2 Introduction to JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Business Services

This chapter contains the following topics:

2.1 Understanding JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Business Services

Business services are objects that enable interoperability between JD Edwards EnterpriseOne and other Oracle applications or third-party applications and systems. Business services enable software applications that are written in various programming languages and running on various platforms to exchange information.

A web service is a standardized way of integrating web-based applications. In JD Edwards EnterpriseOne, published business services are exposed to consumers as web services. These web services enable JD Edwards EnterpriseOne to expose native transactions to other applications and systems.

Note:

In the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne system, published business services are exposed as web services. Therefore, in many cases, you will see the terms business service and web service used interchangeably.

2.1.1 Published Business Services

A published business service is a JD Edwards EnterpriseOne object that is managed in Object Management Workbench (OMW). The published business service represents one Java class that publishes multiple business services. When you create a business service or web service, you identify the Java class. The published business service also contains value object classes that make up the signature for the published business service.

2.1.2 Internal Business Services

A business service is a JD Edwards EnterpriseOne object that is managed by OMW. A business service represents one or more classes that expose public methods. Each method performs a business process. A business service also contains internal value object classes that make up the signature for the business service methods. These public methods can be called from other business service classes and published business service classes.

Published business services are exposed to consumers. Internal business services are created for internal use by JD Edwards EnterpriseOne published business services. They are made available to consumers as a call from a published business service. Business services that are exposed to consumers are exposed as web service operations.

Note:

In the context of EnterpriseOne, business services are exposed as web service operations. Therefore, in many cases, you will see the terms business service and web service used interchangeably.

2.1.3 Business Service Properties

Many business services use business services properties. Business service properties are similar to processing options for an interactive or batch program in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne system. Properties enable you to easily change values or processing information about a business service without having to modify the programming code associated with that business service.

For example, many business services include a business service property that enables the user to specify the maximum number of records to return for a query. Other business services include properties that enable users to specify the version of a specific JD Edwards EnterpriseOne program to use during processing.

This documentation includes details about all of the business service properties that are used by each business service.

2.1.4 Utilities

Utilities are generic, reusable business services that perform standard operations that are used by many business services.

Utilities enable multiple business services to complete the same process in a uniform manner. For example, both the ProcessPurchaseOrder and ProcessCustomer business services retrieve entity information from the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne system. Rather than coding the retrieval of entity information separately in both of the business services, each business service uses the Entity Processor utility to retrieve the entity information. By using the Entity Processor utility, the complexity and the amount of code associated with each of the business services is reduced.

Business services use these utilities:

  • Entity Processor (J0100010)

  • GL Account Processor (J0900010)

  • Inventory Item ID Processor (J4100010)

  • Net Change Processor (J0000020)

  • Processing Version Processor (J0000010)

  • User Defined Code Utility (J0000050)

See JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Business Services Development Guide.

2.2 JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Business Services Integration Process

Published business services transfer information between JD Edwards EnterpriseOne and other Oracle or third-party systems. Internal business services (web service operations) process that information within EnterpriseOne. Because these systems may be using different programming languages or running on different platforms, data must be formatted during transfer so that it can be read and processed by each system.

The user of a third-party system, also known as the consumer, initiates a business services integration by entering data into an input interface. An input interface is based on JD Edwards EnterpriseOne data structure, and is used to hold the information associated with the user's request. For example, the consumer might specify that they want to inquire on a particular sales order in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne system. Therefore, they can enter the sales order number in the input interface and specify that they want to inquire on that order.

The published business service reads the consumer's request to determine the action that the system takes, and calls the appropriate business service. In this example the SalesOrderManager published business service calls the GetSalesOrder business service. Additionally, the published business service formats the data in the input interface so that it can be read and processed by the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne system.

The business service passes the data into the EnterpriseOne system and tells the system what actions to perform. After the EnterpriseOne system processes or retrieves the specified information, it sends the results back to the business service. The business service receives the processed data from the EnterpriseOne system and passes it back to the published business service. The published business service then formats the data so that it can be read by the third-party system and passes it back to the consumer using the response interface.

2.3 JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Business Services Implementation

Before you can use JD Edwards EnterpriseOne business services, you must be sure that the technical setup of your system supports Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) integration processing. All of the system setup steps that you must perform are outlined in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne 8.98 Documentation Map, which you can access on the JD Edwards Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) page from the My Oracle Support web site.

In addition to technical setup, you must set up the application systems that are associated with the business services you will use before you can use the business services that are included in this documentation:

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Accounts Payable

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Accounts Receivable

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Address Book

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Customer Relationship Management

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Human Capital Management

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Inventory Management

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Procurement

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Real Estate Management

  • JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Sales Order Management

The implementation steps that are required for each of these systems are documented in detail in the corresponding implementation guide.