1 Introduction to IdM Suite Components Integration

This chapter explains integration concepts for the Oracle Identity Management suite.

The chapter contains these topics:

1.1 Prerequisites to Integrating IdM Suite Components

Before using these procedures to integrate Identity Management components, you must install and deploy the components.

These prerequisites are explained in the following sections:

For details about installing Identity Management components, see:

  • Oracle® Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access Management

  • Oracle® Fusion Middleware Quick Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access Management

1.1.1 Understanding the Installation Roadmap

You will take (or may already have taken) one of these paths in your IdM deployment:

  • Installation, followed by component integration, and ending with scale-out (HA)

  • Installation, followed by scale-out, and ending with integration

With scale-out, you may already have performed some of the integration procedures described here; notes in the relevant sections can help you determine whether a procedure is needed.

Introduction in the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access Management contains background on the IdM deployment procedure and describes the installation roadmap, prerequisites, and the installation and configuration workflow.

High Availability Concepts in the High Availability Guide explains the high availability solutions in Oracle Fusion Middleware, as well as the topologies and architecture of the various HA options.

1.1.2 Understanding Deployment Topologies

Before starting this integration, you must also understand the identity management topology and the environment in which the components will work together.

To learn more about the topology supported in this document, see Understanding Oracle Identity Management Integration Topologies.

1.1.3 Understanding LDAP Synchronization in Oracle Identity Governance

Enable LDAP synchronization in Oracle Identity Management before starting this integration.

LDAP synchronization works when Oracle Identity Manager is integrated with Access Manager (OAM). But OAM-OIM integration using IDMConfigTool is not supported in 12c. The integration will be based on LDAP connectors and will be available post PS3. However, If you have upgraded Oracle Identity Manager from Release 11.1.2.3 to Release 12.2.1.3, then you can continue with LDAP synchronization, as described in About LDAP Synchronization in Oracle Identity Manager and Enabling LDAP Synchronization in Oracle Identity Manager in the Integration Guide for Oracle Identity Management Suite for Release 11.1.2.3.

1.1.4 About Using Oracle Virtual Directory with Access Manager

Using Oracle Virtual Directory with Oracle Access Management Access Manager (Access Manager) is optional.

However, if you plan to use Oracle Virtual Directory with Access Manager, then you must configure Oracle Virtual Directory for integration with Access Manager before starting the core integration procedures described in this publication. See Configuring Oracle Virtual Directory for Integration with Oracle Access Management Access Manager.

1.1.5 Common Environment Variables

Shorthand notations are used to refer to common environment variables.

For example, the Oracle Middleware Home directory is often referred to as MW_HOME.

See "Identifying Installation Directories" in the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access Management.

1.2 Understanding Oracle Identity Management Integration Topologies

Oracle Identity Management consists of a number of products, which can be used either individually or collectively.

Two basic types of topology are available in Oracle Identity Management:

  • Basic integration topology

    This topology supports integration between suite components, in an environment where each component runs on a separate node.

  • Enterprise integration topology

    This topology supports integration between suite components in an enterprise environment. Each component may run on multiple nodes.

This book is dedicated to the first type, single-node integration topology. Use the procedures described in this book when deploying Oracle Identity Management in an environment where each component runs on its own node. You can also use the procedures to understand integration tools and techniques, and to understand the effects and benefits of integrating specific identity management components.

1.2.1 About the Basic Integration Topology

Basic integration topology is where the IdM components Access Manager and Oracle Identity Management are configured on separate Oracle WebLogic domains.

See Also:

Table 1-1 for definitions of acronyms used in this section.

Figure 1-1 shows a basic integration topology where the IdM components Access Manager and Oracle Identity Management are configured on separate Oracle WebLogic domains:

Figure 1-1 Basic Integration Topology with Multiple Administration Servers



Note that:

  • All IdM components, including Access Manager server (AMHOST), the Oracle Identity Management server (OIMHOST), and Oracle Internet Directory (OID) are configured in separate WebLogic domains, and each is administered by its own administration server.

    Besides enhancing management of each component, this topology ensures you have flexibility when applying patches and upgrades. Patches for each component can be applied independently, with no version dependency on other components.

  • For simplicity, some of the OMSS topology is omitted; for example the MSAS server which resides in the DMZ is not shown in the diagram.

  • The BIP server and SOA Suite reside on the OIM domain; they are not shown in the diagram.

  • The figure shows some representative ports only.

The SOA Suite used by OIM must be installed in the same domain as OIM. However, if you use SOA Suite for other purposes, you should consider setting up a separate install of SOA Suite for running your own services, composites, and other SOA features for that purpose.

In the single-domain architecture, Oracle Access Management Access Manager, Oracle Identity Management, and Oracle Mobile Security Access Server are configured on the same WebLogic domain. While possible, such a topology is not practical in the current context for the reasons cited above, and is not recommended for IdM integration.

See Also:

Overview of IdM Components Used in the Integration for an introduction to each IdM component.

1.2.1.1 About the Three Tier Architecture

This architecture can be viewed as consisting of three layers or zones:

  • The Web Tier consists of the HTTP server and handles incoming Web traffic.

  • The Application Tier contains identity management applications for managing identities and access, including Oracle Identity Management and Oracle Access Manager.

  • The Data Tier, here considered to include the directory servers, hosts LDAPs and database.

1.2.1.2 Understanding the Web Tier

The web tier is in the DMZ Public Zone. The HTTP servers are deployed in the web tier.Most Identity Management components can function without the web tier. However, the web tier is required to support enterprise level single sign-on using products such as Access Manager.

The web tier is structured as follows in the single-node topology:

  • WEBHOST has Oracle HTTP Server, WebGate (an Access Manager component), and the mod_wl_ohs plug-in module installed. The mod_wl_ohs plug-in module enables requests to be proxied from Oracle HTTP Server to a WebLogic Server running in the application tier.WebGate, an Access Manager component in Oracle HTTP Server, uses Oracle Access Protocol (OAP) to communicate with Access Manager running on OAMHOST. WebGate and Access Manager are used to perform operations such as user authentication.

1.2.1.3 Understanding the Application Tier

The application tier is the tier where Java EE applications are deployed. Products such as Oracle Identity Manager, Oracle Mobile Security Suite, Oracle Access Management Identity Federation, and Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control are among key Java EE components deployed in this tier.

The Identity Management applications in the application tier interact with the directory tier as follows:

  • They leverage the directory tier for enterprise identity information.

  • They leverage the directory tier (and sometimes the database in the data tier) for application metadata.

  • Fusion Middleware Control Console provides administrative functions to the components in the application and directory tiers.

  • Oracle WebLogic Server has built-in web server support. If enabled, the HTTP listener exists in the application tier as well.

1.2.1.4 Understanding the Data Tier

The data tier is the deployment layer where all the LDAP services reside. This tier includes products such as Oracle Internet Directory (OIDHOST), Oracle Virtual Directory (OVDHOST), Oracle Unified Directory, and Oracle Database (IDMDBHOST).

The data tier stores two types of information:

  • Identity Information: Information about users and groups resides in the identity store.

  • Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS): Information about security policies and about configuration resides in the policy store.

Policy information resides in a centralized policy store that is located within a database. You may store identity information in Oracle Internet Directory or in another directory.

If you store the identity details in a directory other than Oracle Internet Directory you can use Oracle Virtual Directory to present all the identity data in a single consolidated view that Oracle Identity Management components can interpret. See Configuring an Identity Store with Multiple Directories.

Note:

Oracle Identity Management uses Oracle Virtual Directory server or libOVD to access third-party directories.

1.2.2 About the Enterprise Integration Topology

Unlike single-node topologies, an enterprise integration topology takes into account such features as high availability, failover, and firewalls, and is beyond the scope of this document.

1.2.3 Using Multiple Directories for an Identity Store

Although the integration scenarios in this document focus on a simple identity store topology consisting of an Oracle Internet Directory LDAP server, your site may have some user data in a third-party directory, such as Microsoft Active Directory, and other user data in Oracle Internet Directory.

To account for this topology, you can use Oracle Virtual Directory to present all the identity data in a single consolidated view that Oracle Identity Management components can interpret.

See Configuring an Identity Store with Multiple Directories.

1.2.4 Integration Terminology

Definitions of terms that define the Oracle Fusion Middleware architecture.

Table 1-1 shows key terms and acronyms that are used to describe the architecture and topology of an Oracle Fusion Middleware environment:

Table 1-1 Oracle Fusion Middleware Integration Terminology

Term Definition

IdM Configuration Tool

A command-line tool to verify the status of identity management components and to perform certain integration tasks.

Oracle Access Protocol (OAP)

A secure channel for communication between Webgates and Access Manager servers during authorization.

Oracle Fusion Middleware home

A Middleware home consists of the Oracle WebLogic Server home, and, optionally, one or more Oracle homes.

A Middleware home can reside on a local file system or on a remote shared disk that is accessible through NFS.

Oracle HTTP Server (OHS)

Web server component for Oracle Fusion Middleware that provides a listener for Oracle WebLogic Server.

WebLogic Server home

A WebLogic Server home contains installed files necessary to host a WebLogic Server. The WebLogic Server home directory is a peer of other Oracle home directories underneath the Middleware home directory.

Oracle home

An Oracle home contains installed files necessary to host a specific product. For example, the Oracle Identity Management Oracle home contains a directory that contains binary and library files for Oracle Identity Management.

An Oracle home resides within the directory structure of the Middleware home. Each Oracle home can be associated with multiple Oracle instances or Oracle WebLogic Server domains.

Oracle instance

An Oracle instance contains one or more system components, such as Oracle Web Cache, Oracle HTTP Server, or Oracle Internet Directory. The system components in an Oracle instance must reside on the same machine. An Oracle instance directory contains files that can be updated, such as configuration files, log files, and temporary files.

An Oracle instance is a peer of an Oracle WebLogic Server domain. Both contain specific configurations outside of their Oracle homes.

The directory structure of an Oracle instance is separate from the directory structure of the Oracle home. It can reside anywhere; it need not be within the Middleware home directory.

Oracle WebLogic Server domain

A WebLogic Server domain is a logically related group of Java components. A WebLogic Server domain includes a special WebLogic Server instance called the Administration Server, which is the central point from which you configure and manage all resources in the domain. Usually, you configure a domain to include additional WebLogic Server instances called Managed Servers. You deploy Java components, such as Web applications, EJBs, and Web services, and other resources to the Managed Servers and use the Administration Server for configuration and management purposes only.

Managed Servers in a WebLogic Server domain can be grouped together into a cluster.

An Oracle WebLogic Server domain is a peer of an Oracle instance. Both contain specific configurations outside of their Oracle homes.

The directory structure of an WebLogic Server domain is separate from the directory structure of the WebLogic Server home. It can reside anywhere; it need not be within the Middleware home directory.

system component

A system component is a manageable process that is not WebLogic Server. For example: Oracle HTTP Server, WebCache, and Oracle Internet Directory. Includes the JSE component.

Java component

A Java component is a peer of a system component, but is managed by the application server container. Generally refers to a collection of applications and resources, with generally a 1:1 relationship with a domain extension template. For example: SOA and WebCenter Spaces.

Oracle Fusion Middleware farm

Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control is a Web browser-based, graphical user interface that you can use to monitor and administer an Oracle Fusion Middleware farm.

An Oracle Fusion Middleware farm is a collection of components managed by Fusion Middleware Control. It can contain WebLogic Server domains, one or more Managed Servers and the Oracle Fusion Middleware system components that are installed, configured, and running in the domain.

Oracle Identity Management

The suite of identity and access management components in Oracle Fusion Middleware. See Overview of IdM Components Used in the Integration for details.

WebLogic Administration Server

The Administration Server is the central point from which you configure and manage all resources in the WebLogic domain.

WebLogic Managed Server

The Managed Server is an additional WebLogic Server instance to host business applications, application components, Web services, and their associated resources. Multiple managed servers can operate within the domain. Certain Managed Servers in the domain are created specifically to host Oracle Fusion Middleware components.

1.3 Overview of IdM Components Used in the Integration

This section provides a brief overview of IdM components whose integrations are described in this book, and explains the benefits of integration.

Topics include:

1.3.1 Oracle Unified Directory

Oracle Unified Directory is a comprehensive next generation directory service. It is designed to address large deployments and to provide high performance in a demanding environment.

The Oracle Unified Directory server is an LDAPv3-compliant directory server written entirely in Java. The directory server provides full LDAPv3 compliance, high performance and space effective data storage, and ease of configuration and administration.

Several procedures in this book feature Oracle Unified Directory as the repository for the identity store.

1.3.2 Oracle Internet Directory

Oracle Internet Directory is a general purpose directory service that enables fast retrieval and centralized management of information about dispersed users and network resources. It combines Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) Version 3 with the high performance, scalability, robustness, and availability of an Oracle Database.

Oracle Internet Directory can serve as the repository for the identity store, which contains user identities leveraged by identity management components and other applications.

For details about integration with Oracle Internet Directory, see:

1.3.3 Oracle Virtual Directory

Oracle Virtual Directory, an LDAP version 3 enabled service that provides virtualized abstraction of one or more enterprise data sources into a single directory view. Oracle Virtual Directory makes many directories appear to be one local repository, hiding the complexity of data location, format, and protocol from client applications.

See Configuring Oracle Virtual Directory for Integration with Oracle Access Management Access Manager.

1.3.4 Oracle Access Management Access Manager

Oracle Access Management Access Manager provides a full range of Web perimeter security functions that include Web single sign-on; authentication and authorization; policy administration; auditing, and more. All existing access technologies in the Oracle Identity Management stack converge in Access Manager.

For details about integration with Access Manager, see:

1.3.4.1 A Note About IDMDomain Agents and Webgates

By default, the IDMDomain Agent is enabled in the Oracle HTTP Server deployment. If you migrate from IDMDomain Agent to WebGate Agent, note the following:

  • The protection policies set up for IDMDomain can be reused for WebGate if your webgate uses the IDMDomain preferredHost.

  • IDMDomain and WebGate can coexist. If the IDMDomain Agent discovers a WebGate Agent in the Oracle HTTP Server deployment, IDMDomain Agent becomes dormant.

1.3.5 Oracle Identity Governance

Oracle Identity Management is a powerful and flexible enterprise identity management system that automatically manages users' access privileges within enterprise IT resources. Oracle Identity Manager is designed from the ground up to manage user access privileges across all of a firm's resources, throughout the entire identity management lifecycle—from initial creation of access privileges to dynamically adapting to changes in business requirements.

1.3.6 Oracle Access Management Identity Federation

To enhance support for federated authentication in cloud, web services, and B2B transactions, a SAML-based federation service is being introduced in a single access management server in 11g Release 2 (11.1.2). Oracle Access Management Identity Federation is an enterprise-level, carrier-grade service for secure identity information exchange between partners. Identity Federation protects existing IT investments by integrating with a wide variety of data stores, user directories, authentication providers and applications.

In this initial release Identity Federation is limited to Service Provider mode. Identity Provider mode still requires an Oracle Identity Federation 11gR1 installation.

For details about using the Identity Federation service with Access Manager, see Integrating with Identity Federation.

1.4 IdM Integration Quick Links

Links to integration procedures.

Table 1-2 provides links to the integration procedures described here.

Table 1-2 Links to Integration Procedures in This Guide

Components to Integrate Link

Post-install LDAP Synchronization with Oracle Identity Manager

Enabling LDAP Synchronization in Oracle Identity Governance

Oracle Virtual Directory and Oracle Identity Manager

Enabling LDAP Synchronization in Oracle Identity Governance

Oracle Virtual Directory and Access Manager

Configuring Oracle Virtual Directory for Integration with Oracle Access Management Access Manager

Access Manager and Oracle Identity Manager

Integrating Access Manager and Oracle Identity Governance

Access Manager and Identity Federation

Integrating with Identity Federation

Multi-Directory identity store

Configuring an Identity Store with Multiple Directories

Table 1-3 lists key integration procedures that appear in other IdM documents:

Table 1-3 Links to Integration Procedures in Other Guides

Components to Integrate Link

Oracle Privileged Account Manager (OPAM) and Oracle Identity Manager (OIM)

Integrating with Oracle Identity Manager in Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle Privileged Account Manager

OPAM and OAM

Integrating with Oracle Access Management Access Manager in Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle Privileged Account Manager

OIM and Oracle Identity Analytics (OIA)

Integrating with Identity Analytics in Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle Identity Manager

1.5 Common Access Manager and Oracle Identity Governance Integration Scenarios

Common scenarios in Access Manager and Oracle Identity Management integrations for resource protection and password life cycle management are detailed here.

1.5.1 About Password Management Scenarios

Common management scenarios supported by these deployment modes include:

1.5.1.1 About Access Manager Integrated with Oracle Identity Governance

Figure 1-2 shows how password management is achieved when Access Manager and Oracle Identity Manager are integrated.

Figure 1-2 Integrating Access Manager and Oracle Identity Manager for Password Management

Integration flow OAM-OAAM-OIG

The flow of interactions between the components is as follows:

  1. A user tries to access a resource protected by Access Manager.

  2. The Oracle Access Management WebGate intercepts the (unauthenticated) request.

  3. WebGate redirects the user to the Access Manager login service, which performs validation checks.

  4. If Access Manager finds any password management trigger conditions, such as password expiry, it redirects users to Oracle Identity Manager.

  5. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to establish the user's identity and carry out the appropriate action, such as resetting the password.

  6. Access Manager logs the user in by means of auto-login, and redirects the user to the Access Manager-protected resource which the user was trying to access in Step 1.

1.5.1.2 About Self-Registration

In this scenario, the user does not have an account but tries to access an Access Manager-protected resource. An Oracle Access Management 11g WebGate intercepts the request, detects that the user is not authenticated, and redirects the user to the Oracle Access Management Credential Collector (or 10g authenticating WebGate), which shows the Access Manager Login page containing a Register New Account link.

On selecting this link, the user is securely redirected to the Oracle Identity Manager Self Registration URL. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to provision his account.

The Welcome Page is an unprotected page from which the self-registration/account creation can be initiated. This page contains two links, in addition to any introductory text or branding information. The links are:

  • Register New Account - This is an unprotected URL to the corresponding application's registration wizard

  • Login - This is a protected URL which serves as the landing page to which the user is directed after successfully completing the login.

Note:

Any application protected by a single sign-on system with the self-registration requirement is expected to support a self-registration page. The options are:

  • Self-registration using the default self-registration page or a customized version of the page.

    This is the most common option and is covered here.

  • Self-registration using anonymous pages in other applications.

    If the application dictates that the user be automatically logged in at the end of the registration process, it can implement this by using the Oracle Platform Security Services APIs.

The account creation flow is as follows:

  1. The user (using his browser) accesses the application's welcome page, which contains a Register New Account link.

  2. The user clicks the Register New Account link, which takes the user to a self-registration page provided by the application.

  3. The user interacts with the application to self-register.

  4. On completion, the application performs an auto-login for the user.

The protected application is expected to send an SPML request to Oracle Identity Manager to create the user. After this, the application could choose to do one of the following:

  • The application may choose not to auto-login the user. The application redirects the user to the protected landing page URL. Access Manager then shows the login page and takes the user through the login flow.

  • If there is no approval associated with the request, the application can make use of the Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS) APIs to conduct an auto-login to the specific landing page URL and respond with a redirect request with that URL (along with the SSO cookie). This takes the user directly to the landing page without bringing up the login page.

  • Auto-login cannot be done if approval is needed. The application determines which profile to use at the time of SPML request. The application needs to respond with an appropriate page indicating that the request has been submitted.

1.5.1.3 About Password Change

The Change Password flow enables users to change their password.

In the Change Password flow with Access Manager and Oracle Identity Manager, the user successfully logs into Access Manager but is required to immediately change the password. The user is not authorized to access protected resources until the password is changed and challenges have been set up.

On successful login, Access Manager detects if the triggering condition is in effect and redirects the user to the Oracle Identity Manager Change Password URL. Oracle Identity Manager facilitates the user password change or challenge set-up and resets the triggering condition.

On completion, Oracle Identity Manager redirects the user to the protected resource.

This situation is triggered in the following cases:

  • The Change Password upon Login flag is on. This occurs:

    • when a new user is created

    • when the administrator resets a user's password

  • The password has expired.

This flow describes the situation where a user logs in to an Access Manager-protected application for the first time, and is required to change password before proceeding.

The following describes the Change Password flow:

  1. Using a browser, the user tries to access an application URL that is protected by Access Manager.

  2. Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO Agent) intercepts the request and redirects the user to the Access Manager Login Page.

  3. The user submits credentials, which are validated by Access Manager.

  4. Access Manager next determines if any of the First Login trigger conditions are valid. If so, Access Manager redirects the user to the Oracle Identity Manager Change Password URL.

  5. Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO Agent) intercepts the request, determines that Oracle Identity Manager is protected by the Anonymous Authentication Policy, and allows the user request to proceed.

  6. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to enable the user to change his password. On completion, Oracle Identity Manager updates the attributes that triggered the First Login flow. Oracle Identity Manager then performs a user auto-login.

  7. Oracle Identity Manager notifies Access Manager of the successful first login.

  8. Oracle Identity Manager redirects the user to the application URL the user tried to access in step 1.

1.5.1.4 About Forgot Password

The Forgot Password flow allows users to reset their password after successfully answering all challenge questions.

In this scenario, the user is at the Access Manager Login page and clicks the Forgot Password link. Access Manager redirects the user to the Oracle Identity Management Forgot Password URL, and passes the destination URL to which Oracle Identity Manager must redirect upon a successful password change as a query parameter (backURL).

Oracle Identity Management asks the user the challenge questions. Upon providing the correct responses, the user is allowed to specify a new password.

On completion, Oracle Identity Management redirects the user to the protected resource.

The Forgot Password flow is as follows:

  1. Using a browser, the user tries to access an application URL that is protected by Access Manager.

  2. The Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO Agent) intercepts the request and redirects the user to the Access Manager Login Page.

  3. The user clicks on the Forgot Password link on the Access Manager Login page, which sends the user to the Oracle Identity Manager Forgot Password URL.

  4. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to enable the user to reset the password. On completion, Oracle Identity Manager performs a user auto-login.

  5. Oracle Identity Manager redirects the user to the application URL to which access was attempted in step 1.

1.5.1.5 About Account Lock and Unlock

Access Manager keeps track of login attempts and locks the account when the count exceeds the established limit in the password policy.

After the user account is locked, Access Manager displays the Help Desk contact information and Forgot Password link, or similar for any login attempt made. The information provided about the account unlocking process will need to be customized to reflect the process that is followed by your organization.

The following describes the account locking/unlocking flow:

  1. Using a browser, a user tries to access an application URL that is protected by Access Manager.

  2. Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO Agent) intercepts the request and redirects the user to the Access Manager login page.

  3. The user submits credentials that fail Access Manager validation. Access Manager renders the login page and asks the user to resubmit his or her credentials.

  4. The user's unsuccessful login attempts exceed the limit specified by the policy. Access Manager locks the user account and redirects the user to the Access Manager Account Lockout URL. The resulting page displays the Help Desk contact information and Forgot Password link.

  5. If the user contacts the Help Desk over the telephone and asks an administrator to unlock the account, then:

    1. The Help Desk unlocks the account using the Oracle Identity Manager administration console.

    2. Oracle Identity Manager notifies Access Manager of the account unlock event.

    3. The user attempts to access an application URL and this event triggers the normal Oracle Access Management single sign-on flow.

  6. If the user uses the Forgot Password link, the user is sent to the Oracle Identity Manager Forgot Password URL, then:

    1. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to enable the user to reset the password. On completion, Oracle Identity Manager performs a user auto-login.

    2. Oracle Identity Manager redirects the user to the application URL.

    Note:

    The user would be able to self-unlock the account by going through the Oracle Identity Manager Forgot Password flow, only once the user status is locked in Oracle Identity Manager. The user locked status is synchronized from the LDAP provider to Oracle Identity Manager only when the "LDAP User Create and Update Reconciliation" scheduled job is run.

1.5.1.6 About Challenge Setup

The Challenge Setup enables users to register challenge questions and answers.

When such redirection happens, Oracle Identity Management checks if the challenge questions are set. If not, it asks the user to set up challenge questions in addition to resetting the password.

Access Manager detects and redirects on password trigger conditions:

  • Password Policy is updated to increase the required number of challenges.

  • Password Policy is updated to require challenges

The following describes the flow:

Note:

The flow assumes First Login is not required.

  1. Using a browser, the user tries to access an application URL that is protected by Access Manager.

  2. Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO agent) intercepts the request and redirects the user to the Access Manager Login Page.

  3. The user submits credentials, which are validated by Access Manager. If a password triggering condition is detected, Access Manager redirects the user to the Oracle Identity Manager change password URL.

  4. The Oracle Access Management WebGate (SSO agent) intercepts the request, determines that Oracle Identity Manager is protected by the anonymous authentication policy, and allows the user request to proceed.

  5. Oracle Identity Manager interacts with the user to set up the challenges. On completion, Oracle Identity Manager updates the attributes that triggered the set challenges flow.

  6. Oracle Identity Manager redirects the user to the application URL that the user attempted to access in Step 1.

1.5.2 About Managing Mobile Security Accounts and Applications Using Identity Self-Service

The Manage Mobile Security Account flow enables users to manage their mobile security accounts and applications. The flow between Oracle Mobile Security Suite and Oracle Mobile Security Suite-integrated components is as follows:

  1. The user enrolls his mobile devices in Oracle Mobile Security Suite.

  2. Oracle Mobile Security Suite provisions applications to the users based on his roles.

  3. The user logs in to the Oracle Identity Manager Self Service Console to:

    • view his devices

    • perform operations, such as lock, wipe, or reset passcode for his device or workspace

  4. The Oracle Mobile Security Suite task flows embedded in the Oracle Identity Management Console invokes Oracle Mobile Security Suite to obtain information on the devices and perform operations on them.

1.6 System Requirements and Certification

Refer to the system compatibility, requirements and certification documentation for information about hardware and software requirements, platforms, databases, and other information.

The compatibility documentation describes compatibility and interoperability considerations that may arise when you install, patch, or upgrade Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g components. For details, see Understanding Interoperability and Compatibility.

The system requirements document covers information such as hardware and software requirements, minimum disk space and memory requirements, and required system libraries, packages, or patches.

The certification document covers supported installation types, platforms, operating systems, databases, JDKs, directory servers, and third-party products.

For the latest requirements and certification documentation refer to the table "Oracle Fusion Middleware Certification Matrices" in the Understanding Interoperability and Compatibility.

1.7 Using My Oracle Support for Additional Troubleshooting Information

You can use My Oracle Support (formerly MetaLink) to help resolve Oracle Fusion Middleware problems.

My Oracle Support contains several useful troubleshooting resources, such as:

  • Knowledge base articles

  • Community forums and discussions

  • Patches and upgrades

  • Certification information

Note:

You can also use My Oracle Support to log a service request.

You can access My Oracle Support at https://support.oracle.com.