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XML DB Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Full-Text Search Over XML Data

Indexing with a CONTEXT Indexavailable when building a full-text index. These choices are expressed as indexing preferences. To … use an indexing preference, add the PARAMETERS clause to CREATE INDEX, as shown in Example 12-29.

Database Performance Tuning Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Configuring a Database for Performance

4.2.3 Indexing DataThe most efficient time to create indexes is after data has been loaded. In this way, space management becomes simpler, and no index maintenance takes place for each row inserted. SQL*Loader automatically uses this technique, but if you are using other methods to do initial data load, then you may need to create indexes manually. Additionally, you can perform index creation in parallel using the PARALLEL

Database Utilities, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Conventional and Direct Path Loads

Presorting Data for Faster IndexingYou can improve the performance of direct path loads by presorting your data on indexed columns. Presorting minimizes temporary storage requirements during the load. Presorting also enables you to take advantage of high-performance sorting routines that are optimized for your operating system or application. If the data is presorted and the existing index is not empty, then presorting minimizes the

Spatial Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Spatial Concepts

1.7.1 R-Tree IndexingA spatial R-tree index can index spatial data of up to four dimensions. An R-tree index approximates each geometry by a single rectangle that minimally encloses the geometry (called the minimum bounding rectangle, or MBR), as shown in Figure 1-3.

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Administering Oracle Text

12.6 Servers and IndexingManager in Oracle Enterprise Manager. See Also: Chapter 3, " Indexing with Oracle Text" for more information about indexing and index synchronization

Text Reference, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Oracle Text Multilingual Features

D.2 IndexingThe following sections describe the multilingual indexing features: Multilingual Features for Text

Spatial GeoRaster Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

GeoRaster Operations

3.7 Indexing GeoRaster Data: Function-based indexes on metadata objects using the Oracle XMLType or Oracle Text document indexing

Spatial Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Spatial Concepts

1.7 Indexing of Spatial DataSection 5.2. 1.7 Indexing of Spatial Data The introduction of spatial indexing capabilities into the … will be documented as they become available. The following sections explain the concepts and options associated with R-tree indexing.

Spatial Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Linear Referencing System

7.3 Indexing of LRS DataLRS function must be 3301. 7.3 Indexing of LRS Data If LRS data has four dimensions (three plus the M

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8.1 How long should indexing take?Answer: Indexing text is a resource-intensive process. The speed of indexing will depend on the … power of the hardware involved. Indexing speed depends on CPU and I/O capacity. Given sufficient I/O … , location of your data, and the calls to user-defined datastores, filters, and lexers can have an impact on your indexing

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8 Frequently Asked Questions About Indexing PerformanceThis section answers some of the frequently asked questions about indexing performance.

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8.5 Can parallel indexing improve performance?Answer: Parallel indexing can improve index performance when you have a large amount of data, and … the index with up to three separate indexing processes depending on your resources. Parallel … indexing can also be used to create local partitioned indexes on partitioned tables. However, indexing … systems. Because

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8.4 How does the format of my data affect indexing?500MB, because there is ten times as much plain text in the latter set. Indexing time is less clear-cut

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8.3 How much disk overhead will indexing require?Answer: The overhead, the amount of space needed for the index tables, varies between about 50% of the original text volume and 200%. Generally, the larger the total amount of text, the smaller the overhead, but many small records will use more overhead than fewer large records. Also, clean data (such as published text) will require less overhead than dirty data such as e-mails or discussion notes,

Text Application Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Tuning Oracle Text

7.8.7 How can I tell how much indexing has completed?Answer: You can use the CTX_OUTPUT.START_LOG procedure to log output from the indexing process

Spatial Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Spatial Data Types and Metadata

2.1 Simple Example: Inserting, Indexing, and Querying Spatial DataThis section presents a simple example of creating a spatial table, inserting data, creating the spatial index, and performing spatial queries. It refers to concepts that were explained in Chapter 1 and that will be explained in other sections of this chapter. The scenario is a soft drink manufacturer that has identified geographical areas of marketing interest for several products (colas). The colas

XML DB Developer's Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Full-Text Search Over XML Data

CONTAINS SQL FunctionRestricting the Scope of a CONTAINS Search Projecting the CONTAINS Result Indexing with a CONTEXT Index

Application Express Release Notes, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Oracle® Application Express Release Notes

5.11 Enabling Indexing of Online Help in Oracle Database 11g Release 2 and Higherindexing of online Help in Oracle Application Express, the permission to use an Oracle Text URL data

Application Express Installation Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Configuration Tasks When Installing from the Database

4.5.4 Enable Indexing of Online Help in Oracle Database 11g Release 2 and Higherindexing of online Help in Oracle Application Express, the permission to use an Oracle Text URL data

Application Express Installation Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2)

Downloading from Oracle Technology Network

3.4.7 Enable Indexing of Online Help in Oracle Database 11g Release 2 and Higherenable the indexing of online Help in Oracle Application Express, the permission to use an Oracle Text