JSON_TABLE

Note:

The JSON_TABLE function is available starting with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2).

Syntax

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(JSON_path_expression::=, JSON_table_on_error_clause::=, JSON_columns_clause::=)

JSON_path_expression::=

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object_step::=

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array_step::=

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JSON_table_on_error_clause::=

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JSON_columns_clause::=

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JSON_column_definition::=

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JSON_exists_column::=

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(The syntax and semantics of these clauses are described in the JSON_EXISTS and JSON_VALUE documentation: JSON_value_return_type::=, JSON_path_expression::=, JSON_exists_on_error_clause::=)

JSON_query_column::=

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(The syntax and semantics of these clauses are described in the JSON_QUERY documentation: JSON_query_return_type::=, JSON_query_wrapper_clause::=, JSON_path_expression::=, JSON_query_on_error_clause::=)

JSON_value_column::=

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(The syntax and semantics of these clauses are described in the JSON_VALUE documentation: JSON_value_return_type::=, JSON_path_expression::=, JSON_value_on_error_clause::=)

nested_path_column::=

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(JSON_path_expression::=, JSON_columns_clause::=)

ordinality_column::=

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Purpose

JSON_TABLE creates a relational view of JSON data. It maps the result of a JSON data evaluation into relational rows and columns. You can query the result returned by the function as a virtual relational table using SQL. The main purpose of JSON_TABLE is to create a row of relational data for each object inside a JSON array and output JSON values from within that object as individual SQL column values.

You must specify JSON_TABLE only in the FROM clause of a SELECT statement. The function first applies a JSON path expression, called a row path expression, to the supplied JSON data. The JSON value that matches the row path expression is called a row source in that it generates a row of relational data. The COLUMNS clause evaluates the row source, finds specific JSON values within the row source, and returns those JSON values as SQL values in individual columns of a row of relational data.

The COLUMNS clause enables you to search for JSON values in different ways by using the following clauses:

  • JSON_exists_column - Evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_EXISTS condition, that is, determines if a specified JSON value exists, and returns either a VARCHAR2 column of values 'true' or 'false', or a NUMBER column of values 1 or 0.

  • JSON_query_column - Evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_QUERY function, that is, finds one or more specified JSON values, and returns a column of character strings that contain those JSON values.

  • JSON_value_column - Evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_VALUE function, that is, finds a specified scalar JSON value, and returns a column of those JSON values as SQL values.

  • JSON_nested_path - Allows you to flatten JSON values in a nested JSON object or JSON array into individual columns in a single row along with JSON values from the parent object or array. You can use this clause recursively to project data from multiple layers of nested objects or arrays into a single row.

  • ordinality_column - Returns a column of generated row numbers.

The column definition clauses allow you to specify a name for each column of data that they return. You can reference these column names elsewhere in the SELECT statement, such as in the SELECT list and the WHERE clause.

expr

Use this clause to specify the JSON data to be evaluated. For expr, specify an expression that evaluates to a text literal. If expr is a column, then the column must be of data type VARCHAR2, CLOB, or BLOB. If expr is null, then the function returns null.

If expr is not a text literal of well-formed JSON data using strict or lax syntax, then the function returns null by default. You can use the JSON_table_on_error_clause to override this default behavior. Refer to JSON_table_on_error_clause.

FORMAT JSON

You must specify FORMAT JSON if expr is a column of data type BLOB.

JSON_path_expression

Use this clause to specify the row path expression. The function uses the row path expression to evaluate expr and find the a JSON value, called the row source, that matches, or satisfy, the path expression. This row source is then evaluated by the COLUMNS clause. The path expression must be a text literal.

The JSON_path_expression clause has the same semantics for JSON_TABLE and JSON_QUERY. For the full semantics of this clause, refer to JSON_path_expression in the documentation on JSON_QUERY.

JSON_table_on_error_clause

Use this clause to specify the value returned by this function when the following errors occur:

  • expr is not well-formed JSON data using strict or lax JSON syntax

  • No match is found when the JSON data is evaluated using the row path expression

You can specify the following clauses:

  • NULL ON ERROR - Returns null when an error occurs. This is the default.

  • ERROR ON ERROR - Returns the appropriate Oracle error when an error occurs.

  • DEFAULT literal ON ERROR - Returns literal when an error occurs. If the data type of the value returned by this function is VARCHAR2, then you must specify a text literal. If the data type is NUMBER, then you must specify a numeric literal.

JSON_columns_clause

Use the COLUMNS clause to define the columns in the virtual relational table returned by the JSON_TABLE function.

JSON_exists_column This clause evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_EXISTS condition, that is, it determines if a specified JSON value exists. It returns either a VARCHAR2 column of values 'true' or 'false', or a NUMBER column of values 1 or 0. A value of 'true' or 1 indicates that the JSON value exists and a value of 'false' or 0 indicates that the JSON value does not exist.

You can use the JSON_value_return_type clause to control the data type of the returned column. If you omit this clause, then the data type is VARCHAR2(4000). Use column_name to specify the name of the returned column. The rest of the clauses of JSON_exists_column have the same semantics here as they have for the JSON_EXISTS condition. For full information on these clauses, refer to "JSON_EXISTS Condition". Also see "Using JSON_exists_column: Examples" for an example.

JSON_query_column This clause evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_QUERY function, that is, it finds one or more specified JSON values, and returns a column of character strings that contain those JSON values.

Use column_name to specify the name of the returned column. The rest of the clauses of JSON_query_column have the same semantics here as they have for the JSON_QUERY function. For full information on these clauses, refer to JSON_QUERY. Also see "Using JSON_query_column: Example" for an example.

JSON_value_column This clause evaluates JSON data in the same manner as the JSON_VALUE function, that is, it finds a specified scalar JSON value, and returns a column of those JSON values as SQL values.

Use column_name to specify the name of the returned column. The rest of the clauses of JSON_value_column have the same semantics here as they have for the JSON_VALUE function. For full information on these clauses, refer to JSON_VALUE. Also see "Using JSON_value_column: Example" for an example.

nested_path_column Use this clause to flatten JSON values in a nested JSON object or JSON array into individual columns in a single row along with JSON values from the parent object or array. You can use this clause recursively to project data from multiple layers of nested objects or arrays into a single row.

Specify the JSON_path_expression clause to match the nested object or array. This path expression is relative to the row path expression specified in the JSON_TABLE function.

Use the COLUMNS clause to define the columns of the nested object or array to be returned. This clause is recursive—you can specify the nested_path_column clause within another nested_path_column clause. Also see "Using nested_path_column: Examples" for an example.

ordinality_column This clause returns a column of generated row numbers of data type NUMBER. You can specify at most one ordinality_column. Also see "Using JSON_value_column: Example" for an example of using the ordinality_column clause.

Examples

Creating a Table That Contains a JSON Document: Example This example shows how to create and populate table j_purchaseorder, which is used in the rest of the JSON_TABLE examples in this section.

The following statement creates table j_purchaseorder. Column po_document is for storing JSON data and, therefore, has an IS JSON check constraint to ensure that only well-formed JSON is stored in the column.

CREATE TABLE j_purchaseorder
  (id RAW (16) NOT NULL,
   date_loaded TIMESTAMP(6) WITH TIME ZONE,
   po_document CLOB CONSTRAINT ensure_json CHECK (po_document IS JSON));

The following statement inserts one row, or one JSON document, into table j_purchaseorder:

INSERT INTO j_purchaseorder
  VALUES (
    SYS_GUID(),
    SYSTIMESTAMP,
    '{"PONumber"              : 1600,
      "Reference"             : "ABULL-20140421",
       "Requestor"            : "Alexis Bull",
       "User"                 : "ABULL",
       "CostCenter"           : "A50",
       "ShippingInstructions" : {"name"   : "Alexis Bull",
                                 "Address": {"street"   : "200 Sporting Green",
                                              "city"    : "South San Francisco",
                                              "state"   : "CA",
                                              "zipCode" : 99236,
                                              "country" : "United States of America"},
                                 "Phone" : [{"type" : "Office", "number" : "909-555-7307"},
                                            {"type" : "Mobile", "number" : "415-555-1234"}]},
       "Special Instructions" : null,
       "AllowPartialShipment" : true,
       "LineItems" : [{"ItemNumber" : 1,
                       "Part" : {"Description" : "One Magic Christmas",
                                 "UnitPrice"   : 19.95,
                                 "UPCCode"     : 13131092899},
                       "Quantity" : 9.0},
                      {"ItemNumber" : 2,
                       "Part" : {"Description" : "Lethal Weapon",
                                 "UnitPrice"   : 19.95,
                                 "UPCCode"     : 85391628927},
                       "Quantity" : 5.0}]}');

Using JSON_query_column: Example The statement in this example queries JSON data for a specific JSON property using the JSON_query_column clause, and returns the property value in a column.

The statement first applies a row path expression to column po_document, which results in a match to the ShippingInstructions property. The COLUMNS clause then uses the JSON_query_column clause to return the Phone property value in a VARCHAR2(100) column.

SELECT jt.phones
FROM j_purchaseorder,
JSON_TABLE(po_document, '$.ShippingInstructions'
COLUMNS
  (phones VARCHAR2(100) FORMAT JSON PATH '$.Phone')) AS jt;
PHONES
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[{"type":"Office","number":"909-555-7307"},{"type":"Mobile","number":"415-555-1234"}]

Using JSON_value_column: Example The statement in this example refines the statement in the previous example by querying JSON data for specific JSON values using the JSON_value_column clause, and returns the JSON values as SQL values in relational rows and columns.

The statement first applies a row path expression to column po_document, which results in a match to the elements in the JSON array Phone. These elements are JSON objects that contain two members named type and number. The statement uses the COLUMNS clause to return the type value for each object in a VARCHAR2(10) column called phone_type, and the number value for each object in a VARCHAR2(20) column called phone_num. The statement also returns an ordinal column named row_number.

SELECT jt.*
FROM j_purchaseorder,
JSON_TABLE(po_document, '$.ShippingInstructions.Phone[*]'
COLUMNS (row_number FOR ORDINALITY,
         phone_type VARCHAR2(10) PATH '$.type',
         phone_num VARCHAR2(20) PATH '$.number'))
AS jt;

ROW_NUMBER PHONE_TYPE PHONE_NUM
---------- ---------- --------------------
         1 Office     909-555-7307
         2 Mobile     415-555-1234

Using JSON_exists_column: Examples The statements in this example test whether a JSON value exists in JSON data using the JSON_exists_column clause. The first example returns the result of the test as a 'true' or 'false' value in a column. The second example uses the result of the test in the WHERE clause.

The following statement first applies a row path expression to column po_document, which results in a match to the entire context item, or JSON document. It then uses the COLUMNS clause to return the requestor's name and a string value of 'true' or 'false' indicating whether the JSON data for that requestor contains a zip code. The COLUMNS clause first uses the JSON_value_column clause to return the Requestor value in a VARCHAR2(32) column called requestor. It then uses the JSON_exists_column clause to determine if the zipCode object exists and returns the result in a VARCHAR2(5) column called has_zip.

SELECT requestor, has_zip
FROM j_purchaseorder,
JSON_TABLE(po_document, '$'
COLUMNS
  (requestor VARCHAR(32) PATH '$.Requestor',
   has_zip VARCHAR2(5) EXISTS PATH '$.ShippingInstructions.Address.zipCode'));

REQUESTOR                        HAS_ZIP
-------------------------------- -------
Alexis Bull                      true

The following statement is similar to the previous statement, except that it uses the value of has_zip in the WHERE clause to determine whether to return the Requestor value:

SELECT requestor
FROM j_purchaseorder,
JSON_TABLE(po_document, '$'
COLUMNS
  (requestor VARCHAR(32) PATH '$.Requestor',
   has_zip VARCHAR2(5) EXISTS PATH '$.ShippingInstructions.Address.zipCode'))
WHERE (has_zip = 'true');

REQUESTOR
--------------------------------
Alexis Bull

Using nested_path_column: Examples The following two simple statements demonstrate the functionality of the nested_path_column clause. They operate on a simple JSON array that contains three elements. The first two elements are numbers. The third element is a nested JSON array that contains two string value elements.

The following statement does not use the nested_path_column clause. It returns the three elements in the array in a single row. The nested array is returned in its entirety.

SELECT *
FROM JSON_TABLE('[1,2,["a","b"]]', '$'
COLUMNS (outer_value_0 NUMBER PATH '$[0]',
         outer_value_1 NUMBER PATH '$[1]', 
         outer_value_2 VARCHAR2(20) FORMAT JSON PATH '$[2]'));

OUTER_VALUE_0 OUTER_VALUE_1 OUTER_VALUE_2
------------- ------------- --------------------
            1             2 ["a","b"]

The following statement is different from the previous statement because it uses the nested_path_column clause to return the individual elements of the nested array in individual columns in a single row along with the parent array elements.

SELECT *
FROM JSON_TABLE('[1,2,["a","b"]]', '$'
COLUMNS (outer_value_0 NUMBER PATH '$[0]',
         outer_value_1 NUMBER PATH '$[1]',
         NESTED PATH '$[2]'
         COLUMNS (nested_value_0 VARCHAR2(1) PATH '$[0]',
                  nested_value_1 VARCHAR2(1) PATH '$[1]')));

OUTER_VALUE_0 OUTER_VALUE_1 NESTED_VALUE_0 NESTED_VALUE_1
------------- ------------- -------------- --------------
            1             2 a              b

The previous example shows how to use nested_path_column with a nested JSON array. The following example shows how to use the nested_path_column clause with a nested JSON object by returning the individual elements of the nested object in individual columns in a single row along with the parent object elements.

SELECT *
FROM JSON_TABLE('{a:100, b:200, c:{d:300, e:400}}', '$'
COLUMNS (outer_value_0 NUMBER PATH '$.a',
         outer_value_1 NUMBER PATH '$.b',
         NESTED PATH '$.c'
         COLUMNS (nested_value_0 NUMBER PATH '$.d',
                  nested_value_1 NUMBER PATH '$.e')));

OUTER_VALUE_0 OUTER_VALUE_1 NESTED_VALUE_0 NESTED_VALUE_1
------------- ------------- -------------- --------------
          100           200            300            400

The following statement uses the nested_path_column clause when querying the j_purchaseorder table. It first applies a row path expression to column po_document, which results in a match to the entire context item, or JSON document. It then uses the COLUMNS clause to return the Requestor value in a VARCHAR2(32) column called requestor. It then uses the nested_path_column clause to return the property values of the individual objects in each member of the nested Phone array. Note that a row is generated for each member of the nested array, and each row contains the corresponding Requestor value.

SELECT jt.*
FROM j_purchaseorder,
JSON_TABLE(po_document, '$'
COLUMNS
  (requestor VARCHAR2(32) PATH '$.Requestor',
   NESTED PATH '$.ShippingInstructions.Phone[*]'
     COLUMNS (phone_type VARCHAR2(32) PATH '$.type',
              phone_num VARCHAR2(20) PATH '$.number')))
AS jt;
 
 
REQUESTOR            PHONE_TYPE           PHONE_NUM
-------------------- -------------------- ---------------
Alexis Bull          Office               909-555-7307
Alexis Bull          Mobile               415-555-1234