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The dedicated infrastructure feature of Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing enables you to create an Oracle Autonomous Database platform that is private and isolated to your use all the way down to the Oracle Exadata hardware running your database instances and storing your database data.

You define and use Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Networking and IAM (Identity and Access Management) resources to ensure secure and authorized use of your dedicated Autonomous Transaction Processing databases and the database resources that underlie them.

The Components of Dedicated Infrastructure

The Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing dedicated infrastructure feature is based upon four kinds of Oracle Cloud resources:

  • An Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource allocates an available Oracle Exadata Database Machine to you. Its primary purpose is to act as a bridge between the hardware and software components of your dedicated infrastructure. You must create at least one Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource before you can create any of the other kinds of dedicated infrastructure resources.

  • An Autonomous Container Database resource provides a container for your Autonomous Databases. You can create multiple Autonomous Container Database resources in a single Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource, but you must create at least one before you can create any Autonomous Databases.

  • An Autonomous Database resource is a user database. To create a dedicated Autonomous Transaction Processing database, you create an Autonomous Database, specifying "Transaction Processing" as its workload type and "Dedicated Infrastructure" as its deployment type. You can create many Autonomous Databases in a single Autonomous Container Database resource.

  • An Autonomous Backup resource is a backup of an Autonomous Database. Oracle creates these resources for you automatically.

User Roles Associated with Dedicated Infrastructure

The tasks involved in setting up and using the Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing dedicated infrastructure feature can be grouped into three logical roles: a few people act as fleet administrators, more act as database administrators, and even more act as database users. A given person can assume one or more of these roles, depending on how you decide to isolate and distribute duties.

  • Fleet Administrator. Fleet administrators create, monitor and manage Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure and Autonomous Container Database resources.

    To perform these duties, a fleet administrator must be an Oracle Cloud user whose permissions permit the management of these resources and permit the use of the networking resources that need to be specified when creating these resources.

  • Database Administrator. Database administrators create, monitor and manage Autonomous Databases. Additionally, they create and manage Oracle Database users within these databases, and provide others the information necessary access the database.

    To perform these duties, a database administrator must be an Oracle Cloud user whose permissions permit the management of Autonomous Database and Autonomous Backup resources and permit the use of the Autonomous Container Database and networking resources that need to be specified when creating an Autonomous Database. When creating an Autonomous Database resource, the database administrator defines and gains access to the ADMIN administrative user account for the database.

  • Database User. Database users are the developers who write applications that connect to and use an Autonomous Database to store and access the data. Database users do not need Oracle Cloud accounts: they gain network connectivity to and connection authorization information for the database from the database administrator.

Service Maintenance for Dedicated Deployments

Oracle schedules and performs all patching and other maintenance operations on all dedicated infrastructure resources.

You can specify when such maintenance operations can occur, and what kind of database patching is performed.

Specifying When Maintenance Can Occur

In general, Oracle schedules and performs maintenance in the first week of every quarter. You can let Oracle handle maintenance scheduling, or you can set a specific maintenance window when Oracle can begin maintenance operations. You set this maintenance window at the Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure level, and it applies to all Autonomous Container Databases and Autonomous Databases created in Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource as well as to the resource itself. You can set the maintenance window when you create Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource (see Create an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure Resource) or you can set or change it later (see Change the Maintenance Schedule of an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure Resource).

Tip:

Oracle recommends that you set a maintenance window. Doing so will prevent maintenance operations from occurring at times that would be disruptive to regular database operations.

Specifying What Kind of Patches to Apply

One standard maintenance operation is to apply database software patches to your Autonomous Container Databases and, by extension, the Autonomous Databases created in them. By default, Oracle applies Release Updates (RUs). You can choose to have Oracle apply Release Update Revisions (RURs) instead on a container-database by container-database basis. You can do this when you create an Autonomous Container Database (see Create an Autonomous Container Database) or later (see Change the Maintenance Type of an Autonomous Container Database).

To help you decide whether to have Oracle apply RUs or RURs to a given Autonomous Container Database, see My Oracle Support Note 2285040.1, Release Update Introduction and FAQ.

Viewing Upcoming Scheduled Maintenance

You can view when any upcoming maintenance is scheduled for an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource or an Autonomous Container Database. For instructions, see View Scheduled and Past Maintenance of an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure Resource and View Scheduled and Past Maintenance of an Autonomous Container Database.

Access Control Within Dedicated Infrastructure

When configuring the dedicated infrastructure feature, you need to ensure that your cloud users have access to use and create only the appropriate kinds of cloud resources to perform their job duties. Additionally, you need to ensure that only authorized personnel and applications have access to the autonomous databases created on dedicated infrastructure. Otherwise, you run the risk of "runaway" consumption of your dedicated infrastructure resources or inappropriate access to mission-critical data.

Therefore, before you begin creating and using the cloud resources that provide the dedicated infrastructure feature, you need to formulate an access control plan, and then institute by creating appropriate IAM (Identity and Access Management) and Networking resources.

The kinds of IAM resources you will use include:

  • Compartment: A collection of related resources. Compartments are a fundamental component of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure for organizing and isolating your cloud resources.

  • Group: A collection of users who all need the same type of access to a particular set of resources or compartment.

  • Policy: A group of statements that specify who can access which resources, and how. Access is granted at the group and compartment level, which means you write a policy statements that gives a group a specific type of access to a specific type of resource within a specific compartment.

The kinds of Networking resources you will use include:

  • VCN (Virtual Cloud Network): A virtual, private network that you set up in a single Oracle Cloud Infrastructure region. It closely resembles a traditional network, with firewall rules and specific types of communication gateways that you can choose to use.

  • Subnet: A subdivision you define in a VCN. Subnets contain VNICs (virtual network interface cards), which are attached to the dedicated infrastructure resources you create. Subnets act as a unit of configuration within the VCN: all VNICs in a given subnet use the same route table, security lists, and DHCP options. You can designate a subnet as either public or private when you create it. Private means VNICs in the subnet can't have public IP addresses. Public means VNICs in the subnet can have public IP addresses at your discretion.

Depending on how you decide to control access to autonomous databases, you will use various other kinds of Networking resources.

For guidance in formulating your access control plan and creating the resources to institute it, see Plan Access Controls and Create Supporting Resources.

Typical Workflow

To start using the Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing dedicated infrastructure feature, refer to the following tasks as a guide.

Task Description More Information

Determine and institute user access constraints

Determine the controls you deem necessary to ensure that your users have the appropriate access to the appropriate cloud resources to perform their job duties, and then create infrastructure resources to institute these controls.

Plan Access Controls and Create Supporting Resources

Confirm resource availability

Make sure your service limits show at least one Exadata.Quarter2.92 - X7 database resource available; request a service limit increase if necessary.

Service Limits in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Documentation.

Create Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resources

Create at least one Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure resource.

Create an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure Resource

Create Autonomous Container Database resources

Create at least one Autonomous Container Database in an Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure.

Create an Autonomous Container Database

Create Autonomous Databases

Create at least one Autonomous Database in an Autonomous Container Database resource.

Using Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing Dedicated Deployments

Access Autonomous Transaction Processing in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Console

  1. Open your web browser and go to http://cloud.oracle.com.

  2. Click Sign In at the top of the page.

  3. Enter the name of your cloud account in the Account field and then click Next.

  4. On the Oracle Cloud Account Sign In page, enter your sign-in credentials and then click Sign In.

  5. Click the Menu icon menu icon in the top corner to display the side menu and then click Autonomous Transaction Processing.

    The Autonomous Transaction Processing Databases page opens, showing the list of databases in your current Compartment.