7Ledgers

This chapter contains the following:

Overview

Overview of Accounting Configuration Offerings

Use the Setup and Maintenance work area in Oracle Applications to manage the configuration of legal entities, ledgers, and reporting currencies. To create a legal entity or ledger, first create an implementation project. This implementation project can be populated by either adding a financials-related offering or one or more task lists.

Note: Setup tasks that are not related to the ledger or legal entity setup tasks are opened from either an implementation project or directly from the Setup and Maintenance work area.

The financial applications have two predefined implementations:

  • The Oracle Accounting Hub Cloud offering is used to add the General Ledger and Subledger Accounting application features to an existing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) source system to enhance reporting and analysis.

  • The Financials offering includes the General Ledger and Subledger Accounting application features and one or more subledger financial applications.

When adding an offering to an implementation project, update the tasks displayed by adding additional tasks.

Oracle Fusion Applications reflect the traditional segregation between the general ledger and associated subledgers. Detailed transactional information is captured in the subledgers and periodically imported and posted in summary or detail to the ledger.

A ledger determines the currency, chart of accounts, accounting calendar, ledger processing options, and accounting method for its associated subledgers. Each accounting setup requires a primary ledger and optionally, one or more secondary ledgers and reporting currencies. Reporting currencies are associated with either a primary or secondary ledger.

The number of ledgers and subledgers is unlimited and determined by your business structure and reporting requirements.

Single Ledger

If your subsidiaries all share the same ledger with the parent company or they share the same chart of accounts and calendar, and all reside on the same applications instance, you can consolidate financial results in Oracle Fusion General Ledger in a single ledger. Use Oracle Fusion Financial Reporting functionality to produce individual entity reports by balancing segments. General Ledger has three balancing segments that can be combined to provide detailed reporting for each legal entity and then rolled up to provide consolidated financial statements.

Multiple Ledgers

Accounting operations using multiple ledgers can include single or multiple applications instances. You need multiple ledgers if one of the following is true:

  • You have companies that require different account structures to record information about transactions and balances. For example, one company may require a six-segment account, while another needs only a three-segment account structure.

  • You have companies that use different accounting calendars. For example, although companies may share fiscal year calendars, your retail operations require a weekly calendar, and a monthly calendar is required for your corporate headquarters.

  • You have companies that require different functional currencies. Consider the business activities and reporting requirements of each company. If you must present financial statements in another country and currency, consider the accounting principles to which you must adhere.

Subledgers

Oracle Fusion Subledgers capture detailed transactional information, such as supplier invoices, customer payments, and asset acquisitions. Oracle Fusion Subledger Accounting is an open and flexible application that defines the accounting rules, generates detailed journal entries for these subledger transactions, and posts these entries to the general ledger with flexible summarization options to provide a clear audit trail.

Companies account for themselves in primary ledgers, and, if necessary, secondary ledgers and reporting currencies. Transactions from your subledgers are posted to your primary ledgers and possibly, secondary ledgers or reporting currencies based on balance, subledger, or journal level settings. Local and corporate compliance can be achieved through an optional secondary ledger. Provide an alternate accounting method, or in some cases, a different chart of accounts. Your subsidiary's primary and secondary ledgers can both be maintained in your local currency. You can convert your local currency to your parent's ledger currency to report your consolidated financial results using reporting currencies or translation.

Primary Ledgers

A primary ledger:

  • Is the main record-keeping ledger.

  • Records transactional balances by using a chart of accounts with a consistent calendar and currency, and accounting rules implemented in an accounting method..

  • Is closely associated with the subledger transactions and provides context and accounting for them.

To determine the number of primary ledgers, your enterprise structure analysis must begin with your financial, legal, and management reporting requirements. For example, if your company has separate subsidiaries in several countries worldwide, enable reporting for each country's legal authorities by creating multiple primary ledgers that represent each country with the local currency, chart of accounts, calendar, and accounting method. Use reporting currencies linked to your country-specific primary ledgers to report to your parent company from your foreign subsidiaries. Other considerations that affect the number of primary ledgers required are:

  • Corporate year end

  • Ownership percentages

  • Local government regulations and taxation

  • Secondary ledgers

Secondary Ledgers

A secondary ledger:

  • Is an optional ledger linked to a primary ledger for the purpose of tracking alternative accounting.

  • Can differ from its primary ledger by using a different accounting method, chart of accounts, accounting calendar, currency, or processing options.

When you set up a secondary ledger using the Manage Secondary Ledger task, you select a data conversion level. The data conversion level determines what level of information is copied to the secondary ledger. You can select one of the following levels: Balance, Journal, Subledger, or Adjustment Only.

  • Balance: When you run the Transfer Balances to Secondary Ledger process, balances are transferred from the primary ledger to the secondary ledger.

  • Journal: When you post journals in the primary ledger, the posting process copies the journals to the secondary ledger for the sources and categories that you specify in the Journal Conversion Rules section on the Map Primary to Secondary Ledger page.

    In the Journal Conversion Rules section, you can do one of the following:

    • Accept the default setting of Yes for the journal source and category combination of Other, and then specify the source and category combinations to exclude from the conversion.

    • Set the journal source and category combination of Other to No, and then specify the source and category combinations to include in the conversion.

  • Subledger: When you run the Create Accounting process in the primary ledger, the process creates subledger journals for both the primary and secondary ledgers. When you run the Post Journals process in the primary ledger for journals that are created through methods other than the Create Accounting process, the posting process copies the primary ledger journals to the secondary ledger. For any journals that you don't want copied by posting, you can change the settings in the Journal Conversion Rules section on the Map Primary to Secondary Ledger page. To prevent duplication, posting doesn't copy any journal that originated from subledgers, regardless of the settings in the Journal Conversion Rules section.

    Caution: You don't have to specify journal conversion rules for your subledgers because journal conversion rules are applicable only to postings from Oracle Fusion General Ledger. The Create Accounting process automatically produces accounting for both the primary and the secondary ledger, regardless of the journal conversion rule settings.
  • Adjustment Only: This level is an incomplete accounting representation that holds only adjustments. The adjustments can be entered as manual journals in General Ledger. This type of secondary ledger must share the same chart of accounts, accounting calendar, period type, and currency as the associated primary ledger.

Tip: To obtain a complete secondary accounting representation that includes both transactional data and adjustments, use ledger sets to combine the ledgers when running reports.
Example

Your primary ledger uses US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and you maintain a secondary ledger for International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) accounting requirements. You first decide to use the subledger conversion level for the IFRS secondary ledger. However, since most of the accounting between US GAAP and IFRS is identical, the adjustment only level is the better solution for the secondary ledger. The subledger level requires duplication of most subledger and general ledger journal entries and general ledger balances. The adjustment only level transfers only the adjustment journal entries and balances necessary to convert your US GAAP accounting to the IFRS accounting. Thus, requiring less processing resources.

Tip: To avoid difficult reconciliations, use the same currency for primary and secondary ledgers. Use reporting currencies or translations to generate the different currency views to comply with internal reporting needs and consolidations.

Reporting Currencies

Reporting currencies maintain and report accounting transactions in additional currencies. Consider the following before deciding to use reporting currencies.

  • Each primary and secondary ledger is defined with a ledger currency that's used to record your business transactions and accounting data for that ledger.

  • Best practices recommend that you maintain the ledger in the currency in which the majority of its transactions are denominated. For example, create, record, and close a transaction in the same currency to save processing and reconciliation time.

  • Compliance, such as paying local transaction taxes, is also easier using a local currency.

  • Many countries require that your accounting records be kept in their national currency.

If you maintain and report accounting records in different currencies, you do this by defining one or more reporting currencies for the ledger. When you set up a reporting currency using the Manage Reporting Currency task, you select a currency conversion level. The currency conversion level determines what level of information is copied to the reporting currency.

You can select one of the following levels: Balance, Journal, Subledger.

  • Balance: When you run the Translate General Ledger Account Balances process, balances are transferred from the specified ledger to the reporting currency and converted.

  • Journal: When you post journals, the posting process copies the journals to the reporting currency for the sources and categories that you specify in the Journal Conversion Rules section on the Create or Edit Reporting Currency pages.

    In the Journal Conversion Rules section, you can do one of the following:

    • Accept the default setting of Yes for the journal source and category combination of Other, and then specify the source and category combinations to exclude from the conversion.

    • Set the journal source and category combination of Other to No, and then specify the source and category combinations to include in the conversion.

  • Subledger: When you run the Create Accounting process in the primary ledger, the process creates subledger journals for both the primary ledger and the reporting currency. When you run the Post Journals process in the primary ledger for journals that are created through methods other than the Create Accounting process, the posting process copies the primary ledger journals to the reporting currency. For any journals that you don't want copied by posting, you can change the settings in the Journal Conversion Rules section on the Edit Reporting Currency page. To prevent duplication, posting doesn't copy any journal that originated from subledgers, regardless of the settings in the Journal Conversion Rules section.

    Caution: You don't have to specify journal conversion rules for your subledgers because journal conversion rules are applicable only to postings from Oracle Fusion General Ledger. The Create Accounting process automatically produces accounting for both the primary ledger and the reporting currency, regardless of the journal conversion rule settings.
Note: A full accounting representation of your primary ledger is maintained in any subledger level reporting currency. Secondary ledgers can't use subledger level reporting currencies.

Do not use journal or subledger level reporting currencies if your organization translates your financial statements to your parent company's currency for consolidation purposes infrequently. Standard translation functionality meets this need. Consider using journal or subledger level reporting currencies when any of the following conditions exist.

  • You operate in a country whose unstable currency makes it unsuitable for managing your business. As a consequence, you manage your business in a more stable currency while retaining the ability to report in the unstable local currency.

  • You operate in a country that's part of the European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), and you select to account and report in both the European Union currency and your National Currency Unit.

Note: The second option is rare since most companies have moved beyond the initial conversion to the EMU currency. However, future decisions could add other countries to the EMU, and then, this option would again be used during the conversion stage.

The process of designing an enterprise structure, including the accounting configuration, is the starting point for an implementation. This process often includes determining financial, legal, and management reporting requirements, setting up primary and secondary ledgers, making currency choices, and examining consolidation considerations.

Primary ledgers are connected to reporting currencies and secondary ledgers to provide complete reporting options. You map the chart of accounts for the primary ledger to the chart of accounts for the secondary ledger. Legal entities are assigned to ledgers, both primary and secondary, and balancing segments are assigned to legal entities. Business units must be connected to both a primary ledger and a default legal entity. Business units can record transactions across legal entities.

The following figure provides an example of an enterprise structure with primary ledgers, secondary ledgers, a reporting currency, legal entities, business units, and balancing segments, and shows their relationships to one another.

This figure shows the components of an enterprise structure
and their relationship to one another.

Primary Ledgers

A primary ledger is the main record-keeping ledger. Create a primary ledger by combining a chart of accounts, accounting calendar, ledger currency, and accounting method. To determine the number of primary ledgers, your enterprise structure analysis must begin with determining financial, legal, and management reporting requirements. For example, if your company has separate subsidiaries in several countries worldwide, create multiple primary ledgers representing each country with the local currency, chart of accounts, calendar, and accounting method to enable reporting to each country's legal authorities.

If your company just has sales in different countries, with all results being managed by the corporate headquarters, create one primary ledger with multiple balancing segment values to represent each legal entity. Use secondary ledgers or reporting currencies to meet your local reporting requirements, as needed. Limiting the number of primary ledgers simplifies reporting because consolidation isn't required. Other consideration such as corporate year end, ownership considerations, and local government regulations, also affect the number of primary ledgers required.

Secondary Ledgers

A secondary ledger is an optional ledger linked to a primary ledger. A secondary ledger can differ from its related primary ledger in chart of accounts, accounting calendar, currency, accounting method, or ledger processing options. Reporting requirements, for example, that require a different accounting representation to comply with international or country-specific regulations, create the need for a secondary ledger.

If the primary and secondary ledgers use different:

  • Charts of accounts, a chart of accounts mapping is required to instruct the application on how to propagate journals from the source chart of accounts to the target chart of accounts.

  • Accounting calendars, the accounting date, and the general ledger date mapping table are used to determine the corresponding nonadjusting period in the secondary ledger. The date mapping table also provides the correlation between dates and nonadjusting periods for each accounting calendar.

  • Ledger currencies, currency conversion rules are required to instruct the application on how to convert the transactions, journals, or balances from the source representation to the secondary ledger.

Note: Journal conversion rules, based on the journal source and category, are required to provide instructions on how to propagate journals and types of journals from the source ledger to the secondary ledger.

Reporting Currencies

Reporting currencies are the currency you use for financial, legal, and management reporting. If your reporting currency isn't the same as your ledger currency, you can use the foreign currency translation process or reporting currencies functionality to convert your ledger account balances in your reporting currency. Currency conversion rules are required to instruct the application on how to convert the transactions, journals, or balances from the source representation to the reporting currency.

Legal Entities

Legal entities are discrete business units characterized by the legal environment in which they operate. The legal environment dictates how the legal entity should perform its financial, legal, and management reporting. Legal entities generally have the right to own property and the obligation to comply with labor laws for their country. They also have the responsibility to account for themselves and present financial statements and reports to company regulators, taxation authorities, and other stakeholders according to rules specified in the relevant legislation and applicable accounting standards. During setup, legal entities are assigned to the accounting configuration, which includes all ledgers, primary and secondary.

Balancing Segments

You assign primary balancing segment values to all legal entities before assigning values to the ledger. Then, assign specific primary balancing segment values to the primary and secondary ledgers to represent nonlegal entity related transactions such as adjustments. You can assign any primary balancing segment value that hasn't already been assigned to a legal entity. You are allowed to assign the same primary balancing segment values to more than one ledger. The assignment of primary balancing segment values to legal entities and ledgers is performed within the context of a single accounting setup. The Balancing Segment Value Assignments report is available to show all primary balancing segment values assigned to legal entities and ledgers across accounting setups to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their assignments. This report lets you quickly identify these errors and view any unassigned values.

Business Units

A business unit is a unit of an enterprise that performs one or many business functions that can be rolled up in a management hierarchy. When a business function produces financial transactions, a business unit must be assigned a primary ledger, and a default legal entity. Each business unit can post transactions to a single primary ledger, but it can process transactions for many legal entities. Normally, it has a manager, strategic objectives, a level of autonomy, and responsibility for its profit and loss. You define business units as separate task generally done after the accounting setups steps.

The business unit model:

  • Allows for flexible implementation

  • Provides a consistent entity for controlling and reporting on transactions

  • Enables sharing of sets of reference data across applications

For example, if your company requires business unit managers to be responsible for managing all aspects of their part of the business, then consider using two balancing segments, company and business unit to enable the production of business unit level balance sheets and income statements.

Transactions are exclusive to business units. In other words, you can use business unit as a securing mechanism for transactions. For example, if you have an export business that you run differently from your domestic business, use business units to secure members of the export business from seeing the transactions of the domestic business.

Create a primary ledger as your main record-keeping ledger. A primary ledger records transactional balances by using a chart of accounts with a calendar, currency, and accounting rules implemented in an accounting method. The primary ledger is closely associated with the subledger transactions and provides context and accounting for them.

Scenario

You have been assigned the task of creating a primary ledger for your company Vision Corporation.

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Manage Primary Ledger

  2. Click the Create icon.

  3. Complete the fields, as shown in this table.

    Field Value

    Name

    Vision Corporation

    Description

    Vision Corporation primary ledger for recording transactions.

    Chart of Accounts

    Vision Corporation Chart of Accounts

    Accounting Calendar

    Standard Monthly

    Currency

    USD

    Accounting Method

    Standard Accrual

  4. Click Save and Close.

    Note: You can't change the chart of accounts, accounting calendar, or currency for your ledger after you save the ledger.

Ledger Options

This example demonstrates specifying the ledger options for a primary ledger. Your company, InFusion Corporation, is a multinational conglomerate that operates in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK). InFusion has purchased an Oracle Fusion Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution including Oracle Fusion General Ledger and all of the Oracle Fusion subledgers.

After defining your InFusion America Primary Ledger, in the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

  • Offering: Financials

  • Functional Area: General Ledger

  • Task: Specify Ledger Options, with the ledger scope set

Note: Both primary and secondary ledgers are created in the same way and use the same user interface to enable their specific ledger options.

Reviewing General Options

  1. Accept the default name and description for the selected ledger.

  2. Review the currency and chart of accounts for the specified ledger, which are automatically provided.

Setting Accounting Calendar Options

  1. Review the accounting calendar that defaults from your ledger.

  2. Select Jan-2017 as the first open period for your ledger.

    Select a period after the first defined period in the ledger calendar to enable running translation. You can't run translation in the first defined period of a ledger calendar. In this example, your calendar began with Jan-2016.

  3. Enter 3 in the Number of Future Enterable Periods field.

    Any value between 0 and 999 periods can be specified to permit entering journals, but not posting them in future periods. Minimize the number of open and future periods to prevent entries in the wrong period.

Selecting Subledger Accounting Options

  1. Accept the default accounting method from your ledger.

  2. Select US American English as your journal language.

Completing the Period Close Options

  1. Enter your retained earnings account: 101-00-31330000-0000-000-0000-0000.

    This account is required. General Ledger moves the revenue and expense account balances to this account at the end of the accounting year.

  2. Enter your cumulative translation adjustment account: 101-00-31350000-0000-000-0000-0000.

    The Cumulative Translation Adjustment (CTA) account is required for ledgers running translation.

  3. Don't enter a value for the Default Period End Rate Type or Default Period Average Rate Type fields.

    The values entered here are used as the default for balance level reporting currency processing. InFusion America Primary Ledger is using the subledger level reporting currency processing.

Specifying Journal Processing Options

  1. Complete the fields, as shown in this table.

    Field Value

    Enable Suspense

    General Ledger

    Default Suspense Account

    101-00-98199999-0000-000-0000-0000

    Rounding Account

    101-10-98189999-0000-000-0000-0000

    Entered Currency Balancing Account

    101-10-98179999-0000-000-0000-0000

    Balancing Threshold Percent

    10

  2. Enable the following entry and import options:

    • Enable journal approval: Enable the journal approval functionality.

    • Notify when prior period journal is entered: Notify the user when a prior period date is selected on a journal entry.

    • Allow mixed and statistical journals: Enter both monetary and statistical amounts on the same line in a journal entry.

    • Validate reference date: Require a reference date in an open or future enterable period.

    • Separate journals by accounting date during journal import: Create individual journal entries for each accounting date.

  3. Select InFusion America Accrual Set from the list of values in the Journal Reversal Criteria Set field and click the Run AutoReverse after open period option to reverse accrual journal entries automatically when a new period is opened.

  4. Click the Enable intercompany accounting option to enable automatic balancing for primary, second, and third balancing segments on intercompany journals and transactions.

    To complete the intercompany accounting functionality, you must define intercompany rules.

    Note:
    • This example describes setting options for a standard ledger. You can convert a standard ledger to an average daily balance ledger before the first period is opened by selecting the Enable average balances check box on the Specify Ledger Options page.

    • You can also convert an average daily balance ledger to a standard ledger before submitting the Review and Submit Accounting Configuration task, provided the average daily balance ledger wasn't created through the rapid implementation process.

How You Require Manual Journals Balance by Entered Currency

You can require that manual journals balance by entered currency when a journal is created. So when a journal preparer creates a journal on the Create Journal page or Create Journal spreadsheet, total debits must equal total credits for each entered currency, otherwise the journal can't be saved.

This also means that the journal posting process doesn't have to generate additional lines to balance the journal. The posting process continues to balance any unbalanced journals coming in through external feeds.

Here's how you set it up.

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the Specify Ledger Options task:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Specify Ledger Options, with the primary ledger scope set

  2. On the Specify Ledger Options page, enable the Require manually entered journals balance by currency option in the Journal Processing Balancing section. The option is automatically enabled for any associated secondary ledgers and reporting currencies.

How You Limit a Journal to a Single Currency

You can enforce single currency journals for a journal source. The limit applies to journals entered on the Create Journal page and to journals that are imported. The Import Journals process automatically separates the journals by currency.

Here's how you set it up.

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the Specify Ledger Options task:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Specify Ledger Options, with the primary ledger scope set

  2. On the Specify Ledger Options page, enable the Limit a journal to a single currency option in the Journal Processing Entry section. The option is automatically enabled for any associated secondary ledgers and reporting currencies.

  3. Go to the Manage Journal Sources task:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Manage Journal Sources

  4. On the Manage Journal Sources page, enable the Limit Journal to Single Currency option for the applicable journal sources.

    Note: You can't enable the option for these journal sources: Allocations, AutoCopy, Balance Transfer, Closing Journal, and Revaluation.

Legal Entity and Balancing Segment Assignment

Optionally, assign legal entities and balancing segments to your accounting configuration.

Assign Legal Entities

Assign one or more legal entities to your accounting configuration by following these steps:

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Assign Legal Entities, with the ledger scope set

  2. Click the Select and Add icon.

  3. Enter your legal entity information.

  4. Click Apply.

  5. Click Done.

  6. Click Save and Close.

Assign Balancing Segments to Legal Entities

Assign balancing segment values to your legal entities by following these steps:

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Assign Balancing Segment Values to Legal Entities, with the ledger scope set

  2. Click the Create icon.

  3. Select the balancing segment value. Optionally, add a start date.

  4. Click Save and Close to close the Assign Company Values window.

  5. Click Save and Close.

Assign Balancing Segments to Ledgers

Assign balancing segment values directly to your ledger by following these steps:

  1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Assign Balancing Segment Value to Ledger, with the ledger scope set

  2. Select the balancing segment value.

  3. Optionally enter a start date.

  4. Click Save and Close.

Note: The balancing segment values that are assigned to the ledger represent nonlegal entity transactions, such as adjustments. If you use legal entities, you must assign balancing segment values to all legal entities before assigning values to the ledger. The only available balancing segment values that can be assigned to ledgers are those not assigned to legal entities.

Reporting Currency Balances

Reporting currency balances, set at the journal or subledger level, are updated when General Ledger journals are posted and converted to your reporting currencies. This process includes:

  • General Ledger manual journals, periodic journals, and allocations.

  • At the subledger level, journals from Oracle Fusion Subledger Accounting.

  • Other journals imported from sources other than your Oracle Fusion subledgers.

When you post a journal in a ledger that has one or more reporting currencies defined, the posting process:

  • Creates journals converted to each of your reporting currencies.

  • Includes them in the same batch as the original journal with a status of Posted.

Settings That Affect Reporting Currency Balances

Reporting currencies share a majority of the ledger options with their source ledger. For example, the reporting currency uses the same suspense account and retained earnings accounts as its source ledger. However, there are certain options that must be set specifically for reporting currencies, such as the currency conversion level. The currency conversion levels are Balance, Journal, and Subledger.

Note: Secondary ledgers can't use subledger level reporting currencies.

Multiple dependencies exist between a reporting currency and its source ledger. Therefore, complete your period opening tasks, daily journal or subledger level reporting currencies accounting tasks, and period closing tasks in the correct order. The following table describes some of the tasks for each task type.

Type Tasks

Period Opening

Open the accounting period in both your ledger and reporting currencies before you create or import journals for the period. Converted journals are only generated in your reporting currency if the period is open or future enterable.

Daily

Enter daily conversion rates to convert journals to each of the reporting currencies.

Period Closing

  • Finish entering all regular and adjusting journals for the period in your ledger.

  • Post all unposted journals in your ledger if not already done in the previous step.

  • Post all unposted journals in your reporting currencies if not already done in the previous step.

  • Run revaluation in both your ledger and reporting currencies. Post the resulting revaluation batches in each ledger.

  • As needed, translate balances in your ledger.

  • Generate needed reports from both your ledger and reporting currencies.

  • Close your accounting period in both your ledger and reporting currencies.

How Reporting Currencies Are Calculated

If you use reporting currencies at the journal or subledger level, journals are posted in your reporting currency when you:

  • Create accounting.

  • Post journal entries.

  • Translate balances.

General Ledger and Subledger Accounting automatically generate journals in your reporting currencies where the entered currency amounts are converted to the reporting currency amounts. Other factors used in the calculation of reporting currency balances are listed:

  • Manual Journals: Enter a manual journal batch in your reporting currency at the journal or subledger level by using the Create Journals page. Select the journal or subledger level reporting currency from the ledger's list of values. Continue in the same manner as entering any other manual journal.

  • Conversion Rounding: Use the reporting currency functionality to round converted and accounted amounts using the same rounding rules used throughout your Oracle Fusion Applications. The reporting currency functionality considers several factors that are a part of the currencies predefined in your applications, including:

    • Currency Precision: Number of digits after the decimal point used in currency transactions.

    • Minimum Accountable Unit: Smallest denomination used in the currency. This might not correspond to the precision.

  • Converted Journals: Generate and post automatically journals in your reporting currencies when you post the original journals in the source ledger for the following types of journals:

    • Manual journals

    • Periodic and allocation journals

    • Unposted journals from non-Oracle subledger applications

    • Unposted journals from any Oracle Fusion subledger that doesn't support reporting currency transfer and import

    • Optionally, revaluation journals

  • Unconverted Journals: Rely on the subledger accounting functionality to convert and transfer Oracle Fusion subledger journals, for both the original journal and the reporting currency journal, to the General Ledger for import and posting. The reporting currency conversion for these journals isn't performed by the General Ledger.

  • Approving Journals: Use the journal approval feature to process reporting currency journals through your organization's approval hierarchy. You can enable journal approval functionality separately in your source ledger and reporting currencies.

  • Document Numbers: Accept the default document numbers assigned by the General Ledger application to your journal when you enter a journal in your ledger. The converted journal in the reporting currency is assigned the same document number. However, if you enter a journal in the reporting currency, the document number assigned to the journal is determined by the reporting currency.

  • Sequential Numbering: Enable sequential numbering to maintain the same numbering in your reporting currency and source ledger for journals, other than those journals for Oracle Fusion subledgers. Do not create separate sequences for your reporting currencies. If you do, the sequence defined for the reporting currencies is used. The sequences can cause the document numbers not to be synchronized between the ledger and reporting currencies.

    Note: General Ledger enters a document number automatically when you save your journal if:
    • The Sequential Numbering profile option is set to Always Used or Partially Used.

    • Automatic document numbering sequence is defined.

    If you use manual numbering, you can enter a unique document number.

  • Revaluation: Run periodically revaluation in your ledger and reporting currencies as necessary to satisfy the accounting regulations of the country in which your organization operates.

  • Account Inquiries: Perform inquires in the reporting currency. You can:

    • Drill down to the journal detail for the reporting currency balance.

    • Drill down to see the source ledger currency journal amounts from any automatically converted journal that was created when the original journal posted.

Note: Be careful when changing amounts in a reporting currency, since the changes aren't reflected in your source ledger. Making journal entry changes to a reporting currency makes it more difficult to reconcile your reporting currency to your source ledger. In general, enter or change your journals in your source ledger, and then allow posting to update the reporting currency.
Note: If you use journal or subledger level reporting currencies, statistical journals are generated for your reporting currencies, but the journals aren't converted.

Accounting Configuration Review and Submission

A balances cube stores financial balances in a multidimensional database for interactive reporting and analysis.

A ledger has a chart of accounts, calendar, currency, and accounting method. When the accounting configuration process is submitted for a primary or secondary ledger that uses a new unique combination of chart of accounts and calendar, a balances cube is created.

The following figure shows the components of a ledger and that the accounting configuration process creates the balances cube.

This figure shows that a ledger consists of a chart
of accounts, calendar, currency, and accounting method. The accounting
configuration process creates a balances cube for a primary or secondary
ledger.

Balance cubes are named after the chart of accounts they contain.

A balances cube:

  • Stores financial balances in a multidimensional cube for real time, interactive financial reporting and analysis.

  • Preaggregates balances at every possible point of summarization, ensuring immediate access to financial data and eliminating the need for an external data warehouse for financial reporting.

  • Is uniquely identified by a combination of the chart of accounts and accounting calendar. Average balances are tracked in a separate balances cube.

  • Is automatically synchronized by the following general ledger processes: posting, open period, and translation.

  • Consists of a set of defining business entities called dimensions. Dimensions in a cube determine how data is accumulated for reporting and analytical purposes.

  • Are referred to as an application or database connection in the user interfaces for Financial Reports, Smart View, and Calculation Manager.

Dimensions for Standard Balance Cubes

A balances cube consists of a set of defining business entities called dimensions. These dimensions are available for creating financial reports, Smart View queries, and allocations using multidimensional cubes.

The following table describes the dimensions and provides example values.

Dimension Description Examples

Accounting Period

Based upon the calendar of the ledger or ledger set. Report on years, quarters, or periods.

  • 2012

  • Quarter-1

  • Jan-12

Ledger or Ledger Set

Used to select a ledger for the reporting. Multiple ledgers may be in the same cube if they share a common chart of accounts.

  • Vision North America Ledger Set

  • Vision US Primary Ledger

Chart of Accounts Segments

Uses a separate dimension for each of the segments from the charts of accounts. Organized by hierarchy. A default hierarchy is provided that includes all detail segment values. Hierarchies published in the Publish Account Hierarchies user interface are included.

  • Company: Vision America: 101

  • Cost Center: Sales: 400

  • Account: Cash: 1110

Scenario

Indicates if the balances represented are actual or budget amounts. Allocation-related dimensions are predefined members and required for allocation solutions. Allocation dimensions aren't used directly by end users.

Budget scenario dimension members are user-defined in the Oracle Fusion Applications value set called Accounting Scenario. The dimension members appear in the cube after running the Create Scenario Dimension Members process.

  • Budget 2012

  • Actual

  • Forecast 2013

Balance Amount

Indicates if the value is the beginning balance, period activity, or ending balance. Debit, Credit, and Net amounts are available for reporting.

  • Beginning Balance (DR, CR, or Net)

  • Period Activity (DR, CR, or Net)

  • Ending Balance (DR, CR, or Net)

Amount Type

Indicates whether the amounts represent Base, Period to Date, Quarter to Date, or Year to Date.

  • Base

  • PTD: Period to Date

  • QTD: Quarter to Date

  • YTD: Year to Date

Currency

Used to select the wanted currency for the balances.

  • All ISO Currencies

  • USD: US Dollar

  • JPY: Japanese yen

Currency Type

Used to select the currency type of the balances.

  • Total

  • Entered

  • Converted From (for each ISO currency)

Note: Dimensions are predefined and new ones can't be added.

Examples of Standard and Average Balances Cubes

There are two types of Oracle Fusion General Ledger Balances cubes: Standard Balances cubes and Average Balances cubes.

Standard Balances Cubes

A new standard balances cube is created whenever an accounting configuration is submitted for a ledger, either primary or secondary, that uses a new unique combination of chart of accounts and accounting calendar. Cubes are named after the chart of accounts.

Two examples of standard balance cubes:

  1. The chart of accounts, InFusion US Chart of Accounts has a related cube entitled, InFusion US Chart of Accounts. If a chart of accounts is used by multiple ledgers with different calendars, the cube names are distinguished by appending a number to their names.

  2. The InFusion US Chart of Accounts is used by two different ledgers, each of which has a different accounting calendar, one with a standard calendar year ending December 31st and the other with a fiscal year ending May 31st. Two cubes are created. The cubes are named InFusion US Chart of Accounts and InFusion US Chart of Accounts 2.

Average Balances Cubes

Average balances cubes use different dimensions than the standard balances cubes therefore require their results be stored in separate cubes. If the average balances option is enabled for a ledger, a second average balances cube is automatically created based upon the same criteria of a unique combination of chart of accounts and accounting calendar. Average balances cubes are named with ADB (average daily balances) plus the name of the associated chart of accounts.

For example, for a chart of accounts, InFusion US Chart of Accounts, the average balances cube name is ADB InFusion US Chart of Accounts. Numbers are appended to the name when more than one calendar is used by the same chart of accounts. The numbering is determined and shared with the related standard balances cubes. The standard cube called InFusion US Chart of Accounts 3 has a corresponding average balance cube entitled ADB InFusion US Chart of Accounts 3.

Considerations for GL Balance Cube Dimension Values That Are Customer-Specific

In creating your cube, consider the dimensions that you, the customer define, and those that are partially or completely already predefined.

The Chart of Accounts and Scenario dimensions have customer-specific dimension values and require user procedures to populate the cube. The Accounting Period, Currency, and Ledger dimensions are customer-specific, but are automatically created in the cubes from the changes made in the applicable user interfaces. Other dimensions, such as Amount Type and Balance Amount have only predefined members.

Consider the following points when setting up and populating cubes for the Chart of Accounts and Scenario dimension members.

Create Account Hierarchies

Create account hierarchies for your chart of account dimensions on the Manage Account Hierarchies page or the Manage Trees and Trees Versions page after setting up your value sets, chart of accounts, and values. Create account hierarchies (trees) to identify managerial, legal, or geographical relationships between your value set values. Define date-effective tree versions to reflect organizational changes within each hierarchy over time.

Note: The tree version must be in an active or inactive status to be published. Draft versions can't be published.

To create account hierarchies, in the Setup and Maintenance area, go to the following:

  • Offering: Financials

  • Functional Area: Financial Reporting Structures

  • Task: Manage Account Hierarchies

Publish Account Hierarchies

After defining the tree versions, publish the account hierarchies (tree versions) to the cube. Before publishing, set the profile option called GL: Set Cube Alias to Segment Value Description. Consider the following points when setting the profile option:

  • The member alias displayed in the GL balances cubes.

    • Yes: Displays only the segment value description, for example Cash.

    • No: Displays the segment value plus the segment value description, for example 1110 Cash.

  • When you change the profile option setting, republish the hierarchy.

  • The default value is No. No is necessary when there are duplicate segment value descriptions in the same value set. The descriptions are stored in the alias in the cube. Aliases must be unique in a dimension in the cube. For example, if the description West existed for more than two segment values in the Cost Center value set, the entire cube creation process fails.

    Note: Essbase cubes display only the first 80 characters in the description, so the first 80 characters in the description must be unique.
  • If duplicate segment value descriptions exist, the cube can be created with the profile set to No. At any time the value of the profile can be changed to Yes after the duplicates are removed. At that time, the account hierarchies (tree versions) must be published or republished to the cube.

  • If you set the profile value to Yes, and then decide to rebuild a cube from a process run in Enterprise Scheduler, or create a cube by submitting an accounting configuration and duplicate descriptions exist, the cubes creation process errors. You have two options at that point:

    • Set the profile value to No and run the Create Cubes process. For a new ledger with a new chart of accounts and accounting calendar combination, submit the accounting configuration.

    • Remove the duplicates across all dimensions, not just a single segment. Then run the Create Cubes process or resubmit the accounting configuration.

In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

  • Offering: Financials

  • Functional Area: Financial Reporting Structures

  • Task: Publish Account Hierarchies

Use the Publish Account Hierarchies page to search for and publish account hierarchies.

  • Select the Publish check box. This is the indicator of what to include in the balances cube by selecting the check box, or what you don't want to include in balances cube by removing the check from the check box.

  • Select the rows. Functionality allows for multiple rows to be selected.

  • Select the Publish button to update the balances cubes. A process is generated.

  • Monitor the process from the Scheduled Processes work area.

Note: Use Smart View to verify that the account hierarchies were correctly published.

Define Scenario Dimension Members

The customer-specific Scenario dimension members are defined on the Manage Value Sets and Manage Values pages in the value set called Accounting Scenario. Any customer-specific Scenario dimension is included in all balances cubes.

Best practice is to set up the customer-specific Scenario members in this value set before you create your first ledger and run the Accounting Configuration process, which generates your balances cubes. If the cubes already existed, you can run the Create Scenario Dimension Members process to update the balances cubes for the new members.

Note: If you're on a release before the Create Scenario Dimension Members process is available, you have to rebuild the cubes with the Create Cubes process to add the Scenario dimension in the cube. Follow the guidelines for creating cubes before running the process.

Default Values for Standard Balance Cube Dimensions

For Standard Balances Cube dimensions, there are default values that if used in Smart View and on financial reports created in Financial Reporting Studio cause #MISSING to appear when balances are returned on a report output. If #MISSING appears, check that all dimensions are properly set. Particularly, check the Accounting Period, Ledger, Scenario, and Currency dimensions, which all must have a value selected other than the default highest level value called Gen1.

The following table lists dimensions, available and default dimension values, and provides guidance on selecting the correct dimension values.

Dimension Possible Values Default Value Additional Information

Accounting Period

Years, quarters, and period

Accounting Period = Accounting Period (Gen1)

You must always select an accounting period for each financial report including User Point of View, Smart View query, or allocation including Point of View. If you do not specify a valid Accounting Period, the financial reports, Smart View queries, and Account Inspector displays #MISSING.

Ledger

Includes ledgers and ledger sets

Ledger = Ledger (Gen1)

If you do not specify a specific Ledger or Ledger Set, the financial reports, Smart View queries, and Account Inspector queries display #MISSING

Chart of accounts dimensions

Not Applicable

Highest level (Gen1)

There is a separate dimension for each segment of the chart of accounts used by the cube. Each segment has a default account hierarchy that includes all the detail values for the segment but not parent values. Only account hierarchies (tree versions) published from the Publish Account Hierarchies user interface are available in the cube.

Scenario

Not Applicable

Scenario = Scenario represents the sum of all values: Actual + Allocated + Total for Allocations + Budget + Forecast. Select a value for this dimension.

Note: Must always select a Scenario dimension.

Predefined values are Actual, Allocated, and Total for Allocated. Additional scenario values for Budget, Forecast Q1, and Forecast Q2 may be available if they have been added to the Accounting Scenario value set. These additional values are published to every cube.

Balance Amount

  • Beginning Balance DR, CR, or Net

  • Period Activity DR, CR, or Net

  • Ending Balance DR, CR, or Net

  • Balance Amount (same as Ending Balance)

Balance Amount = Balance Amount (Gen1) which is the equivalent of Ending Balance.

Not Applicable

Amount Type

Base, PTD, QTD, YTD

Amount Type = Amount Type (Gen1) which is the equivalent of Base.

Base is necessary because this is the value used to store from posting all balances at the lowest level. PTD, QTD, and YTD are calculated values.

Currency

All ISO currencies (250+).

Highest level (Gen1)

Similar to Accounting Period and Ledger, there may not be an appropriate default for Currency since different Ledgers have different ledger currencies. If you don't specify a valid currency in a financial report, Smart View query, or allocation, you get a result of #MISSING.

Currency Type

Total, Entered, and Converted from for each ISO currency = each ISO currency.

Currency Type = Currency Type (Gen1), which is the equivalent of Total.

Not Applicable

Average Balances Cubes Dimensions

The following dimensions are included in the average balances cube in this order. Most comments from standard cube are applicable unless stated.

  • Accounting Period: Valid values are years, quarters, accounting period and day, which is equivalent to accounting date.

  • Ledger

  • Separate dimension for each Chart of accounts segment

  • Scenario

  • Amount Type valid values are: PATD, QATD, and YATD

  • Currency

  • Currency Type

Currencies and Currency Types for Balances Cubes

A currency type is a GL balances cube dimension that you can use in reports and analyses, such as Financial Reports, Smart View queries, and also in Account Inspector, and on the Inquire on Detail Balances page.

The Currency Type dimension has these members:

Total

Select the Total currency type to view cumulative ledger currency balances.

To view summarized balances entered in the ledger currency, along with any balances entered in a foreign currency that were converted to that ledger currency for a primary ledger, secondary ledger, journal-level reporting currency, or subledger-level reporting currency, set the following dimensions:

  • Ledger: Select either the primary or secondary ledger, or the journal-level or subledger-level reporting currency.

  • Currency: Select the ledger currency.

  • Currency Type: Select Total.

To view translated balances for a primary or secondary ledger in a balance-level reporting currency, set the following dimensions:

  • Ledger: Because balance-level reporting currencies aren't ledgers themselves, select the primary or secondary ledger for the reporting currency.

  • Currency: Select the translation currency, which is the same as the currency of the balance-level reporting currency.

  • Currency Type: Select Total.

Entered

Select the Entered currency type to view balances that were entered in a specific currency. You can select this currency type for any primary or secondary ledger, or any journal-level or subledger-level reporting currency.

For example, the Vision Corporation ledger has a ledger currency of USD. To view balances that were entered in JPY, set the following dimensions:

  • Ledger: Vision Corporation

  • Currency: JPY

  • Currency Type: Entered

Converted From

To view balances that were converted from an entered currency to the ledger currency, select the currency type that begins with From followed by the currency with the balances you want to view.

For example, the Vision Corporation ledger has a ledger currency of USD. To view balances that were entered in JPY and converted to USD, set the following dimensions:

  • Ledger: Vision Corporation

  • Currency: USD

  • Currency Type: From JPY

Converted All

Use the Converted All currency type along with the Entered currency type in your reports to view entered balances and their equivalent converted balances side by side.

Here's an example of a Smart View analysis with a side by side comparison. The ledger currency is USD. Each row shows a currency followed by its entered and converted balances for the March 2020 accounting period. The third column uses the Total currency type and shows the cumulative balance in USD.

An example of a Smart View report with entered
and converted balances appearing side by side.

You can use this currency type for any primary or secondary ledger or any journal-level or subledger-level reporting currency. You can also select this currency type for a ledger set, provided the ledgers in the set have the same ledger currency.

Levels and Generations in GL Balances Cubes

Levels and generations are cube terminology used to describe hierarchies in Oracle Fusion General Ledger balances cubes.

Levels

Levels are used to describe hierarchy levels. Levels are numbered from the lowest hierarchy level. For example, the detail chart of accounts segment values are Level 0. The immediate parent is Level 1; the next parent is Level 2.

Generations

Generations (Gen) describe hierarchy levels starting with the highest level of the hierarchy and moving down through the generations of the same.

An example for generations is as follows:

  • Accounting Period = Accounting Period is Gen 0

    • Year is Gen 1

      • Quarter is Gen 2

        • Period is Gen 3

  • Ledger = Ledger is Gen 1

    • All Ledgers is Gen 2

      • VF USA is Gen 3

    • Ledger Set (any ledger set) is Gen 2

  • Company = Company is Gen 1

    • All Company Values, for example detail values, is Gen 2

      • 11010 is Gen 3

    • Tree 1 V1 is Gen 2

      • [Tree 1 V1].[10000] is Gen 3

        • [Tree 1 V1].[10000].[11000] is Gen 4

    • Tree 2 V1 is Gen 2

      • [Tree 2 V1].[10000] is Gen 3

        • [Tree 1 V1].[10000].[11000] is Gen 4

Note: Similar levels and generations apply to the other dimension, including chart of accounts dimensions and those that are not chart of accounts dimensions.

Examples of Using Dimension Values in Reporting

By using combinations of values for the Accounting Period, Balance Amount, and Amount Type dimensions, you can derive different amounts to meet financial reporting requirements. In some cases, more than one combination of query values can return the wanted information. Some duplication in the calculations for the balances cube exists to ensure complete reporting requirements.

Reporting needs can be completed using the Balance Amount dimension, Amount Type equal to Base, and the Accounting Period equal to Year, Quarter, or Month.

However, the Amount Type dimension is still required for the following reasons:

  • To get the complete QTD (Quarter to Date) reporting requirements for the first and second month in a quarter. Complete QTD can only be achieved using QTD and Accounting Period = Month.

  • PTD (Period to Date) and YTD (Year to Date) are also available to ensure more consistency reporting with the E-Business Suite Release 12.

Obtaining Quarter Information

This example shows how to obtain quarter information.

  • QTD for the first and second months of a quarter can only be achieved using Amount Type dimension equal to QTD.

  • The end of quarter information can be derived from the Accounting Period dimension equal to Quarter or with the Amount Type equal QTD.

Obtaining End of Year Information

This example shows how to obtain end of year information.

  • Accounting Period equal to Year and Balance Amount equal to Ending Balance and Amount Type equal to Base or YTD.

  • Accounting Period equal to a specific month and Balance Amount equal to Period Activity and Amount Type equal to YTD.

  • When the Balance Amount equals the Balance Amount or the Balance Amount equals the Ending Balance, this results in an Ending Balance.

Note: Ending Balance is always the ending balance regardless of Amount Type member setting or Accounting Period member setting (period, quarter or year).

Example of Standard Balances

You have loaded your Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12 balances into your new Oracle Standard Balances Cube. Now you want to query the results to verify that the data was loaded correctly.

Scenario

The tables show the amounts loaded into the balances cube from your R12 balances and the calculated balances for:

  • Ending balance

  • Year to date (YTD)

  • Quarter to date (QTD

The first table is the balance sheet-based balances and the second table is for income statement-based balances.

Oracle E-Business Suite R12 Balances

The following table shows the beginning balance sheet balances, activity, ending balances, and YTD and QTD amounts, for each month.

Month Beginning Balance Loaded to Cube Activity Loaded to Cube Ending Balance Calculated YTD QTD

Jan

200

20

220

20

20

Feb

220

30

250

50

50

Mar

250

25

275

75

75

Apr

275

50

325

125

50

May

325

40

365

165

90

Jun

365

45

410

210

135

Jul

410

100

510

310

100

Aug

510

200

710

510

300

Sep

710

140

850

650

440

Oct

850

150

1000

800

150

Nov

1000

100

1100

900

250

Dec

1100

400

1500

1300

650

The following table shows the beginning income statement balances, activity, ending balances, and YTD and QTD amounts, for each month.

Month Beginning Balance Loaded to Cube Activity Loaded to Cube Ending Balance Calculated YTD QTD

Jan

0

70

70

70

70

Feb

70

20

90

90

90

Mar

90

30

120

120

120

Apr

120

100

220

220

100

May

220

200

420

420

300

Jun

420

250

670

670

550

Jul

670

50

720

720

50

Aug

720

300

1020

1020

350

Sep

1020

130

1150

1150

480

Oct

1150

110

1260

1260

110

Nov

1260

200

1460

1460

310

Dec

1460

500

1960

1960

810

Analysis

These two tables show the results available from Oracle General Ledger from your R12 loaded and aggregated balances in the balances cube.

Oracle General Ledger Balances

The following table shows the results for the balance sheet balances in the balances cube.

Accounting Period Balance Amount Amount Type Value Comments R12 Amount Type Equivalent

May

Beginning Balance

YTD

200

Jan Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

YTD

165

Jan to May Activity

YTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

YTD

365

May Ending Balance

YTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

QTD

275

Apr Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

QTD

90

Apr-May Activity

QTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

QTD

365

May Ending Balance

QTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

PTD

325

May Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

PTD

40

May Activity

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

PTD

365

May Ending Balance

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

Base

325

May Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

Base

40

May Activity

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

Base

365

May Ending Balance

YTD-Actual as of May

Q2

Beginning Balance

QTD

275

April Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Q2

Period Activity

QTD

135

Always Apr-Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

QTD

410

Ending Balance always as of Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

YTD

410

Ending Balance always as of Jun

YTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Beginning Balance

Base

275

Apr Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Q2

Period Activity

Base

135

Always Apr-Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

Base

410

Ending Balance always as of Jun

YTD-Actual as of Jun

Year

Beginning Balance

YTD

200

Jan Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Year

Period Activity

YTD

1300

Jan-Dec Activity

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Ending Balance

YTD

1500

Ending Balance always as of Dec

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Beginning Balance

Base

200

Jan Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Year

Period Activity

Base

1300

Jan-Dec Activity

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Ending Balance

Base

1500

Ending Balance always as of Dec

YTD-Actual as of Dec

The following table shows the results for the income statement balances.

Accounting Period Balance Amount Amount Type Value Comments R12 Amount Type Equivalent

May

Beginning Balance

YTD

0

Jan Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

YTD

420

Jan to May Activity

YTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

YTD

420

May Ending Balance

YTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

QTD

120

Apr Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

QTD

300

Apr-May Activity

QTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

QTD

420

May Ending Balance

QTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

PTD

220

May Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

PTD

200

May Activity

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

PTD

420

May Ending Balance

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Beginning Balance

Base

220

May Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

May

Period Activity

Base

200

May Activity

PTD-Actual as of May

May

Ending Balance

Base

420

May Ending Balance

YTD-Actual as of May

Q2

Beginning Balance

QTD

120

Apr Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Q2

Period Activity

QTD

550

Period Activity Always Apr-Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

QTD

670

Ending Balance always as of Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

YTD

670

Ending Balance always as of Jun

YTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Beginning Balance

Base

120

Apr Beginning Balance

Not Applicable

Q2

Period Activity

Base

550

Period Activity always Apr-Jun

QTD-Actual as of Jun

Q2

Ending Balance

Base

670

Ending Balance always as of Jun

YTD-Actual as of Jun

Year

Beginning Balance

YTD

0

Jan Beginning Balance (always zero for Income Statement)

Not Applicable

Year

Period Activity

YTD

1960

Jan-Dec Activity

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Ending Balance

YTD

1960

Ending Balance always as of Dec

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Beginning Balance

Base

0

Jan Beginning Balance (always zero for Income Statement)

Not Applicable

Year

Period Activity

Base

1960

Jan-Dec Activity

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Year

Ending Balance

Base

1960

Ending Balance always as of Dec

YTD-Actual as of Dec

Invalid Combinations of Balance Cube Dimensions

By using various combinations for the Accounting Period, Balance Amount, and Amount Type dimensions, you can derive different amounts to meet financial reporting requirements.

The following table shows the combinations of the accounting period, balance amount, and amount type dimensions that don't return data.

Accounting Period Balance Amount Amount Type

Year

Beginning Balance

QTD

Year

Period Activity

QTD

Year

Ending Balance

QTD

Year

Beginning Balance

PTD

Year

Period Activity

PTD

Year

Ending Balance

PTD

Q2

Beginning Balance

YTD

Q2

Period Activity

YTD

Q2

Beginning Balance

PTD

Q2

Period Activity

PTD

Q2

Ending Balance

PTD

GL Balance Cube Processes Run from User Interface

On application pages, you can run processes that create, rebuild, publish, and maintain Oracle General Ledger balances cubes, including automatically run child processes.

The Create Accounting Configuration process updates the underlying table and permanently saves the settings after the accounting configuration has been completed. The process also runs the Create Accounting Configuration: Create Cubes child process, which creates the accounting configuration and a balances cube when setup is completed. Both standard and average daily balances (ADB) cubes, if enabled, are processed in the same request. To run the accounting configuration process, navigate to the Review and Submit Accounting Configuration task.

The Publish Chart of Account Hierarchies process creates the structural hierarchy for the chart of accounts. Both standard and average daily balances (ADB) cubes, if enabled, are processed in the same request. The process also runs the Publish Chart of Account Hierarchy Versions child process, one child process runs for each combination of value set and chart of accounts. To run the publication process, navigate to the Publish Account Hierarchies task.

The Create Ledger Set process updates the underlying tables and creates a ledger set. It affects both standard and ADB cube types, if enabled, in the same request. To run the ledger set process, navigate to the Manage Ledger Sets task.

The following table describes the child processes for the Create Ledger Set process and indicates the affected cube types.

Child Process Description Cube Type

Create Accounting Configuration: Process Accounting Configuration

Runs processes necessary to process accounting configuration and ledger set data.

Not applicable to the cube

Create Ledger Set Dimension Members

Creates and updates ledger set members in a balances cube.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

The following table describes other cube parent and child processes and their related cube types that can be submitted from other pages or processes.

Parent Process Child Process Description Cube Type Additional Information

Create Ledger Dimension Member for Reporting Currency

Not Applicable

Creates ledger dimension member for reporting currency.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Navigate to the Manage Reporting Currencies task and the Create Reporting Currency page. Run for new reporting currencies added after accounting configuration has completed.

Update Ledger Dimension Member for Reporting Currency

Not Applicable

Updates ledger dimension member for reporting currency.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Navigate to the Manage Reporting Currencies task and the Update Reporting Currencies page. This process runs for new reporting currencies added after accounting configuration has completed.

Not Applicable

Publish Chart of Accounts Dimension Members: Detailed Values Only

Publishes chart of accounts dimension member changes to balances cubes and updates dimension members for any new or changed segment values.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Runs only from the journal posting process when detailed values do not exist in the GL balances cube during posting.

GL Balance Cube Processes Run from Scheduled Processes Work Area

On the Scheduled Processes page, you can run the processes to create, rebuild, publish, and maintain Oracle General Ledger balances cubes.

The Create Cube process creates or rebuilds a balances cube based on a combination of chart of accounts and accounting calendar. The process automatically runs child processes for standard and average daily balance (ADB) cubes, if enabled.

The following table describes the child processes for creating a cube and also indicates the type of cube the process creates, whether standard or ADB.

Child Process Description Cube Type

Create Cube: Initialize Cube

Starts the process to import data into the balances cube.

Standard

Create Cube: Create Calendar Dimension Members and Hierarchies

Creates the calendar dimension members and hierarchies for a balances cube.

Standard

Create Cube: Create Ledger Dimension Members

Creates the ledger dimension members for a balances cube.

Standard

Create Cube: Publish Chart of Accounts Dimension Members and Hierarchies

Publishes chart of accounts and hierarchy changes to balances cubes and updates dimension members for any new or changed segment values.

Standard

Create Average Daily Balance Cube

Determines the amount required to manually adjust general ledger account average balances to reflect the differences between the original and revalued customer open items.

ADB

Create Cube: Initialize Average Balances Cube

Begins the process to import average balances into the balances cube.

ADB

Create Cube: Create Daily Dimension Members and Hierarchies

Creates the daily calendar dimension members and hierarchies for a balances cube.

ADB

Create Cube: Create Ledger Dimension Members

Creates the ledger dimension members for a balances cube.

ADB

Create Cube: Publish Chart of Accounts Dimension Members and Hierarchies

Publishes chart of accounts and hierarchy changes to balances cubes and updates dimension members for any new or changed segment values.

ADB

Create Cube: Transfer General Ledger Balances to Essbase

Transfer balances to balances cubes.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

The Publish Chart of Accounts Dimension Members and Hierarchies process publishes chart of accounts dimension member and hierarchy changes to balances cubes and updates dimension members for any new or changed segment values. The process affects both standard and ADB cubes in the same request, if ADB cubes are enabled. The process submits the child process Update Chart of Accounts Dimension Members and Hierarchies, which updates chart of accounts dimension member and hierarchy changes to Essbase.

The Transfer General Ledger Balances to Essbase process refreshes standard cube, and average balances cube if enabled, in the General Ledger balances cube.

The following table describes other cube processes that are run in the Enterprise Scheduler Service, and indicates the type of cube affected.

Parent Process Description Cube Type

Create Accounting Period Dimension for Standard Cube

Creates the accounting period dimension members.

Standard

Create Ledger Dimension Members

Creates and updates ledger dimension members including primary ledgers, secondary ledgers, reporting currencies, and ledger sets in the balances cubes.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Create Currency Dimension Members

Creates and updates all currencies in every balances cube.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Create Scenario Dimension Members

Creates and updates all scenario dimension members when new scenarios are created or existing scenarios are changed.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

Create Accounting Period Dimension for Average Daily Balances Cube

Creates the accounting period dimension members in the average daily balances cube.

ADB

Create Rules XML File for BI Extender Automation

Creates rules XML file for a specific Essbase cube, used for BI extender automation.

Standard and ADB, if enabled, in same request

To run the cube process, use the following steps in the Scheduled Processes work area from the Navigator menu.

  1. Click Schedule New Process.

  2. Search the process name.

  3. Enter the parameters.

  4. Enter the process options and schedule.

  5. Click Submit.

First Period

For all ledgers, primary, secondary, and journal and subledger level reporting currencies, open the first period of the ledger when you're ready to transact in that period.

  1. To open the first period of your ledgers, navigate to the Open First Period task in the primary ledger task list.

  2. Click the Go to Task icon.

  3. On the submission page, select the ledger and the period to open.

  4. Click the Submit button to submit the open period process.

You can use other ways to open the first period or subsequent periods without going into the Setup and Maintenance work area. You can maintain the ledgers' period statuses from the:

  • Close Status region in the General Accounting Dashboard. The Close Status region provides real-time visibility into the period close process from your subledgers to your General Ledger across the entire enterprise.

  • Manage Accounting Periods task in the Period Close work area.

  • Process Monitoring work area, which provides a framework for submitting, monitoring and maintaining processes across Oracle Fusion Financials.

Clearing Accounts Reconciliation

Clearing accounts reconciliation offers automatic and manual methods to group, match, and reconcile related in and out journal lines that no longer contribute to an account's ending balance. You can analyze those unreconciled journal lines that are both relevant and responsible for the buildup of the ending balance in a clearing account.

The following figure shows the process flow for clearing accounts reconciliation. Reconciliation can be automatic or manual. You can run reconciliations reports and also reverse reconciliations.

The process flow for reconciling clearing accounts
includes reconciling automatically and manually, marking lines as
reviewed, reversing reconciliations, and running reconciliation reports.

The recommended approach for reconciling clearing accounts is to run automatic reconciliation to process the majority of the journal lines, based on your setup. Then use manual reconciliation to resolve the journal lines that weren't reconciled automatically. You can also reverse incorrect reconciliations. Reports are available to help with this process.

Clearing accounts reconciliation offers automatic and manual methods to group, match, and reconcile related in and out journal lines that no longer contribute to an account ending balance.

Steps to Enable

To use clearing accounts reconciliation, perform these steps.

In the Setup and Maintenance work area:

  1. Go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Specify Ledger Options, with the ledger scope set

  2. On the Specify Ledger Options page, Reconciliation section, enable primary and secondary ledgers for clearing accounts reconciliation as required, by selecting the Enable reconciliation option.

  3. Go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: Financial Reporting Structures

    • Task: Manage Chart of Accounts Value Set Values

  4. On the Manage Values page, set the Reconcile attribute to Yes for each of the reconcilable clearing account values in the natural account segment.

In the Scheduled Processes work area:

  1. Run the Inherit Segment Value Attributes process to update existing account combinations with the subsequent changes to the segment value.

In the Setup and Maintenance work area:

  1. Go to the following:

    • Offering: Financials

    • Functional Area: General Ledger

    • Task: Manage Clearing Accounts Reconciliation

  2. On the Manage Clearing Accounts Reconciliation page, configure and maintain clearing account reconciliation types and the associated reconciliation rules.

Reconciliation types consist of one or more reconcilable clearing accounts and their associated reconciliation rules. Use the Manage Clearing Accounts Reconciliation task to configure and maintain them.

Chart of Accounts Level or Ledger Level

You can define reconciliation types at a chart of accounts level or at a ledger level. Chart of accounts level reconciliation types apply to all associated primary and secondary ledgers that are enabled for reconciliation. For ease of maintenance, define reconciliation types at the chart of accounts level.

If a ledger requires reconciliation rules that vary from the associated chart of accounts' rules, you can specify the ledger when creating the reconciliation type. You can select from among the primary and secondary ledgers enabled for clearing accounts reconciliation that use the chart of accounts you selected.

The Manage Clearing Accounts Reconciliation page automatically displays all reconciliation types, whether defined at a chart of accounts level or a ledger level.

Note: If you submit the automatic reconciliation process for all reconciliation types, the process reconciles ledger-specific reconciliation types first, followed by chart of accounts level types.

Reconciliation Type Names

Use unique names for reconciliation types. Maintaining a consistent naming convention is recommended. Consider appending the chart of accounts or ledger name as a suffix to distinguish between chart of accounts level and ledger level definitions. Following this convention helps you identify the appropriate definitions on the various reconciliation processing pages. This practice also helps to keep reconciliation type names unique within the application, and across ledgers and charts of accounts.

Account Matching Rules and Account Filters

When you create a reconciliation type, you must select an account matching rule. The account matching rule identifies the chart of account segments that are significant for finding matching journal lines during the reconciliation process. Conversely, the selection implies which segments are insignificant and irrelevant during the reconciliation process. Those irrelevant segments aren't considered when grouping and matching eligible journal lines that are reconciled together.

The account matching rules are:

  • By Primary Balancing Segment, Natural Account

  • By Primary Balancing Segment, Natural Account, Cost Center

  • By Account Combination

After you select the account matching rule, use the account filter to specify the segment values that belong to valid clearing account combinations. You would typically specify segment values only for those segments that are part of the account matching rule that you selected. At a minimum, you must specify a value for one of the segments. Most likely, you would provide a value for the natural account segment. If you don't specify values for a segment, the reconciliation process considers all of the underlying child values for that segment as valid values in a clearing account combination, when matching and grouping together related journal lines.

If you specify values for a segment that's not part of the account matching rule, journal lines across the specified values for that segment are reconciled together.

For example, a chart of accounts has the following segments and child values:

  • Company: Primary balancing segment values of 01, 02, 03

  • Cost Centers: 000, 100, 200

  • Natural Accounts: Range of 00000 - 99999

  • Products: 100, 200

The chart of accounts is used by the Vision Services (USA) ledger, which has been enabled for reconciliation. The reconciliation type has the following attributes:

  • Name: Approved Claims

  • Account Matching Rule: By Primary Balancing Segment, Natural Account

  • Account Filter:

    • Cost Center: 100 to 200

    • Natural Accounts: 22100 to 22101

This table shows how the process groups the journal lines together for matching and reconciliation, for the Vision Services (USA) ledger and the Approved Claims reconciliation type.

Set 1 Set 2 Set 3 Set 4 Set 5 Set 6

01-100-22100-100

01-100-22101-100

02-100-22100-100

02-100-22101-100

03-100-22100-100

03-100-22101-100

01-100-22100-200

01-100-22101-200

02-100-22100-200

02-100-22101-200

03-100-22100-200

03-100-22101-200

01-200-22100-100

01-200-22101-100

02-200-22100-100

02-200-22101-100

03-200-22100-100

03-200-22101-100

01-200-22100-200

01-200-22101-200

02-200-22100-200

02-200-22101-200

03-200-22100-200

03-200-22101-200

In this example, the journal lines are grouped together into six sets. Because the account matching rule is By Primary Balancing Segment, Natural Account, each primary balancing segment value (01, 02, 03) is combined with each natural account segment value that's in the account filter (22100, 22101), into its own set.

Since the product segment isn't part of the account matching rule or account filter, each set includes all of the product segment values (100, 200).

Lastly, the cost center segment isn't part of the account matching rule, but it's included in the account filter. The cost center segment values are 000, 100, and 200, but the account filter specifies only 100 and 200. This means that the journal lines eligible for reconciliation are limited to account combinations with cost centers 100 and 200. And, since the cost center isn't part of the account matching rule, each set includes journal lines containing both cost centers 100 and 200.

In summary, even though the following account combinations include primary balancing segment values 01, 02, and 03, and natural account segment values 22100 and 22101, they're excluded from the reconciliation because the cost center is 000.

  • 01-000-22100-100

  • 01-000-22100-200

  • 01-000-22101-100

  • 01-000-22101-200

  • 02-000-22100-100

  • 02-000-22100-200

  • 02-000-22101-100

  • 02-000-22101-200

  • 03-000-22100-100

  • 03-000-22100-200

  • 03-000-22101-100

  • 03-000-22101-200

Reconciliation Start Date and Last Automatic Reconciliation Run

Every reconciliation type has a reconciliation start date. The reconciliation start date, and the criteria you specify when reconciling automatically or manually, are used to retrieve the clearing account journal lines eligible for reconciliation. Only journal lines with an accounting date after the reconciliation start date are available for reconciliation.

The Manage Clearing Accounts Reconciliation page displays the date of the last successful automatic reconciliation run. You can use this date to track and monitor completed and pending reconciliations. Clearing accounts reconciliation, as an integral part of period close activities, can be planned accordingly.

Tolerances for Manual Reconciliation

You can set up amount and percentage tolerances for manual reconciliation. When the net accounted amount of the journal lines is within the tolerance, the lines can be reconciled together using manual reconciliation. If you:

  • Leave both the amount and percentage tolerance fields blank, then there is no tolerance.

  • Specify a value in one of the two tolerance fields, that amount or percentage becomes the applicable tolerance.

  • Specify both an amount and a percentage, the stricter of the two tolerances is applied.

The percentage tolerance is calculated on the higher of the grouped journal lines total debit or credit amounts. The amount tolerance is based on the absolute amount in the ledger currency.

Changes to Reconciliation Types

You can change the reconciliation type name, description, tolerance percentage or amount, reconciliation start date, and whether the reconciliation type is active. The edited reconciliation type becomes the applicable definition for any future reconciliation processes subsequent to the edit. Existing journal line groups that were already reconciled aren't affected by the changes. You can still reverse groups that were previously reconciled.

Inactive Reconciliation Types

Inactive reconciliation types are ineligible for automatic and manual clearing accounts reconciliation processing, starting from the moment they're inactivated. Also, the submission page for the Unreconciled Transactions report doesn't display inactive reconciliation types as a report parameter. You can however, use inactive reconciliation types when submitting the Reconciled Transactions report, as well as on the Reverse Reconciliation page.

When you define reconciliation types for clearing accounts reconciliation, you can specify an amount tolerance, a percentage tolerance, or both. These tolerances apply only to the manual reconciliation process. The percentage tolerance is calculated on the higher of the grouped journal lines total debit or credit amounts. The amount tolerance is based on the absolute amount in the ledger currency. If you specify both an amount tolerance and a percentage tolerance, the stricter of the two is applied.

How Tolerances Are Applied

As an example, a reconciliation type has the following definition:

  • Chart of accounts level

  • Account Matching Rule: By Account Combination

  • Account Filter: 01-000-22100

  • Tolerance percentage: 1

  • Tolerance amount: 5

This table shows the journal lines eligible for reconciliation that were retrieved on the Manual Reconciliation page.

Journal Line Account Combination Accounted Amount (Debit) Accounted Amount (Credit)

1

01-000-22100

100.00

2

01-000-22100

98.00

Total debits are 100.00 and total credits are 98.00. The higher of the two is 100.00. The percentage tolerance of 1 is applied against 100.00. One percent of 100.00 is 1. The amount tolerance is 5. The stricter of the two is applied, so in this example, the tolerance of 1 is applied. The difference between total debits of 100.00 and total credits of 98.00 is 2. This difference is higher than the applicable tolerance of 1, so the two journal lines remain unreconciled.

Average Balance Processing

You can enable average balance processing by selecting the Enable Average Balances option when defining a ledger in Functional Setup Manager. In the Setup and Maintenance work area use the Specify Ledger Options task:

  • Offering: Financials

  • Functional Area: General Ledger

  • Task: Specify Ledger Options, with the ledger scope set

When you enable average balance processing, by default it's enabled only for balance sheet accounts. If you want to also include income statement accounts, you must explicitly enable the Include Income Statement Accounts option.

Note: You can only enable income statements for newly created ledgers. You can't enable income statement accounts on average balance processing ledgers that are already created.

Once your accounting setup is complete, the application automatically begins to store the balances that are used to calculate average and end-of-day balances for your ledger.

Note: During implementation, you can convert a standard ledger to an average balance ledger before the first period is opened, or you can convert an average balance ledger to a standard ledger before submitting the accounting configuration.

Transaction Calendars

Use a transactional calendar to indicate which days in an accounting calendar are business days or nonbusiness days. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, use the Manage Transaction Calendars task:

  • Offering: Financials

  • Functional Area: Financial Reporting Structures

  • Task: Manage Transaction Calendars

When you first define the calendar, you specify a name and optionally, a description. The application uses this information to create the calendar, which includes an entry for every calendar day in the range of dates that exist in your application. Each entry includes these items:

  • Date: The actual calendar date.

  • Day of Week: The day of the week.

  • Business Day: An indicator that shows whether the entry is defined as a business day. The business day defaults to Yes for Monday through Friday and No for Saturday and Sunday. You can change the initial default values to suit your own needs.

After the transaction calendar is created, you should specify your holidays by changing the Business Day indicator to a nonbusiness day.

Here are some points to note for nonbusiness days:

  • Nonbusiness days can't be used for posting, unless you explicitly indicate that posting is allowed.

  • Nonbusiness days are included in determining the number of days in a period range.

  • Even though transactions aren't generally posted to accounts on nonbusiness days, the application still maintains aggregate and average balances for nonbusiness days, as well as business days.

Transaction calendars and accounting calendars are completely independent of each other. For example, you might have one accounting calendar, shared by your parent company and all its subsidiaries. However, each subsidiary might use a separate transaction calendar to accommodate their different holiday schedules.

Ledgers

You define the attributes of a ledger, such as accounting calendar, ledger currency, chart of accounts and subledger accounting method in Functional Setup Manager. You can define a ledger with average balance processing enabled.

In a typical ledger where average balance processing is enabled, the standard and average balances are linked, since the average balances are derived from the standard balances. To enforce this linkage, the application prevents you from creating journal entries that directly manipulate average balances.

If you choose to enable average balance processing, you must specify additional information when defining the ledger, such as:

  • Transaction Calendar: A calendar used to ensure that transactions are posted only to valid business days.

  • Net Income Account: An account the application uses to capture the net activity of all revenue and expense accounts when calculating the average balance for retained earnings. If you decide to include income statement accounts for average balance processing, then you don't need to specify the Net Income Account.

    Note: If you enable the option to include income statement accounts, the Net Income Account field won't appear.

Net Income Account

If you decide not to include income statement accounts for average balance processing, then you must specify the net income account when you enable the ledger for average balance processing.

Retained earnings contains two components for any interim accounting period:

  • Current account balance, which is equal to the final ending balance from the previous year.

  • Net income, which is the net of all revenue and expense accounts.

The application calculates the average balance for retained earnings the same way that it calculates average balances for any other account. However, since the application doesn't maintain average balances for revenue and expense accounts, some special processing takes place to handle this particular component of retained earnings.

The application uses a special nonpostable net income account to capture the net activity of all revenue and expense accounts. The account is treated as a balance sheet account, with an account type of Owners' Equity. It's used to calculate the net income impact on the average balances for any given period, quarter or year.

Note: You can also use the nonpostable net income account in your reports and online inquiries.
Note: The primary difference between the nonpostable net income account and other balance sheet accounts, is that the nonpostable balance doesn't roll forward when you open a new year. Instead, the application resets the account to zero when revenues and expenses are closed out to retained earnings at the end of the year.

FAQs for Ledgers

Changing the cumulative translation adjustment (CTA) account is a very significant revision to your accounting configuration and should be avoided if possible. To prevent data corruption, your CTA can only be changed if you delete translated balances.

Changing the retained earnings account is a very significant revision to your accounting configuration and should be avoided if possible. To prevent data corruption, your retained earnings account can only be changed if you first perform the following set of steps:

  1. To reverse what was closed out to the incorrect retained earnings account, enter and post journals to bring the ending balances for your income statement accounts to zero at the end of each accounting year. Use a temporary account, such as a suspense account, for the offsetting amount.

  2. Update the retained earnings account.

  3. Reverse the journal entries used to bring the income statement accounts' ending account balances to zero to reinstate each accounting year's profit and loss, and now close these out to the new retained earning's account in the following accounting year.

    Note: The recommended reversal method for the journals is Change Sign.
  4. If you have translated balances for the ledger, follow the process of deleting translated balances for a change in the retained earnings account.

How can I inquire on translated balances?

You can query on Currency Type equal to Total and Currency equal to Translated Currency.

When do I rebuild the GL balances cubes?

Carefully consider requirements and work with Oracle Support before rebuilding a balances cube. Use the on-demand programs to rebuild dimension members for each dimension and to refresh balances to the cubes rather than rebuilding the cube. When you rebuild a cube, the process rebuilds both the standard and average balances cubes.

To rebuild cubes, run the Create Cubes process. Enter values for the following parameters:

  • Chart of Accounts

  • Accounting Calendar

  • Starting Period

How can I refresh balances in the GL balances cubes?

Run the General Ledger Transfer Balances to Essbase process. Select your Ledger or Ledger Set and Starting Period as parameters

One task is for the primary ledger and the other is for the secondary ledger. You can tell the difference by clicking the Scope link.

Here's the list of tasks that have scope selections for both the primary and secondary ledger.

  • Assign Balancing Segment Values to Ledger

  • Assign Balancing Segment Values to Legal Entities

  • Manage Reporting Currencies

  • Specify Ledger Options

As an example, here's an image of the scope selection dialog box for the Specify Ledger Options task for a primary ledger.

The scope selection dialog box for the primary
ledger showing Manage Primary Ledger and Specify Ledger Options buttons
and a Primary Ledger field.

And here's an image of the corresponding scope selection dialog box for the secondary ledger.

The scope selection for the secondary ledger showing
Manage Primary Ledgers, Manage Secondary Ledgers, and Specify Ledger
Options buttons. The dialog box also includes fields for the primary
and secondary ledgers.