long" during installation. 


ORACLE_HOME

Oracle home is the root directory in which Oracle software is installed.

Oracle9i Application Server cannot share the same Oracle home with other Oracle products. If you have installed other Oracle products, then Oracle9i Application Server must be installed in a different Oracle home. If previously-set Oracle homes exist on the machine where you are installing Oracle9i Application Server on, then refer to "Preventing Conflicts Between ORACLE_HOMEs" below.


Note:

Be sure not to install Oracle9i Application Server in an Oracle home containing other Oracle products, including the database. Such an installation could overwrite shared components, causing the products to malfunction. For migration or upgrade issues, refer to the Oracle9i Application Server Migration Guide 


ORACLE_HOME on AIX-Based Systems

If the value for the ORACLE_HOME environment variable is very long, the iCache Configuration Assistant might fail.

Preventing Conflicts Between ORACLE_HOMEs

To prevent a conflict between the software in an existing Oracle home and Oracle9i Application Server, you must remove all references to the existing Oracle home. The following steps describe removing these references.

  1. Unset your existing Oracle home variable by using the following command:

    C shell  Bourne/Korn shell 
    prompt> unsetenv ORACLE_HOME
    
     
    prompt> export ORACLE_HOME=
    
     
  2. Edit your PATH, CLASSPATH, and LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variables so they do not use the existing Oracle home value.

Setting ORACLE_HOME

To set ORACLE_HOME environment variable, run the following command.

C shell  Bourne/Korn shell 
prompt> setenv ORACLE_HOME full_path
 
prompt> export ORACLE_HOME=full path
 

ORACLE_TERM

ORACLE_TERM specifies the terminal definition resource file to be used with the installer. If ORACLE_TERM is not set, then the installer uses the value of the UNIX environment variable TERM and searches for an equivalent ORACLE_TERM resource file.

C shell  Bourne/Korn shell 
prompt> setenv ORACLE_TERM term_value
 
prompt> export ORACLE_TERM=term_value
 

Table 2-5 lists common ORACLE_TERM settings on SUN SPARC Solaris 2.x.

Table 2-5 ORACLE_TERM value
Terminal  ORACLE_TERM value 

ANSI terminal for SCO 

ansi 

AT386 console 

386 

AT386 xterm 

386x 

UNIXWARE terminal 

386u 

Solaris x86 xterm 

386s 

Data General 200 

dgd2 

Data General 400 

dgd4 

IBM High Function terminal and aixterm (monochrome) 

hft 

IBM High Function terminal and aixterm (color) 

hftc 

hpterm terminal emulator and HP 700/9x terminal 

hpterm 

IBM 3151 terminal 

3151 (for IBM) 

NCD X terminal with vt200 style keyboard 

ncd220 

cmdtool/shell using a type 4 keyboard 

sun 

cmdtool/shell using a type 5 keyboard 

sun5 

vt100 terminal 

vt100 

vt200 terminal 

vt200 

Wyse 50 or 60 terminal 

wy50 

Wyse 150 terminal 

wy150 

xterm using a type 4 keyboard 

xsun 

xterm using a type 5 keyboard 

xsun5 

DISPLAY

Setting the DISPLAY environment variable enables you to run the Oracle Universal Installer remotely from a local work station. On the system where you run the Oracle Universal Installer, set DISPLAY to the system name or IP address of your local workstation.


Note:

A PC X emulator can be used to run the install if it supports a PseudoColor color model or PseudoColor visual. Set the PC X emulator to use a PueedoColor visual, and then start the installer. Refer to the X emulator documentation for instructions on how to change the color model or visual settings. 


If you get an Xlib error similar to "Failed to connect to server", "Connection refused by server", or "Can't open display" when starting the installer, then run the commands on your local workstations as listed in the table below.

Shell Types  On server where the installer is running  In session on your workstation 

C shell 

prompt> setenv DISPLAY hostname:0.0
 
prompt> xhost +server_name
 

Borne or
Korn shell 

prompt> export DISPLAY=hostname:0.0
 
prompt> xhost +server_name
 

TMP

During installation, Oracle Universal Installer uses a temporary directory for swap space. This directory must meet the "Hardware Requirements" listed before installing Oracle9i Application Server. The installation may fail if you do not have sufficient space. The installer checks for the TMP environment variable to locate the temporary directory. If this environment variable does not exist, then the installer uses the /tmp directory. The following are instructions for setting the TMP environment variable.

C shell  Bourne/Korn shell 
prompt> setenv TMP full_path
 
prompt> export TMP=full_path
 

TNS_ADMIN

TNS_ADMIN points to the directory where Net8 configuration files are stored.

If TNS_ADMIN is set on your system, you will have conflicts between that directory and the directory where the Oracle9i Application Server Net8 configuration files are created. You will also have conflicts if the configuration files are in a common directory outside of the Oracle home for your other Oracle product. For example, your system may use /var/opt/oracle/tnsnames.ora for database aliases.

To prevent conflicts between the Net8 configuration files for different Oracle products, copy the configuration files from either TNS_ADMIN or the common directory to ORACLE_HOME/network/admin for the other product and unset TNS_ADMIN using the following command.

C shell  Bourne/Korn shell 
prompt> unsetenv TNS_ADMIN
 
prompt> export TNS_ADMIN=
 

Creating UNIX Accounts and Groups

The following UNIX account and groups are required for the installation process.

UNIX Group Name for the Oracle Universal Installer Inventory

Use one of the following utilities to create a group named oinstall:

See Also:

For more information on these utilities, refer to the appropriate operating system documentation for your system. 

Platform  Utility 

AIX-Based Systems 

smit 

Compaq Tru64 UNIX 

XSysAdmin, dxaccounts, addgroup, or SysMan 

HP 9000 Series HP-UX 

sam or groupadd 

Linux Intel 

useradd or groupadd 

The oinstall group will own Oracle Universal Installer's oraInventory directory. The oracle user account that runs the installation must have the oinstall group as its primary group.

UNIX Account to Own Oracle Software

The oracle account is the UNIX account that owns Oracle software for your system. You must run Oracle Universal Installer from this account.

Create an oracle account with the properties listed in Table 2-6.

Table 2-6 Oracle Account Properties
Variable  Property 

Login Name 

Choose any name to access the account. This document refers to the name as the oracle account. 

Group Identifier 

The oinstall group. 

Home Directory 

Choose a home directory consistent with other user home directories. The home directory of the oracle account does not have to be the same as the ORACLE_HOME directory. 

Login Shell 

The default shell can be either the C, Bourne, or Korn shell. 


Note:

Use the oracle account only for installing and maintaining Oracle software. Never use it for purposes unrelated to the Oracle Universal Installer. Do not use root as the oracle account. 


UNIX Group Names for Privileged Groups

Two groups, the database operator group and the database administrator group, are required for installation. Oracle documentation refers to these groups as OSOPER and OSDBA, respectively. Databases use these groups for operating system authentication. This is necessary in situations where the database is shutdown and database authentication is unavailable.

The privileges of these groups are given to either a single UNIX group or two corresponding UNIX groups. There are two ways to choose which group(s) get the privileges:

The following table lists the privileges for the OSOPER and OSDBA groups.

Group  Privileges 

OSOPER 

Permits the user to perform STARTUP, SHUTDOWN, ALTER DATABASE OPEN/MOUNT, ALTER DATABASE BACKUP, ARCHIVE LOG, and RECOVER, and includes the RESTRICTED SESSION privilege. 

OSDBA 

Contains all system privileges with ADMIN OPTION, and the OSOPER role; permits CREATE DATABASE and time-based recover. 

Selecting a Locale

You must select a Locale to install Oracle9i Application Server if you want to use a language other than English. For example, on HP-UX, perform the following procedure with Common Desktop Environment (CDE) to select a locale for Oracle9i Application Server installation:

  1. Close all open windows.

  2. Log out (right-click your desktop, select Logout, and click OK).

  3. Select the desired locale from the Options menu. For example, to choose a German locale, choose:

    Options > Language > C to es_BO > de (German)

  4. Log in.

  5. Open a terminal emulator window.

  6. Enter the following command to verify the locale:

    $ env | grep LANG 
    
    

    The output of this command must include the LANG environment variable, and it must have the value selected in Step 3.

    If the LANG environment variable is not shown or is set to a different value, check .profile.login, .cshrc or other files where the LANG environment variable is set or unset. After fixing the problem, repeat these steps, beginning with Step 1.

  7. Install Oracle9i Application Server on your platform.

The translated files for the selected locale are installed. In addition, English files are always installed.


Note:

You must unset the LANG environment variable on Linux before installing Oracle9i Application Server. 


Migration

If you are migrating from a previous version of Oracle9i Application Server, including version 1.0.2.1, review the Oracle9i Application Server Migration Guide.

Port Allocation

Oracle9iAS Database Cache

Oracle9i Application Server installs another database that listens on port 1521. This is so only if you install Enterprise Edition and configure Oracle9iAS Database Cache. To avoid port conflicts, change the port for the origin database listener to be, for example, 1526.

Oracle HTTP Server

Oracle HTTP Server does not have a set port number that the server listens on. By default, the server will listen for non-SSL requests on port 7777, but if that port is in use, then the installer will search for unoccupied port numbers starting from port 7778. Similarly, if port 443 is in use, then the installer will search for unoccupied port numbers starting from port 4443 for SSL requests.

A file named setupinfo.txt is automatically generated in ORACLE_HOME/Apache/Apache. This file is generated at install time, and is not updated thereafter. If the user restarts Oracle HTTP Server, the information in setupinfo.txt becomes inaccurate.

setupinfo.txt displays the port number information in the following format:

The HTTP Server can be accessed using the following URLs:
Non SSL Mode (executed at install time):
http://machine_name:7778
SSL mode: (executed at install time)
http://machine_name:80
https://machine_name:443

Completing Preinstallation for Specific Installation Options

After setting the environment variables and creating UNIX accounts and groups, complete version-specific preinstallation tasks for the Oracle9i Application Server.

The following list directs you to the installation option that you have license to:

Core Edition

Core Edition does not require any preinstallation tasks.

You have completed the preinstallation tasks for the Oracle9i Application Server. Proceed to "About Oracle Universal Installer" to start the installer.

Minimal Edition

Minimal Edition does not require any preinstallation tasks.

Oracle9iAS Portal Installation on Linux Intel

Pre Installation Tasks

Installation of Oracle9iAS Portal on Linux Intel requires reconfiguration of specific database parameters on the server machine before you install the Minimal Edition option of Oracle9i Application Server. The following are instructions on how to set these parameters, as follows:

  1. Before changing any parameters, shut down the network listener, interMedia Text Servers, and the database.

    1. Shut down the network listener:

      prompt> lsnrctl stop
      
      
    2. Shut down the interMedia Text servers:

      SQL>exec ctx_adm.shutdown();
      SQL>exit
      
      
    3. Shut down the database using SQL*Plus:

      prompt> sqlplus /nolog 
      
      SQL> connect sys/sys_password as sysdba; 
      Connected. 
      SQL> shutdown [immediate] 
      Database closed
      Database dismounted
      ORACLE instance shutdown 
      SQL> exit
      
      
  2. Set the following Oracle Initialization parameters to the values specified:

    $ORACLE_BASE/admin/global_database_name/pfile
    
    


    Note:

    This configuration file might be in a different directory depending on how the database was installed. For more information see the Oracle8i Installation Guide 


    1. Set the value for shared_pool_size at least 61440000.

    2. Set the value for java_pool_size to at least 209715200.

  3. Restart the network listener and database:

    1. Start the network listener:

      prompt> lsnrctl start
      
      
    2. Start the database:

      prompt> sqlplus /nolog
      SQL> connect sys/<sys password> as sysdba
      Connected. 
      SQL> startup
      
      
    3. Execute the following SQL statement:

      SQL> SELECT name, value FROM v$parameter WHERE name = 'large_pool_size';
      
      

You should see the large_pool_size value, entered in the initSID.ora file in step 2. For more information, refer to Oracle8i Administrator's Reference.

Origin Database Connectivity

Oracle9i Application Server requires an active database connection. The installer uses this connection to add database objects to the origin database. The origin database is the original and primary storage for your data and is typically located on a database server tier.

You have completed the preinstallation tasks for the Oracle9i Application Server. Proceed to "About Oracle Universal Installer" to start the installer.

Standard Edition

Perform preinstallation tasks for the following Standard Edition component:

Oracle Internet File System

Perform the following tasks on the origin database to set database parameters for Oracle Internet File System:

Installation of Oracle Internet File System requires reconfiguration of specific database parameters on the origin database.

  1. Before changing any parameters, shut down the network listener, interMedia Text servers, and the database.

    See Also:

    Oracle8i Installation Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library 

    Set the following Oracle initialization parameters to the values specified. These parameters are contained in the initSID.ora file in the ORACLE_HOME/admin/global_database_name/pfile directory.


    Note:

    This configuration file may be located in a different directory depending on how the database was installed. 


    1. Set the value for open_cursors to at least 255.

    2. Set the value for shared_pool_size at least 50 MB.

    3. Set the value for processes to at least 200.

    4. Make sure there is at least one online non-system rollback segment.

      To verify that there is at least one online non-system rollback segment, connect to Oracle as the SYS user with SQL*Plus and execute the following SQL statement:

      SQL> SELECT segment_name, tablespace_name, status
           FROM dba_rollback_segs;
      
      
      

      This will result in output that looks like the following table.

      Table 2-7 dba_rollback_segs Output
      SEGMENT_NAME  TABLESPACE_NAME  STATUS 

      SYSTEM 

      SYSTEM 

      ONLINE 

      PUBLIC_RS 

      SYSTEM 

      ONLINE 

      USERS_RS 

      USERS 

      ONLINE 

      In this example, USERS_RS is an online non-system rollback segment. To ensure that the rollback segment is always online after a database startup, include the following line in the initSID.ora file:

      rollback_segments = (rbs_name1, .... , rbs_namex)
      
      

      See Also:

      Oracle8i Administrator's Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library 

  2. Restart the network listener and database.

  3. Execute the following SQL statement:

    SQL> SELECT name, value FROM v$parameter WHERE name = `open_cursors';
    
    
    

    You should see the open_cursors value you entered in the initSID.ora file in step 2.

    See Also:

    Oracle8i Administrator's Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library 

Configure the Net8 Server for External Procedures

Oracle interMedia Text is an optional component that allows Oracle Internet File System to search on document contents. If interMedia Text is installed, you must verify that it is configured correctly, or Oracle Internet File System will not operate correctly. You must configure Net8 Server on the database system for external procedures by editing the tnsnames.ora and listener.ora files. By default, these files are located in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory:

For more information on configuring Net8 External Procedures, refer to Oracle Net8 Administrator's Guide.

To test whether you have an external procedure listener, enter the following command:

prompt> tnsping EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA

If you see the following message, then there is an existing external procedure listener on the origin database. You can skip to Configure the Oracle Database for Authentication Encryption.

TNS Ping Utility: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 13-APR-2001 09:09:19
(c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Attempting to contact (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL=IPC) (KEY=EXTPROC))
OK (102 msec)

If you see the following message, then an external procedure listener does not exist on the origin database.

TNS Ping Utility: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 13-APR-2001 09:09:19
(c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.

TNS-03505: Failed to resolve name

Modify the listener.ora File

Modify the listener.ora file as shown in the following example.

For this example:

Modify the tnsnames.ora File

Modify the tnsnames.ora file as shown in the following example:

IFS=

(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST=
(ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL =TCP) (HOST = localhost) (PORT = 1521))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVICE_NAME =mydb)
)
)

EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST=
(ADDRESS =(PROTOCOL = IPC)(KEY = EXTPROC))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SID = PLSExtProc)
(PRESENTATION = RO)
)
)
Configure the Oracle Database for Authentication Encryption

Before you can install Oracle Internet File System, you must configure authentication encryption, as follows:

  1. Change to the $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin directory:

    prompt> cd $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin
    
    
  2. Connect to Oracle as the SYS user with SQL*Plus and run the catobtk.sql script:

    prompt> sqlplus sys/<sys password> 
    SQL> @catobtk.sql
    
    
  3. Enter the following SQL statement:

    SQL> GRANT EXECUTE ON dbms_obfuscation_toolkit TO PUBLIC;
    

Origin Database Connectivity

Oracle9i Application Server requires an active database connection. The installer uses this connection to add database objects to the origin database. The origin database is the original and primary storage for your data and is typically located on a database server tier.

You have completed the preinstallation tasks for the Oracle9i Application Server. Proceed to "About Oracle Universal Installer" to start the installer.

Enterprise Edition

Perform preinstallation tasks for the following Enterprise Edition components:

Oracle9iAS Web Cache

For TCP/IP performance tuning tips for the computer running Oracle9iAS Web Cache, refer to Oracle HTTP Server powered by Apache Performance Guide available on your product CD.

Oracle9iAS Database Cache

Perform the following preinstallation tasks for Oracle9iAS Database Cache on the origin database machine:

Synchronize the Origin Database Name with its SID

To use Oracle9iAS Database Cache, the name of your origin database and its System Identifier (SID) must be the same. You can see both the name and SID by executing the following commands in SQL*Plus when logged on as the sys user:

SQL> select value from v$parameter where name = 'db_name';
SQL> select instance_name from v$instance;

If these values are different, then you must perform the following steps on the origin database machine to change the SID:

  1. Shut down the origin database and listener.

    See Also:

    Oracle8i Installation Guide and Oracle8i Administratior's Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library for information on shutting down the origin database and listener. 

  2. Change the value of the ORACLE_SID environment variable to the new value. This new value must match the origin database name.

  3. Rename the initSID.ora and orapwSID files to use the new SID.

  4. Change the listener.ora and tnsnames.ora files to use the new SID.

  5. Restart the network listener and database.

Allow Remote Access to the Origin Database

To allow remote access by Oracle9iAS Database Cache to the origin database, perform the following steps:

  1. Edit the initialization file (initSID.ora) of the origin database. If the file contains the REMOTE_LOGIN_PASSWORDFILE parameter, then make sure that the value equals SHARED or EXCLUSIVE. Oracle9iAS Database Cache can use either value. If the parameter is already set to either SHARED or EXCLUSIVE, then you do not need to change the value.

    • EXCLUSIVE: The password file can be used by only one database and the password file can contain user names other than SYS and INTERNAL.

    • SHARED: The password file can be used by more than one database. However, the only user names recognized by the password file are SYS and INTERNAL.

    If the file does not contain the entry, then add it to the file, specifying either SHARED or EXCLUSIVE as the value. For example, to specify EXCLUSIVE, add the following entry to the file:

    REMOTE_LOGIN_PASSWORDFILE=EXCLUSIVE
    
    

    The initSID.ora file is in the ORACLE_HOME/database directory for of the origin database.

    Check if a password file exists for the database. The file is named pwdSID.ora, where SID is the system identifier of the origin database.

  2. If you change the parameter, stop and restart the origin database.

  3. If the file does not exist, create the password file using the orapwd utility with the following commands:

    prompt> orapwd file=orapwSID password=syspw entries=maxRemUsers
    
    

    There are no spaces around the equal sign (=). The parameters have the following meanings:

    • FILE: The full path name of the password file. The contents of this file are encrypted, and the file is not user-readable. This parameter is mandatory. The types of file names allowed for the password file are operating system specific. Some platforms require the password file to be a specific format and located in a specific directory. Other platforms allow the use of environment variables to specify the name and location of the password file. See your operating system-specific Oracle documentation for the names and locations allowed on your platform.

    • PASSWORD: The password of the user SYS for the origin database. This parameter sets the password for SYSOPER and SYSDBA. If you issue the ALTER USER statement to change the password after connecting to the origin database, both the password stored in the data dictionary and the password stored in the password file are updated.

    • ENTRIES: The maximum number of users allowed for remote connections. This value must be greater than the number of Oracle9iAS Database Cache nodes that will connect to the origin database.

Configure the Listener for External Procedures

You must configure the listener for the origin database so that it listens for external procedure calls. Perform the following test to check for existing external procedure listener:

To test if you have an external procedure listener, you need to do a tnsping on EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA from the origin database. The command is:

prompt> tnsping EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA

  1. If you see the following message, then there is an existing external procedure listener on the origin database. You can skip to Step 7.

    TNS Ping Utility for Solaris: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 
    13-APR-2001 09:09:19
    (c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
    Attempting to contact (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL=IPC) (KEY=EXTPROC))
    OK (102 msec)
    
  2. If you see the following message, then an external procedure listener does not exist on the origin database.

    TNS Ping Utility for Solaris: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 
    13-APR-2001 09:09:19
    (c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
    
    TNS-03505: Failed to resolve name
    
    

Perform the following steps to configure an external procedure listener:

  1. Edit the tnsnames.ora file for the origin database by adding an entry that enables you to connect to the listener process (and subsequently, the extproc process). For example, add the following entry to the tnsnames.ora file:

    EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA.US.ORACLE.COM=
       (DESCRIPTION=
          (ADDRESS_LIST=      
             (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL=IPC) (KEY=EXTPROC0))
          )
          (CONNECT_DATA=
             (SID=PLSExtProc)
             (PRESENTATION= RO)
          )
       )
    
    

    Verify the following:

    • The service name must be "EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA". (Note that the domain name can be set to any value appropriate for your network.)

    • The ADDRESS_LIST contains an ADDRESS entry setting "(PROTOCOL = IPC)".

    Make a note of the KEY value (in this example, it is "EXTPROC0"). All KEY values defined by different services within the listener must be unique. Also make a note of the SID value (in his example, it is "PLSExtProc"). These values must match the KEY and SID_NAME value, respectively, in the corresponding entry in the listener.ora file.

  2. Edit the listener.ora file for the origin database and add the following entries for the external procedure listener:

    LISTENER=
       (DESCRIPTION_LIST=
          (DESCRIPTION=  
             (ADDRESS_LIST=
                (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL= TCP) (HOST = my_hostname) (PORT = 1521))
             )
             (ADDRESS_LIST=
                (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL= IPC)  (KEY=EXTPROC0))
             )
          )
       )
    
    

    Verify the following:

    • The ADDRESS_LIST contains an ADDRESS entry setting "(PROTOCOL = IPC)".

    • The ADDRESS_LIST containing "(PROTOCOL = IPC) "has a key value which is the same KEY value from the tnsnames.ora file. In this example, the key value is "EXTPROC0".

    Make a note of the name of the listener that will be used for external procedures. In this example, the listener name is "LISTENER".

  3. Edit the listener.ora file and verify that there is a SID for external procedure listener in the listener's SID_LIST.

    SID_LIST_LISTENER=
       (SID_LIST=
          (SID_DESC=
             (SID_NAME=PLSExtProc)
             (ORACLE_HOME=/dsk1/oracle/rdbms/OraHome)
             (PROGRAM=extproc)
          )
          ...
       (SID_DESC =
          (GLOBAL_DBNAME = global_DBname)
          (ORACLE_HOME = /dsk1/oracle/rdbms/OraHome)
          (SID_NAME = ias)
        )
       )
    

    Verify the following:

    • The SID_LIST contains an entry with a SID_NAME that is the same as the SID noted in Step 1. In this example, the SID is "PLSExtProc".

    • The ORACLE_HOME value for this entry is set to the ORACLE_HOME for the origin database.

    • The PROGRAM value for this entry is "extproc".

  4. Restart the listener if you have made any changes to the configuration files. If the listener name you noted in step 2 is anything other than "LISTENER", then you will need to start and stop that specific listener. In the following example, the listener name is "LISTENER".

    prompt> lsnrctl stop listener
    prompt> lsnrctl start listener
    
    
  5. The extproc process spawned by the listener inherits the operating system privileges of the listener. So Oracle Corporation strongly recommends that you restrict the privileges for the separate listener process. The process should not have permission to read or write to database files. The owner of this separate process should not be the oracle user (which is the default owner of the server executable and database files). Start the listener from a user account that does not have permission to read or write to database files or the Oracle server address space.

  6. If not already installed, place the extproc executable in the bin directory under the ORACLE_HOME of the origin database.

  7. Minimum configuration for sqlnet.ora:

    NAMES.DEFAULT_DOMAIN = your.Domain.Name
    NAMES.DIRECTORY_PATH= (TNSNAMES, ONAMES, HOSTNAME)
    

Oracle Internet File System

Perform the following tasks on the origin database machine to set database parameters for Oracle Internet File System:

Installation of Oracle Internet File System requires reconfiguration of specific database parameters on the origin database.

  1. Before changing any parameters, shut down the network listener, interMedia Text servers, and the database.

    See Also:

    Oracle8i Installation Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library 

    Set the following Oracle initialization parameters to the values specified. These parameters are contained in the initSID.ora file in the ORACLE_HOME/admin/global_database_name/pfile directory.


    Note:

    This configuration file may be located in a different directory depending on how the database was installed. 


    1. Set the value for open_cursors to at least 255.

    2. Set the value for shared_pool_size at least 90 MB.

    3. Set the value for processes to at least 200.

    4. Make sure there is at least one online non-system rollback segment.

      To verify that there is at least one online non-system rollback segment, connect to Oracle as the SYS user with SQL*Plus and execute the following SQL statement:

      SQL> SELECT segment_name, tablespace_name, status
           FROM dba_rollback_segs;
      
      
      

      This will result in output that looks like the following table.

      Table 2-8 dba_rollback_segs Output
      SEGMENT_NAME  TABLESPACE_NAME  STATUS 

      SYSTEM 

      SYSTEM 

      ONLINE 

      PUBLIC_RS 

      SYSTEM 

      ONLINE 

      USERS_RS 

      USERS 

      ONLINE 

      In this example, USERS_RS is an online non-system rollback segment. To ensure that the rollback segment is always online after a database startup, include the following line in the initSID.ora file:

      rollback_segments = (rbs_name1, .... , rbs_namex)
      
      

      See Also:

      Oracle8i Administrator's Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library. 

  2. Restart the network listener and database.

  3. Execute the following SQL statement:

    SQL> SELECT name, value FROM v$parameter WHERE name = `open_cursors';
    
    
    

    You should see the open_cursors value you entered in the initSID.ora file in step 2.

    See Also:

    Oracle8i Administrator's Guide in the Oracle Database Documentation Library 

Configure the Net8 Server for External Procedures

Oracle interMedia Text is an optional component that allows Oracle Internet File System to search on document contents. If interMedia Text is installed, you must verify that it is configured correctly, or Oracle Internet File System will not operate correctly. You must configure Net8 Server on the database system for external procedures by editing the tnsnames.ora and listener.ora files. By default, these files are located in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory:

For more information on configuring Net8 External Procedures, refer to Oracle Net8 Administrator's Guide.

To test whether you have an external procedure listener, enter the following command:

prompt> tnsping EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA

If you see the following message, then there is an existing external procedure listener on the origin database. You can skip to Configure the Oracle Database for Authentication Encryption.

TNS Ping Utility: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 13-APR-2001 09:09:19
(c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Attempting to contact (ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL=IPC) (KEY=EXTPROC))
OK (102 msec)

If you see the following message, then an external procedure listener does not exist on the origin database.

TNS Ping Utility: Version 8.1.7.0.0. - Production on 13-APR-2001 09:09:19
(c) Copyright 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.

TNS-03505: Failed to resolve name

Modify the listener.ora File

Modify the listener.ora file as shown in the following example.

For this example:

Modify the tnsnames.ora File

Modify the tnsnames.ora file as shown in the following example:

IFS=

(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST=
(ADDRESS= (PROTOCOL =TCP) (HOST = localhost) (PORT = 1521))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVICE_NAME =mydb)
)
)

EXTPROC_CONNECTION_DATA =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS_LIST=
(ADDRESS =(PROTOCOL = IPC)(KEY = EXTPROC))
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SID = PLSExtProc)
(PRESENTATION = RO)
)
)
Configure the Oracle Database for Authentication Encryption

Before you can install Oracle Internet File System, you must configure authentication encryption, as follows:

  1. Change to the $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin directory:

    prompt> cd $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin
    
    
  2. Connect to Oracle as the SYS user with SQL*Plus and run the catobtk.sql script:

    prompt> sqlplus sys/<sys password> 
    SQL> @catobtk.sql
    
    
  3. Enter the following SQL statement:

    SQL> GRANT EXECUTE ON dbms_obfuscation_toolkit TO PUBLIC;
    

Origin Database Connectivity

Oracle9i Application Server requires an active database connection. The installer uses this connection to add database objects to the origin database. The origin database is the original and primary storage for your data and is typically located on a database server tier.

You have completed the preinstallation tasks for the Oracle9i Application Server. Proceed to "About Oracle Universal Installer" to start the installer.

Additional Preinstallation Steps for Oracle9iAS Enterprise Edition Installation on Linux Intel

The following sections describe additional pre-installation steps for Oracle9i Application Server Enterprise Edition Installation on Linux Intel.

Creating libXm Symbolic Links in a SuSe 7.1 System

Before starting the Oracle9iAS Enterprise Edition installation, create the following symbolic link if it does not already exist.

cd /usr/X11R6/lib
ln -s libXm.so.2.1 libXm.so
/etc/oratab file Limitation

Before starting the Oracle9iAS Enterprise Edition installation, ensure that the /etc/oratab file exists. You must have write permission to the /etc/oratab file. When the installation is 88% complete, Oracle Universal Installer will open two xterm windows.

The first window will install the 80601 component. If the /etc/oratab file does not exist or is not writable, then the oratab dialog box will appear in the xterm window. Select OK in the oratab dialog box to continue installing the 80601 component.

When the 80601 has finished installing, the second xterm window will open. This window is for the installation of the 80630 component. Select OK in the oratab dialog box. If the /etc/oratab file exists and is writable, the two xterm windows will show the progress of the installations and the oratab dialog box will not prompt you for information.


Note:

Character-based orainst utility is used to install the 80601 and 80630 components. This is because motif-based orainst utility is not available on Linux Intel. 


Pre-installation step for Discoverer Configuration

Ensure that the soft limit for the system parameter number of open file descriptor for each user process (output of ulimit -n) is set to a minimum of 8192. If this value is less than 8192, it might affect the Discoverer configuration during installation. However, this value may need to be increased, depending on the system load.

About Oracle Universal Installer

Oracle9i Application Server uses Oracle Universal Installer to configure environment variables and to install components. The installer guides you through each step of the installation process, so you can choose configuration options for a customized product.

The installer includes features that perform the following tasks:

oraInventory Directory

The installer creates the oraInventory directory the first time it is run on your machine. The oraInventory directory keeps an inventory of products that the installer installs on your machine as well as other installation information. If you have previously installed Oracle products, then you may already have an oraInventory directory.

Starting Oracle Universal Installer

Follow these steps to launch Oracle Universal Installer, which installs Oracle9i Application Server:

  1. Stop all Oracle processes and services (for example, the Oracle database).

  2. Mount the installation CD-ROM.

    The Oracle Product Installation CD-ROM is in RockRidge format. To begin installation, insert the CD labelled Disk 1.

    To manually mount or unmount the CD-ROM, you must have root privileges. Be sure to unmount the CD-ROM before removing it from the drive.

    To manually mount Disk 1 CD-ROM, perform the following tasks:

    1. Insert the Oracle9i Application Server CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive.

    2. Log in as the root user.

    3. Create the CD-ROM mount point directory.

      prompt> mkdir mount_point
      
      
    4. Mount the CD-ROM drive on the mount point directory and exit the root account:

      prompt> mount options device_name mount_point
      prompt> exit
      
      

    The following example mounts the CD-ROM manually on /cdrom. Execute the following commands as root user.

    prompt> mkdir /cdrom
    prompt> mount -r -F hsfs device_name /cdrom
    prompt> exit
    
    
  3. Run Oracle Universal Installer from the CD-ROM.


    Note:

    Be sure you are not logged in as the root user when you start the Oracle Universal Installer. If you are, then only the root user will have permissions to manage Oracle9i Application Server. 


    1. Log in as the oracle user.

    2. Start the installer by entering:

      prompt> mount_point/9ias_10222_disk1/runInstaller
      
      


      Note:

      Do not use mount_point as your working directory when you start the installer. If you do, then you will not be able to eject Disk 1 during the installation process to insert Disk 2. 


This launches Oracle Universal Installer through which you can install Oracle9i Application Server.

The list below navigates you to installation instructions for the Oracle9i Application Server edition you are licensed to:


Go to previous page Go to next page
Oracle
Copyright © 2001 Oracle Corporation.

All Rights Reserved.
Go To Table Of Contents
Contents
Go To Index
Index