3.7 About System-State Targets

systemd defines system-state targets allow you to start a system with only the services that are required for a specific purpose. For example, a server can run more efficiently with multi-user.target, because it does not run the X Window System at that run level. It is best to perform diagnostics, backups, and upgrades with rescue.target when only root can use the system. Each run level defines the services that systemd stops or starts. For example, systemd starts network services for multi-user.target and the X Window System for graphical.target, whereas it stops both of these services for rescue.target.

Table 3.1, “System-State Targets and Equivalent Run-Level Targets” shows the commonly-used system-state targets and their equivalent run-level targets, where compatibility with Oracle Linux 6 run levels is required.

Table 3.1 System-State Targets and Equivalent Run-Level Targets

System-State Targets

Equivalent Run-Level Targets

Description

graphical.target

runlevel5.target

Set up a multi-user system with networking and display manager.

multi-user.target

runlevel2.target

runlevel3.target

runlevel4.target

Set up a non-graphical multi-user system with networking.

poweroff.target

runlevel0.target

Shut down and power off the system.

reboot.target

runlevel6.target

Shut down and reboot the system.

rescue.target

runlevel1.target

Set up a rescue shell.


The runlevel* targets are implemented as symbolic links.

The nearest equivalent systemd target to the Oracle Linux 6 run levels 2, 3, and 4 is multi-user.target.

For more information, see the systemd.target(5) manual page.