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Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance Administration Guide
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Document Information

Preface

1.  Introduction

2.  Status

3.  Configuration

Configuration

Introduction

Initial

Initial Configuration

Prerequisites

Summary

BUI

Configuring Management Port

CLI

Performing Initial Configuration with the CLI

Network

Network Configuration

Devices

Datalinks

Interfaces

IP MultiPathing (IPMP)

Performance and Availability

Routing

Routing Entries

Routing Properties

BUI

Configuration

Addresses

Routing

CLI

Tasks

BUI

CLI

Storage

Introduction

Configure

Configuration Rules and Guidelines

Verification

Allocation on SAS-2 Systems

Profile Configuration

Import

Add

Unconfig

Scrub

Tasks

BUI

SAN

SAN

Terminology

Targets and Initiators

Target and Initiator Groups

BUI

CLI

Terms

SAN Terminology

FC

Fibre Channel

Target Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Performance Considerations

Troubleshooting

Queue Overruns

Link-level Issues

BUI

Changing modes of FC ports

Viewing discovered FC ports

Creating FC Initiator Groups

Associating a LUN with an FC initiator group

CLI

Changing modes of FC ports

Viewing discovered FC ports

Creating FC Initiator Groups

Associating a LUN with an FC initiator group

Scripting Aliases for Initiators and Initiator Groups

FCMPxIO

Configuring FC Client Multipathing

Tasks

FCMPxIO Tasks

Configuring Solaris Initiators

Configuring Windows Initiators

Windows Tunables - Microsoft DSM Details

Configuring Linux Initiators

Configuring VMware ESX Initiators

Troubleshooting

See Also

iSCSI

Introduction

Target Configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator Configuration

Planning Client Configuration

Solaris iSCSI/iSER and MPxIO Considerations

Troubleshooting

Observing Performance

Tasks

iSCSI Tasks

CLI

Adding an iSCSI target with an auto-generated IQN

Adding an iSCSI target with a specific IQN and RADIUS authentication

Adding an iSCSI initiator which uses CHAP authentication

Adding an iSCSI target group

Adding an iSCSI initiator group

SRP

Introduction

Target configuration

Clustering Considerations

Initiator configuration

Observing Performance

Multipathing Considerations

VMWare 4.0

Path Selection Plugin (psp)

Storage Array Type Plugin (satp)

VMWare ESX 4.0 Issues

Tasks

SRP Tasks

CLI

Users

Introduction

Roles

Authorizations

Properties

Users

Roles

BUI

CLI

Tasks

BUI

CLI

Generic

Preferences

Introduction

BUI

CLI

SSH Public Keys

Alerts

Introduction

Actions

Send Email

Send SNMP trap

Send Syslog Message

Resume/Suspend Dataset

Resume/Suspend Worksheet

Execute Workflow

Threshold Alerts

BUI

CLI

Tasks

BUI

Cluster

Clustering

Features and Benefits

Drawbacks

Terminology

Subsystem Design

Cluster Interconnect I/O

Resource Management Concepts

Takeover and Failback

Configuration Changes in a Clustered Environment

Clustering Considerations for Storage

Clustering Considerations for Networking

Clustering Considerations for Infiniband

Redundant Path Scenarios

Preventing 'Split-Brain' Conditions

Estimating and Reducing Takeover Impact

Tasks

Cluster Tasks

Setup Procedure

Shutting Down a Clustered Configuration

Node Cabling

JBOD Cabling

BUI

Tasks

Cluster Tasks

Unconfiguring Clustering

4.  Services

5.  Shares

6.  Integration

Glossary

SAN

SAN

The SAN configuration screen allows you to connect your appliance to your SAN (Storage Area Network). A SAN is made up of three basic components:

These three components remain the same regardless of which protocol is used on the network. In some cases, the network may even be a cable between the initiator and the target, but in most cases, there is some type of switching involved.

Terminology

To configure the appliance to operate on a SAN, it is essential to understand some basic terms:

Term
Description
Logical Unit
A term used to describe a component in a storage system. Uniquely numbered, this creates what is referred to as a Logicial Unit Number, or LUN. A storage system, being highly configurable, may contain many LUNs. These LUNs, when associated with one or more SCSI targets, forms a unique SCSI device, a device that can be accessed by one or more SCSI initiators.
Target
A storage system end-point that provides a service of processing SCSI commands and I/O requests from an initiator. A target is created by the storage system administrator, and is identified by unique addressing methods. A target, once configured, consists of zero or more logical units.
Target group
A set of targets. LUNs are exported over all the targets in one specific target group.
Initiator
An application or production system end-point that is capable of initiating a SCSI session, sending SCSI commands and I/O requests. Initiators are also identified by unique addressing methods.
Initiator group
A set of initiators. When an initiator group is associated with a LUN, only initiators from that group may access the LUN. As of the 2013.1.0 software release, a LUN can be associated with multiple initiator groups.

Additionally, it is important to be aware of SCSI transport protocols:

Term
Description
Fibre Channel, a protocol for sharing SCSI based storage over a storage area network (SAN), consisting of fiber-optic cables, FC switches and HBAs.
Internet SCSI, a protocol for sharing SCSI based storage over IP networks.
iSER
iSCSI Extension for RDMA, a protocol that maps the iSCSI protocol over a network that provides RDMA services (i.e. InfiniBand). The iSER protocol is transparently selected by the iSCSI subsystem, based on the presence of correctly configured IB hardware. In the CLI and BUI, all iSER-capable components (targets and initiators) are managed as iSCSI components.
SCSI RDMA Protocol, a protocol for sharing SCSI based storage over a network that provides RDMA services (i.e. InfiniBand).

Targets and Initiators

Targets and initiators are configured by protocol. Refer to the documentation on a particular protocol (FC, iSCSI or SRP) for details.

Target and Initiator Groups

Target and initiator groups define sets of targets and initiators that can be associated with LUNs. A LUN that is associated with a target group can only be seen via the targets in the group. If a LUN is not explicitly associated with a target group, it is in the default target group and will be accessible via all targets, regardless of protocol. Similarly, a LUN can only be seen by the initiators in the group or groups to which it belongs. If a LUN is not explicitly associated with an initiator group, it is in the default initiator group and can be accessed by all initiators. While using the default initiator group can be useful for evaluation purposes, its use is discouraged since it may result in exposure of the LUN to unwanted or conflicting initiators.

To avoid possible LUN conflicts when an initiator belongs to multiple groups, configure initiators within all groups before associating groups with LUNs.

BUI

To configure targets, go to the Configuration > SAN page, use Fibre Channel, iSCSI, and SRP to navigate, and then configure the Ports, Initiator, and Target Groups controls.

To associate a LUN, go to the Shares > Shares > Protocols page and then configure the Target Group and Initiator Group controls.

CLI

Use the configuration san context of the CLI to operate on targets and initiators by protocol type. Then, use the shares CLI context to create LUNs and associate them with target and initiator groups.