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Oracle® VM Server for SPARC 3.6 Administration Guide

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Updated: September 2019
 
 

Using Power Management

This appendix contains information about using power management (PM) on Oracle VM Server for SPARC systems.

Starting with the Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.5.0.1 software, Logical Domains Manager-based PM is disabled by default for Oracle SPARC platforms.

To enable PM, set the ldmd/pm_enabled SMF property value to true. See the ldmd(8) man page.

If you do not plan to override this new default, perform the following steps before you upgrade to the Oracle VM Server for SPARC software. Performing these steps ensures that the system runs at full power and with the highest performance.

    Perform the following steps that apply to your SPARC server:

  • Up to and including the SPARC M6 and SPARC T5 series servers.

    1. Disable Service Processor power management, also known as the platform policy.

      Run the following ILOM command as an administrative user:

      --> set /SP/powermgmt/ policy=disabled
    2. Set the PM administrative control to platform on the control domain as superuser:

      primary# poweradm set active_control/administrative-authority=platform
  • Starting with the SPARC M7, SPARC T7, and SPARC S7 series servers. Perform one of the following steps:

    • Perform a power cycle of the server.

    • Update the server with at least system firmware version 9.8.6.

Using Power Management

To enable power management (PM), you first need to set the PM policy in the Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 firmware. This section summarizes the information that you need to be able to use PM with the Oracle VM Server for SPARC software.

    For more information about ILOM, see the following:

  • “Monitoring Power Consumption” in the Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 CLI Procedures Guide

  • Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 Feature Updates and Release Notes

    The power policy governs system power usage at any point in time. The following power policies are supported, assuming that the underlying platform has implemented PM features:

  • Disabled. Permits the system to use all the power that is available.

  • Performance. Enables one or more of the following PM features that have a negligible affect on performance:

    • CPU core auto-disabling

    • CPU clock cycle skip

    • CPU dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS)

    • Coherency link scaling

    • Oracle Solaris Power Aware Dispatcher (PAD)

  • Elastic. Adapts the system power usage to the current utilization level by using the PM features described in the performance section. For example, the power state of resources is reduced as utilization decreases.


Note - The pm_boot_policy property value is shown in some list output. This value contains internal PM data and is not to be interpreted or modified.

For information about preventing a user to suspend or power down a system from a system console, see How to Remove Power Management Capability From Users in Securing Users and Processes in Oracle Solaris 11.4.

Power Management Features

    The PM features are as follows:

  • CPU core auto-disabling. When the elastic or performance policy is in effect, the Logical Domains Manager automatically disables a CPU core when all the hardware threads (strands) on that core are not bound to a domain. This feature is available only for the SPARC T4 platforms.

  • CPU clock cycle skip.When the elastic policy is in effect, the Logical Domains Manager automatically adjusts the number of clock cycles that execute instructions on the following CPU resources that are bound to domains:

    • Processors (SPARC T4 on domains that run the Oracle Solaris 10 or Oracle Solaris 11 OS)

    • Cores (SPARC M5 only on domains that run the Oracle Solaris 10 OS)

    • Core-pairs (SPARC T5 or SPARC M6 only on domains that run the Oracle Solaris 10 OS)

    • SPARC Cache Cluster (SCC) (SPARC T7, SPARC T8, SPARC M7, SPARC M8, and SPARC S7 series servers only on domains that run the Oracle Solaris 10 OS)

    The Logical Domains Manager also applies cycle skipping if the processor, core, core-pair, or SCC has no bound strands.

  • CPU dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS). When the elastic policy is in effect, the Logical Domains Manager automatically adjusts the clock frequency of processors or SCCs that are bound to domains running the Oracle Solaris 10 OS. The Logical Domains Manager also reduces the clock frequency on SPARC T5, SPARC M5, and SPARC M6 processors that have no bound strands. On SPARC T7 and SPARC T8 series servers, the clock frequency is reduced on SCCs. This feature is available only on servers starting with the SPARC T5, SPARC M5, and SPARC S7 series server.

  • Coherency link scaling. When the elastic policy is in effect, the Logical Domains Manager causes the hypervisor to automatically adjust the number of coherency links that are in use. This feature is only available on SPARC T5-2 systems.

  • Power limit. You can set a power limit on servers starting with the SPARC T4, SPARC M5, and SPARC S7 series server to restrict the power draw of a system. If the power draw is greater than the power limit, PM uses techniques to reduce power. You can use the ILOM service processor (SP) to set the power limit.

      See the following documents:

    • Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 CLI Procedures Guide

    • Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 Feature Updates and Release Notes

    You can use the ILOM interface to set a power limit, grace period, and violation action. If the power limit is exceeded for more than the grace period, the violation action is performed.

    If the current power draw exceeds the power limit, an attempt is made to reduce the power state of CPUs. If the power draw drops below the power limit, the power state of those resources is permitted to increase. If the system has the elastic policy in effect, an increase in the power state of resources is driven by the utilization level.

  • Solaris Power Aware Dispatcher (PAD). A guest domain that runs the Oracle Solaris 11.1 OS uses the power-aware dispatcher (PAD) on servers starting with the SPARC T5, SPARC M5, and SPARC S7 series server to minimize power consumption from idle or under-utilized resources. PAD, instead of the Logical Domains Manager, adjusts the CPU or SCC clock cycle skip level and DVFS level.

For instructions on configuring the power policy by using the ILOM 3.0 firmware CLI, see “Monitoring Power Consumption” in the Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM) 3.0 CLI Procedures Guide.

Viewing Power-Consumption Data

The Power Management (PM) Observability Module and the ldmpower command enable you to view CPU thread power-consumption data for your domains.

The PM Observability Module is enabled by default because the ldmd/pm_observability_enabled Service Management Facility (SMF) property is set to true. See the ldmd(8) man page.

The ldmpower command has the following options and operands with which you can customize the power-consumption reporting data:

ldmpower [-ehiprstvx | -o hours | -m minutes] | -c resource [-l domain-name[,domain-name[,...]]]
  [interval [count]]

For information about the options, see the ldmpower(8) man page.

To run this command as a non-privileged user, you must be assigned the LDoms Power Mgmt Observability rights profile. If you already have been assigned the LDoms Management or LDoms Review rights profile, you automatically have permission to run the ldmpower command.

For information about how Oracle VM Server for SPARC uses rights, see Logical Domains Manager Profile Contents.

These rights profiles can be assigned directly to users or to a role that is then assigned to users. When one of these profiles is assigned directly to a user, you must use the pfexec command or a profile shell, such as pfbash or pfksh, to successfully use the ldmpower command to view CPU thread power-consumption data. See Delegating the Management of Logical Domains by Using Rights.

The following examples show how to enable the PM Observability Module and show ways in which to gather power-consumption data for the CPUs that are assigned to your domains.

Example 89  Enabling the Power Management Observability Module

The following command enables the PM Observability Module by setting the ldmd/pm_observability_enabled property to true if the property is currently set to false.

# svccfg -s ldmd setprop ldmd/pm_observability_enabled=true
# svcadm refresh ldmd
# svcadm restart ldmd
Example 90  Using a Profile Shell to Obtain CPU Thread Power-Consumption Data by Using Roles and Rights Profiles
  • The following example shows how to create the ldmpower role with the LDoms Power Mgmt Observability rights profile, which permits you to run the ldmpower command.

    primary# roleadd -P "LDoms Power Mgmt Observability" ldmpower
    primary# passwd ldmpower
    New Password:
    Re-enter new Password:
    passwd: password successfully changed for ldmpower

    This command assigns the ldmpower role to the sam user.

    primary# usermod -R ldmpower sam

    User sam assumes the ldmpower role and can use the ldmpower command. For example:

    $ id
    uid=700299(sam) gid=1(other)
    $ su ldmpower
    Password:
    $ pfexec ldmpower
    Processor Power Consumption in Watts
    DOMAIN  15_SEC_AVG  30_SEC_AVG  60_SEC_AVG
    primary 75          84          86
    gdom1   47          24          19
    gdom2   10          24          26
  • The following example shows how to use rights profiles to run the ldmpower command.

    Assign the rights profile to a user.

    primary# usermod -P +"LDoms Power Mgmt Observability" sam

    The following commands show how to verify that the user is sam and that the All, Basic Solaris User, and LDoms Power Mgmt Observability rights profiles are in effect.

    $ id
    uid=702048(sam) gid=1(other)
    $ profiles
    All
    Basic Solaris User
    LDoms Power Mgmt Observability
    $ pfexec ldmpower
    Processor Power Consumption in Watts
    DOMAIN  15_SEC_AVG  30_SEC_AVG  60_SEC_AVG
    primary 75          84          86
    gdom1   47          24          19
    gdom2   10          24          26
Example 91  Viewing Processor Power-Consumption Data

    The following examples show how to use the ldmpower to report processor power-consumption data for your domains.

  • The following command shows the 15-second, 30-second, and 60-second rolling average processor power-consumption data for all domains:

    primary# ldmpower
    Processor Power Consumption in Watts
    DOMAIN  15_SEC_AVG  30_SEC_AVG  60_SEC_AVG
    primary 75          84          86
    gdom1   47          24          19
    gdom2   10          24          26
  • The following command shows extrapolated power-consumption data for all the domains: primary, gdom1, and gdom2.

    primary# ldmpower -x
    System Power Consumption in Watts
    DOMAIN  15_SEC_AVG  30_SEC_AVG  60_SEC_AVG
    primary 585/57.47%  701/68.96%  712/70.22%
    gdom1   132/12.97%  94/9.31%    94/9.30%
    gdom2   298/29.27%  218/21.47%  205/20.22%
  • The following command shows the instantaneous processor power-consumption data for the gdom2 and gdom5 domains. It reports the data every ten seconds for five times.

    primary# ldmpower -itl gdom2,gdom5 10 5
    Processor Power Consumption in Watts
    DOMAIN          TIMESTAMP               INSTANT
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:14:45     13
    gdom5           2013.05.17 11:14:45     24
    
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:14:55     18
    gdom5           2013.05.17 11:14:55     26
    
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:15:05     9
    gdom5           2013.05.17 11:15:05     16
    
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:15:15     15
    gdom5           2013.05.17 11:15:15     19
    
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:15:25     12
    gdom5           2013.05.17 11:15:25     18
  • The following command shows the average power-consumption data for the last 12 hours for all domains. Data is shown at one-hour intervals starting from the last requested hourly calculation.

    primary# ldmpower -eto 12
    Per domain MINIMUM and MAXIMUM power consumption ever recorded:
    primary         2013.05.17 08:53:06     3                Min Processors
    primary         2013.05.17 08:40:44     273              Max Processors
    gdom1           2013.05.17 09:56:35     2                Min Processors
    gdom1           2013.05.17 08:53:06     134              Max Processors
    gdom2           2013.05.17 10:31:55     2                Min Processors
    gdom2           2013.05.17 08:56:35     139              Max Processors
    
    primary         2013.05.17 08:53:06     99               Min Memory
    primary         2013.05.17 08:40:44     182              Max Memory
    gdom1           2013.05.17 09:56:35     13               Min Memory
    gdom1           2013.05.17 08:53:06     20               Max Memory
    gdom2           2013.05.17 10:31:55     65               Min Memory
    gdom2           2013.05.17 08:56:35     66               Max Memory
    
    Processor Power Consumption in Watts
    12 hour's worth of data starting from 2013.05.16 23:17:02
    DOMAIN          TIMESTAMP               1 HOUR AVG
    primary         2013.05.17 09:37:35     112
    gdom1           2013.05.17 09:37:35     15
    gdom2           2013.05.17 09:37:35     26
    
    primary         2013.05.17 10:37:35     96
    gdom1           2013.05.17 10:37:35     12
    gdom2           2013.05.17 10:37:35     21
    
    primary         2013.05.17 11:37:35     85
    gdom1           2013.05.17 11:37:35     11
    gdom2           2013.05.17 11:37:35     23
    ...