2.1 Installing Oracle VM Server on x86 Hardware

This section is intended for system administrators who want to install Oracle VM Server on x86 hardware. For smaller deployments installation from a bootable DVD-ROM using the provided ISO image file is common, while for larger deployments administrators may consider deployment via network installation using PXE boot.

To install Oracle VM Server using the DVD-ROM or PXE boot method, you need to visit the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud to select the Oracle VM Server ISO image file from the Oracle VM Media Pack. The Oracle VM Server ISO image file can be burned as a bootable disk and used to install Oracle VM Server from a DVD-ROM drive.

A PXE boot installation requires several additional steps to configure a DHCP/PXE boot server. Furthermore, if automated installation is required, a kickstart configuration file must be created to guide the Anaconda installation wizard through each of the installation steps. The DHCP/PXE boot server allows a bare-metal system to automatically receive an IP address via DHCP, load a kernel via TFTP, and then boot without an installed operating system. Once the bare-metal server boots, you can install Oracle VM Server from the installation media or use a kickstart file to automate the Oracle VM Server installation.

This section describes pre-installation tasks and requirements. These apply to all deployments of Oracle VM Server, regardless of your installation strategy. We also provide detailed coverage of a manual attended installation performed from bootable physical media, such as a DVD-ROM. It is recommended that you perform at least one fully attended installation of Oracle VM Server from bootable physical media, even if you intend to perform a network-based install using PXE boot. Once you have completed this, refer to Section 3.1, “Installing Oracle VM Server for x86 from PXE Boot” for more information on how to prepare for a network-based installation.

Note

If you plan to install Oracle VM Server on a system that uses a software RAID array as storage, you must use a kickstart configuration file. For more information, see Section 2.1.4, “Performing a Kickstart Installation of Oracle VM Server”.

2.1.1 Preinstallation Tasks and Requirements

Before you start the Oracle VM Server installation, make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware and software requirements and that your network is configured appropriately.

2.1.1.1 Hardware Requirements

This release of Oracle VM Server supports x86_64 host hardware only. Oracle VM Server requires a 64-bit processor with at least an i686-class processor on the host computer. This includes all Intel Pentium Pro or newer, and all AMD Athlon/Duron processors or newer. At least a Pentium 4 or Athlon CPU is recommended.

For hardware virtualized (unmodified) guest operating systems (for example, Microsoft Windows), a CPU with hardware virtualization support is required. This includes some Intel Pentium D, Core, Core2 and Xeon models, and some AMD Athlon and Opteron models. This feature may also need to be enabled in the BIOS or UEFI. Please refer to your processor documentation for information on whether your processor supports hardware virtualization and how to enable it in the system firmware interface.

A dual core CPU or multiple CPUs are recommended to run multiple guests.

The minimum memory requirement is 1 GB RAM, although it is recommended you have a computer with at least 2 GB RAM. Guest memory requirements vary for each guest operating system. You should perform your own memory sizing for guest operating systems.

It is also worth noting that if you intend to connect to SAN-based physical disks, memory consumption increases on the server for each LUN or target by around 1 MB per LUN or target. If hundreds of LUNs are to be attached to the server, you must scale memory requirements appropriately.

By default, the installer creates a root partition into which Oracle VM Server is installed and an additional partition that you can use as a local repository or as a virtual disk attached to a virtual machine. However, in cases where the additional partition is 2GB or less in size, Oracle VM Server cannot use the additional partition. Likewise, if the disk on which you are installing Oracle VM Server is small enough that the root partition takes most of the available space, the installer does not create the additional partition.

Note

In future you will upgrade your environment between errata releases and new versions. Over time these operations consume disk space. While it is possible to remove unnecessary files and clean up disk space and resize partitions, you should plan to minimize disruption and avoid issues by allocating two or three times the minimum required disk space to Oracle VM Server, where possible.

Table 2.1 Minimum Hardware Requirements for Oracle VM Server

Items

Minimum Value

Memory

1.0 GB

Processor Type

64 bit i686 P4

Processor Speed

1.3 GHz*2

Available Hard Disk Space

6 GB


2.1.1.2 Software Requirements

There are no prerequisite software requirements. Oracle VM Server includes a small Linux-based management operating system. All previous operating systems and data on the disk selected for installation are lost during the installation of Oracle VM Server.

Migration from any operating system, or previous alternate virtualization environment, is not supported in this release.

2.1.1.3 Network Requirements

Oracle VM Server requires at least one stable and static IPv4 address that does not change over server reboots. If you use DHCP to manage the IP address space in your environment, the DHCP server should be configured to map the server interface MAC addresses to specific IP assignments. This ensures that your host always receives the same IP address. The behavior of the Oracle VM Server host is undefined if used in an environment where your IP address may change due to DHCP lease expiry.

If your DHCP server is configured to provide a default gateway, this could impact on the behavior of Oracle VM Server as the gateway provided over DHCP would override any statically defined gateway set on Oracle VM Server. Therefore, Oracle recommends that you ensure that your DHCP server is not configured to provide a default gateway unless you are certain that the default route is the one that you want your Oracle VM Server instances to make use of.

Many actions performed within Oracle VM Manager require that server hostnames are properly resolved. It is highly recommended that a DNS server is configured on your network and will answer with the hostname and reverse IP lookups for each Oracle VM Server in your Oracle VM environment. If this is not feasible, you may need to add host entries to /etc/hosts on each Oracle VM Server after you have finished your installation. Since it is easy for these entries to become outdated, resulting in difficulty when troubleshooting, this approach should be avoided.

Technically, it is possible to run Oracle VM Server with a single network interface per physical server. During the installation of each Oracle VM Server the management interface is configured, and during discovery by Oracle VM Manager the server management interfaces are included in the default management network. Since the management network is capable of providing all network functions in Oracle VM, including storage and virtual machine traffic, there is no functional need for additional networks. Even if you wish to separate different types of network traffic, a single interface is enough: the management network can be run on a VLAN and additional network connections can be made via VLAN interfaces configured on top of the single physical network interface.

The main reasons to opt for multiple physical network interfaces are:

  • Security. You may wish to keep internal and inter-server traffic separated from networks with a route to the internet. Or you may need to guarantee that network traffic from different virtual environments, or different types of network traffic, are physically separated. The management domain, dom0, network and control ports should never be exposed to or reachable from the internet.

  • Redundancy. You do not want your environment to stop working if one network interface fails. A good way to avoid this is to aggregate two interfaces in a bond interface. A bond port, as it is called in Oracle VM, can work in active-backup mode, but also increases performance when used as an aggregation of two active links with twice the bandwidth and load balancing.

  • Performance. If you have multiple physical network interfaces, link aggregation is a good way to add bandwidth for a given network function. In addition, or as an alternative, you can create multiple physical networks and use them for dedicated functions; for example a separate storage network or a network for virtual machine traffic only.

Note

Oracle VM Ethernet network functionality can be applied to standard 10/100/1000Mbit Ethernet interfaces as well as 10Gbit Ethernet interfaces.

2.1.1.4 Oracle VM Server Memory Settings

Installation allocates memory to dom0 using the following calculation:

(768 + 0.0205 * Physical memory (MB)) round to 8

You can use this calculation to determine memory allocation for the Oracle VM Server installation. However, you should not make the memory allocation for dom0 smaller than the calculated value.

2.1.1.5 Obtaining the Software

If you do not already have the Oracle VM Server software, download the Oracle VM Server ISO image file from:

See Section 1.2, “Getting Installation ISOs and Packages” for more information.

Depending on your installation strategy, you may need to perform some additional steps before you begin the installation. If you intend to install from DVD-ROM, you should burn a DVD-ROM disc with the ISO image file. See Section 1.3, “Installation From Bootable Physical Media” for information on how you can do this. If you intend to perform a network installation using PXE boot, you need to ensure that you DHCP/PXE boot server is properly set up and configured for this, that the kernel on the ISO image file is available via TFTP and that the entire ISO image file is accessible via NFS or HTTP. See Section 3.1, “Installing Oracle VM Server for x86 from PXE Boot” for further information. Finally, if you wish to perform an unattended installation, you must create a kickstart configuration file. This is discussed in Section 2.1.4, “Performing a Kickstart Installation of Oracle VM Server”.

2.1.2 Installing Oracle VM Server From a DVD-ROM

If you have not installed Oracle VM Server before, you should perform at least one installation directly from DVD-ROM. Even if you intend to perform the majority of your installations over the network using PXE boot, a successful fully attended installation of Oracle VM Server can be useful if you need to obtain a template kickstart configuration file to use for your unattended network-based installations.

You can install Oracle VM Server in legacy BIOS mode or UEFI mode. However, you cannot change modes after installation. For example, if you install Oracle VM Server in legacy BIOS mode, you cannot then switch to UEFI mode. If you want to change from legacy BIOS mode to UEFI mode, or from UEFI mode to legacy BIOS mode, you must re-install Oracle VM Server.

If you are installing Oracle VM Server in UEFI mode, you must switch from legacy BIOS mode to UEFI mode before you begin the installation process. Enter the BIOS setup utility for the target server and change the boot mode to UEFI, if necessary.

To install Oracle VM Server from a bootable physical media such as a DVD-ROM:

  1. Insert the Oracle VM Server installation media into your optical disc drive.

  2. Change the boot order to start from the optical disc drive in the BIOS or UEFI settings.

  3. Boot the server with the Oracle VM Server installation media.

  4. The boot: prompt displays. Press Enter to begin the installation.

    Note

    • The installer starts automatically after one minute.

    • The installer is available in text mode only.

  5. On the Disc Found screen, do one of the following:

    • Select OK and then press Enter to test the installation media for errors.

      Warning

      Testing the installation media requires a server reboot to continue the installation. If you do not have physical access to the server itself, it is not recommended that you perform this test.

    • Select Skip and press Enter to continue the installation without testing the media.

  6. If the installer successfully detects the installation media, a welcome screen displays. Select OK.

  7. On the Language Selection screen, select the language you want to use for the installation process as well as the default language for the operating system. Select OK and then press Enter.

  8. On the Keyboard Selection screen, select the keyboard layout, for example, us for U.S. English. The keyboard layout you select becomes the default for the operating system. Select OK and then press Enter.

  9. On the Oracle VM Server End User License Agreement screen, read the licensing terms for Oracle VM Server. Select Accept to accept the EULA and continue.

Disk Partition Layout

The Partitioning Type screen lets you choose a partitioning option for the drive into which you install Oracle VM Server.

Disk device naming and node numbering can change across reboots. This means that a local disk may not be at /dev/sda as you might have expected for each subsequent reboot, or a partition that is initially represented as sda1 may appear as sda2 after a reboot. However, Oracle VM Server uses partition UUIDs to ensure that partitions are correctly mapped to their mount points at boot time, so when reviewing partition layout, you should not expect the device node numbering to always remain the same.

Option

Description

Use entire drive

Uses all the available space on the target drive.

Select this option if you are installing Oracle VM Server to a multipathed disk. See Section 2.1.3, “Installing Oracle VM Server to Multipath Storage” for more information.

Replace existing Linux system

Replaces an existing Linux system on the target drive.

Use free space

Uses only the free space available on the target drive.

Create custom layout

Lets you create and edit partitions on the target drive.

You cannot create a custom partition layout if you are installing in UEFI mode.

After you select a partition layout, do the following:

  1. Select which drive(s) you want to use for the installation.

    If you are installing in legacy mode, you can select one or more drives. If you are installing in UEFI mode, you should select only one bootable drive.

    Important

    If you have attached USB storage to the server, it might appear as a listed disk where you are able to install Oracle VM Server. Running Oracle VM Server from a USB disk is possible but is not supported for production environments. If you are testing an installation and decide to install to a USB disk, the disk must be at least 32 GB in size. In the case where you select to install to a USB disk, the entire disk is used for the Oracle VM Server installation. Partitioning does not make excess disk space available for use as a discoverable local disk.

  2. Select OK and press Enter.

  3. On the Review Partition Layout screen, select one of the following:

    Yes

    Examines and formats the target drive before proceeding with the installation. If you are installing in legacy mode, you can select this option to ensure that the installer can successfully install Oracle VM Server with the selected partitioning layout. Do not select this option if you are installing in UEFI mode.

    No

    Skips the partitioning layout check and proceed with the installation.

  4. On the Writing storage configuration to disk screen, confirm that you want to write the partitioning information to disk. Proceeding past this step erases any data on the selected partition.

  5. Select Write changes to disk and then press Enter.

Boot Loader Partition

On the Boot loader configuration screen, do the following:

  1. Select the partition into which you want to install the boot loader. Make sure the boot loader is installed on the bootable disk which is configured in the BIOS, or edit the boot device order accordingly within the BIOS to ensure that the correct disk is used to access the boot loader at start up.

  2. Select Allow boot from a multipath device to install Oracle VM Server to a multipathed disk. For information and considerations on performing a multipath installation, see Section 2.1.3, “Installing Oracle VM Server to Multipath Storage”.

  3. Select Change drive order to arrange drive order and modify where the installation program locates the Master Boot Record.

  4. Select OK and then press Enter.

Kdump Setting

Kdump is a crash dumping mechanism that captures a memory dump image for dom0 in the event of a system crash. The Kdump mechanism reserves a small amount of memory to boot the system from the context of another kernel, instead of from the context of the crashed kernel. Kdump then generates a memory dump image, or vmcore file, which allows you to accurately determine the cause of the system crash.

By default, Kdump is disabled. However, Oracle strongly recommends that you enable Kdump during installation. If a system crash occurs for Oracle VM Server, the information that the vmcore file provides helps to accurately and efficiently diagnose issues and drastically improves the time it takes to return to production.

Make one of the following selections and then press Enter:

Yes

Enable Kdump. The amount of memory reserved for Kdump is calculated automatically and vmcore files are stored in the default location at /var/crash/.

No

Do not enable Kdump. This option is not recommended.

With Oracle VM Server Release 3.4.2, Kdump settings are automatically carried forward during the upgrade process. If the Kdump service was enabled previously, it is recommended that you check and confirm the settings are correct after the upgrade or enable the Kdump service after the upgrade if it was not enabled previously.

For more information on configuring Kdump, refer to Manually Configuring kdump for Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

Management Network Interface

Select the network interface that you have configured for the management connection. This network interface allows Oracle VM Manager to discover the Oracle VM Server that you are installing.

Warning

As of Oracle VM Release 3.4.4, an option is available that allows you to disable the default network bond that is created during installation. This network bond is called bond0 and it should only be disabled for specific configurations approved by Oracle. Contact your Oracle support representative for more information if required.

Make one of the following selections and then press Enter:

OK

Connects the interface to a regular network.

Add to VLAN

Connects the interface to a VLAN-type network.

Management VLAN

If your Oracle VM Management network is on a VLAN, the Oracle VM Management VLAN screen lets you enter the applicable VLAN tag.

  • 0 is reserved.

  • 1 corresponds with "untagged".

After you enter the VLAN tag, select OK and then press Enter.

Network Interface Configuration

On the Network Interface Configuration screen, do the following:

  1. If your computer uses a static IP address, enter the IP address and prefix (netmask) for your computer.

    If your computer uses DHCP to assign its IP address, select Dynamic IP configuration (DHCP). See Section 2.1.1.3, “Network Requirements” for more information on using DHCP with Oracle VM.

    Select OK and then press Enter.

  2. The Miscellaneous Network Settings screen is displayed. Enter the Gateway, Primary DNS and optional Secondary DNS in the respective fields.

    Select OK and then press Enter.

  3. The Hostname Configuration screen is displayed. If your machine has its own hostname, select manually and enter the hostname or IP address. You should use a fully qualified hostname, for example, myserver.example.com.

    If your machine uses DHCP to assign its hostname, select automatically via DHCP. See Section 2.1.1.3, “Network Requirements” for more information on using DHCP with Oracle VM.

    Select OK and then press Enter.

Time and Date Settings

On the Time Zone Selection screen, configure the system time and date. Select OK and then press Enter.

Note

It is best practice to configure 3 NTP servers at a minimum. See Section 7.3, “Configure the NTP Service on the Oracle VM Manager Host” for more information.

Root and Agent Passwords

You specify the Oracle VM Agent and root user passwords during installation. For information about password security, review Installing Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Security Guide.

On the Oracle VM Agent password screen, do the following:

  1. Enter a password to be used for the Oracle VM Agent in the Password field. This password is used by Oracle VM Manager to take ownership of the Oracle VM Server. This is the password you use when discovering Oracle VM Servers in Oracle VM Manager.

  2. Re-enter the password in the Password (confirm) field.

  3. Select OK and then press Enter. If the two passwords do not match, you must enter them again.

On the Root Password screen, do the following:

  1. Enter a password for the root user in the Password field. The root password must be at least six characters long.

  2. Re-enter the password in the Password (confirm) field.

  3. Select OK and then press Enter. If the two passwords do not match, you must enter them again.

Existing Installation Check

The installer checks for an existing Oracle VM Server installation. If one is found, the System to Upgrade screen displays.

Select Reinstall System to replace the existing installation.

For instructions on upgrading, see Section 5.6.2, “Upgrading Oracle VM Server Using the ISO File”.

Note

Upgrading an Oracle VM Server from Release 2.x is not supported; you must perform a fresh install.

Final Installation Steps

When you finish configuring the installation settings, the installer performs dependency checks and then begins configuring and installing packages. The Package Installation screen displays and shows the progress and details about the installation process.

When the Oracle VM Server installation is finished, the Complete screen displays, do the following:

  1. Remove the Oracle VM installation media.

  2. Select Reboot.

When the server reboots, the Oracle VM Agent starts automatically.

A log of the install is located in /root/install.log. If the install fails to complete successfully, review this log file to identify possible causes.

2.1.3 Installing Oracle VM Server to Multipath Storage

Oracle VM Server can be installed to a multipathed disk attached to a Fibre Channel adapter. Review the following considerations before you install Oracle VM Server to a multipathed disk:

  • The target disk must be multipathed.

  • You must have a Fibre Channel HBA enabled within the boot BIOS of the target server. Refer to the documentation provided by your adapter manufacturer to obtain instructions on loading firmware and enabling the adapter.

  • The BIOS settings for the target server must be configured to select the HBA and target disk as the primary boot device after the installation is complete.

  • The boot Fibre Channel adapter must be connected to an external disk large enough for the install contents and there should be enough free space available on the disk to complete the installation.

  • Multipath installation does not use remaining disk space to create an additional partition for local repositories or virtual machine assignment.

To install Oracle VM Server to a multipathed disk, do the following:

  1. Run the Oracle VM Server installation media.

  2. Step through the installer screens until the Partitioning Type screen displays. See Disk Partition Layout for more information.

  3. Select Use entire drive. Ensure that only one multipath disk is selected for installation and that this disk matches the one that you have prepared for the installation.

    Note

    Splitting an install across multiple disks for a boot-from-SAN configuration is not supported. Mixing local disks and multipath disks in an installation is not supported.

  4. Continue with the installation process.

    Note

    If you are attempting to install Oracle VM Server into a Fiber Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) SAN that the installer does not list, see Section 6.1.1, “FCoE SAN not Listed as Available Drive”.

  5. When you have completed the installation, reboot the server and remove the installation media or update your PXE configuration to allow the server to boot from the Fibre Channel HBA and target disk defined as the primary boot device in the server BIOS or UEFI.

  6. When the server has rebooted, confirm that it is using the multipathed disk for the root mount point. For example, run the df command and check that the output is similar to the following:

    /dev/mapper/360a98000433468704234747633373175p2       51475068 1222456  47631172   3% /
Note

Remember, to reinstall or boot from a local disk, you must change the boot device order in the BIOS or UEFI setup for the server.

2.1.4 Performing a Kickstart Installation of Oracle VM Server

You can automate the installation of Oracle VM Server with a kickstart configuration file. A kickstart configuration file provides information about the target system to the installation program and sets installation options so that you do not need to enter them manually.

In certain cases, Oracle VM supports installation of Oracle VM Server with a kickstart configuration file only. If you plan to install Oracle VM Server on a system that uses a software RAID array as storage, you must use a kickstart configuration file.

2.1.4.1 Creating Kickstart Configuration Files

Important

You should always review the kickstart configuration before you begin the installation process. Performing installations with kickstart configuration files does not provide a method for notifying you of errors. For this reason, you should always verify that Oracle VM Server is successfully installed on the target system and that the file system partitioning is correct.

There are two recommended methods for creating kickstart configuration files for Oracle VM Server:

  • Manually install Oracle VM Server and copy the kickstart file that the installation program creates.

    The installation program generates a kickstart configuration file that contains the options that you specify during the installation process. After you complete the installation, the file is available on the Oracle VM Server file system at: /root/anaconda-ks.cfg.

  • Use the Kickstart Configurator tool.

    To use the Kickstart Configurator tool, you should install Oracle Linux Release 6 with a graphical user environment. You can then install and run system-config-kickstart. For more information, see:

    http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37670_01/E41137/html/ol_kickstart.html

2.1.4.2 Kickstart Configurations

Before you attempt to install Oracle VM Server with a kickstart configuration, you should review the following examples:

You should also review the information in Considerations for Kickstart Configurations.

Single Disk Partitions

The following shows a kickstart configuration for an installation of Oracle VM Server onto a single disk:

# Kickstart configuration

install
nfs --server=n.n.n.n --dir=/srv/install/ovs
eula Accepted
lang en_US.UTF-8
keyboard us
network --onboot yes --device eth0 --mtu=1500 --bootproto dhcp --noipv6
ovsagent --iscrypted $6$pkg8GsEJFbLPdRf6$JvBX.yJo6F9oyz1qIldIPy0bHvPpOHElZKvg3FR9DIWW07nMy/k2T5r3r
ovsmgmntif eth0
rootpw  --iscrypted $6$TO0IU.UJCLq2JZio$iJj1RPwV5wX7pD3puIUrZh1j7R2aF.cGFs6FEs2K9Py2yO3eEntR2vRKo4

firewall --service=ssh
authconfig --enableshadow --passalgo=sha512
selinux --disabled
timezone --utc America/Los_Angeles

bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="rhgb quiet crashkernel=auto"

clearpart --all --drives=sda

part / --fstype=ext4 --grow --maxsize=51200 --size=1024
part /boot --fstype=ext4 --size=500
part swap --grow --maxsize=16128 --size=16128

part None --fstype=ext4 --grow --size=100

reboot

%packages
@base
@core
@ovs-virtualization

%end

The preceding kickstart configuration includes the following options:

  • Use an NFS server at the path to the Oracle VM Server ISO image file:

    nfs --server=n.n.n.n --dir=/srv/install/ovs
  • Accept the EULA (End User License Agreement) in a kickstart configuration:

    eula Accepted
    Important

    You should read the EULA before you accept the terms in the kickstart configuration. The EULA is available on the Oracle VM Server ISO.

  • Install the boot loader on the Master Boot Record, specify that the sda drive is before the sdb drive in the BIOS drive order, and append the rhgb and quiet kernel parameters:

    bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="rhgb quiet crashkernel=auto"
    Note

    The crashkernel=auto directive enables Kdump during installation. The installer automatically calculates appropriate memory and offset values to reserve for the crash kernel and appends the correct information to the GRUB 2 configuration. For more information, see Diagnostic Tools for Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

  • Clear all partitions on the disk where you are installing Oracle VM Server:

    clearpart --all --drives=sda
  • Create a root partition with the ext4 file system type that is 1024 MB in size and can grow in size to a maximum of 51200 MB:

    part / --fstype=ext4 --grow --maxsize=51200 --size=1024
  • Create a boot partition with the ext4 file system type that is 500 MB in size:

    part /boot --fstype=ext4 --size=500
  • Create a swap partition that is 16128 MB in size and can grow in size to a maximum of 16128 MB:

    part swap --grow --maxsize=16128 --size=16128
  • Create an additional partition with the remaining space on the local disk:

    part None --fstype=ext4 --grow --size=100
  • Ignore all disks other than the target installation disk:

    ignoredisk --only-use=/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:1f.2-scsi-0:0:0:0
  • Automatically reboot Oracle VM Server after installation:

    reboot
Software RAID Partitions

You can configure a software RAID in a kickstart configuration to install Oracle VM Server on an array of disks.

Important
  • Oracle VM Server supports installation on software RAID devices on BIOS-based systems only.

  • You should not attempt to install Oracle VM Server on a software RAID if a disk that is 2 TB or larger is a member of the array. Due to a limitation with the Master Boot Record (MBR), Oracle VM Server cannot boot from disks that are 2 TB or larger in a software RAID configuration.

The following is an example kickstart configuration for installing Oracle VM Server on a software RAID device:

# Kickstart configuration for software RAID

install
url --url http://hostname/path/to/ISO
eula Accepted
lang en_US.UTF-8
keyboard us
network --device MAC_address --bootproto static --ip ip_address \
--netmask mask --nameserver ip_address --hostname hostname
ovsagent --iscrypted $6$upZltfKbh46roUFg$uMZl9u.aVfHb4KTe0VoiVPtz63fM4OtY9aY7GgvOJ0ChPwOBKu4rx/

ovsmgmntif MAC_address
rootpw --iscrypted $1$5VD6GV8E$ums7BMsNiFRcYz0D8HrD6/
firewall --disabled
authconfig --enableshadow --enablemd5
selinux --disabled
timezone --utc America/Los_Angeles

bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --append="crashkernel=auto"
iscsiname iSCSI_initiator_name

zerombr yes

clearpart --initlabel --all --drives=disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID,disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID

part raid.boota --size 500 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
part raid.bootb --size 500 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
raid /boot --fstype=ext4 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.boota raid.bootb

part raid.roota --size 32768 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
part raid.rootb --size 32768 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
raid / --fstype=ext4 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.roota raid.rootb

part raid.swapa --size 8192 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
part raid.swapb --size 8192 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
raid swap --fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.swapa raid.swapb

reboot

%packages
#@everything
@base
@core
@ovs-virtualization

The preceding kickstart configuration includes the following options:

  • Access the contents of the Oracle VM Server ISO image file at a URL:

    url --url http://hostname/path/to/ISO
  • Accept the EULA (End User License Agreement) in a kickstart configuration:

    eula Accepted
    Important

    You should read the EULA before you accept the terms in the kickstart configuration. The EULA is available on the Oracle VM Server ISO.

  • Install the boot loader on the Master Boot Record, specify the BIOS drive order, and append the crashkernel=auto kernel parameter:

    bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --append="crashkernel=auto"
    Note

    The crashkernel=auto directive enables Kdump during installation. The installer automatically calculates appropriate memory and offset values to reserve for the crash kernel and appends the correct information to the GRUB 2 configuration. For more information, see Diagnostic Tools for Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

  • Assign a name to the iSCSI node that is attached during installation:

    iscsiname iSCSI_initiator_name
  • Initialize any invalid partition tables on disks:

    zerombr yes
    Note

    This option destroys all contents of disks that have invalid partition tables.

  • Clear all partitions on the disks in the array:

    clearpart --initlabel --all --drives=disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID,disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID
  • Create a boot partition with RAID level 1 and filesystem type ext4 that is 500 MB in size on each disk in the array. Also assign md0 as the device name:

    part raid.boota --size 500 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
    part raid.bootb --size 500 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
    raid /boot --fstype=ext4 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.boota raid.bootb
  • Create a root partition with RAID level 1 and filesystem type ext4 that is 32768 MB in size on each disk in the array. Also assign md1 as the device name:

    part raid.roota --size 32768 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
    part raid.rootb --size 32768 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
    raid / --fstype=ext4 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.roota raid.rootb
  • Create a swap partition with RAID level 1 and filesystem type swap that is 8192 MB in size on each disk in the array. Also assign md1 as the device name:

    part raid.swapa --size 8192 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk1-ID --asprimary
    part raid.swapb --size 8192 --ondisk disk/by-id/scsi-disk2-ID --asprimary
    raid swap --fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.swapa raid.swapb
  • Automatically reboot Oracle VM Server after installation:

    reboot
Considerations for Kickstart Configurations

You should also consider the following points when you create your kickstart configuration:

  • Oracle VM Release 3.4 supports installations of Oracle VM Server onto a single disk or LUN only. As a result, kickstart installations using multiple disks in a non-software RAID configuration is not supported.

  • As a security best practice, you should ensure the console=hvc0 option is not appended to the boot loader configuration. This option can echo your password in the server console at login.

  • Several other options may be appended to the bootloader line depending on your environment requirements. See Section 5.7, “Finalizing Upgrades on Oracle VM Server for x86” for more information on the other options that you may want to append here.

  • If your server has multiple network interfaces, you should at least specify the network interface to be used for the management interface first. If you have more than one network interface specified in a kickstart file, the first interface is used as the management interface. It is preferable to not include lines for any of the other network interfaces available on your server within the kickstart configuration file, as this can confuse the installer. You can configure additional network interfaces on a server within Oracle VM Manager after installation and discovery.

  • It is possible to create a %post division in your kickstart configuration file for the purpose of automating some actions after the install has completed, but before the server has rebooted. This can prove useful if you need to perform additional tasks, such as copying SSH keys from a location accessible to the server, or for triggering a change to a PXELinux configuration parameter to prevent an install loop as discussed in Section 3.1, “Installing Oracle VM Server for x86 from PXE Boot”.

  • Disk device names and node numbering can change after Oracle VM Server reboots. As a result, non-persistent device names, such as /dev/sda, change between reboots. For this reason you should use persistent names such as the device UUID or WWID when identifying disks in a kickstart configuration. You can use the following command to identify disks:

    # ls -lR /dev/disk