Setting Time Balance Properties

If an accounts dimension member uses the time balance property, it affects how Essbase calculates the parent of that member in the time dimension. By default, a parent in the time dimension is calculated based on the consolidation and formulas of its children. For example, in the Sample.Basic database, the Qtr1 member is the sum of its children (Jan, Feb, and Mar). However, setting a time balance property causes parents, for example Qtr1, to roll up differently.

To set time balance properties, see Understanding Dimension Worksheets in Using Oracle Analytics Cloud - Essbase.

Example 6-1 Example of Time Balance as None

None is the default value. When you set the time balance property as none, Essbase rolls up parents in the time dimension in the usual way—the value of the parent is based on the formulas and consolidation properties of its children.

Example 6-2 Example of Time Balance as First

Set the time balance as “first” when you want the parent value to represent the value of the first member in the branch (often at the beginning of a time period).

For example, assume that a member named OpeningInventory represents the inventory at the beginning of the time period. If the time period was Qtr1, OpeningInventory represents the inventory at the beginning of Jan; that is, the OpeningInventory for Qtr1 is the same as the OpeningInventory for Jan. For example, if you had 50 cases of Cola at the beginning of Jan, you also had 50 cases of Cola at the beginning of Qtr1.

Tag OpeningInventory as first, as shown in the following example consolidation:

OpeningInventory (TB First), Cola, East, Actual, Jan(+),  50
OpeningInventory (TB First), Cola, East, Actual, Feb(+),  60
OpeningInventory (TB First), Cola, East, Actual, Mar(+),  70
OpeningInventory (TB First), Cola, East, Actual, Qtr1(+), 50

Example 6-3 Example of Time Balance as Last

Set the time balance as “last” when you want the parent value to represent the value of the last member in the branch (often at the end of a time period).

For example, assume that a member named EndingInventory represents the inventory at the end of the time period. If the time period is Qtr1, EndingInventory represents the inventory at the end of Mar; that is, the EndingInventory for Qtr1 is the same as the EndingInventory for Mar. For example, if you had 70 cases of Cola at the end of Mar, you also had 70 cases of Cola at the end of Qtr1.

Tag EndingInventory as last, as shown in the following example consolidation:

EndingInventory (TB Last), Cola, East, Actual, Jan(+),  50
EndingInventory (TB Last), Cola, East, Actual, Feb(+),  60
EndingInventory (TB Last), Cola, East, Actual, Mar(+),  70
EndingInventory (TB Last), Cola, East, Actual, Qtr1(+), 70

Example 6-4 Example of Time Balance as Average

Set the time balance as “average” when you want the parent value to represent the average value of its children.

For example, assume that a member named AverageInventory represents the average of the inventory for the time period. If the time period was Qtr1, then AverageInventory represents the average of the inventory during Jan, Feb, and Mar.

Tag AverageInventory as average, as shown in the following example consolidation:

AverageInventory (TB Average), Cola, East, Actual, Jan(+),  60
AverageInventory (TB Average), Cola, East, Actual, Feb(+),  62
AverageInventory (TB Average), Cola, East, Actual, Mar(+),  67
AverageInventory (TB Average), Cola, East, Actual, Qtr1(+), 63