Use a Load Balancer to Connect to Services on a Cluster

The Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Load Balancing service provides automated traffic distribution from one entry point to multiple backend servers. You can use a load balancer with Big Data Service to provide the entry point for accessing services like Cloudera Manager, Hue, and Big Data Studio (the Big Data Service notebook application).

About Load Balancers

A load balancer includes one or more backend sets to route incoming traffic to backend servers. The backend set is a logical entity that includes:

  • A list of backend servers, to which traffic is directed by the load balancer. In Big Data Service, the cluster nodes are the backend servers. A backend server is typically identified by an IP address and a port.
  • A load balancing policy, which tells the load balancer how to distribute incoming traffic to the backend servers.
  • A health check policy, to test the health and availability of backend servers.
  • Optional Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) handling, to establish an encrypted link between a client and a server.
  • Optional session persistence configuration. Session persistence isn't used in the scenario described below.

A load balancer also has one or more listeners, to accept incoming traffic. Listeners route traffic to backend sets, which route traffic to backend servers.

Overview of This Task

These instructions tell how to create a load balancer that can be used as the front end for accessing Cloudera Manager, Hue, and Big Data Studio from a web browser. You'll be able to connect to the services by using the load balancer's IP address or hostname, plus the port where a service runs, for example:

  • https://<load-balancer-ip-or-hostname>:7183 for Cloudera Manager
  • https://<load-balancer-ip-or-hostname>:8889 for Hue
  • https://<load-balancer-ip-or-hostname>:30000 for Big Data Studio.

You can create a public load balancer (in a public subnet), which allows access from the public internet; or you can create a private load balancer (in a private subnet), which allows access from your private VCN. For a private load balancer, you must set up private access from the VCN, for example by using a bastion host or by using Oracle FastConnect service or Oracle IPSec VPN service. However, for simplicity, these instructions tell how to create a public load balancer.

Specifically, you'll do the following:

  • Create a load balancer.
  • Create three backend sets, one for Cloudera Manager, one for Hue, and one for Big Data Studio.
  • Add one backend server to each backend set. A backend server is the cluster node where the service runs, plus the port where the service listens for requests.
  • Create three listeners, one for Cloudera Manager, one for Hue, and one for Big Data Studio.
  • Configure SSL for the backend sets and for the listeners, thus implementing end-to-end SSL.

For complete documentation about Oracle Cloud Infrastructure load balancers, see Load Balancing in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

Prerequisites

  • An Oracle Big Data Service cluster running in a Virtual Cloud Network (VCN) with an internet gateway and a public regional subnet (for a public load balancer).

  • Security rules that allow incoming traffic to the ports where services run in the cluster: Cloudera Manager (port 7183), Hue (port 8889), and Big Data Studio (port 30000). See Define Security Rules.

  • Admin access to manage load balancers. For examples, see "Let network admins manage load balancers" in Common Policies in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

  • SSH access to the cluster. You must be able to connect to nodes on your cluster to download self-signed SSL certificates that are stored on the cluster. To do this, prior to creating a load balancer, you must set up your environment to allow that access. For example you can use Oracle FastConnect or Oracle IpSec VPN, you can set up a bastion host, or you can map private IPs to public IP addresses. See Establish Connections to Nodes with Private IP Addresses.

  • A DNS domain (optional if using self-signed SSL certificates or required if using SSL certificates from a certificate authority (CA)). For information about using DNS in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, see Overview of the DNS Service in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

  • SSL certificates, used for authentication.

    • Self-signed certificates from the cluster are required.

    • Certificates issued by a trusted certificate authority are recommended. You must have a DNS domain (as mentioned above) to obtain certificates from a certificate authority.

    This requirement is explained more fully in STEP 1: Obtain SSL Certificates, below.

  • A list of the private IP addresses of the nodes where the services run on your cluster.

    • In a highly-available (HA) cluster, the services run on the following nodes:

      • Cloudera Manager runs on the first utility node.
      • Hue and Big Data Studio run on the second utility node.
    • In a non-HA cluster, all the services run on the first (and only) utility node.

STEP 1: Obtain SSL Certificates

This topic tells you how to implement end-to-end SSL for your load balancer. The load balancer will accept SSL encrypted traffic from clients, and it will encrypt traffic to the backend servers. To do this, you must associate SSL certificate bundles with the listeners and with the backend servers.

  • For listeners, you can use signed SSL certificates issued by a trusted certificate authority or you can use self-signed certificates that you download from the cluster. Oracle recommends that you use signed SSL certificates from a certificate authority to provide the highest level of security.

    Note:

    This topic uses the phrases "CA-signed SSL certificate" or just "CA-signed certificate" to refer to a signed SSL certificates obtained from a certificate authority.
  • For backend sets, use the self-signed certificates that you download from the cluster.

Obtain certificates from the following sources:

  • CA-signed SSL certificates: You can purchase SSL certificates from a trusted certificate authority such as Symantec, Thawte, RapidSSL, or GeoTrust. See the documentation from your chosen certificate authority for information about obtaining and managing certificates.

    To obtain SSL certificates from a certificate authority, you usually have to have a DNS domain. For information about using DNS in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, see Overview of the DNS Service in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

  • Self-signed certificates: Self-signed SSL certificates are created on the cluster when the cluster is created and are saved in the following locations on each node:
    • Public certificate: /opt/cloudera/security/x509/<hostname>.pem.

      For example, the certificate on a node myclustun0 might be something like node_myclustun0.sub06181916540.mynetvcn.oraclevcn.com.pem.

      The <hostname>.pem files for all the nodes are stored in the above directory on all the nodes. That is, you can access and download all the files from a single node.

    • Private SSL key: /opt/cloudera/security/x509/node.hue.key.

      Each node has a unique node.hue.key file. The file names are all the same, but the contents are different for each node.

    You may want to download the certificates before you get started with the rest of the steps. For an HA cluster, download the SSL certificates and keys from the first and second utility nodes. For a non-HA cluster, download the SSL certificate and key from the first (and only) utility node.

For more information about using SSL with load balancers, see Managing SSL Certificates in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

STEP 2: Create the Load Balancer

  1. In the Oracle Cloud Console, open the navigation menu navigation menu. Under Core Infrastructure, point to Networking, and then click Load Balancers.

  2. On the Load Balancers in <compartment> Compartment page, under Compartment in the panel on the left, select the compartment where you want to create the load balancer. Then click Create Load Balancer.

  3. On the Add Details page of the Create Load Balancer wizard, enter the following information:

    • Load Balancer Name: Enter a name to identify the load balancer.

    • Choose Visibility Type: Click Public to create a load balancer that will be accessible from the public internet.

      You could choose instead to select Private to create a load balancer that will be accessible only from your private network, but for simplicity these instructions describe how to create a public load balancer.

    • Choose Total Bandwidth: Select Small.

    • Virtual Cloud Networking in <compartment>: Click the Select a virtual cloud network list and select the VCN where your cluster is running. If the network is in a different compartment, click Change Compartment and select the compartment from the list.

    • Subnet in <compartment>: Click the Select a subnet list and select a public subnet in your VCN to use for the load balancer. (A public subnet is required for a public load balancer.) If the subnet is in a different compartment, click Change Compartment and select the compartment from the list.

    • Use Network Security Groups to Control Traffic: Leave this box unchecked.

  4. Click Next.
  5. On the Choose Backends page of the wizard, enter the following information to create a backend set (with health policy) for Cloudera Manager:

    • Specify a Load Balancing Policy: Accept the default Weighted Round Robin.

    • Select Backend Servers: Skip this option. You'll add a backend server later.
    • Specify Health Check Policy: Enter the following for the health check policy for this Cloudera Manager backend set:

      • Protocol: Select HTTP.

      • Port: Enter 7183, which is the port on which Cloudera Manager listens.

      • URL Path (URI): Keep the default forward slash (/).

    • Use SSL: Leave this box unchecked. You'll configure SSL for this backend set later.
  6. Click Next.

  7. On the Configure Listener page, enter the following information:

    • Listener Name: Enter a name for the listener, for example cm-listener.

    • Specify the type of traffic your listener handles: Select HTTP. You'll change this to HTTPS later.

    • Specify the Port Your Listener Monitors for Ingress Traffic: Enter 7183.

  8. Click Submit. When the large load balancer status icon load balancer status icon at the top of the Load Balancer Details page is green, you can continue with the steps below. It may take a few minutes to create the load balancer.

STEP 3: Create Certificate Bundles

In this step, you'll save your SSL files as bundles, which you'll use later to configure SSL for backend sets and listeners. You'll create different bundles, depending on the type of cluster and the source of your SSL certificates. The use cases are:

  • Use case A: HA cluster that uses a CA-signed certificate
  • Use case B: Non-HA cluster that uses a CA-signed certificate
  • Use case C: HA cluster that uses only the self-signed certificates from the cluster
  • Use case D: Non-HA cluster that uses only a self-signed certificate from the cluster

Each use case requires one to three certificate bundles. The table below shows all possible bundles, although you only have to create the ones required for your use case. The instructions following the table tell you which bundles to create for your use case.

Note:

The names used for the bundles in the table below are user-supplied names. You can provide different names when you create the bundles, but the names below are used throughout this topic for clarity.

Node names are node0 for the first node and node1 for the second node.

Table 4-1 Certificate Bundles

Bundle Contents
lb-ca-signed-cert
  • CA-signed SSL certificate, obtained from a certificate authority, for the listener on the load balancer host
  • CA certificate from your certificate authority
  • Private key associated with SSL certificate, above
node0-self-signed-cert
  • Self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node, downloaded from the cluster
  • Private key downloaded from first utility node
node1-self-signed-cert
  • Self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node, downloaded from the cluster
  • Private key downloaded from second utility node

Note:

In several steps while creating the load balancer, you'll be prompted to enter certificates and keys. The Cloud Console provides alternative ways to add them. For example, the options for adding an SSL certificate are:

  • Choose SSL Certificate File: If you select this option, you can either drag a file from your local file system directly into the SSL Certificate box, or you can click select one and navigate to select the file on your file system.

  • Paste SSL Certificate: If instead you select this option, open the appropriate file, copy the entire contents, and paste it into the SSL Certificate box.

Similar options are presented for CA Certificate and Private Key, and the same instructions apply. When those options appear in the console, the instructions below simply say, "add the certificate..." or "add the key..."

To create the bundles:

  1. On the left side of the Load Balancer Details page, under Resources, click Certificates.

    Refer to the Table 4-2 table, below, to find your use case. Then refer to the Complete These Steps column to find which of the subsequent steps you must follow to create the bundle or bundles for your use case.

    Notice that:

    • Use case A requires three bundles, use cases B and C each require two bundles, and use case D requires only one bundle.
    • All the use cases require one or two bundles with self-signed certificates. Use cases A and B also require a bundle with a CA-signed certificate.

    Table 4-2 Steps to Complete for Each Use Case

    Use Case Type of Cluster CA-signed certificate? Complete These Steps
    A HA Yes

    2: Create a bundle with a CA-signed certificate

    3: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the first utility node

    4: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the second utility node

    B Non-HA Yes

    2: Create a bundle with a CA-signed certificate

    3: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the first utility node

    C HA No

    3: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the first utility node

    4: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the second utility node

    D Non-HA No

    3: Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the first utility node

  2. Create a bundle with a CA-signed certificate. You must create this bundle if you have either of the following use cases:

    • Use Case A: HA cluster with a CA-signed certificate
    • Use Case B: Non-HA cluster with a CA-signed certificate

    Create the bundle:

    1. Click Add Certificate.

    2. On the Add Certificate page, enter the following information:

      • Certificate Name: Enter lb-ca-signed-cert (or a name of your choice).
      • SSL Certificate: Add your CA-signed SSL certificate.

      • Specify CA Certificate: Check this box, and then add your CA certificate.

      • Specify Private Key: Check this box, and then add the private key associated with the SSL certificate you added in the SSL Certificate field, above.

    3. Click Add Certificate, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the bundle to be added to the Certificates table.
  3. Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the first utility node. You must create this bundle for all the use cases:

    • Use Case A: HA cluster with a CA-signed certificate
    • Use Case B: Non-HA cluster with a CA-signed certificate
    • Use Case C: HA cluster with only the self-signed certificates from the cluster
    • Use Case D: Non-HA cluster with only a self-signed certificate from the cluster

    Create the bundle:

    1. Remain on the Certificates page. Click Add Certificate.

    2. On the Add Certificate page, enter the following information:

      • Certificate Name: Enter node0-self-signed-cert (or a name of your choice).
      • SSL Certificate: Add the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node that you downloaded from the cluster.

      • Specify CA Certificate: Check this box, and then add the same self-signed SSL certificate that you just added for SSL Certificate, directly above.

      • Specify Private Key: Check this box, and then add the private key associated with the SSL certificate you added in the SSL Certificate field, above, that is, the node.hue.key you downloaded from the first utility node.

    3. Click Add Certificate, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the bundle to be added to the Certificates table.
  4. Create a bundle with the self-signed certificate from the second utility node. You must create this bundle if you have either of the following use cases:

    • Use Case A: HA cluster with a CA-signed certificate
    • Use Case C: HA cluster with only self-signed certificates from the cluster

    Create the bundle:

    1. Remain on the Certificates page. Click Add Certificate.

    2. On the Add Certificate page, enter the following information:

      • Certificate Name: Enter node1-self-signed-cert (or a name of your choice).
      • SSL Certificate: Add the self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node that you downloaded from the cluster.

      • Specify CA Certificate: Check this box, and then add the same self-signed SSL certificate that you just added for SSL Certificate, directly above.

      • Specify Private Key: Check this box, and then add the private key associated with the SSL certificate you added in the SSL Certificate field, above, that is, the node.hue.key you downloaded from the second utility node.

    3. Click Add Certificate, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the bundle to be added to the Certificates table.

STEP 4: Configure the Backend Set for Cloudera Manager

  1. On the left side of the Certificates page, under Resources, click Backend Sets. The backend set you created in STEP 2: Create the Load Balancer is displayed in the Backend Sets table, with a name like bs-lb-<date-timestamp>, for example, bs_lb_2020-0928-1136.

  2. Click the Action menu Action menu at the end of the row containing this backend set, and select Edit.

  3. Enter the following information.

    • Name: Read only. This name was created for you by the wizard.
    • Traffic Distribution Policy: Accept the default Weighted Round Robin.
    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select node0-self-signed-cert. Use this bundle for all use cases. It's the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of a the cluster.

    • Verify Peer Certificate: Check this box.
    • Verify Depth: Set to 1, or select another number to indicate maximum depth for certificate chain verification.
    • Session Persistence: Accept the default Disable Session Persistence.
  4. Click Update Backend Set, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. When complete, a cipher suite name is added to the Cipher Suite field for the backend set. It may take a few moments.

STEP 5: Create a Backend Set for Hue

  1. Remain on the Backed Sets page and click Create Backend Set again. On the Create Backend Set page, enter the following information.
    • Name: Provide a name, for example, hue-backend-set.

    • Traffic Distribution Policy: Accept the default Weighted Round Robin.

    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select the certificate bundle for your use case:

      • For HA clusters, select node1-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node of the cluster.

      • For non-HA clusters, select node0-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of the cluster.

    • Verify Peer Certificate: Check this box.
    • Verify Depth: Set to 1, or select another number to indicate maximum depth for certificate chain verification.
    • Session Persistence: Accept the default Disable Session Persistence.
    • Health Check: Enter the following information:

      • Protocol: Select TCP.

      • Port: Enter 8889, which is the port on which Hue listens.

  2. Click Create Backend Set, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the backend set to be added to the Backend Sets table.

STEP 6: Create a Backend Set for Big Data Studio

  1. Remain on the Backend Sets page and click Create Backend Set again. On the Create Backend Sets page, enter the following information.

    • Name: Provide a name, for example, data-studio-backend-set.
    • Traffic Distribution Policy: Accept the default Weighted Round Robin.
    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select the certificate bundle for your use case:

      • For HA clusters, select node1-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node of the cluster.

      • For non-HA clusters, select node0-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of the cluster.

    • Verify Peer Certificate: Check this box.
    • Verify Depth: Set to 1, or select another number to indicate maximum depth for certificate chain verification.
    • Session Persistence: Accept the default Disable Session Persistence.
    • Health Check: Enter the following information:

      • Protocol: Select HTTP.

      • Port: Enter 30000, which is the port on which Big Data Studio listens.

      • URL Path (URI): Enter a forward slash (/).

  2. Click Create Backend Set, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the backend set to be added to the Backend Sets table.

STEP 7: Add a Backend Server for Cloudera Manager

  1. Remain on the Backend Sets page. In the Backend Sets table, click the name of the backend set for Cloudera Manager, for example bs_lb_2020-0928-1136. (Remember, the wizard assigned this name to the first backend set.)
  2. On the left side of the Backend Set Details page, under Resources, click Backends. Then click Add Backends.
  3. On the Add Backends page, select IP Addresses at the top of the page, and enter the following information:
    • IP Address: Enter the private IP address of the first utility node of your cluster, for example 10.2.0.106.
    • Port: Enter 7183, which is port where Cloudera Manager listens.
    • Weight: Accept the default value 1.
  4. Click Add, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the backend server to be added to the Backends table.

STEP 8: Add a Backend Server for Hue

  1. Click Backend Sets in the breadcrumbs at the top of the page to return to the Backend Sets page. In the Backend Sets table, click the name of the backend set you created for Hue, for example hue-backend-set.
  2. On the left side of the Backend Set Details page, under Resources, click Backends. Then click Add Backends.
  3. On the Add Backends page, select IP Addresses at the top of the page, and enter the following information:
    • IP Address: Enter the private IP address of the second utility node for an HA cluster or the first (and only) utility node for a non-HA cluster, for example 10.2.0.100.
    • Port: Enter 8889, which is the port where Hue listens.
    • Weight: Accept the default value 1.
  4. Click Add, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the backend server to be added to the Backends table.

STEP 9: Add a Backend Server for Big Data Studio

  1. Click Backend Sets in the breadcrumbs at the top of the page to return to the Backend Sets page. In the Backend Sets table, click the name of the backend set you created for Big Data Studio, for example data-studio-backend-set.

  2. On the left side of the Backend Set Details page, under Resources, click Backends. Then click Add Backends.

  3. On the Add Backends page, select IP Addresses at the top of the page, and enter the following information:

    • IP Address: Enter the private IP address of the second utility node for an HA cluster or the first (and only) utility node for a non-HA cluster, for example 10.2.0.106.
    • Port: Enter 30000, for the port where Big Data Studio listens.
    • Weight: Accept the default value 1.
  4. Click Add, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the backend server to be added to the Backends table.

STEP 10: Configure the Listener for Cloudera Manager

  1. Click Load Balancer Details in the breadcrumbs at the top of the page. On the left side of the Load Balancer Details page, under Resources, click Listeners. Notice that the Listeners table includes the listener you created for Cloudera Manager in STEP 2: Create the Load Balancer, for example, cm-listener.
  2. Click the Action menu Action menu at the end of the row containing the listener, and select Edit.

  3. On the Edit Listener page, enter the following information:
    • Name: Read only.

    • Protocol: Select HTTP.

    • Port: Enter 7183, which is the port where Cloudera Manager listens.

    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select the certificate bundle for your use case:

      • If you're using CA-signed SSL certificates, select: lb-ca-signed-cert

        This is the bundle containing the CA-signed SSL certificate. Use this for both HA and non-HA clusters.

      • If you're using the self-signed certificate from the cluster only, select: node0-self-signed-cert

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of a the cluster. Use this for both HA and non-HA clusters.

    • Verify Peer Certificate : Leave this box unchecked.

    • Backend Set: From the list, select the backend set you created for Cloudera Manager in STEP 2: Create the Load Balancer, for example, bs_lb_2020-0928-1136. (Remember, the wizard assigned this name when you created it.)

  4. Click Create Listener, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the listener to be added to the Listeners table.

STEP 11: Create a Listener for Hue

  1. Click Backend Sets in the breadcrumbs at the top of the page to return to the Backend Sets page.
  2. On the left side of the page, under Resources, click Listeners.
  3. Click Create Listener.
  4. On the Create Listener page, enter the following information:
    • Name: Enter a name for the listener, for example, hue-listener.

    • Protocol: Select HTTP.

    • Port: Enter 8889, which is the port where Hue listens.

    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select the certificate bundle for your use case:

      • If you're using a CA-signed certificate, select lb-ca-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the CA-signed SSL certificate for the load balancer host.

      • If you're using only self-signed certificates with an HA cluster, select: node1-self-signed-cert,

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node of a the cluster.

      • If you're using only the self-signed certificate with a non-HA cluster, select node0-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of a the cluster.

    • Verify Peer Certificate : Leave this box unchecked.

    • Backend Set: From the list, select the backend set you created for Hue in STEP 5: Create a Backend Set for Hue, for example, hue-backend-set.

  5. Click Create Listener, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the listener to be added to the Listeners table.

STEP 12: Create a Listener for Big Data Studio

  1. Remain on the Listeners page. Click Create Listener again.

  2. On the Create Listener page, enter the following information:

    • Name: Enter a name for the listener, for example, data-studio-listener.

    • Protocol: Select HTTP.

    • Port: Enter 30000, which is the port where Big Data Studio listens.

    • Use SSL: Select this box, then, under Certificate Name, select the certificate bundle for your use case:

      • If you're using a CA-signed certificate, select lb-ca-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the CA-signed SSL certificate for the load balancer host.

      • If you're using only self-signed certificates with an HA cluster, select: node1-self-signed-cert,

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the second utility node of a the cluster.

      • If you're using only the self-signed certificate with a non-HA cluster, select node0-self-signed-cert.

        This is the bundle containing the self-signed SSL certificate for the first utility node of a the cluster.

    • Verify Peer Certificate : Leave this box unchecked.

    • Backend Set: From the list, select the backend set you created for Big Data Studio in STEP 6: Create a Backend Set for Big Data Studio, for example, data-studio-backend-set.

  3. Click Create Listener, and then click Close in the Work Request Submitted dialog box. It may take a few moments for the listener to be added to the Listeners table.

STEP 13: Access the Cluster

It may take a few minutes for the backend sets and listeners to be ready to receive requests. On the left side of the page, under Resources, click Backend Sets. In the Backend Sets table, check the status in the Health column. When the status for all the backend sets are OK OK, you can use the load balancer.

Tip:

If it's taking a long time for the health check, consider shortening the interval. Click the Action menu Action menu at the end of the row containing a backend set, and select Update Heath Check. Change Interval in Ms to 1000 (the minimum interval) and Timeout in Ms to 500. Repeat for each backend set. You can change the settings later if you want the health checks to be performed less often.

To open the services included in this load balancer:

  1. Find the IP address or the hostname used for your load balancer.

    • IP address:

      The IP address is listed in the Load Balancer Information panel at the top of the load balancer pages in the console.

    • DNS hostname:

      After the load balancer is created and it's been given an IP address, you or another administrator must add a DNS entry to your DNS name servers, to resolve your desired hostname (for example, bds-frontend.mycompany.com) to the public IP address of the load balancer. Then, the services registered in the load balancer will be accessible by using that hostname, for example, bds-frontend.mycompany.com:7183 for Cloudera Manager.

      For information about using DNS in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, see Overview of the DNS Service in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure documentation.

  2. In a web browser, enter the address as follows:

    • To use the load balancer's IP address: https://<load-balancer-ip>:<port>.

    • To use the load balancer's hostname in a domain: https://<hostname>:<port>.

    That is, for Cloudera Manager:
    • https://<load-balancer-ip>:7183
    • https://<hostname>:7183
    For Hue:
    • https://<load-balancer-ip>:8889
    • https://<hostname>:8889
    For Big Data Studio:
    • https://<load-balancer-ip>:30000
    • https://<hostname>:30000