Creating an Instance Using a Blank Orchestration v2

You can create a blank orchestration in the web console. Instead of defining the orchestration in a JSON-formatted file and then uploading the orchestration to Compute Classic, you can create a blank orchestration, and then add objects to it by updating the orchestration. While updating the orchestration, you can define attributes for a single instance or create complex topologies that consist of multiple instances and multiple networks.

Prerequisites

  • To complete this task, you must have the Compute_Operations role. If this role isn’t assigned to you or you’re not sure, then ask your system administrator to ensure that the role is assigned to you in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Classic Console. See Modifying User Roles in Managing and Monitoring Oracle Cloud.

Procedure

  1. Sign in to the Compute Classic console.
  2. Sign in to the Compute Classic console. If your domain spans multiple sites, select the appropriate site. To change the site, click the Site menu near the top of the page.
  3. Click the Orchestrations tab.
  4. Click Create Orchestration.
    The Create Orchestration dialog box appears.
  5. Enter the following information, and then click Create.
    • Name: Enter a name for the orchestration.
    • Description: Enter a description.
    • Tags: Specify one or more tags to help you identify and categorize the orchestration.

    A blank orchestration is created and listed in the Orchestration page.

  6. Update the orchestration to add objects to it. Go to the blank orchestration that you want to update. From the menu icon menu, select Update.
    The orchestration details page appears.
  7. To add any object type, go to the appropriate section and click Add. Let’s consider that you want to create an Oracle Linux instance which you want to access over the public Internet by using SSH and which you want to associate with an IP network. To achieve this: add an SSH key, create a storage volume, vNICset, IP network, an access control list (ACL), and set up the required security rules. To create a new IP network, click Add in the IP Network section. The Create IP Network dialog box appears. Enter the required information, and then click Create. Similarly, you can add all the other objects that you’ll require while creating the instance.

    The object is added to the orchestration with the status Inactive. The objects are created when you start the orchestration.

    Note:

    By default, objects that you define in the Orchestration details page are not associated with the instances you define in the orchestration. You’ll have to associate the objects, such as storage volume and IP network with the instance while defining the instance.

  8. By default, the objects that you define in the Orchestration details page are not persistent.

    Note:

    Oracle recommends setting persistent to false for instances and setting persistent to true for the objects associated with an instance, such as security rules, storage volumes, and IP network. Objects that are not persistent will be deleted when you suspend the orchestration. This allows you to shutdown instances without losing data or breaking other instances. Generally, instances boot from a persistent boot disk, ensuring that any changes that you make at the operating system-level persist when the instance is re-created. If you create and customize an instance using a nonpersistent boot disk, you can use instance snapshots to use the instance as a template to create multiple identical instances but changes that you make at the operating system-level are lost.

    To make these objects persistent, perform the following task for every object that you have defined.

    1. Go to the object, and then from the menu icon menu, select Properties.
      The Object Properties dialog box appears.
    2. Select the Persistent check box.
    3. Click Update.
      The property of the object is updated.
  9. To add an instance:
    1. In the Instance section, click Add. An instance with default configuration (/oracle/public/OL_7.2_UEKR4_x86_64 as the image and oc3 as shape) is added to the orchestration with the status Inactive. As this instance doesn’t have an interface on the shared network or on any IP network, when you start the orchestration this instance is automatically added to the default security list on the shared network.
    2. Update attributes of the instance such as image, shape, storage volume attached to the instance, IP network interfaces, shared network interface, and SSH keys. Go to the instance. From the menu icon menu, click Update.
    3. In the Information section, provide the following information for the instance.
      • Name: Enter a name for your instance, or accept the default.

      • Image: Select the image you want to use. The image specifies the operating system and disk size of the instance.

      • Shape: The shape specifies the OCPU and memory resources to be allocated to the instance. If you select a high I/O shape, an NVMe SSD disk is automatically attached to your instance. This is a local, nonpersistent NVMe SSD disk, which provides high I/O access rates. This disk is attached to your instance with the device name /dev/xvdz. After your instance is created, you can mount this disk and format it as required. The size of this NVMe SSD disk is fixed depending on the selected shape.

        Note:

        High I/O shapes aren’t available in all regions.

        For more information about shapes, see About Shapes.

      • Desired State: When you don’t set the desired state, the instance inherits this value from the orchestration. If you select Running, the instance is started. If you select Stopped, the instance is shut down. You can start the instance again later by updating the instance with the desired state specified as running.

      • DNS Hostname Prefix: (Optional) Specify a DNS host name prefix. The host name is visible internally within your DNS space. It is referenced by other instances in the domain, as well as by the OS and applications running on your instance. The host name that you specify is suffixed by the domain name. If you don’t specify a host name, then a host name is generated automatically.

      • Reverse DNS: If set to true (default), then reverse DNS records are created. If set to false, no reverse DNS records are created.

      • Custom Attributes: Enter any additional attributes that you want to store on the instance. This field allows you to customize your instance by providing additional information specific to each instance. You can enter arbitrary key-value pairs in plain text. The text you enter here must be in JSON format. This information is stored as user data on your instance.

        For information about user-defined attributes that can be used to automate instance configuration, see Automating Instance Initialization Using opc-init.

        After the instance is created, the attributes that you specify here are available within the instance at http://192.0.0.192/latest/user-data. For information about retrieving user data, see Retrieving User-Defined Instance Attributes.

      • Tags: (Optional) Specify one or more tags to help you identify and categorize the instance.

    4. Click Update to update the attributes of the instance.
    5. In the Storage Volumes section, click Attach a Storage Volume to attach an existing storage volume to the instance. The Attach a Storage Volume dialog box appears. Specify the following information, and then click Attach.
      • Attach Storage Volume: Select the storage volume that you want to attach. Ensure that the storage volume that you select is not attached to any other instance.

      • Attach as Disk #: Enter a disk index number. The disk number that you specify here determines the device name. The disk attached at index 1 is named /dev/xvdb, the disk at index 2 is /dev/xvdc, the disk at index 3 is /dev/xvdd, and so on. Make a note of the disk number. You’ll need it later when you mount the storage volume on the instance.

      Note:

      It is recommended that you create a persistent boot disk from which instances can boot, ensuring that any changes that you make at the operating system-level persist when the instance is re-created. If you create and customize an instance using a nonpersistent boot disk, you can use instance snapshots to use the instance as a template to create multiple identical instances but changes that you make at the operating system-level are lost. If you don’t select a storage volume, neither a data disk nor a nonpersistent boot disk is attached to the instance.

    6. In the Shared Network Interface section, configure the shared network if required. Don’t select an interface on the Shared Network if you want to set up the instance for SSH access on IP networks. When you select shared network, the interface on the shared network is used as the default gateway even if you have created an interface on the IP network.

      Note:

      If you don’t add an interface to the Shared Network or to any IP network, then the instance is added to the default security list on the Shared Network. You can add it to other security lists and create security rules and assign a public IP address later; however you can't add it to any IP network later.

    7. In the IP Network Interfaces section, click Add IP Network Interface to add the instance to an IP network and then provide the following information.
      • Interface: Select the interface that you want to add to the IP network. You can select any interface from eth0 to eth7. You can’t add, delete, or modify interface allocations after an instance is created.

      • vNIC Name: Retain the default vNIC name or enter another name. The three-part vNIC name is generated using this name. It has the format /Compute-identity_domain/username/instanceName_vnicName.

      • IP Network: Specify the IP network that you want to add this interface to. When you add an instance to an IP network, the specified interface of the instance is assigned an IP address on the specified IP network. After the instance is created, you can view information about each interface on the Instance Details page.

      • Static IP Address: Specify a private IP address for this interface. The private IP address must be unused and it must belong to the subnet of the selected IP network. Remember, too, that certain IP addresses in a subnet are reserved. For example, the first unicast IP address of any IP network is reserved for the default gateway, the DHCP server, and the DNS server of that IP network.

        If no static IP address is specified, an IP address from the specified IP network is allocated dynamically, when the instance is created. Dynamically allocated IP addresses might change if the instance is deleted and re-created.

        Dynamic IP addresses are allocated from the lowest IP address in the range upwards. For example, if your IP network subnet is 192.168.1.0/25, dynamic allocation of IP addresses would start with 192.168.1.2 (as the first two IP addresses in the range, 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.1, are reserved).

        To ensure that a static IP address that you’ve specified isn’t already dynamically allocated, it is recommended that you specify static IP addresses from the end of your subnet range. For example, if your IP network subnet is 192.168.1.0/25, start allocating static IP addresses from 192.168.1.126 downwards (as the last IP address in the range, 192.168.1.127, is reserved).

      • Public IP Address: Select an available IP reservation for IP networks. When the instance is created, you can configure security rules and access control lists for your IP network to enable access to this IP address over the public Internet. If you don’t select an IP reservation now, you can associate a public IP address with this interface later by creating or updating an IP reservation.

      • Cloud IP Address: Select an available IP reservation from the cloud IP pool. When the instance is created, this IP address can be accessed by other Oracle Cloud services without being accessible over the public Internet. If you don’t select a cloud IP address now, you can associate a cloud IP address with this interface later by creating or updating an IP reservation.

      • MAC Address: Specify the MAC address of the interface, in hexadecimal format, where each digit is separated by colon. For example, you can enter 01:02:03:04:ab:cd as the MAC address but not 01-02-03-04-ab-cd. Ensure that the MAC addresses that you specify are unique within each IP network exchange and each IP network. If you specify a duplicate MAC address, each vNIC with that MAC address is disabled.

      • Virtual NIC Sets: Select the vNICsets that you want to add this interface to. Each interface is added to the default vNICset by default. If you select other vNICsets to add this interface to, you can remove it from the default vNICset. However, ensure that you add each interface to at least one vNICset, to enable communication to that interface. After the instance is created, communication with each vNIC depends on the vNICsets it belongs to and the access control lists that apply to each vNICset. While creating an instance, you can add a vNIC to up to 4 vNICsets. To add a vNIC to more than 4 vNICsets, update the required vNICsets after the instance is created. You can also remove vNICs from a vNICset after the instance is created.

      • DNS: Enter the DNS A record names for the instance. You can specify up to eight DNS A record names for each interface on an IP network. These names can be queried by instances on any IP network in the same IP network exchange. If no static IP address is specified for the interface, an IP address on the specified IP network is assigned automatically. After the instance is launched, the defined names are associated with the IP address that was automatically allocated to the interface.

      • Name Servers: Enter the name servers that are sent through DHCP as option 6. You can specify a maximum of eight name server IP addresses per interface.

      • Search Domains: Enter the search domains that should be sent through DHCP as option 119. You can enter a maximum of eight search domain zones per interface.

      • Default Gateway: Select this option if you want to use this interface as the default gateway. All network traffic uses the specified default gateway, unless a different interface is explicitly configured for an application within the instance.

        If the instance has an interface on the shared network, that interface is always used as the default gateway.

    8. In the SSH Public Keys section, click Add SSH Public Key and then select the SSH public key that you want to associate with the instance.

    WARNING:

    Remember to associate an SSH public key and a public IP address with every Linux instance that you will access over SSH. If you don’t associate an SSH key, you can’t access your Linux instance and you can't associate SSH keys later on.

    Note:

    You don’t need to do this if you’re creating a Windows instance, because you can’t log in to a Windows instance using SSH.

  10. Click Start to start the orchestration.
    When you start the orchestration, the status of the orchestration changes to Starting and then to Ready when all the objects defined in the orchestration are created successfully. The instance and other objects are created and their status changes from Inactive to Active.