Manage Users in Live Experience

Learn about managing and creating new user accounts in Oracle Live Experience. Discover how to use roles to grant and control access to Live Experience interfaces. Managing users consists of creating, deleting, and modifying users accounts.

You manage users using the Live Experience Admin Console. Go to either of the following URLs to get started:

  • https://live.oraclecloud.com/ui?tenant=your_tenant_name

    or, for EMEA customers

  • https://emea.live.oraclecloud.com/ui?tenant=your_tenant_name

The following graphic shows the Manage Users screen in the Admin Console and calls out the areas of interest.

Description of manage_usersrs.png follows
Description of the illustration manage_usersrs.png
  1. To open the Manage Users screen, from the Admin Console navigation menu, click Users, then click the Users tab.

  2. To open the Manage Teams page, click the Teams tab.

  3. Click Add New User to create a new user.

    See Adding or Modifying a User for more info.

  4. You can use the Search field to search for users by name or email address.

  5. Lists the teams that this user account belongs to. Only associates can be assigned to teams.

  6. Lists the roles associated with this user account. The possible roles are Associate, Supervisor, and Administrator (see About Live Experience User Roles for more info).

  7. Click the pencil icon to modify a user account.

    See Adding or Modifying a User for more info.

  8. Click the trash icon to delete a user account.

Adding or Modifying a User

Only an administrator can add or modify users.

The following graphic shows the Users screen in the Admin Console, which you see when you add or modify a user, and calls out the areas of interest.

Description of add_modify_usersrs.png follows
Description of the illustration add_modify_usersrs.png

To add a new user to Oracle Live Experience

  1. The user's name. The name in the title automatically updates to match the value you enter in the Name field.

  2. The user's email address. When you are adding a new user, you enter the email address. This email address serves as the user's username when logging into Live Experience.

    You can't change the email address once you create the user (because the email address doubles as the username). So if someone's email changes, you need to create a new account for them.

  3. The user roles for this account. Add a role to the user account by selecting one or more roles. You can assign multiple roles. In this example, Lenke Peterson's account is granted the Associate and Supervisor roles, allowing him to use the Associate Desktop, and allowing him limited use of the Admin Console. See About Live Experience User Roles for more info.

    Only accounts with the Associate role can be assigned to teams or be given skills. If you want to modify an account so that the user is no longer an associate, you need to remove the teams and the skills first.

  4. The list of teams created on this Live Experience tenant. Add the user account to a team by selecting one or more teams. In this example, Lenke Peterson is assigned to the Product Support and Sales Support teams.

    Assigning users to teams is helpful for setting up advanced routing rules. See Manage Teams in Live Experience for more info.

  5. The list of skills belonging to this user account.

    Assigning skills to users is helpful for setting up advanced routing rules. See Manage Skills for more info.

  6. The skill value indicates the user's proficiency at each skill, on a range from 1 to 10.

  7. Click the X icon to remove a skill from a user account.

  8. To add a skill to an account from the list of skills created for your Live Experience tenant, click Add New Skill.

About Live Experience User Roles

Using roles, Live Experience distinguishes between the following kinds of users: associates, supervisors, and administrators.

  • An associate is someone with access to the Live Experience Associate Desktop to engage with customers, either by answering incoming engagements that are routed to them, or by directly calling or engagement with customers.

  • A supervisor is someone with limited access to the Live Experience Admin Console: who is able to view the Service Overview Dashboard, and who can search for engagement details and play back recorded engagements.

  • An administrator is someone with complete access to the Live Experience Admin Console: who is able to enable and disable features, create and modify users and teams, create and modify engagement scenarios, and who can view the Service Overview Dashboard, view reports, and search for engagement details and play back recorded engagements.

When assigning roles, you'll want to keep the following rule in mind: assign a user the role with the minimum level of privilege required for them to do their job effectively. You should end up with only a handful of administrators, a number of supervisors that represent your organization's managerial structure, and most of your users assigned only the Associate role.

For example, you might not want to give some of your associate full access to the Admin Console, because they could delete or modify your engagement scenarios or routing rules out of curiosity. Similarly, you might not want some of your administrators to be engaging with your customers.

What's neat is that you can grant multiple roles to your users to give them access to multiple interfaces.

Role or Role Combination Live Experience Feature Access

Administrator

Complete access to Admin Console.

Can't be assigned to teams.

Supervisor

Access only to service dashboard, reporting dashboard, and engagement history in the Admin Console.

Can't be assigned to teams.

Associate

Complete access to the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams.

Administrator and Associate

Complete access to the Admin Console as well as the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams (because of the Associate role).

Supervisor and Associate

Access only to service dashboard, reporting dashboard, and engagement history in the Admin Console, and access to the Associate Desktop.

Can be assigned to teams (because of the Associate role).

Note:

Several possible combinations aren't listed in the table above because they're irrelevant. For example, there's no point in having a user with both administrator and supervisor roles, since the administrator role already has full access to the Admin Console. Likewise, all three roles assigned to a single user are similarly pointless.

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Common Tasks for Administrators