Document Information


Part I Introduction

1.  Overview

2.  Using the Tutorial Examples

Part II The Web Tier

3.  Getting Started with Web Applications

4.  JavaServer Faces Technology

5.  Introduction to Facelets

6.  Expression Language

7.  Using JavaServer Faces Technology in Web Pages

8.  Using Converters, Listeners, and Validators

9.  Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology

10.  JavaServer Faces Technology: Advanced Concepts

11.  Using Ajax with JavaServer Faces Technology

12.  Composite Components: Advanced Topics and Example

13.  Creating Custom UI Components and Other Custom Objects

14.  Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications

15.  Java Servlet Technology

16.  Uploading Files with Java Servlet Technology

17.  Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications

Part III Web Services

18.  Introduction to Web Services

19.  Building Web Services with JAX-WS

20.  Building RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS

21.  JAX-RS: Advanced Topics and Example

Part IV Enterprise Beans

22.  Enterprise Beans

23.  Getting Started with Enterprise Beans

24.  Running the Enterprise Bean Examples

25.  A Message-Driven Bean Example

26.  Using the Embedded Enterprise Bean Container

27.  Using Asynchronous Method Invocation in Session Beans

Part V Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

28.  Introduction to Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

29.  Running the Basic Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

30.  Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform: Advanced Topics

31.  Running the Advanced Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

Part VI Persistence

32.  Introduction to the Java Persistence API

33.  Running the Persistence Examples

34.  The Java Persistence Query Language

35.  Using the Criteria API to Create Queries

36.  Creating and Using String-Based Criteria Queries

37.  Controlling Concurrent Access to Entity Data with Locking

38.  Using a Second-Level Cache with Java Persistence API Applications

Part VII Security

39.  Introduction to Security in the Java EE Platform

40.  Getting Started Securing Web Applications

41.  Getting Started Securing Enterprise Applications

42.  Java EE Security: Advanced Topics

Part VIII Java EE Supporting Technologies

43.  Introduction to Java EE Supporting Technologies

Transactions in Java EE Applications

Java Message Service

44.  Transactions

45.  Resources and Resource Adapters

46.  The Resource Adapter Example

47.  Java Message Service Concepts

48.  Java Message Service Examples

49.  Bean Validation: Advanced Topics

50.  Using Java EE Interceptors

Part IX Case Studies

51.  Duke's Bookstore Case Study Example

52.  Duke's Tutoring Case Study Example

53.  Duke's Forest Case Study Example



Resources in Java EE Applications

A resource is a program object that provides connections to such systems as database servers and messaging systems.

The Java EE Connector Architecture and Resource Adapters

The Java EE Connector architecture enables Java EE components to interact with enterprise information systems (EISs) and EISs to interact with Java EE components. EIS software includes such kinds of systems as enterprise resource planning (ERP), mainframe transaction processing, and nonrelational databases. Connector architecture simplifies the integration of diverse EISs. Each EIS requires only one implementation of the Connector architecture. Because it adheres to the Connector specification, an implementation is portable across all compliant Java EE servers.

The specification defines the contracts for an application server as well as for resource adapters, which are system-level software drivers for specific EIS resources. These standard contracts provide pluggability between application servers and EISs. The Java EE Connector Architecture 1.6 specification defines new system contracts such as Generic Work Context and Security Inflow. The Java EE Connector Architecture 1.6 specification is available at

A resource adapter is a Java EE component that implements the Connector architecture for a specific EIS. A resource adapter can choose to support the following levels of transactions:

  • NoTransaction: No transaction support is provided.

  • LocalTransaction: Resource manager local transactions are supported.

  • XATransaction: The resource adapter supports the XA distributed transaction processing model and the JTA XATransaction interface.

See Chapter 45, Resources and Resource Adapters for a more detailed explanation of resource adapters.

Java Database Connectivity Software

To store, organize, and retrieve data, most applications use relational databases. Java EE applications access relational databases through the JDBC API.

A JDBC resource, or data source, provides applications with a means of connecting to a database. Typically, a JDBC resource is created for each database accessed by the applications deployed in a domain. Transactional access to JDBC resources is available from servlets, JavaServer Faces pages, and enterprise beans. The connection pooling and distributed transaction features are intended for use by JDBC drivers to coordinate with an application server. For more information, see DataSource Objects and Connection Pools.