Maps

Two different kinds of maps are available, domain values maps (DVM) and cross-reference maps (XREF). The maps are similar in that both maps group elements by domain name and are composed of elements that map specific values from one domain to another. The difference from a technical perspective is that XREF values are constantly being created, whereas DVM values are relatively static.

XREF

DVM

Usually keys

Usually attributes

Data maintained programmatically

Data maintained manually through the user interface

Map cardinality provides an independent classification of the mapping functions. Maps are based on single values (1:1) or multivalues (N:N).

A Domain Value Map (DVM) is used for values that are relatively static and are relatively limited in total number, such as country codes and states. DVMs generally have all values entered into the maps prior to the transformation process, and are less frequently extended compared to cross-reference maps.

The DVM consists of domains, maps, and elements.

Field or Control

Definition

Domain

A participating integrating system, for example, Siebel or Oracle E-Business Suite.

Note: Multiple domains can be maintained for a map.

Maps

A static object for which the mapping needs to be maintained, for example, currency code or country code.

Element

The unit of data in the local or remote message upon which an irreducible transanimation operates. An irreducible transanimation is one that cannot be broken into smaller transformations. Most elements contain a single data value, but that may not always be the case. For example, an address could be represented as a single string, or it could be composed of separate strings representing city, state, street, and house number. Examples of DVM elements are country code and common value.

A cross-reference map is used for values that are dynamic in nature, such as key elements used to identify an instance. These are referred to as key maps or cross-references. The values are the names of larger data entities.

Cross-references consist of domains, maps, and elements.

Field or Control

Definition

Domain

A participating integrating system, for example, Siebel or E-Business Suite.

Note: Multiple domains can be maintained for a map.

Maps

A transaction object where the cross-reference for the keys is maintained, for example, voucher or vendor.

Element

An individual element captured as part of the key information, for example, SETID, VENDOR_ID.