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Administering an Oracle® Solaris Cluster 4.4 Configuration

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Updated: March 2019
 
 

Adding a Quorum Device

This section provides procedures to add a quorum device. Ensure that all nodes in the cluster are online before adding a new quorum device. For information about determining the number of quorum vote counts necessary for your cluster, recommended quorum configurations, and failure fencing, see Quorum and Quorum Devices in Concepts for Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.4.


Caution

Caution  -  Do not add a disk that is currently configured as a quorum device to a Solaris ZFS storage pool. When a configured quorum device is added to a Solaris ZFS storage pool, the disk is relabeled as an EFI disk and quorum configuration information is lost and the disk no longer provides a quorum vote to the cluster. Once a disk is in a storage pool, that disk can then be configured as a quorum device. You can also unconfigure the disk, add it to the storage pool, and then reconfigure the disk as a quorum device.


The Oracle Solaris Cluster software supports the following types of quorum devices:

  • Shared LUNs from the following:

    • Shared SCSI disk

    • Serial Attached Technology Attachment (SATA) storage

    • Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance

    • Supported NAS devices

  • Oracle Solaris Cluster Quorum Server

Procedures for adding these devices are provided in the following sections:


Note -  You cannot configure replicated disks as quorum devices. If you try to add a replicated disk as a quorum device, you receive the following error message and the command exits with an error code.
Disk-name is a replicated device. Replicated devices cannot be configured as
quorum devices.

A shared-disk quorum device is any attached storage device that is supported by Oracle Solaris Cluster software. The shared disk is connected to two or more nodes of your cluster. If you turn fencing on, a dual-ported disk can be configured as a quorum device that uses SCSI-2 or SCSI-3 (the default is SCSI-2). If fencing is turned on and your shared device is connected to more than two nodes, you can configure your shared disk as a quorum device that uses the SCSI-3 protocol (the default protocol for more than two nodes). You can use the SCSI override flag to make the Oracle Solaris Clustersoftware use the SCSI-3 protocol for dual-ported shared disks.

If you turn fencing off for a shared disk, you can then configure the disk as a quorum device that uses the software quorum protocol. This would be true regardless of whether the disk supports SCSI-2 or SCSI-3 protocols. Software quorum is a protocol from Oracle that emulates a form of SCSI Persistent Group Reservations (PGR).


Caution

Caution  -  If you are using disks that do not support SCSI (such as SATA), you should turn SCSI fencing off.


For quorum devices, you can use a disk that contains user data or is a member of a device group. View the protocol that is used by the quorum subsystem with a shared disk by looking at the access-mode value for the shared disk in the output from the cluster show command.


Note -  You can also create a quorum server device or a shared disk quorum device by using the Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager browser interface. For Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager log-in instructions, see How to Access Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager.

See the clsetup(8CL) and clquorum(8CL) man pages for information about the commands that are used in the following procedures.

How to Add a Shared Disk Quorum Device

Oracle Solaris Cluster software supports shared-disk (both SCSI and SATA) devices as quorum devices. A SATA device does not support a SCSI reservation, and you must disable the SCSI reservation fencing flag and use the software quorum protocol to configure these disks as quorum devices.

To complete this procedure, identify a disk drive by its device ID (DID), which is shared by the nodes. Use the cldevice show command to see the list of DID names. Refer to the cldevice(8CL) man page for additional information. Ensure that all nodes in the cluster are online before adding a new quorum device.

Use this procedure to configure SCSI or SATA devices.

The phys-schost# prompt reflects a global-cluster prompt. Perform this procedure on a global cluster.

This procedure provides the long forms of the Oracle Solaris Cluster commands. Most commands also have short forms. Except for the long and short forms of the command names, the commands are identical.

  1. Assume the root role or a role that provides solaris.cluster.modify authorization on any node of the cluster.
  2. Start the clsetup utility.
    # clsetup

    The clsetup Main Menu is displayed.

  3. Type the number for the option for Quorum.

    The Quorum Menu is displayed.

  4. Type the number for the option for adding a quorum device, then type yes when the clsetup utility asks you to confirm the quorum device that you are adding.

    The clsetup utility asks what type of quorum device you want to add.

  5. Type the number for the option for a shared-disk quorum device.

    The clsetup utility asks which global device you want to use.

  6. Type the global device you are using.

    The clsetup utility asks you to confirm that the new quorum device should be added to the global device you specified.

  7. Type yes to continue adding the new quorum device.

    If the new quorum device is added successfully, the clsetup utility displays a message to that effect.

  8. Verify that the quorum device has been added.
    # clquorum list -v

How to Add an Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance NAS Quorum Device

Ensure that all nodes in the cluster are online before adding a new quorum device.

The phys-schost# prompt reflects a global-cluster prompt. Perform this procedure on a global cluster.

This procedure provides the long forms of the Oracle Solaris Cluster commands. Most commands also have short forms. Except for the long and short forms of the command names, the commands are identical.


Note -  You can also use the Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager browser interface to add an Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance NAS device. For Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager log-in instructions, see How to Access Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager.
  1. Consult the installation documentation that shipped with the Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance or the appliance's online Help for instructions on setting up an iSCSI device.
  2. On each of the cluster nodes, discover the iSCSI LUN and set the iSCSI access list to static configuration.
    # iscsiadm modify discovery -s enable
    
    # iscsiadm list discovery
    Discovery:
    Static: enabled
    Send Targets: disabled
    iSNS: disabled
    
    # iscsiadm add static-config iqn.LUN-name,IP-address-of-NASdevice
    # devfsadm -i iscsi
    # cldevice refresh
  3. From one cluster node, configure the DIDs for the iSCSI LUN.
    # cldevice populate
  4. Identify the DID device that represents the NAS device LUN that has just been configured into the cluster using iSCSI.

    Use the cldevice show command to see the list of DID names. Refer to the cldevice(8CL) man page for additional information.

  5. Assume the root role or a role that provides solaris.cluster.modify authorization on any node of the cluster.
  6. Use the clquorum command to add the NAS device as a quorum device, using the DID device identified in Step 4.
    # clquorum add d20

    The cluster has default rules for deciding whether to use scsi-2, scsi-3, or software quorum protocols. See the clquorum(8CL) man page for more information.

How to Add a Quorum Server Quorum Device

Before You Begin

Before you can add an Oracle Solaris Cluster quorum server as a quorum device, the Oracle Solaris Cluster quorum server software must be installed on the host machine and the quorum server must be started and running. For information about installing the quorum server, see the How to Install and Configure Oracle Solaris Cluster Quorum Server Software in Installing and Configuring an Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.4 Environment.

The phys-schost# prompt reflects a global-cluster prompt. Perform this procedure on a global cluster.

This procedure provides the long forms of the Oracle Solaris Cluster commands. Most commands also have short forms. Except for the long and short forms of the command names, the commands are identical.


Note -  You can also create a quorum server device by using the Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager browser interface. For Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager log-in instructions, see How to Access Oracle Solaris Cluster Manager.
  1. Assume the root role or a role that provides solaris.cluster.modify authorization on any node of the cluster.
  2. Ensure that all Oracle Solaris Cluster nodes are online and can communicate with the Oracle Solaris Cluster quorum server.
    1. Ensure that network switches that are directly connected to cluster nodes meet one of the following criteria:
      • The switch supports Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP).

      • Fast port mode is enabled on the switch.

      One of these features is required to ensure immediate communication between cluster nodes and the quorum server. If this communication is significantly delayed by the switch, the cluster interprets this prevention of communication as loss of the quorum device.

    2. If the public network uses variable-length subnetting, also called Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR), modify the following files on each node.

      If you use classful subnets, as defined in RFC 791, you do not need to perform these steps.

      1. Add to the /etc/inet/netmasks file an entry for each public subnet that the cluster uses.

        The following is an example entry which contains a public-network IP address and netmask:

        10.11.30.0	255.255.255.0
      2. Append netmask + broadcast + to the hostname entry in each /etc/hostname.adapter file.
        nodename netmask + broadcast +
    3. On each node in the cluster, add the quorum server hostname to the /etc/inet/hosts file or the /etc/inet/ipnodes file.

      Add a hostname-to-address mapping to the file, such as the following.

      ipaddress qshost1
      ipaddress

      The IP address of the computer where the quorum server is running.

      qshost1

      The hostname of the computer where the quorum server is running.

    4. If you use a naming service, add the quorum server host's name-to-address mapping to the name-service database.
  3. Start the clsetup utility.
    # clsetup

    The clsetup Main Menu is displayed.

  4. Type the number for the option for Quorum.

    The Quorum Menu is displayed.

  5. Type the number for the option for adding a quorum device.

    Then type yes to confirm that you are adding a quorum device.

    The clsetup utility asks what type of quorum device you want to add.

  6. Type the number for the option for a quorum-server quorum device and then type yes to confirm that you are adding a quorum-server quorum device.

    The clsetup utility asks you to provide the name of the new quorum device.

  7. Type the name of the quorum device you are adding.

    The quorum device name can be any name you choose. The name is only used to process future administrative commands.

    The clsetup utility asks you to provide the name of the host of the quorum server.

  8. Type the name of the host of the quorum server.

    This name specifies the IP address of the machine where the quorum server runs or the hostname of the machine on the network.

    Depending on the IPv4 or IPv6 configuration of the host, the IP address of the machine must be specified in the /etc/hosts file, the /etc/inet/ipnodes file, or both.


    Note -  The machine you specify must be reachable by all cluster nodes and must run the quorum server.

    The clsetup utility asks you to provide the port number of the quorum server.

  9. Type the port number that is used by the quorum server to communicate with the cluster nodes.

    The clsetup utility asks you to confirm that the new quorum device should be added.

  10. Type yes to continue adding the new quorum device.

    If the new quorum device is added successfully, the clsetup utility displays a message to that effect.

  11. Verify that the quorum device has been added.
    # clquorum list –v