Fusion Middleware Documentation
Advanced Search


Solutions Guide for Oracle TopLink
Close Window

Table of Contents

Show All | Collapse

24 Using Oracle TopLink with the Oracle Database

This chapter provides instructions for understanding and using EclipseLink features in Oracle TopLink that are designed specifically to support the Oracle Database platform.

This chapter contains the following sections:

Use Case

Oracle TopLink offers a persistence solution that is designed to work with any database. However, applications that plan to use the Oracle Database platform can take advantage of enhanced support for the Oracle Database.

Solution

The solution is achieved by using various TopLink APIs and Oracle products. Applications choose to implement different Oracle TopLink APIs based on the Oracle Database feature or products being used.

Components

  • TopLink 12c Release 1 (12.1.2) or later.

    Note:

    TopLink's core functionality is provided by EclipseLink, the open source persistence framework from the Eclipse Foundation. EclipseLink implements Java Persistence API (JPA), Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB), and other standards-based persistence technologies, plus extensions to those standards. TopLink includes all of EclipseLink, plus additional functionality from Oracle.

  • Oracle Database

  • Additional Oracle Database and Middleware products are required depending on the features that an application chooses to use.

24.1 Introduction to the Solution

EclipseLink includes enhanced support for the Oracle Database platform. Applications that have standardized on the Oracle Database can take advantage of this support to gain ease-of-use, increase performance and scalability, and enhance security. EclipseLink includes support for native Oracle JDBC-specific APIs, PL/SQL, Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC), Oracle Virtual Private Database, Oracle Proxy Authentication, and Oracle Spatial and Graph. Refer to the Oracle Database documentation for details on these technologies.

Much of the Oracle Database platform support is contained in the org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle* package. For details on the APIs, see Java API Reference for Oracle TopLink.

24.2 Implementing the Solution

The solution in this section is organized according to technology. The organization allows developers to easily understand the different parts of the solution and choose specific parts to implement.

This section includes the following topics:

24.2.1 Using Oracle Platform-Specific APIs

Oracle Database platform support is provided in the org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.OraclePlatform class, the org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle* packages, and the org.eclipse.persistence.mappings.xdb package for Oracle XML Database support. For details on the API, see Java API Reference for Oracle TopLink. For details on specific Oracle SQL types, see Oracle Database JDBC Java API Reference.

The following support is provided for the Oracle Database:

  • Batch writing with optimistic locking

  • Native SQL for byte[], Date, Time, Timestamp and Calendar

  • Support for BLOB and CLOB database types using Oracle JDBC specific LOBLocator for large values

    Note:

    For non-Oracle thin JDBC drivers or applications environments where the thin driver is wrapped, it is possible to turn off LOBLocator usage using setShouldUseLocatorForLOBWrite(boolean) on the platform instance.

  • Native support for outer join syntax (+) =

  • Native Sequencing (SELECT SEQ_NAME.NEXTVAL FROM DUAL)

  • Native SQL/ROWNUM support for MaxRows and FirstResult filtering.

  • Hierarchical selects (connect by prior)

  • Returning clause

  • Custom expression functions (REGEXP_LIKE, LOCATE, ATAN2, LOG, CONCAT, SYSDATE (Date, Time, Today), EXCEPT)

  • PLSQL data types, stored functions, stored procedure syntax for invoking and parameter passing, output parameters and output cursors. See Section 24.2.2, "Using Oracle PL/SQL With EclipseLink."

  • Timestamp query for use in optimistic locking using SYSDATE and SYSTIMESTAMP

  • Multi-byte support of NCHAR, NSTRING, and NCLOB

  • Support of TIMESTAMP, TIMESTAMPTZ, and TIMESTAMPLTZ

  • Oracle XML Database support of XMLType field and custom XSQL functions (extract, extractValue, existsNode, isFragment, getStringVal, and getNumberVal)

  • XDK XML parser

  • Flashback Querying in Historical Sessions

  • Object-relational Mappings (ReferenceMapping, StructureMapping, NestedTableMapping, ArrayMapping, ObjectArrayMapping)

  • Oracle AQ

  • Oracle Real Application Clusters. See Section 24.2.5, "Using EclipseLink with Oracle RAC."

  • Virtual Private Database (VPD), including Oracle Label Security. Section 24.2.3, "Using Oracle Virtual Private Database."

  • Proxy Authentication. See Section 24.2.4, "Using Oracle Proxy Authentication."

24.2.2 Using Oracle PL/SQL With EclipseLink

EclipseLink includes APIs for use with Oracle PL/SQL. The APIs are located in the org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.plsql package and the org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.annotations package.

This Section contains the following topics:

24.2.2.1 Executing an Oracle PL/SQL Stored Function

Oracle PL/SQL stored functions can be used to return complex PL/SQL data-types such as RECORD types and TABLE types. PL/SQL types are not supported by Oracle JDBC, so these types must be translated to Oracle OBJECT types and VARRAY types. OBJECT types are returned as java.sql.Struct and VARRAY as java.sql.Array types in JDBC.

Executing PL/SQL stored functions or procedures requires defining mirror OBJECT and VARRAY types for the RECORD and TABLE types. OBJECT types can be mapped to classes annotated with either @Entity or @Embeddable using the @Struct annotation. Typically, classes annotated with @Embeddable are used, unless the OBJECT type defines an Id and can be stored in a table. Nested OBJECT and VARRAY types are mapped using the @Structure and @Array annotations.

Use the PLSQLStoredFunctionCall class or the @NamedPLSQLStoredFunctionQuery annotation to call a stored function using PL/SQL types. The PLSQLStoredProcedureCall class and the @NamedPLSQLStoredProcedureQuery annotation also exist for stored procedures. Use the StoredFunctionCall class, the @NamedStoredFunctionQuery annotation, the StoredProcedureCall class, and the @NamedStoredProcedureQuery annotation for stored functions and procedure that do not return complex PL/SQL types.

24.2.2.1.1 Main Tasks

To execute an Oracle PL/SQL stored function:

24.2.2.1.2 Task 1: Create an Oracle Stored Function That Returns a PL/SQL Record Type
CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE EMP_PKG AS
TYPE EMP_REC IS RECORD (F_NAME VARCHAR2(30), L_NAME VARCHAR2(30), 
   SALARY NUMBER(10,2));
FUNCTION GET_EMP RETURN EMP_REC;
END EMP_PKG;

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY EMP_PKG AS
FUNCTION GET_EMP RETURN EMP_REC AS
   P_EMP EMP_REC;
   BEGIN P_EMP.F_NAME := 'Bob'; P_EMP.F_NAME := 'Smith'; P_EMP.SALARY := 30000;
   RETURN P_EMP;
END;
END EMP_PKG;
24.2.2.1.3 Task 2: Define an Object Type Mirror
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE EMP_TYPE AS OBJECT (F_NAME VARCHAR2(30), 
   L_NAME VARCHAR2(30), SALARY NUMBER(10,2))
24.2.2.1.4 Task 3: Define a Java Class Mapping The OBJECT Type
@Embeddable
@Struct(name="EMP_TYPE", fields={"F_NAME", "L_NAME", "SALARY"})
public class Employee {
   @Column(name="F_NAME")
   private String firstName;
   @Column(name="L_NAME")
   private String lastName;
   @Column(name="SALARY")
   private BigDecimal salary;
   ...
}
24.2.2.1.5 Task 4: Execute a PL/SQL Stored Function Using JpaEntityManager
import javax.persistence.Query;
import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.orcle.plsql.
   PLSQLStoredFunctionCall;
import org.eclipse.persistence.queries.ReadAllQuery;

DataReadQuery databaseQuery = new DataReadQuery();
databaseQuery.setResultType(DataReadQuery.VALUE);
PLSQLrecord record = new PLSQLrecord();
record.setTypeName("EMP_PKG.EMP_REC");
record.setCompatibleType("EMP_TYPE");
record.setJavaType(Employee.class);
record.addField("F_NAME", JDBCTypes.VARCHAR_TYPE, 30);
record.addField("L_NAME", JDBCTypes.VARCHAR_TYPE, 30);
record.addField("SALARY", JDBCTypes.NUMERIC_TYPE, 10, 2);
PLSQLStoredFunctionCall call = new PLSQLStoredFunctionCall(record);
call.setProcedureName("EMP_PKG.GET_EMP");
databaseQuery.setCall(call);

Query query = ((JpaEntityManager)entityManager.getDelegate()).
   createQuery(databaseQuery);
Employee result = (Employee)query.getSingleResult();
24.2.2.1.6 Task 5: Define a Stored Function Using @NamedPLSQLStoredFunctionQuery
@NamedPLSQLStoredFunctionQuery(name="getEmployee", functionName="EMP_PKG.GET_EMP",
   returnParameter=@PLSQLParameter(name="RESULT", databaseType="EMP_PKG.EMP_REC"))
@Embeddable
@Struct(name="EMP_TYPE", fields={"F_NAME", "L_NAME", "SALARY"})
@PLSQLRecord(name="EMP_PKG.EMP_REC", compatibleType="EMP_TYPE",
   javaType=Employee.class,fields={@PLSQLParameter(name="F_NAME"), 
@PLSQLParameter(name="L_NAME"), @PLSQLParameter(name="SALARY",
   databaseType="NUMERIC_TYPE")})

public class Employee {
 ...
}
24.2.2.1.7 Task 6: Use the Stored Function in a Query
Query query = entityManager.createNamedQuery("getEmployee");
Employee result = (Employee)query.getSingleResult();

24.2.2.2 Handling PL/SQL arguments for Oracle Stored Procedures

The standard way of handling a stored procedure is to build an instance of the StoredProcedureCall class. However, the arguments must be compatible with the JDBC specification. To handle Oracle PL/SQL arguments (for example, BOOLEAN, PLS_INTEGER, PL/SQL record, and so on), use the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall class.

Note:

the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall class is only supported on Oracle8 or higher.

24.2.2.2.1 Using the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall Class

The following example demonstrates handling PL/SQL arguments using the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall class. The example is based on the following target procedure:

PROCEDURE bool_in_test(x IN BOOLEAN)

Example of Using the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall Class

import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import org.eclipse.persistence.logging.SessionLog;
import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.jdbc.JDBCTypes;
import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.Oracle10Platform;
import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.OraclePLSQLTypes;
import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.PLSQLStoredProcedureCall;
import org.eclipse.persistence.queries.DataModifyQuery;
import org.eclipse.persistence.sessions.DatabaseLogin;
import org.eclipse.persistence.sessions.DatabaseSession;
import org.eclipse.persistence.sessions.Project;
import org.eclipse.persistence.sessions.Session;

public class TestClass {
 
   public static String DATABASE_USERNAME = "username";
   public static String DATABASE_PASSWORD = "password";
   public static String DATABASE_URL = "jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:ORCL";
   public static String DATABASE_DRIVER = "oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver";
 
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Project project = new Project();
      DatabaseLogin login = new DatabaseLogin();
      login.setUserName(DATABASE_USERNAME);
      login.setPassword(DATABASE_PASSWORD);
      login.setConnectionString(DATABASE_URL);
      login.setDriverClassName(DATABASE_DRIVER);
      login.setDatasourcePlatform(new Oracle10Platform());
      project.setDatasourceLogin(login);
      Session s = project.createDatabaseSession();
      s.setLogLevel(SessionLog.FINE);
      ((DatabaseSession)s).login();

      PLSQLStoredProcedureCall call = new PLSQLStoredProcedureCall();
      call.setProcedureName("bool_in_test");
      call.addNamedArgument("X", OraclePLSQLTypes.PLSQLBoolean);
      DataModifyQuery query = new DataModifyQuery();
      query.addArgument("X");
      query.setCall(call);
      List queryArgs = new ArrayList();
      queryArgs.add(Integer.valueOf(1));
      s.executeQuery(query, queryArgs);
    }
}

The following log excerpt shows the target procedure being invoked from an anonymous PL/SQL block:

...[EclipseLink Info]: 2007.11.23 01:03:23.890--DatabaseSessionImpl(15674464)--
   Thread(Thread[main,5,main])-- login successful
[EclipseLink Fine]: 2007.11.23 01:03:23.968--DatabaseSessionImpl(15674464)--
   Connection(5807702)--Thread(Thread[main,5,main])--
DECLARE
   X_TARGET BOOLEAN := SYS.SQLJUTL.INT2BOOL(:1);
BEGIN
   bool_in_test(X=>X_TARGET);
END;
   bind => [:1 => 1]

Note:

Notice the conversion of the Integer to a PL/SQL BOOLEAN type in the DECLARE stanza (as a similar conversion is used for OUT BOOLEAN arguments).

24.2.2.2.2 Mixing JDBC Arguments With Non JDBC Arguments

A Stored Procedure may have a mix of regular and non JDBC arguments. Use the PLSQLStoredProcedureCall class when at least one argument is a non JDBC type. In addition, some additional information may be required for the JDBC type (length, scale or precision) because the target procedure is invoked from an anonymous PL/SQL block. The example is based on the following target procedure:

PROCEDURE two_arg_test(x IN BOOLEAN, y IN VARCHAR)

Example of Mixing JDBC Arguments With NonJDBC Arguments

import org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.jdbc.JDBCTypes;
...
   PLSQLStoredProcedureCall call = new PLSQLStoredProcedureCall();
   call.setProcedureName("two_arg_test");
   call.addNamedArgument("X", OraclePLSQLTypes.PLSQLBoolean);
   call.addNamedArgument("Y", JDBCTypes.VARCHAR_TYPE, 40);
   DataModifyQuery query = new DataModifyQuery();
   query.addArgument("X");
   query.addArgument("Y");
   query.setCall(call);
   List queryArgs = new ArrayList();
   queryArgs.add(Integer.valueOf(0));
   queryArgs.add("test");
   boolean worked = false;
   String msg = null;
   s.executeQuery(query, queryArgs);

The following log excerpt shows the target procedure being invoked from an anonymous PL/SQL block:

[EclipseLink Fine]: 2007.11.23 02:54:46.109--DatabaseSessionImpl(15674464)--
   Connection(5807702)--Thread(Thread[main,5,main])--
DECLARE
   X_TARGET BOOLEAN := SYS.SQLJUTL.INT2BOOL(:1);
   Y_TARGET VARCHAR(40) := :2;
BEGIN
   two_arg_test(X=>X_TARGET, Y=>Y_TARGET);
END;
   bind => [:1 => 0, :2 => test]
24.2.2.2.3 Handling IN and OUT Arguments

The following example demonstrates a stored procedure that contain both IN and OUT arguments and is based on the following target procedure:

PROCEDURE two_arg_in_out(x OUT BINARY_INTEGER, y IN VARCHAR) AS
BEGIN
   x := 33;
END;

Example of Handling IN and OUT Arguments

import static org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.OraclePLSQLTypes.
   BinaryInteger;
...
   PLSQLStoredProcedureCall call = new PLSQLStoredProcedureCall();
   call.setProcedureName("two_arg_in_out");
   call.addNamedOutputArgument("X", OraclePLSQLTypes.BinaryInteger);
   call.addNamedArgument("Y", JDBCTypes.VARCHAR_TYPE, 40);
   DataReadQuery query = new DataReadQuery();
   query.setCall(call);
   query.addArgument("Y");
   List queryArgs = new ArrayList();
   queryArgs.add("testsdfsdfasdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfdfsdfsdffds");
   boolean worked = false;
   String msg = null;
   List results = (List)s.executeQuery(query, queryArgs);
   DatabaseRecord record = (DatabaseRecord)results.get(0);
   BigDecimal x = (BigDecimal)record.get("X");
   if (x.intValue() != 33) {
      System.out.println("wrong x value");
   }

The following log excerpt shows the target procedure being invoked from an anonymous PL/SQL block:

[EclipseLink Fine]: 2007.11.23 03:15:25.234--DatabaseSessionImpl(15674464)--
   Connection(5807702)--Thread(Thread[main,5,main])--
DECLARE
   Y_TARGET VARCHAR(40) := :1;
   X_TARGET BINARY_INTEGER;
BEGIN
   two_arg_in_out(X=>X_TARGET, Y=>Y_TARGET);
   :2 := X_TARGET;
END;
   bind => [:1 => testsdfsdfasdfsdfsdfsdfsdfsdfdfsdfsdffds, X => :2]

Note:

The order in which arguments are bound at runtime must be altered. Anonymous PL/SQL blocks must process the ordinal markers (:1,:2) for all the IN arguments first, then the OUT arguments. Inside the block, the arguments are passed in the correct order for the target procedure, but the bind order is managed in the DECLARE stanza and after the target procedure has been invoked.

24.2.2.2.4 Handling IN OUT Arguments

Anonymous PL/SQL blocks cannot natively handle IN OUT arguments. The arguments must be split into two parts: an IN-half and an OUT-half. The following example demonstrates a stored procedure that handles IN OUT arguments and is based on the following target procedure:

PROCEDURE two_args_inout(x VARCHAR, y IN OUT BOOLEAN) AS
BEGIN
   y := FALSE;
END;

Example of Handling IN OUT Arguments

...
   PLSQLStoredProcedureCall call = new PLSQLStoredProcedureCall();
   call.setProcedureName("two_args_inout");
   call.addNamedArgument("X", JDBCTypes.VARCHAR_TYPE, 20);
   call.addNamedInOutputArgument("Y", OraclePLSQLTypes.PLSQLBoolean);
   DataReadQuery query = new DataReadQuery();
   query.addArgument("X");
   query.addArgument("Y");
   query.setCall(call);
   List queryArgs = new ArrayList();
   queryArgs.add("test");
   queryArgs.add(Integer.valueOf(1));
   List results = (List)s.executeQuery(query, queryArgs);
   DatabaseRecord record = (DatabaseRecord)results.get(0);
   Integer bool2int = (Integer)record.get("Y");
   if (bool2int.intValue() != 0) {
      System.out.println("wrong bool2int value");
   }

The following log excerpt shows the target procedure being invoked from an anonymous PL/SQL block:

[EclipseLink Fine]: 2007.11.23 03:39:55.000--DatabaseSessionImpl(25921812)--
   Connection(33078541)--Thread(Thread[main,5,main])--
DECLARE
   X_TARGET VARCHAR(20) := :1;
   Y_TARGET BOOLEAN := SYS.SQLJUTL.INT2BOOL(:2);
BEGIN
   two_args_inout(X=>X_TARGET, Y=>Y_TARGET);
   :3 := SYS.SQLJUTL.BOOL2INT(Y_TARGET);
END;
   bind => [:1 => test, :2 => 1, Y => :3]

Note:

The Y argument is split in two using the :2 and :3 ordinal markers.

24.2.3 Using Oracle Virtual Private Database

EclipseLink supports Oracle Virtual Private Database (VPD). Oracle VPD is a server-enforced, fine-grained access control mechanism. Oracle VPD ties a security policy to a table by dynamically appending SQL statements with a predicate to limit data access at the row level. You can create your own security policies, or use Oracle's custom implementation called Oracle Label Security (OLS). For details about Oracle VPD, see Oracle Database Security Guide. For details about Oracle Label Security, see Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide.

For details about using Oracle VPD with Multitenancy, see Section 14.4, "Using VPD Multi-Tenancy."

To use the Oracle Database VPD feature in an EclipseLink application, an isolated cache should be used. Any entity that maps to a table that uses Oracle VPD should have the descriptor configured as isolated. In addition, you typically use exclusive connections.

To support Oracle VPD, you must implement session event handlers that the are invoked during the persistence context's life cycle. The session event handler you must implement depends on whether or not you are using Oracle Database proxy authentication.

Oracle VPD with Oracle Database Proxy Authentication

By using Oracle Database proxy authentication, you can set up Oracle VPD support entirely in the database. That is, rather than session event handlers to execute SQL, the database performs the required setup in an after login trigger using the proxy session_user.

For details on using Oracle proxy authentication, see Section 24.2.4, "Using Oracle Proxy Authentication."

Oracle VPD Without Oracle Database Proxy Authentication

If you are not using Oracle Database proxy authentication, implement session event handlers for the following session events:

  • postAcquireExclusiveConnection: used to perform Oracle VPD setup at the time a dedicated connection is allocated to an isolated session and before the isolated session user uses the connection to interact with the database.

  • preReleaseExclusiveConnection: used to perform Oracle VPD cleanup at the time the isolated session is released and after the user is finished interacting with the database.

In the implementation of these handlers, you can obtain the required user credentials from the associated session's properties.

24.2.4 Using Oracle Proxy Authentication

JPA and EclipseLink are typically used in a middle tier/server environment with a shared connection pool. A connection pool allows database connections to be shared to avoid the cost of reconnecting to the database. Typically, the user logs into the application but does not have their own database login as a shared login is used for the connection pool. The provides a mechanism to set a proxy user on an existing database connection. This allows for a shared connection pool to be used, but to also gives the database a user context.

Oracle proxy authentication is configured using the following persistence unit properties on an EntityManager object:

  • "eclipselink.oracle.proxy-type" : oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXYTYPE_USER_NAME, PROXYTYPE_CERTIFICATE, PROXYTYPE_DISTINGUISHED_NAME

  • oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_NAME : user_name

  • oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_PASSWORD : password

  • oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_DISTINGUISHED_NAME

  • oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_CERTIFICATE

  • oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_ROLES

Note:

This connection is only used for writing by default; reads still use the shared connection pool. To force reads to also use the connection, the eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode property should be set to Always, but this depends on if the application wishes to audit writes or reads as well. The eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.is-lazy property configures whether the connection should be connected up front, or only when first required. If only writes are audited, then lazy connections allow for the cost of creating a new database connection to be avoided unless a write occurs.

24.2.4.1 Main Tasks:

To setup proxy authentication, create an EntityManager object and set the persistence unit properties. Three examples are provided:

Task: Audit Only Writes

To configure proxy authentication when auditing only writes:

Map properties = new HashMap();
properties.put("eclipselink.oracle.proxy-type",
 oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXYTYPE_USER_NAME);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_NAME, user);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_PASSWORD, password);
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode", "Transactional");
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.is-lazy", "true");
EntityManager em = factory.createEntityManager(properties);

Task: Audit Reads and Writes

To configure proxy authentication when auditing reads and writes:

Map properties = new HashMap();
properties.put("eclipselink.oracle.proxy-type",
 oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXYTYPE_USER_NAME);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_NAME, user);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_PASSWORD, password);
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode", "Always");
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.is-lazy", "false");
EntityManager em = factory.createEntityManager(properties);

Task: Configure Proxy Authentication in Java EE Applications

If a JEE and JTA managed entity manager is used, specifying a proxy user and password can be more difficult, as the entity manager and JDBC connection is not under the applications control. The persistence unit properties can still be specified on an EntityManager object as long as this is done before establishing a database connection.

If using JPA 2.0, the setProperty API can be used:

em.setProperty("eclipselink.oracle.proxy-type",
   oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXYTYPE_USER_NAME);
em.setProperty(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_NAME, user);
em.setProperty(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_PASSWORD, password);
em.setProperty("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode", "Always");
em.setProperty("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.is-lazy", "false");

Otherwise, the getDelegate API can be used:

Map properties = new HashMap();
properties.put("eclipselink.oracle.proxy-type",
   oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXYTYPE_USER_NAME);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_NAME, user);
properties.put(oracle.jdbc.OracleConnection.PROXY_USER_PASSWORD, password);
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode", "Always");
properties.put("eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.is-lazy", "false");
((org.eclipse.persistence.internal.jpa.EntityManagerImpl)em.getDelegate()).
   setProperties(properties);

24.2.4.2 Caching and security

By default, EclipseLink maintains a shared (L2) object cache. This is fine for auditing, but if Oracle VPD or user based security is used to prevent the reading of certain tables/classes, then the cache may need to be disabled for these secure classes. To disable the shared cache, see "Disabling Entity Caching".

If the database user is used to check security for reads, then set the eclipselink.jdbc.exclusive-connection.mode property to Isolated to only use the user connection for reads for the classes whose shared cache has been disabled (isolated).

24.2.4.3 Using Oracle Virtual Private Database for Row-Level Security

The Oracle Virtual Private Database (VPD) feature allows for row level security within the Oracle database. Typically, database security only allows access privileges to be assigned per table. Row level security allows different users to have access to different rows within each table.

The Oracle proxy authentication features in EclipseLink can be used to support Oracle VPD. The proxy user allows for the row level security to be checked. When using Oracle VPD, it is also important to disable shared caching for the secured objects as these objects should not be shared. To disable the shared cache, see "Disabling Entity Caching".

24.2.5 Using EclipseLink with Oracle RAC

Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) extends the Oracle Database so that you can store, update, and efficiently retrieve data using multiple database instances on different servers at the same time. Oracle RAC provides the software that manages multiple servers and instances as a single group. Applications use Oracle RAC features to maximize connection performance and availability and to mitigate down-time due to connection problems. Applications have different availability and performance requirements and implement Oracle RAC features accordingly. For details on Oracle RAC, see the Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide.

The Oracle Database and the Oracle WebLogic Server both provide connection pool implementations that can create connections to a RAC database and take advantage of various Oracle RAC features. The features include Fast Connection Failover (FCF), Run-Time Connection Load Balancing (RCLB), and connection affinity. In WebLogic Server, applications create JDBC data sources (Multi Data Source or GridLink Data Source) to connect to a RAC-enabled database. Standalone applications use the Universal Connection Pool (UCP) JDBC connection pool API (ucp.jar) to create data sources. Both connection pool implementations require the Oracle Notification Service library (ons.jar). This library is the primary means by which the connection pools register for, and listen to, RAC events. For those new to these technologies, refer to the Oracle Universal Connection Pool for JDBC Developer's Guide and the Administering JDBC Data Sources for Oracle WebLogic Server.

This sections assumes that you have an Oracle JDBC driver and Oracle RAC-enabled database. Make sure that the RAC-enabled database is operational and that you know the connection URL. In addition, download the database Oracle Client software that contains the ons.jar file. The ucp.jar file is included with the Oracle Database.

24.2.5.1 Accessing a RAC-Enabled database from Java EE Applications

The tasks in this section are used to connect to a RAC-enabled database from a persistence application implemented in Oracle WebLogic Server.

24.2.5.1.1 Task 1: Configure a Multi Data Source or GridLink Data Source

Refer to Chapter 3, "Using TopLink with WebLogic Server," and Administering JDBC Data Sources for Oracle WebLogic Server for details about configuring a data source in WebLogic Server for Oracle RAC.

24.2.5.1.2 Task 2: Configure the Persistence Unit

Edit the persistence.xml file and include the name of the data source within a persistence unit configuration. For example:

<persistence-unit name="OrderManagement">
   <jta-data-source>jdbc/MyOrderDB</jta-data-source>
   ...
</persistence-unit>
24.2.5.1.3 Task 3: Include the Required JARs

Ensure that the ons.jar is in the WebLogic Server classpath.

24.2.5.2 Accessing a RAC-Enabled Database from Standalone Applications

The tasks in this section are used to connect to a RAC database from a standalone persistence application. The tasks demonstrate how to use UCP data sources which are required for advanced RAC features.

24.2.5.2.1 Task 1: Create a UCP Data Source

A UCP data source is used to connect to a RAC database. The data source can specify advanced RAC configuration. For details on using advanced RAC features with UCP, see Oracle Universal Connection Pool for JDBC Developer's Guide. The following example creates a data source and enables FCF and configures ONS.

PoolDataSource datasource = PoolDataSourceFactory.getPoolDataSource();
datasource.setONSConfiguration(“nodes=host1:4200,host2:4200”);
datasource.setFastConnectionFailoverEnabled(true);
datasource.setConnectionFactoryClassName(“oracle.jdbc.pool.OracleDataSource”);
datasource.setURL(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@DESCRIPTION=
    (LOAD_BALANCE=on)
    (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=host1)(PORT=1521))
    (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=host2)(PORT=1521))
    (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=host3)(PORT=1521))
    (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=host4)(PORT=1521))
    (CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=service_name)))”);

Applications that do not require the advanced features provided by RAC and UCP can connect to a RAC-enabled database using the native connection pool in EclipseLink. In this case, edit the persistence.xml file for you applications and add the RAC URL connection string for a persistence unit. For example:

<persistence xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence"
   xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
   xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence
   persistence_1_0.xsd" version="1.0">
   <persistence-unit name="my-app" transaction-type="RESOURCE_LOCAL">
      <provider>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider</provider>
      <exclude-unlisted-classes>false</exclude-unlisted-classes>
      <properties>
         <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.driver"
            value="oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver"/>
         <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.url" 
            value="jdbc:oracle:thin@(DESCRIPTION= "+ "(LOAD_BALANCE=on)"+
           "(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=rac_node) (PORT=1521))"+
           "(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=racnode2) (PORT=1521))"+
           "(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=service_name))")"/>
         <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.user" value="user_name"/>
         <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.password" value="password"/>
      </properties>
   </persistence-unit>
</persistence>

To use the persistence unit, instantiate an EntityManagerFactory as follows:

Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("my-app");
24.2.5.2.2 Task 2: Use the UCP Data Source

To use the UCP data source, instantiate an EntityManagerFactory an pass in the data source as follows:

Map properties = new HashMap();
       properties.add("javax.persistence.nonJtaDataSource", datasource);
       Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory(properties);
24.2.5.2.3 Task 3: Include the Required JARs

Ensure that both ucp.jar and ons.jar are in the application classpath.

24.2.6 Using Oracle Spatial and Graph

EclipseLink provides added support for querying Oracle Spatial and Graph data in the Oracle Database. Oracle Spacial and Graph is used to location-enable applications. It provides advanced features for spatial data and analysis and for physical, logical, network, and social and semantic graph applications. The spatial features provide a schema and functions that facilitate the storage, retrieval, update, and query of collections of spatial features in an Oracle database. For details about developing Oracle Spacial and Graph applications, see Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's Guide. To use Oracle Spatial and Graph within WebLogic Server, see Chapter 3, "Task 7: Extend the Domain to Use Advanced Oracle Database Features,"

EclipseLink applications can construct expressions that use Oracle Spacial and Graph operators. See the org.eclipse.persistence.expressions.spatial API for details. For Example:

ExpressionBuilder builder = new ExpressionBuilder();
Expression withinDistance = SpatialExpressions.withinDistance(myJGeometry1,
   myJGeometry2, "DISTANCE=10");
session.readAllObjects(GeometryHolder.class, withinDistance);

The above expression requires a oracle.spatial.geometry.JGeometry object. Use the EclipseLink org.eclipse.persistence.platform.database.oracle.converters.JGeometryConverter converter to convert the JGeometry object as it is read and written from the Oracle database. The JGeometryConverter object must be added to the Oracle Database platform either with the addStructConverter(StructConverter) method or specified in the sessions.xml file. The JGeometry type must also be available on the classpath.

The following example demonstrates how to use the FUNCTION JPA extension to perform Oracle Spatial queries. For details on the FUNCTION extension, see Java Persistence API (JPA) Extensions Reference for Oracle TopLink:

SELECT a FROM Asset a, Geography geo WHERE geo.id = :id AND a.id IN :id_list AND
   FUNCTION('ST_INTERSECTS', a.geometry, geo.geometry) = 'TRUE'

SELECT s FROM SimpleSpatial s WHERE FUNCTION('MDSYS.SDO_RELATE', s.jGeometry,
   :otherGeometry, :params) = 'TRUE' ORDER BY s.id ASC