Document Information


Part I Introduction

1.  Overview

Java EE Application Model

Distributed Multitiered Applications


Java EE Components

Java EE Clients

Web Clients


Application Clients

The JavaBeans Component Architecture

Java EE Server Communications

Web Components

Business Components

Enterprise Information System Tier

Web Services Support


SOAP Transport Protocol

WSDL Standard Format

UDDI and ebXML Standard Formats

Java EE Application Assembly and Deployment

Packaging Applications

Development Roles

Java EE Product Provider

Tool Provider

Application Component Provider

Enterprise Bean Developer

Web Component Developer

Application Client Developer

Application Assembler

Application Deployer and Administrator

Java EE 5 APIs

Enterprise JavaBeans Technology

Java Servlet Technology

JavaServer Pages Technology

JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library

JavaServer Faces

Java Message Service API

Java Transaction API

JavaMail API

JavaBeans Activation Framework

Java API for XML Processing

Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS)

Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB)

SOAP with Attachments API for Java

Java API for XML Registries

J2EE Connector Architecture

Java Database Connectivity API

Java Persistence API

Java Naming and Directory Interface

Java Authentication and Authorization Service

Simplified Systems Integration

Sun Java System Application Server 9.1


2.  Using the Tutorial Examples

Part II The Web Tier

3.  Getting Started with Web Applications

4.  Java Servlet Technology

5.  JavaServer Pages Technology

6.  JavaServer Pages Documents

7.  JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library

8.  Custom Tags in JSP Pages

9.  Scripting in JSP Pages

10.  JavaServer Faces Technology

11.  Using JavaServer Faces Technology in JSP Pages

12.  Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology

13.  Creating Custom UI Components

14.  Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications

15.  Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications

Part III Web Services

16.  Building Web Services with JAX-WS

17.  Binding between XML Schema and Java Classes

18.  Streaming API for XML

19.  SOAP with Attachments API for Java

Part IV Enterprise Beans

20.  Enterprise Beans

21.  Getting Started with Enterprise Beans

22.  Session Bean Examples

23.  A Message-Driven Bean Example

Part V Persistence

24.  Introduction to the Java Persistence API

25.  Persistence in the Web Tier

26.  Persistence in the EJB Tier

27.  The Java Persistence Query Language

Part VI Services

28.  Introduction to Security in the Java EE Platform

29.  Securing Java EE Applications

30.  Securing Web Applications

31.  The Java Message Service API

32.  Java EE Examples Using the JMS API

33.  Transactions

34.  Resource Connections

35.  Connector Architecture

Part VII Case Studies

36.  The Coffee Break Application

37.  The Duke's Bank Application

Part VIII Appendixes

A.  Java Encoding Schemes

B.  About the Authors



Java EE Containers

Normally, thin-client multitiered applications are hard to write because they involve many lines of intricate code to handle transaction and state management, multithreading, resource pooling, and other complex low-level details. The component-based and platform-independent Java EE architecture makes Java EE applications easy to write because business logic is organized into reusable components. In addition, the Java EE server provides underlying services in the form of a container for every component type. Because you do not have to develop these services yourself, you are free to concentrate on solving the business problem at hand.

Container Services

Containers are the interface between a component and the low-level platform-specific functionality that supports the component. Before a web, enterprise bean, or application client component can be executed, it must be assembled into a Java EE module and deployed into its container.

The assembly process involves specifying container settings for each component in the Java EE application and for the Java EE application itself. Container settings customize the underlying support provided by the Java EE server, including services such as security, transaction management, Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) lookups, and remote connectivity. Here are some of the highlights:

  • The Java EE security model lets you configure a web component or enterprise bean so that system resources are accessed only by authorized users.

  • The Java EE transaction model lets you specify relationships among methods that make up a single transaction so that all methods in one transaction are treated as a single unit.

  • JNDI lookup services provide a unified interface to multiple naming and directory services in the enterprise so that application components can access these services.

  • The Java EE remote connectivity model manages low-level communications between clients and enterprise beans. After an enterprise bean is created, a client invokes methods on it as if it were in the same virtual machine.

Because the Java EE architecture provides configurable services, application components within the same Java EE application can behave differently based on where they are deployed. For example, an enterprise bean can have security settings that allow it a certain level of access to database data in one production environment and another level of database access in another production environment.

The container also manages nonconfigurable services such as enterprise bean and servlet life cycles, database connection resource pooling, data persistence, and access to the Java EE platform APIs (see Java EE 5 APIs).

Container Types

The deployment process installs Java EE application components in the Java EE containers as illustrated in Figure 1-5.

Figure 1-5 Java EE Server and Containers

Diagram of client-server communication showing servlets and JSP pages in the web tier and enterprise beans in the business tier.
  • Java EE server: The runtime portion of a Java EE product. A Java EE server provides EJB and web containers.

  • Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) container: Manages the execution of enterprise beans for Java EE applications. Enterprise beans and their container run on the Java EE server.

  • Web container: Manages the execution of JSP page and servlet components for Java EE applications. Web components and their container run on the Java EE server.

  • Application client container: Manages the execution of application client components. Application clients and their container run on the client.

  • Applet container: Manages the execution of applets. Consists of a web browser and Java Plug-in running on the client together.