5Working with Records

Understanding Records

Databases store information in units called records. Each record might contain more than one item of information. For example, Dominique Abbott is an item of information in the EnterpriseOne system. When you access Dominique Abbott from the Address Book application, the record that appears might also include Dominique's phone number, address, and other pertinent information. The system might save all of this information as one record, or it might save some of this information as a primary record and other information as secondary records. These types of relationships exist throughout the system. Database tables store all system records. Each record must have at least one key that links the record to a database table. Keys are unique identifiers that distinguish one record from another. For example, Address Book uses Address Number as the key to distinguish each record. Therefore, each Address Number must be unique. When creating new records, you must enter information into a key field. If you do not enter information into a key field, the system displays an error message. Once you have entered information into a key field, you cannot edit that key field later. To change the key field information, you need to create a new record. The Media Objects feature allows you to add notes, graphics, and other objects to records.

Locating Records Using Specific Selection Criteria

Selection criteria defines your search by specific types of records. For example, you can include information in filter fields such as Name Search and Search Type to search only for employees whose names begin with the letter A.

  1. On Work With Addresses, complete the Search Type field.

    If you do not know the Search Type, use the Search button to view a list of user defined codes.

  2. Click the Find button.

    A list of matching records appears.

Using the Query-by-Example Line

You can use the query-by-example line to search for records by a grid column. For example, if you are searching for a person by name, enter all or part of the name in the query-by-example line directly above the Alpha Name column in the grid. The information that you enter in the query-by-example line must be a valid value for the column. If it is not, the system does not find a match. You cannot enter values in the disabled (grayed-out) columns because these columns do not allow searches. Some query-by-example lines work differently. On some forms in the Tools setup applications, tabbing to the end of a line after filling in one or more fields achieves the same result as clicking the Find button.

On any Find/Browse form, type the characters on which you want to search in the corresponding column of the query-by-example line, and then click Find. For example, on Address Book Revisions (P01012), type all or part of the name of the individual you are searching for in the Alpha Name column of the query-by-example line, and then click Find. The record that matches the query criteria appears in the grid.

Locating Records Using Wildcards and Operators

You can use the asterisk (*) as a wildcard character in place of one or more letters. Using the asterisk widens your search. For example, you can type abb* in the Alpha Name column of the query-by-example line to view all records that begin with the letters abb. Or you can type *bb* in the query-by-example line to retrieve those records that contain the letters bb in the middle of the name. In addition, you can search for values in a set using operators. For example, in the Address Number column of the query-by-example line, type <87 to specify address numbers that are less than 87. Type <b in the Alpha Name column of the query-by-example line to specify names that begin with a. The following operators are valid in the query-by-example line:

< Less than

< = Less than or equal to

> Greater than

> = Greater than or equal to

! Not equal to

Each time that you enter values in a search, click the Find button to retrieve matching records.

Working with Search Criteria

In addition to using QBE and wildcards to search for records, you can define additional search criteria by creating a query. The Query control appears on Find Browse, Search/Select, and Power Browse forms that have a Find button, unless the form appears in a popup window (such as when using the visual assist). Additionally, the Query control appears in the Data Browser, which enables you to view the data in tables and business views and save the search criteria as a query.

See Viewing the Data in Tables and Business Views in this guide.

Note: The queries created using the Query control are Enhanced Queries, which differ from the Saved Queries that users might have created in previous releases. You can convert the format of the old Saved Queries to Enhanced Queries by using a conversion process.See "Converting Saved Queries to Enhanced Queries" in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Runtime Administration Guide

The query feature enables you to select additional fields from a form and add conditions to narrow the search results. Queries enable you to create searches that are more specific than the search results from wildcards and QBE columns alone. The system combines the conditions defined in the form filter fields, the QBE line, and the query to retrieve records from the database.

Security options are available to prevent users from performing searches if they have not entered search criteria in the form filters or QBE columns. If application query security has been implemented, you receive an error or warning message that informs you that your search has been suppressed.

See "Managing Application Query Security" in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Security Administration Guide

If you want to search for records without using a query, set the Query field to All Records.

For more information on the Query Control and creating and managing queries, see XXX

Choosing a Record

You choose a record for a variety of reasons. For example, you might need to change an employee's address and phone number. You can choose a single record or multiple records from the Find/Browse form, and then you can change the information on a Revision form.

You can choose a record in one of two ways:

  • Click the record and then click the Select button to open the corresponding form.

  • Double-click a record to select it and open the corresponding form.

To choose a record:

  1. On any Find/Browse form, locate a record.

  2. Double-click the record to display it on a revision form.

  3. On the revisions form, revise the record and then click OK.

    If you selected more than one record, your second record might appear now. If your second record does not appear, click the Next button at the top of the form. Continue to revise as needed.

  4. After you finish, be sure to click OK to save your latest revision and then click Cancel to exit.

Adding a Record

When adding records to the database, you add the primary record first and then add the secondary records.

To add a record:

  1. On a Find/Browse form, click Add to open a blank revision form.

  2. Enter the information for the new record.

    Note: Some fields enable you to enter any value, and some require you to select from a list of values. A user defined code (UDC) is one value in a set of values that is assigned as valid for a field. UDCs simplify, standardize, and validate the data that is contained in fields.See "Working with User Defined Codes" in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Runtime Administration Guide.
  3. Click OK.

    When you add records, the system uses the Next Numbers feature to automatically number Address Book records, journal entries, purchase orders, and other documents.

Changing a Record

In EnterpriseOne, a Find/Browse form appears when you open most applications. On the Find/Browse form, you choose the action that you want to perform. Choosing a button or function that you want to perform displays, for example, a Fix/Inspect form on which you can change your record.

As you move from field to field, you view your changes reflected in the form. If you type an invalid value in a field, the field highlights in red and an error appears. You must correct the error before you click OK. Clicking OK saves your changes in the database.

Note: Some fields enable you to enter any value, and some require you to select from a list of values. A user defined code (UDC) is one value in a set of values that is assigned as valid for a field. UDCs simplify, standardize, and validate the data that is contained in fields.See "Working with User Defined Codes" in the JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Runtime Administration Guide.

You cannot change information on the Find/Browse form itself. The information you have changed appears after you choose the appropriate button on the Find/Browse form.

To change a record:

  1. On a Find/Browse form, select a record.

    You can double-click a record, or choose a record and then click the Select button.

  2. On the revisions form, revise information as needed.

  3. Click OK to accept the revisions.

Deleting a Record

Occasionally, you might need to remove a record from your database. For example, you might no longer use a particular supplier. Depending upon the application, if you delete a primary record the system might also delete any secondary records related to the primary record, such as phone numbers. See the appropriate application guide for information about deleting child records.

To delete a record:

  1. On a Find/Browse form, select one or more records.

  2. Click Delete.

    The system prompts you to confirm the deletion.