FAQ
History
PreviousHomeNext Search
Feedback
Divider

The Role of XML and the Java Platform

Web services depend on the ability of parties to communicate with each other even if they are using different information systems. Extensible Markup Language (XML), a markup language that makes data portable, is a key technology in addressing this need. Enterprises have discovered the benefits of using XML for the integration of data both internally for sharing legacy data among departments and externally for sharing data with other enterprises. As a result, XML is increasingly being used for enterprise integration applications, both in tightly coupled and loosely coupled systems. Because of this data integration ability, XML has become the underpinning for Web-related computing.

Web services also depend on the ability of enterprises using different computing platforms to communicate with each other. This requirement makes the Java platform, which makes code portable, the natural choice for developing Web services. This choice is even more attractive as the new Java APIs for XML become available, making it easier and easier to use XML from the Java programming language. These APIs are summarized later in this introduction and explained in detail in the tutorials for each API.

In addition to data portability and code portability, Web services need to be scalable, secure, and efficient, especially as they grow. The Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition is specifically designed to fill just such needs. It facilitates the really hard part of developing Web services, which is programming the infrastructure, or "plumbing." This infrastructure includes features such as security, distributed transaction management, and connection pool management, all of which are essential for industrial strength Web services. And because components are reusable, development time is substantially reduced.

Because XML and the Java platform work so well together, they have come to play a central role in Web services. In fact, the advantages offered by the Java APIs for XML and the J2EE platform make them the ideal combination for deploying Web services.

The APIs described in this chapter complement and layer on top of the J2EE APIs. These APIs enable the Java community, developers, and tool and container vendors to start developing Web services applications and products using standard Java APIs that maintain the fundamental Write Once, Run AnywhereTrademarked proposition of Java technology.

In the Sun ONE Application Server, these APIs are found in the <S1AS7_HOME>/share/lib directory and are automatically loaded in the server's classpath. In the Sun ONE Studio, these APIs are available in the directory <S1STUDIO_HOME>/jwsdp/common/lib.

The remainder of this introduction first gives an overview of the Java APIs for XML, explaining what they do and how they make writing Web applications easier. It then describes each of the APIs individually and then presents a scenario that illustrates how they can work together.

The tutorials that follow give more detailed explanations and walk you through how to use the Java APIs for XML to build applications for Web services. They also provide sample applications that you can run.

Divider
FAQ
History
PreviousHomeNext Search
Feedback
Divider

All of the material in The J2EE Tutorial for the Sun ONE Platform is copyright-protected and may not be published in other works without express written permission from Sun Microsystems.