Fusion Middleware Documentation
Advanced Search


Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server
Close Window

Table of Contents

Show All | Collapse

1 Planning Your Oracle HTTP Server Installation

This guide will help you install Oracle HTTP Server 12.1.2.

Various topics are covered that should be reviewed thoroughly to help ensure that you do not encounter any problems either during or after the Oracle HTTP Server installation and domain configuration.

This chapter contains the following sections:

1.1 About Oracle HTTP Server

Oracle HTTP Server is the web server component for Oracle Fusion Middleware. It provides a listener for Oracle WebLogic Server and the framework for hosting static pages, dynamic pages, and applications over the Web.

For more information, see "Introduction to Oracle HTTP Server" in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

1.2 Understanding Oracle HTTP Server Domain Configuration Options

Oracle HTTP Server can be integrated into your Oracle Fusion Middleware environment in a number of ways. For the purposes of this guide, and for general planning purposes, there are two primary domain configurations supported by Oracle HTTP Server:

1.2.1 Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server Domain

When you configure Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain, the Oracle HTTP Server instances can be managed like any other elements of the WebLogic Server domain. Specifically, you can manage your Oracle HTTP Server instances from Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, the WLST Command line interface, and WebLogic Server Node Manager.

To configure Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain, you must install the Oracle HTTP Server software in an existing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure Oracle home.

When you run the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard from the Oracle home, you can then configure or extend a WebLogic Server domain so that it contains one or more Oracle HTTP Server instances, in addition to the Administration Server, Managed Servers, and other elements of the domain.

1.2.2 Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

When you configure Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone domain, the Oracle HTTP Servers reside in a separate, standalone domain that is dedicated to managing system components only.To configure Oracle HTTP Server instances in a standalone domain, you install the Oracle HTTP software in a separate Oracle home and there is no prerequisite for Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure.

For more information, see "What Is a Standalone Domain?" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

1.3 Selecting an Oracle HTTP Server Domain Configuration

Use the following guidelines when deciding which Oracle HTTP Server domain option to configure:

  • Use the Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain configuration if any of the following applies:

    • You plan to use the Oracle HTTP Server instance as a front-end Web tier, which will be routing requests to an Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure domain.

    • You want to take advantage of advanced management capabilities of Fusion Middleware Control to manage your Oracle HTTP Server instances.

    • You want to scale out your domain to multiple hosts and still manage the Oracle HTTP instances from a single FMW Control.

  • Use the Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone domain configuration if any of the following applies:

    • You plan to use the Oracle HTTP Server instance as a front-end Web tier, which will be routing requests to a domain where Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure is not available.

      For example, you can use a standalone Oracle HTTP Server instance to front-end an Oracle WebLogic Server and Coherence domain.

    • You are not interested in managing the Oracle HTTP Server instances with Fusion Middleware Control.

      Instead, you can use the WLST command-line and other features available in a standalone domain.

Note:

You can also configure a test or evaluation domain for Oracle HTTP Server, using a special WLST command. This WLST command creates an Oracle HTTP Server instance in a WebLogic Server domain that provides all the administrative capabilities of a full production domain but does not require an external database. The test domain cannot be scaled out to other machines and is not certified to be used in production.

For more information, see "createOHSTestDomain()" in the WLST Command Reference for Infrastructure Components.

1.4 Introducing the Oracle HTTP Server Standard Installation Topologies

This section contains the following topics:

1.4.1 About the Standard Installation Topologies

Using the Oracle HTTP Server software together with other application softwares, you can create a variety of production topologies to suit the needs of your applications, your organization, and your application users.

As a result, it is difficult to provide exact instructions for every possible Oracle HTTP Server installation. To solve this problem, this documentation provides detailed instructions for installing two typical Oracle HTTP Server configurations. These typical topologies are referred to as the Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c standard installation topologies.

Specifically, this guide describes how to install and configure the standard installation topology for Oracle HTTP Server in two configuration types: Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain (Figure 1-1) and Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone domain (Figure 1-2).

Your actual topology may vary, but the topologies described here provide an example that can be used as a guide to install Oracle HTTP Server and even span out to HA topologies.

For more information about standard installation topologies, see "Understanding the Standard Installation Topology" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

1.4.2 Standard Installation Topology for Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server Domain

For this topology, you install the Oracle HTTP Server software in an existing Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure Oracle home, and then you configure it as part of the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure domain.

Figure 1-1 shows the standard Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure topology with an Oracle HTTP Server instance in the same domain home. Note that you can also use this topology to scale out to an HA environment spanning multiple machines.

Figure 1-1 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server Installation in a WebLogic Server Domain

Description of Figure 1-1 follows
Description of "Figure 1-1 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server Installation in a WebLogic Server Domain"

This figure depicts the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure standard installation topology with an Oracle HTTP Server instance. The Infrastructure domain contains an Administration Server and a cluster containing two Managed Servers and an Oracle HTTP Server instance, all configured within the same Infrastructure domain.

The Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure includes Oracle software libraries, Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, and additional software required for deploying and managing Oracle ADF applications. The domain is configured on a single host and requires a supported database to host the required Fusion Middleware schemas.

Table 1-1 describes the elements of this topology.

Table 1-1 Description of the Elements in the Oracle HTTP Server Installation Topology

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation

APPHOST

Standard term used in Oracle documentation referring to the machine that is hosting the application tier.

Note that in this topology the APPHOST hosts the web tier too.

DBHOST

Standard term used in Oracle documentation referring to the machine that is hosting the database.

WebLogic Domain

A logically related group of Java components (in this case, the Administration Server, Managed Servers, and other related software components).

For more information, see "What is an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Administration Server

The central control entity for the configuration of the entire domain.

For more information, see "What is the Administration Server" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Enterprise Manager

Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. This is the main tool that can be used to manage your domain.

For more information, see "Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Oracle HTTP Server

The Oracle HTTP Server binaries and an Oracle HTTP Server instance.

Cluster

A collection of multiple WebLogic Server instances running simultaneously and working together.

For more information, see "Understanding Managed Servers and Managed Server Clusters" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Machine

Logical representation of the computer that hosts one or more WebLogic Server instances (servers). Machines are also the logical glue between WebLogic Managed Servers and the Node Manager; in order to start or stop a Managed Server with Node Manager, the Managed Server must be associated with a machine.

Managed Server

Host for your applications, application components, Web services, and their associated resources.

For more information, see "Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Infrastructure

Collection of services that include the following:

  • Metadata repository (MDS)

    This contains metadata for Oracle Fusion Middleware components, such as the Oracle Application Developer Framework.

    For more information, see "What is the Metadata Repository" in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

  • Oracle Application Developer Framework (Oracle ADF)

  • Oracle Web Services Manager (OWSM)

For more information, see "About Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure 12c (12.1.2)" in Understanding Interoperability and Compatibility.


For information about the roadmap for arriving at this topology, see Section 1.5.1.

1.4.3 Standard Installation Topology for Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

The standalone Oracle HTTP Server topology can be installed and configured without the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure. For this topology, you install the Oracle HTTP Server software in its own Oracle home, and you configure the Oracle HTTP Server instance in its own standalone domain.

Figure 1-2 shows the standard Oracle HTTP Server instance in the Web tier. Note that after installing standalone Oracle HTTP Server, it can also be wired with a standard Oracle WebLogic Server and Coherence topology.

Figure 1-2 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

Description of Figure 1-2 follows
Description of "Figure 1-2 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain"

Table 1-2 describes the elements of this topology.

Table 1-2 Description of the Elements in the Oracle HTTP Server Standalone Installation Topology

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation

WEBHOST

This a separate host, which the sends requests to a WebLogic Server domain.

Standalone Domain

For more information, see "Standalone Domain" in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

Oracle HTTP Server

The Oracle HTTP Server instance, which is created and managed by the management tools available in the standalone domain.


For more information about the roadmap for arriving at this topology, see Section 1.5.2.

1.5 Roadmaps for Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server

This section contains the following topics:

1.5.1 Roadmap for Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server Domain

Table 1-3 shows the steps required to install and configure Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server Domain.

Tip:

You could install both the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure and the Oracle HTTP Server distributions into the same Oracle home and configure both the Infrastructure domain and the Oracle HTTP Server instance at the same time.

Table 1-3 Roadmap for Oracle HTTP Server Installation Configured in a WebLogic Server Domain

Task Description For More Information

Install and configure the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure standard installation topology

Before beginning the Oracle HTTP Server installation, you must install and configure an Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure software.

Installing and Configuring Oracle Fusion Middleware for Oracle Application Development Framework

Make sure all processes associated with the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure domain are shut down.

If your Node Manager, Administration Server, Managed Servers, and any other servers are up and running, then you must shut them down before you can begin installing and configuring Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain.

"Stopping an Oracle Fusion Middleware Environment" in Administering Oracle Fusion Middleware

"Installing Multiple Products in the Same Domain" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Verify your system environment

Before beginning the installation, verify that the minimum system and network requirements are met.

Section 1.6

Obtain the appropriate distribution

To create the topology described in this guide, obtain the Oracle HTTP Server distribution.

Section 1.7

Determine your installation directories

Verify whether the directories created while installing and configuring the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure topology exists and can be accessed by the installer.

Appendix A

Install Oracle HTTP Server

Run the installation program to install the software. This transfers the software to your system and update the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure Oracle home to include the Oracle HTTP Server binaries.

Chapter 2

Update the existing Infrastructure domain

Use the configuration wizard to extend the Infrastructure domain to include an Oracle HTTP Server instance.

Note: If you have not configured Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure yet, then you can configure Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure and Oracle HTTP Server at the same time.

Chapter 3

Review post-configuration administration and configuration tasks

Discover additional tools and resources to administer your domain and configure your domain to be highly available.

Chapter 5


1.5.2 Roadmap for Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

Table 1-4 shows the steps required to install and configure Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone domain.

Table 1-4 Roadmap for Oracle HTTP Server Installation Configured in a Standalone Domain

Task Description For More Information

Verify your system environment

Before beginning the installation, verify that the minimum system and network requirements are met.

Section 1.6

Obtain the appropriate distribution

To create the topology described in this guide, obtain the Oracle HTTP Server distribution.

Section 1.7

Determine your installation directories

Verify that the product and config directories are created, is accessible by the installer, and exist on systems that meet the minimum requirements.

Section A

Install Oracle HTTP Server

Run the installation program to install the software. This transfers the software to your system and creates the Oracle home directory.

Chapter 2

Create an Oracle HTTP Server standalone domain

Use the configuration wizard to create and configure an Oracle HTTP Server in a standalone domain.

Chapter 4

Review post-configuration administration and configuration tasks

Discover additional tools and resources to administer your domain and configure your domain to be highly available.

Chapter 5


1.6 Roadmap for Verifying Your System Environment

Table 1-5 contains important information that you must read and understand prior to beginning the installation and configuration process. It identifies important tasks and checks, that you must perform, to make sure that your environment is properly prepared for installing and configuring Oracle HTTP Server.

Table 1-5 Roadmap for Verifying Your System Environment

Task Description For More Information, See

Verify certification and system requirements.

Verify that your operating system is certified and properly configured for Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure installation and configuration.

"Verifying Certification and System Requirements" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Prepare your system for installation.

Verify that the necessary environment variables are set, and you have identified a proper installation user.

"Prepare Your System for Installation" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.


1.7 Understanding and Obtaining the Oracle HTTP Server Distribution

The Oracle HTTP Server distribution is available as a standalone executable installation program which includes a Java Runtime Environment.

Tip:

For more information about distributions, see "Understanding and Obtaining Product Distributions" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

To obtain the distribution, see "Obtaining Product Distributions" in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.