Accessing the Data Buffer

This chapter provides overviews of data buffer access, data buffer class examples, and current context, and discusses how to:

Click to jump to parent topicUnderstanding Data Buffer Access

This section discusses:

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicData Buffer Access

In addition to the built-in functions you use to access the component buffer, classes of objects are available that provide access to structured data buffers using the PeopleCode object syntax.

The data buffers accessed by these classes are typically the component buffers that are loaded when you open a component. However, these classes may also be used to access data from general data buffers, loaded by an Application Engine program, a component interface, and so on.

The methods and properties of these classes provide functionality that is similar to what has been available using built-in functions. However, they also provide improved consistency, flexibility, and new functionality.

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicAccess Classes

The four data buffer classes are: Rowset, Row, Record, and Field. These four classes are the foundation for accessing component buffer data through the new object syntax.

A field object, which is instantiated from the Field class, is a single instance of data within a record. It is based on a field definition.

A record object, which is instantiated from the Record class, is a single instance of a data within a row. It is based on a record definition. A record object consists of one to n fields.

A row object, which is instantiated from the Row class, is a single row of data that consists of one to n records of data. A single row in a component scroll area is a row. A row may have one to n child rowsets. For example, a row in a level two scroll area may have n level three child rowsets.

A rowset object is a data structure used to describe hierarchical data. It is made up of a collection of rows. A component scroll area is a rowset. You can also have a level zero rowset.

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicData Buffer Model and Data Access Classes

The data model assumed by the data buffer classes is that of a PeopleTools component, where scroll bars or grids are used to describe a hierarchical, multiple-occurrence data structure. You can access these classes using dot notation.

The four data buffer classes relate to each other in a hierarchical manner. The main points to understand these relationships are:

For component buffers, think of a rowset as a scroll area on a page that contains all of the date in that scroll area. A level zero rowset contains all the data for the entire component. You can use rowsets with application messages, file layouts, business interlinks, and other definitions in addition to components. A level zero rowset from a component buffer only contains one row: the keys that the user specifies to initiate that component. A level zero rowset from data that is not a component, such as a message or a file layout, might contain more than one level zero row.

The following is basic PeopleCode that traverses through a two-level component buffer using dot notation syntax. Level zero is based on record QA_INVEST_HDR, and level one is based on record QA_INVEST_LN.

Local Rowset &HDR_ROWSET, &LINE_ROWSET; Local Record &HDR_REC, &LINE_REC; &HDR_ROWSET = GetLevel0(); For &I = 1 to &HDR_ROWSET.RowCount &HDR_REC = &HDR_ROWSET(&I).QA_INVEST_HDR; &EMPLID = &HDR_REC.EMPLID.Value; &LINE_ROWSET = &HDR_ROWSET(&I).GetRowset(1); For &J = 1 to &LINE_ROWSET.RowCount &LINE_REC = &LINE_ROWSET(&J).QA_INVEST_LN; &LINE_SUM = &LINE_SUM + &LINE_REC.AMOUNT.Value; End-For; End-For;

Each rowset is declared and instantiated. In general, your code is easier to read and maintain if you follow this practice.

Click to jump to parent topicUnderstanding Data Buffer Classes Examples

This section discusses:

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicEmployee Checklist Page Structure

Most of the examples in this section use the Employee Checklist page.

Employee Checklist page

This page has the following record structure:

Scroll Level

Associated Primary Record

Rowset and Variable Name

Level zero

PERSONAL_DATA

Level zero rowset: &RS0

Level one scroll area

EMPL_CHECKLIST

Level one rowset: &RS1

Level one hidden work scroll area

CHECKLIST_ITEM

Level one rowset: &RS1H

Level two scroll area

EMPL_CHKLST_ITM

Level two rowset: &RS2

Another way of looking at the structure of a component is to use the Structure view. All the scroll areas are labeled, and the primary record is associated with each:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST structure

In the example, the visible level one scroll area also has only one row. That row is made up of the following records:

You can see which records are associated with a scroll area by looking at the Order view for a page:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST page Order view showing records

The level two rowset has three rows. Each row is made up of two records: the primary record, EMPL_CHKLST_ITM, and CHKLST_ITM_TBL, the record associated with the related display field DESCR. The following example shows the rowset:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST rowsets and rows

Every record has fields associated with it, such as NAME, EMPLID and CHECKLIST_SEQ. These fields are associated with the record definitions; they are not the fields that appear on the page.

 

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicObject Creation Examples

When declaring variables, using the class with the same name as the data buffer access data type (rowset objects should be declared as type Rowset, field objects as type Field, and so on). Data buffer access class objects can be of type Local, Global, or Component.

The following declarations are assumed throughout the examples that follow:

Local Rowset &LEVEL0, &ROWSET; Local Row &ROW; Local Record &REC; Local Field &FIELD;

Level Zero Access

The following code instantiates a rowset object, from the Rowset class, that references the level zero rowset, containing all the page data. It stores the object in the &LEVEL0 variable.

&LEVEL0 = GetLevel0();

The level zero rowset contains all the rows, rowsets, records, and fields underneath it.

If the level zero rowset is formed from component buffer data, then the level zero rowset has one row of data and that row contains all the child rowsets, which in turn contain rows of data that contain other child rowsets.

If the level zero rowset is formed from buffer data, such as from an application message, then the level zero rowset may contain more than one row of data. Each row of the level zero rowset contains all the child rowsets associated with that row, which in turn contain rows of data that contain other child rowsets.

Use a level zero rowset when you want an absolute path to a lower-level object or to do some processing on the entire data buffer. For example, suppose you load all new data into the component buffers and want to redraw the page. You could use the following code:

/* Do processing to reload Component Buffers */ &LEVEL0 = GetLevel0(); &LEVEL0.Refresh();

Rowset Object

The following code instantiates a rowset object that references the rowset that contains the currently running PeopleCode program:

&ROWSET = GetRowset();

You might later use the &ROWSET variable and the ActiveRowCount property to iterate over all the rows of the rowset, to access a specific row (using the GetRow method), or to hide a child rowset (by setting the Visible property).

The level one rowset contains all the level two rowsets. However, the level two rowsets can only be accessed using the different rows of the level one rowset. From the level zero or level one rowset, you can only access a level two rowset by using the level one rowset and the appropriate row.

For example, suppose your program is running on some field of row five of a level two scroll area, which is on row three of its level one scroll area. The resulting rowset contains all the rows of the level two scroll area that are under the row three of the level one scroll area. The rowset does not contain any data that is under any other level two scroll areas. The following diagram illustrates these results:

Level two rowset from level one row

A further illustration uses an example from the Employee Checklist page.

Suppose that one employee was associated with three different checklists: Foreign Loan Departure, Foreign Loan Arrival, and Foreign Loan Host. The checklist code field (CHECKLIST_CD) on the first level of the page drives the entries on the second level. Each row in the level one rowset produces a different level two rowset.

The Foreign Loan Departure checklist (000001) produces a checklist that contains such items as Briefing with Human Resources and Apply for Visas/Work permits, as shown in the following example:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST Foreign Loan Departure checklist

The Foreign Loan Arrival checklist (0000004) produces a checklist that contains items such as Register at Consulate and Open New Foreign Bank Accounts, as shown in the following example:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST Foreign Load Arrival Checklist

Row Object

When you create a page, you put fields from different records onto the page. You can think of this as creating a type of pseudo-SQL join. The row returned from this pseudo-join is a row object.

For example, the first level scroll area of the EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST page contains the following fields, associated with these records:

Field

Record

CHECKLIST_DT

EMPL_CHECKLIST

CHECKLIST_CD

EMPL_CHECKLIST

COMMENTS

EMPL_CHECKLIST

DESCR

CHECKLIST_TBL

NAME

PERSONAL_DATA

RESPONSIBLE_ID

EMPL_CHECKLIST

The pseudo-SQL join might look like this:

JOIN A.CHECKLIST_DT, A.CHECKLIST_CD, A.COMMENTS, B.DESCR, C.NAME, A.RESPONSIBLE_ID FROM PS_EMPL_CHECKLIST A, PS_CHECKLIST_TBL B, PS_PERSONAL_DATA C, WHERE. . .

What goes into the Where clause is determined by the level zero of the page. For our example, the value is WHERE EMPLID=8001.

When the component is opened, data is loaded into the component buffers. Any row returned by the pseudo-SQL statement is a level one row object. The following table shows a returned row:

CHECKLIST_DT

CHECKLIST_CD

COMMENTS

DESCR

NAME

RESPONSIBLE_ID

12/03/98

000001

 

Foreign Loan Department Checklist

Peppen, Jacques

6602

Record Object

A record definition is a definition of what your underlying SQL database tables look like and how they process data. After you create record definitions, you build the underlying SQL tables that contain the application data that your users enter online in your production environment.

When you create a record object using the CreateRecord function, you are creating an area in the data buffers that has the same structure as the record definition, but no data.

When you instantiate a record object from the Record class using some variation of GetRecord, that record object references a single row of data in the SQL table.

Note. The data in the record that you retrieve is based on the row, which is analogous to setting keys to return a unique record.

The following code instantiates a record object for referencing the EMPL_CHECKLIST record of the specified row:

&REC = &ROW.GetRecord(RECORD.EMPL_CHECKLIST);

Using the short method, the following line of code is identical to the previous line:

&REC = &ROW.EMPL_CHECKLIST;

You might later use the &REC variable and the CopyFieldsTo property to copy all like-named fields from one record to another. In the following example, two row objects are created, the copy from row (COPYFRMROW) and the copy to row (COPYTROW). Using these rows, like-named fields are copied from CHECKLIST_ITEM to EMPL_CHKLST_ITM.

For &I = 1 To &ROWSET1.ActiveRowCount &COPYFRMROW = &ROWSET1.GetRow(&I); &COPYTROW = &RS2.GetRow(&I); &COPYFRMROW.CHECKLIST_ITEM.CopyFieldsTo(&COPYTROW.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); End-For;

A row may contain more than one record: in addition to the primary database record, you may have a related display record or a derived record. You can access these records as well. The level one rowset, &ROWSET1, is made up of many records. The following accesses two of them: EMPL_CHECKLIST and DERIVED_HR.

&REC1 = &ROW.EMPL_CHECKLIST; &REC2 = &ROW.DERIVED_HR;

Field Object

The following instantiates a field object, from the Field class, that is used to access a specific field in the record:

&FIELD = &REC.GetField(FIELD.CHECKLIST_CD);

You might later use the &FIELD variable as a condition:

If ALL(&FIELD) Then

Here is another example:

If &FIELD.Value = "N" Then

Note. The data in the field that you retrieve is based on the record, which is in turn based on the row.

You can also set the value of a field. Using the GetField function does not create a copy of the data from the component buffer. Setting the value or a property of the field object sets the actual component buffer field or property.

See Assigning Objects.

In the following example, the type of field is verified, and the value is replaced with the tangent of that value if it is a number

If &FIELD.Type <> "NUMBER" Then /* do error recording */ Else &FIELD.Value = Tan(&FIELD.Value); End-If;

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicData Buffer Hierarchy Examples

Suppose you want to access the BRIEFING_STATUS field at level two of the following page:

EMPLOYEE_CHECKLIST repatriation checklist

First, determine where your code is running. For this example, the code is starting at a field on a record at level zero. However, you do not always have to start at level zero.

If you start with level zero, you must traverse the data hierarchy, through the level one rowset to the level two rowset, before you can access the record that contains the field.

Obtaining the Rowset

You first obtain the level zero rowset, which is the PERSONAL_DATA rowset. You do not need to know the name of the level zero rowset to access it:

&LEVEL0 = GetLevel0();

Obtaining Rows

The next object to get is a row. As the following code is working with data that is loaded from a page, only one row is at level zero. However, if you have rowsets that are populated with data that is not based on component buffers (for example, an application message), you may have more than one row at level zero.

&LEVEL0_ROW = &LEVEL0(1);

Obtaining Child Rowsets

To obtain the level two rowset, traverse through the level one rowset first. Therefore, the next object to get is the level one rowset, as shown in the following example:

&LEVEL1 = &LEVEL0_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHECKLIST);

Obtaining Subsequent Rows

If you are traversing a page, obtain the appropriate row after you get a rowset. To process all the rows of the rowset, set this functionality up in a loop, as shown in the following example:

For &I = 1 to &LEVEL1.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL1_ROW = &LEVEL1(&I); . . . End-For;

Obtaining Subsequent Rowsets and Rows

Traverse another level in the page structure to access the second level rowset, and then use a loop to access the rows in the level two rowset.

Because we are processing all the rows at level one, we are just adding code to the previous For loop. As we process through all the rows at level two, we are adding a second For loop. The new code is in bold in the following example:

For &I = 1 to &LEVEL1.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL1_ROW = &LEVEL1(&I); ​&LEVEL2 = &LEVEL1_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL. EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); For &J = 1 to &LEVEL2.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL2_ROW = &LEVEL2(&J); . . . End-For; ​End-For;

Obtaining Records

A row always contains a record, and it may contain only a child rowset, depending on how your page is set up. GetRecord is the default method for a row, so all you have to specify is the record name.

Because we are processing all the rows at level two, we just add code to the For loops of the previous example. The new code is in bold:

For &I = 1 to &LEVEL1.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL1_ROW = &LEVEL1(&I); &LEVEL2 = &LEVEL1_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); For &J = 1 to &LEVEL2.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL2_ROW = &LEVEL2(&J); ​&RECORD = &LEVEL2_ROW.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM; . . . End-For; End-For;

Obtaining Fields

Records are made up of fields. GetField is the default method for a record, so all you have to specify is the field name.

Because we are processing all the rows at the level one, we are just adding code to the For loops of the previous example. The new code is in bold:

For &I = 1 to &LEVEL1.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL1_ROW = &LEVEL1(&I); &LEVEL2 = &LEVEL1_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); For &J = 1 to &LEVEL2.ActiveRowCount &LEVEL2_ROW = &LEVEL2(&J); &RECORD = &LEVEL2_ROW.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM; ​&FIELD = &RECORD.BRIEFING_STATUS; /* Do processing */ ​End-For; End-For;

Using Shortcuts

The previous code is the long way of accessing this field. The following example uses shortcuts to access the field in one line of code. The following code assumes all rows are level one:

Rowset example

Here’s another method of expressing the code:

Object Type

Code

Rowset

&LEVEL0 = GetLevel0();

Row

&LEVEL0_ROW = &LEVEL0(1);

Rowset

&LEVEL1 = &LEVEL0_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHECKLIST);

   
 

For &I = 1 to &LEVEL1.ActiveRowCount

Row

&LEVEL1_ROW = &LEVEL1(&I);

   

Rowset

&LEVEL2 = &LEVEL1_ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM);

   
 

For &J = 1 to &LEVEL2.ActiveRowCount

Row

&LEVEL2_ROW = &LEVEL2(&J);

   

Record

&RECORD = &LEVEL2_ROW.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM;

   

Field

&FIELD = &RECORD.BRIEFING_STATUS;

 

/* Do processing */

 

End-For;

 

End-For;

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicRowset Examples

The following code example traverses up to four levels of rowsets and could easily be modified to do more. This example only processes the first record in every rowset. To process every record, set up another For loop (For &R = 1 to &LEVELX.RECORDCOUNT, and so on). Notice the use of the ChildCount function (to process all children rowsets within a rowset), ActiveRowCount, IsChanged, and dot notation.

In the following example, ellipses indicate where application-specific code should go.

&Level0_ROWSET = GetLevel0(); For &A0 = 1 To &Level0_ROWSET.ActiveRowCount ... /***************************/ /* Process Level 1 Records */ /*-------------------------*/ If &Level0_ROWSET(&A0).ChildCount > 0 Then For &B1 = 1 To &Level0_ROWSET(&A0).ChildCount &LEVEL1_ROWSET = &Level0_ROWSET(&A0).GetRowset(&B1); For &A1 = 1 To &LEVEL1_ROWSET.ActiveRowCount If &LEVEL1_ROWSET(&A1).GetRecord(1).IsChanged Then ... /***************************/ /* Process Level 2 Records */ /*-------------------------*/ If &LEVEL1_ROWSET(&A1).ChildCount > 0 Then For &B2 = 1 To &LEVEL1_ROWSET(&A1).ChildCount &LEVEL2_ROWSET = &LEVEL1_ROWSET(&A1).GetRowset(&B2); For &A2 = 1 To &LEVEL2_ROWSET.ActiveRowCount If &LEVEL2_ROWSET(&A2).GetRecord(1).IsChanged Then ... /***************************/ /* Process Level 3 Records */ /*-------------------------*/ If &LEVEL2_ROWSET(&A2).ChildCount > 0 Then For &B3 = 1 To &LEVEL1_ROWSET(&A2).ChildCount &LEVEL3_ROWSET = &LEVEL2_ROWSET(&A2).GetRowset(&B3); For &A3 = 1 To &LEVEL3_ROWSET.ActiveRowCount If &LEVEL3_ROWSET(&A3).GetRecord(1).IsChanged Then ... End-If; /* A3 - IsChanged */ End-For; /* A3 - Loop */ End-For; /* B3 - Loop */ End-If; /* A2 - ChildCount > 0 */ /*--------------------------------*/ /* End of Process Level 3 Records */ /**********************************/ End-If; /* A2 - IsChanged */ End-For; /* A2 - Loop */ End-For; /* B2 - Loop */ End-If; /* A1 - ChildCount > 0 */ /*--------------------------------*/ /* End of Process Level 2 Records */ /**********************************/ End-If; /* A1 - IsChanged */ End-For; /* A1 - Loop */ End-For; /* B1 - Loop */ End-If; /* A0 - ChildCount > 0 */ /*--------------------------------*/ /* End of Process Level 1 Records */ /**********************************/ End-For; /* A0 - Loop */

Click to jump to top of pageClick to jump to parent topicHidden Work Scroll Example

In the FieldChange event for the CHECKLIST_CD field on the EMPL_CHECKLIST record, a PeopleCode program does the following:

  1. Flushes the rowset and hidden work scroll area.

  2. Performs a Select statement on the hidden work scroll area based on the value of the CHECKLIST_CD field and the effective date.

  3. Clears the level two scroll area.

  4. Copies like-named fields from the hidden work scroll area to the level two scroll area.

The following example shows how to do this using built-in functions.

&CURRENT_ROW_L1 = CurrentRowNumber(1); &ACTIVE_ROW_L2 = ActiveRowCount(RECORD.EMPL_CHECKLIST, &CURRENT_ROW_L1, RECORD.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); If All(CHECKLIST_CD) Then ScrollFlush(RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM); ScrollSelect(1, RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM, RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM, "Where Checklist_Cd = :1 and EffDt = (Select Max(EffDt) From PS_Checklist_Item Where Checklist_Cd = :2)", CHECKLIST_CD, CHECKLIST_CD); &FOUNDDOC = FetchValue(CHECKLIST_ITEM.CHKLST_ITEM_CD, 1); &SELECT_ROW = ActiveRowCount(RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM); For &I = 1 To &ACTIVE_ROW_L2 DeleteRow(RECORD.EMPL_CHECKLIST, &CURRENT_ROW_L1, RECORD.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM, 1); End-For; If All(&FOUNDDOC) Then For &I = 1 To &SELECT_ROW CopyFields(1, RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM, &I, 2, RECORD.EMPL_CHECKLIST, &CURRENT_ROW_L1, RECORD.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM, &I); If &I <> &SELECT_ROW Then InsertRow(RECORD.EMPL_CHECKLIST, &CURRENT_ROW_L1, RECORD.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM, &I); End-If; End-For; End-If; End-If;

The following example performs the same function as the previous code, only it uses the data buffer classes:

  1. Flushes the rowset and hidden work scroll area (&RS1H).

  2. Performs a Select statement on &RS1H based on the value of the CHECKLIST_CD field and the effective date.

  3. Clears the level two rowset (&RS2).

  4. Copies like-named fields from &RS1H to &RS1.

    Local Rowset &RS0, &RS1, &RS2, &RS1H; &RS0 = GetLevel0(); &RS1 = GetRowset(); &RS2 = GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); &RS1H = &RS0.GetRow(1).GetRowset(SCROLL.CHECKLIST_ITEM); &MYFIELD = CHECKLIST_CD; If All(&MYFIELD) Then &RS1H.Flush(); &RS1H.Select(RECORD.CHECKLIST_ITEM, "where Checklist_CD = :1 and EffDt = (Select Max(EffDt) from PS_CHECKLIST_ITEM Where CheckList_CD = :2)", CHECKLIST_CD, CHECKLIST_CD); For &I = 1 To &RS2.ActiveRowCount &RS2.DeleteRow(1); End-For; &FOUND = &RS1H.GetCurrEffRow().CHECKLIST_ITEM. CHKLST_ITEM_CD.Value; If All(&FOUND) Then For &I = 1 To &RS1H.ActiveRowCount &COPYFRMROW = &RS1H.getrow(&I); &COPYTROW = &RS2.getrow(&I); &COPYFRMROW.CHECKLIST_ITEM.CopyFieldsTo(&COPYTROW.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM); If &I <> &RS1H.ActiveRowCount Then &RS2.InsertRow(&I); End-If; End-For; End-If; End-If;

Click to jump to parent topicUnderstanding Current Context

Most PeopleCode programs run in a current context. The current context determines which buffer fields can be contextually referenced from PeopleCode, and which row of data is the current row on each scroll level at the time a PeopleCode program is running.

The current context for the data buffer access classes is similar to the current context for accessing the component buffer, as shown in the following diagram:

Current context for rowsets

In this example, a PeopleCode program is running in a buffer field on the second row of the level one rowset. The following code returns a row object for the second row of the level one rowset, because that is the row that is the current context.

Local Row &ROW &ROW = GetRow();

The following code returns the B2 level two rowset because of the current context:

Local Rowset &ROWSET2 &ROWSET2 = &ROW.GetRowset(SCROLL.EMPL_CHKLST_ITM);

This code does not return either the C2 or the A2 rowsets. It returns only the rowset associated with the second row of the level one rowset.

Creating Records or Rowsets and Current Context

When you instantiate a record object using the CreateRecord function, you are only creating an area in the data buffers that has the same structure as the record definition. It does not contain any data. This record object does not have a parent rowset and is not associated with a row. It is a freestanding record object and, therefore, is not considered part of the current context.

The same concept applies when you instantiate a rowset object using the CreateRowset function. You are only creating an area in the data buffers that has the same structure as the records or rowset that the new rowset is based on. The rowset does not contain any data. This type of rowset does not have a parent rowset or row.

See Also

Specifying Data with Contextual References

CreateRecord

CreateRowset

Click to jump to parent topicAccessing Secondary Component Buffer Data

When a secondary page is run, the data for its buffers is copied from the parent component to a buffer structure for the secondary page. That is, two copies of this data are made. The data buffer classes give access to both of these copies of the data. Direct field references (recname.fieldname) always use the current context to determine which value to access. So, in general, when using a secondary page, make sure that references are based on the secondary page.

Click to jump to parent topicInstantiating Rowsets Using Non-Component Buffer Data

Both the application message and the file layout technologies represent hierarchical data, and both use the rowset, row, record, and field hierarchy. Though you use different methods to instantiate a rowset object for this data, you still use the same rowset, row, record, and field methods and properties to manipulate the data. (Any exceptions are marked in the documentation.)

To instantiate a rowset for a message:

&MSG = CreateMessage(OPERATION.EMPLOYEE_DATA); &MYROWSET = &MSG.GetRowset();

To instantiate a rowset for a file layout:

&MYFILE = GetFile(&SOMENAME, "R"); If &MYFILE.IsOpen Then &MYFILE.SetFileLayout(FILELAYOUT.SOMELAYOUT); &MYROWSET = &MYFILE.ReadRowset(); End-if;

In an Application Engine program, the default state record is considered the primary record and the main record in context. You can access the default state record using the following:

&STATERECORD = GetRecord();

If you have more than one state record associated with an Application Engine program, you can access them the same way you would access other, nonprimary data records, by specifying the record name. For example:

&ALTSTATE = GetRecord(RECORD.AE_STATE_ALT);

See Also

Using Standalone Rowsets

Managing Messages

Using Meta-SQL and PeopleCode