Hands On: Managing Users and Teams

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Live Experience User Roles: The Right Tools for the Right Users

Live Experience User Teams: The Right Persons for the Job

10 Minute Read

Using the Oracle Live Experience Admin Console, you can easily define users who are assigned various roles depending on their job responsibilities. Each role grants various privileges. A user can have multiple roles.

Once you've created your users, you can then assign them to teams.

You can then uses your teams in conjunction with skills and routing rules to really fine tune how your customer engagements are routed to associates, as described in Focus Your Resources: Get Your Customers to the Right Team with the Right Skills.

For now, in this article, we'll examine Live Experience user roles in detail, and run through procedures and recommendations for creating both users and teams.

Live Experience User Roles: The Right Tools for the Right Users

As with every complex system, you won't want to give every user access to the keys to the kingdom. Having a regular associate with full access to the Admin Console will cause you massive headaches when they delete or modify your engagement scenarios and routing rules out of curiosity. Likewise, you won't want your technical-minded administrators answering calls in the Associate Desktop. Note that the jury's out on which of those cases is the scariest.

Live Experience Roles Defined

With that in mind, Live Experience lets you assign users you create one or more of the following roles:

  • Associate: An associate engages with end users through audio and visual channels to facilitate a successful user experience. An associate only has access to the Associate Desktop, unless the associate also has additional roles. Only users with the associate role can be assigned to teams.

  • Administrator: An administrator has full access to the administration UI and has rights to modify all Live Experience configuration settings and view end user recordings. An administrator can create user accounts and assign the roles of administrator, supervisor, and associate. Administrators can't access the Associate Desktop unless they also have the role of associate.

  • Supervisor: A supervisor has managerial responsibility for associates and can review the service dashboard and reporting information. Supervisors can't access the Associate Desktop unless they also have the role of associate.

Here's the permissions matrix for relevant combination of roles:

Role or Role Combination Live Experience Feature Access
Administrator Complete access to Admin Console.

Can't be assigned to teams.

Supervisor Access only to service dashboard and reports in Admin Console.

Can't be assigned to teams.

Associate Access only to the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams.

Administrator and Associate Complete access to the Admin Console as well as the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams.

Supervisor and Associate Access only to service dashboard and reports in Admin Console as well as the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams.


Note:

Several possible combinations aren't listed in the table above because they're irrelevant. For example, there's no point in having a user with both administrator and supervisor roles, since the administrator role already has full access to the Admin Console. Likewise, all three roles assigned to a single user are similarly pointless.

Don't Grant Extra Privileges Where None are Needed

When assigning roles, you'll want to keep the following rule in mind: assign a user the role with the minimum level of privilege required for them to do their job effectively. You should end up with only a handful of administrators, a number of supervisors that represent your organization's managerial structure, and most of your users assigned only the Associate role.

Live Experience User Teams: The Right Persons for the Job

You can gather your users into teams that you can then target when you're routing engagements. For instance you might want to create teams of users that can service different customer languages, or you might want separate teams for separate product lines.

Combined with skills and routing rules, discussed in Focus Your Resources: Get Your Customers to the Right Team with the Right Skills, you can ensure that associates with the right skills respond the appropriate engagements, and minimize engagement times and customer frustration.

Let's go over how you create a team:

  1. From the Admin Console, select Users and then select the Teams tab, then select Add New Team.

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    The New Team page appears.

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  2. Enter a Name (99 characters maximum).

    If you've got a large number of teams, you'll want to be relatively descriptive in your naming. Names like Alpha, Bravo, and Charlie sound cool, but unless you're working in some sort of military environment, names like Sales-East or Mainframe-Support will make much more sense when it comes time to create routing rules.

  3. Enable Shared Queue if desired.

    By default, Live Experience will route an incoming engagement to the associate on a team who's been idle the longest. If you enabled a shared queue, Live Experience will route the incoming engagement to all associates, and the first one to answer takes the call.

  4. If desired, you can schedule the team's availability:

  5. Add members. Click Add Members. From the dialog, search for members to add to the team.

  6. Click Save to save your new team.

Your team's now ready to use.

Related Topics

Manage Users

Manage Teams

Focus Your Resources: Get Your Customers to the Right Team with the Right Skills

Live Experience Engagement Scenarios: Choosing the Right Digital Channels for the Job

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Live Experience Users and Teams