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This chapter contains the following:

What's New in Using Supply Chain Orchestration

Get details about what's new or significantly revised in Using Supply Chain Orchestration.

Release 13 (update 19D)

These topics are new or significantly revised.

Topic Description

Manage Your Supply Process

New. Get a 360 degree view of your supply process.

How Supply Orchestration Works

Revised. New flow diagrams and descriptions.

Release 13 (update 19C)

These topics are new or significantly revised.

Topic Description

How Supply Orchestration Processes Back-to-Back Flows

New topic. Diagrams and descriptions for buy, make, and transfer flows.

Overview of Supply Orchestration

Revised. New flow diagrams and descriptions.

All other topics

Revised. All topics were reoriented to help you finish job tasks.

Use Oracle Fusion Supply Orchestration Cloud to manage supply for your items, and to make sure fulfillment is consistent and efficient.

Use Oracle Fusion Supply Orchestration to manage
supply for your items, and to make sure fulfillment is consistent
and efficient.

Manage supply from one, central location.

  • Receive a supply request to meet demand from an Oracle application, such as Supply Planning, Order Management Cloud, Order Promising, or Inventory Management.

  • Send a supply order to fulfill supply in an Oracle application during fulfillment, such as Inventory Management, Purchasing, Manufacturing, and Shipping.

  • Create business rules that manage supply.

  • Manage supply from one location.

  • Start and manage a complex business process that creates supply in the warehouse to fill your anticipated demand.

  • Automate change management that matches supply to demand and makes sure you balance quantity and fulfillment dates. Use automated exception management to avoid creating excess supply or not having enough supply to fulfill each sales order. Balance supply with demand on each order to meet your customer satisfaction and profitability goals.

  • Use a 360 degree view to monitor the process that creates supply and the relationship between different documents in the process.

Manage supply for a variety of flows.

  • Back-to-back flow, such as make, buy, or transfer. Supply Orchestration combines the demand from Order Management and the supply suggestion from Global Order Promising to create the supply document in each back-to-back flow.

  • Drop shipment from your supplier to your customer

  • Internal material transfer

  • Contract manufacturing

  • Consigned inventory

These flows come predefined to automatically process supply, but you can modify them to meet your requirements.

Manage Supply for Back-to-Back Flows

Automate your back-to-back flow. Back-to-back means Supply Orchestration processes the supply request one step after the other, consecutively, and directly.

Use back-to-back when the item is expensive to maintain as on hand inventory, or when you don't want to use up warehouse space to stock an item that only rarely sells.

Automate your back-to-back flow. Back-to-back means
orchestration processes the supply request one step after the other,
consecutively, and directly.

Note.

  • Your customer places a sales order through your order capture system.

  • A predefined orchestration process that's already optimized for back-to-back fulfillment reserves supply in your supplier's factory, your factory, or your warehouse.

  • The factory or warehouse supplies your fulfillment warehouse.

  • Your fulfillment warehouse ships the sales order to your customer.

For example, specialized medical or scientific equipment might not be practical to store in a warehouse because its physically large, or its very expensive to build. Your customers only rarely order the equipment, and when they do, you specialize it for each customer. The medical facility orders the specialized equipment, then sourcing rules determine whether to make the equipment in house or procure it from a supplier. The manufacturing or procurement process finishes, ships it to your warehouse, and your warehouse ships it to the medical facility.

In another example, warehouse space might be expensive in your area. So you stock items in a less expensive location. A customer of yours who resides close to the expensive area orders the item. The back-to-back flow transfers the item from the less expensive location to a warehouse close to your customer, then ships it.

Here are the types of back-to-back flows you can fulfill.

  • Make

  • Buy

  • Transfer

For details, see the How Supply Orchestration Processes Back-to-Back Flows topic.

Manage Supply for Drop Ship Flows

Automate your drop ship flow. Instead of creating and keeping the item in your own inventory, your supplier or contract manufacturer creates, stores, and ships the sales order to your customer.

Automate your drop ship flow. Instead of creating
and keeping the item in your own inventory, your supplier or contract
manufacturer creates, stores, and ships the sales order to your customer.

Note.

  • Your customer places a sales order through your order capture system.

  • A predefined orchestration process that's optimized for drop ship fulfillment sends a purchase order for the item to your supplier, including instructions for shipping directly to your customer.

  • Your supplier creates the item or picks it from inventory, then ships it to your customer.

  • Your supplier sends an invoice or advance shipment notice to you.

Manage Supply for Transfer Flows

Automate your transfer flow. Use a single flow to transfer material between two different organizations, between different sections in the same organization, or between companies.

Automate your transfer flow. Use a single flow
to transfer material between two different organizations, between
different sections in the same organization, or between companies.

Note.

  • Use a technology to bring demand into your flow.

    • File-based data import

    • Web service

    • Inventory management, such as min-max planning

    • Manage Item Quantity of a supply request from a back-to-back flow

    • Supply planning

    • Requisition line in Self-Service Procurement

  • A predefined orchestration process that's optimized for material transfer fulfillment uses a purchase order or a transfer order to orchestrate the transfer. For example, between two different warehouse.

For details, see the Overview of Internal Material Transfer topic.

Automate Change Management

Supply Orchestration comes predefined to use a comprehensive set of predefined change management rules to automate change.

  • Match supply to demand to prevent excess inventory. Excess inventory is expensive and isn't necessary.

  • Automate change management and reduce the cost of handling exceptions.

  • Reduce errors that occur with manual change.

  • No set up is necessary.

Supply Orchestration automatically manages change and keeps demand and supply in balance.

Supply Orchestration automatically manages change
to keep demand and supply in balance.

Use change management to maintain a balance between quantity and fulfillment dates. Do it when a change occurs.

  • The demand changes something.

    • Change the quantity of a sales order.

    • Change the requested date of a sales order.

    • Cancel a sales order, purchase order, transfer order, or work order.

    • Split a sales order, purchase order, or transfer order.

  • The source, such as a supplier or manufacturer, changes something.

    • Increase or decrease the supply quantity.

    • Change the date when supply becomes available.

    • Split supply. Make the total quantity available in more than one delivery.

    • Cancel a supply order.

Assume your customer requests to reduce the line quantity on a back-to-back sales order from 10 to 5, so your fulfillment organization changes the quantity. Supply Orchestration receives the request and updates the quantity on the supply document, which is the purchase order in this example. If Supply Orchestration didn't automatically process the change then your supplier would have supplied more inventory than you need

Change that occurs commonly in your supply chain might require manual intervention, increasing the possibility of error and delay and cause bottlenecks in order fulfillment. Supply Orchestration automatically manages change so you don't have to manually do it.

Supply Orchestration attempts to change supply to match demand so it satisfies the new condition. If it can't, then it creates an exception and notifies the fulfillment system, such as Order Management.

Example

Assume your supplier reduces the purchase order quantity in a back-to-back flow.

  • Demand quantity is 100 units.

  • Purchase order quantity is 100 units.

  • Supplier reduces supply quantity to 75 units.

Here's how Supply Orchestration manages the change.

Here's how Supply Orchestration manages the change.

Here's what Supply Orchestration does.

  1. Locks the supply line to prevent more change.

  2. Looks for another supply source that can fulfill 25 units.

  3. If Supply Orchestration.

    • Finds another source. Creates fulfillment document and update records. In this example, a purchase order is the fulfillment document.

    • Doesn't find another source. Creates exception and notifies fulfillment manager. You can use the Manage Supply Exception Requests page in the Supply Orchestration work area to manage exceptions.

Manage Exceptions

Get status updates while Supply Orchestration creates supply. For example, view errors, exceptions, and jeopardy for supply that's at risk of not meeting fulfillment. If an exception occurs, then use predefined rules to reduce excess inventory and find another source for your supply.

Identify the cause of an exception. Access the supply document to get details, such as the manufacturing work order or purchase order. Resolve the supply risk, then resubmit the supply order. If you can't resolve the risk, then you can cancel the supply request.

How Supply Orchestration Works

Supply Orchestration uses orchestration processes and web services to create and manage supply.

Supply Orchestration uses orchestration processes
and web services to create and manage supply.

  1. Send request. An application sends a request to Supply Orchestration to create supply.

    Application What the Application Does

    Planning Central

    Sends a request for a planned sales order to Supply Orchestration in a back-to-back flow, such as make, buy, or transfer. It might also include a make order for an inventory organization that you set up as contract manufacturer.

    Order Promising

    Order Management Cloud

    • Order Promising confirms the sales order, then sends supply data to Supply Orchestration.

    • Order Management schedules the sales order, then sends demand data to Supply Orchestration.

    • Supply Orchestration combines the data it receives from Order Promising and Order Management into a single set of data, then starts a back-to-back flow.

    Inventory

    Min-Max Planning sends a make, buy, or transfer request to Supply Orchestration.

    File-Based Data Import

    You use an Excel spreadsheet in the File-Based Data Import application to manually import request data into Supply Orchestration.

  2. Transform and assign request. Transform the supply request to a supply order. Run predefined rules or rules that you create.

    Type of Rule Description

    Supply Order Defaulting and Enrichment Rule

    Here's what you can do.

    • Map attribute values you receive in the supply request to values that your fulfillment system can use. If necessary, transform values to optimize fulfillment.

    • Modify an attribute on a purchase order, work order, or transfer order.

    Here are some examples.

    • Set shipment priority.

    • Choose your preferred supplier.

    • Set the currency so it matches the currency your customer uses.

    • Determine whether to use a transfer order or purchase order to process the transfer request. Determine whether to route the transfer through Order Management.

    Execution Document Creation Rule

    Specify the type of supply to transfer between inventory organizations, including the business process and document type to use between organizations.

    Assignment Rule

    Assign a predefined orchestration process to the supply order. Supply Orchestration uses different orchestration processes to manage supply. Each process optimizes processing according to the type of flow, such as a make flow.

    Use a scheduled process to periodically run each orchestration process. For details, see the Scheduled Processes That Plan Supply for Orchestration topic.

  3. Orchestrate supply order. The orchestration process contains steps that create supply and do fulfillment tasks. For example, the process might call a manufacturing system to create or modify a manufacturing work order, or a purchasing system to create or change the quantity on a purchase order.

    Here's how the orchestration process manages tasks.

    • Process planning. Determine the start and end date for each process step. Use the duration of each task to schedule the overall process.

    • Change management. Identify and respond to changes that occur in supply or demand during processing. Make adjustments to keep supply and demand in balance.

    • Tracking. Track progress of each step, track the status and state of execution documents, and the overall process.

    For example, the back-to-back process includes steps. Each step does a task.

    • Call the procurement system to create a purchase order.

    • Call the inventory system to reserve a purchase order for the demand.

    • Receive supply in the warehouse.

  4. Communicate. The flow calls a web service and uses it to send and receive messages to and from each fulfillment system.

    • Create an XML payload that's specific to each fulfillment system, then send it to the fulfillment system.

    • Receive updates from the fulfillment system and send them to the orchestration process for change management. For example, receive and send a status change or quantity decrease on a purchase order.

  5. Fulfill. The fulfillment system uses supply to create and fulfill the item. For example.

    • A manufacturing plant uses supply in a work order in a make flow to build the item.

    • A purchasing organization uses a purchase order to purchase the item from a supplier in buy flow.

    • A warehouse uses supply in a transfer order in a transfer flow to transfer inventory from one warehouse to another warehouse.

Supply Orchestration communicates status to the application that requests supply during fulfillment.

Supply Orchestration uses three types of back-to-back flows: make, buy, and transfer.

Here's what orchestration does.

  • Create and manage the supply order.

  • Send a request depending on the type of flow.

    • Make. Send work order to Manufacturing in Inventory.

    • Buy. Send purchase order to Purchasing.

    • Transfer. Send transfer order to Inventory.

  • Track updates and statuses and send them to Order Management Cloud.

  • Close the supply order after Order Management ships the item to your customer.

Supply Orchestration also supports available-to-promise (ATP), where inventory already exists in the warehouse ready for shipping.

Back-to-back Fulfillment

Supply Orchestration creates the supply request only after Order Promising schedules the sales order. Use it for an item that your fulfillment systems choose not to stock. Use it to expand your item offering when you don't stock the item.

Supply Orchestration maintains a firm link between the demand document, such as a sales order, and the supply document, such as the purchase order, transfer order, or work order, in back-to-back flow. A firm link makes sure the supply chain can't allocate supply incorrectly or divert it to fulfill some other demand. Use back-to-back when fulfillment must occur on time and you must meet high customer satisfaction.

Use the Product Information Management work area to enable the item for back-to-back fulfillment.

Use the Order Promising work area to set up the sourcing rules that determine your options for creating supply.

Use back-to-back when you must view demand, supply, and exceptions in the flow.

Supply Orchestration and Order Orchestration

Back-to-back fulfillment doesn't keep supply on hand in the warehouse, so your back-to-back flow does supply orchestration and order orchestration. Supply orchestration gets the goods that the sales order needs into the warehouse, then order orchestration ships it to your customer.

 Supply orchestration gets the goods that the sales
order needs into the warehouse, then order orchestration ships it
to your customer.

Supply orchestration orchestrates how to create and get supply into the warehouse.

  • Different applications can send a supply request to Supply Orchestration. Supply Orchestration might or might not fulfill a sales order from Order Management.

  • Supply Orchestration creates a supply order.

  • The supply order uses orchestration processes and business rules that Oracle has optimized to orchestrate supply.

  • These processes and rules create and manage the purchase orders, work orders, and transfer orders that create supply in your warehouse.

Order orchestration orchestrates how to fulfill and deliver the item to your customer.

  • Order orchestration fulfills a sales order from Order Management.

  • Order orchestration doesn't fulfill supply requests. Instead, it sends a supply request to Supply Orchestration.

  • Order orchestration uses a set of orchestration processes that Oracle has optimized to orchestrate your fulfillment system.

  • Your fulfillment system uses the warehouse to ship the item to your customer in the most cost-effective way while meeting the requested delivery date.

Orchestration Process Does the Work

An orchestration process contains steps, and each step does a task. Supply Orchestration uses different orchestration processes depending on the flow.

Supply Orchestration uses different orchestration
processes depending on the flow
Flow Steps

Sales Order

Create and stock supply before you need it.

  1. Reserve supply. The supply already exists, so the flow reserves enough supply to meet demand from the sales order.

  2. Ship the item.

  3. Invoice the item.

Sales Order with Back-to-Back Flow

Create supply only when you need it, on demand, in direct reply to a purchase request.

  1. Request supply. Back-to-back doesn't keep supply in inventory, so it must request supply.

  2. Wait for flow to create supply. It usually takes time to purchase, make, or transfer the item, get it into the warehouse and ready for shipping.

  3. Ship the item.

  4. Invoice the item.

Sales Order with Drop Shipment

Drop ship the item from your supplier.

  1. Schedule the item so your supplier is ready to fulfill it when you need it.

  2. Create requisition to get purchase order approved.

  3. Create purchase order so you can buy the item from your supplier.

  4. Your supplier ships the item.

  5. Invoice the item.

Your Setup Selects the Orchestration Process

Settings you make for the item and the business rules you create at design time will select the orchestration process to use for each item at run time.

Settings you make for the item and the business
rules you create at design time will select the orchestration process
to use for each item at run time.

Note.

  1. Set the Back-to-Back Enabled option in the Sales and Order Management area of the Specifications tab for the item in the Product Information Management work area.

  2. Create available-to-promise rules and sourcing rules in the Global Order Promising work area. These rules optimize flow according to various aspects of your supply chain and your fulfillment goals, such as profitability, availability, capacity of supplier, distance to delivery destination, the type of flow, such as buy, make or transfer, and other aspects specific to your environment.

    The result of the rules determine whether to use your warehouse or outsource supply to a supplier in a drop ship flow.

  3. Order Management uses the orchestration process to fulfill the item.

Make Flow

Here's an example of how Supply Orchestration fulfills an item in a make flow for a sales order.

how Orchestration fulfills an item in a make flow.

Note.

  1. Your user adds an item in the Order Management work area and submits it. Order Management sends a request to Supply Orchestration. The request includes details about the item.

  2. Order Management books the item, then sends the sales order to Global Order Promising, and Promising schedules it.

    Promising considers a wide range factors to determine how to schedule supply so it meets the requested delivery date.

    • Examines inventory, lead time, backlog, and other factors to determine availability for the item.

    • Considers the type of request. For example, it might take longer to fulfill a make order that to fulfill a transfer order.

    • Uses available-to-promise rules and sourcing rules to determine where to create supply.

    Promising sends a recommendation to Supply Orchestration to create the supply needed to fulfill the item. For this example, assume Promising determines the most efficient and cost-effective way to fulfill the item and meet delivery dates is to make it, so it sends a make request.

  3. Supply Orchestration creates a supply order, then sends it to Materials Management in Inventory Management to create a work order.

  4. Materials Management creates the work order and makes the item.

  5. Planning monitors fulfillment. For example, assume you order a configured item. Planning monitors the components that the work order uses to fulfill the configure options, the item it creates, whether items are in stock or need replenishment, and so on.

  6. Shipping ships the item to your customer.

Here are some important concepts.

Entity Description

Supply order

Contains the supply order lines that Supply Orchestration creates to fulfill one supply request.

Supply order line

Contains details about each supply request.

Tracking line for supply order

Tracking line that monitors the process that fulfills the supply request according to the supply type.

Details for transfer order

Contains details about the request to transfer supply. Captures details in the fulfillment document for the transfer order from Inventory.

Applies when the supply type for the tracking line is Transfer.

Details for buy order

Contains details about the request to buy supply. Captures details in the fulfillment document for the purchase order from Purchasing.

Applies when the supply type for the tracking line is Buy.

Details for make order

Contains details about the request to make supply. Captures details in the fulfillment document for the work order from Manufacturing.

Applies when the supply type for the tracking line is Make.

Buy Flow

How Global Order Promising Sends a Buy Request

Assume Promising analyzes the supply chain and determines the buy flow is the best way to fulfill the sales order, so it sends a buy request.

Assume Promising analyzes the supply chain and
determines the buy flow is the best way to fulfill the sales order,
so it sends a buy request.

The flow is the same as the make flow but with a few differences.

  1. Global Order Promising sends a buy request instead of a make request.

  2. Supply Orchestration creates and sends a supply order to Purchasing to create a purchase order.

  3. Purchasing creates the purchase order and sends it to the warehouse in Inventory Management.

  4. Shipping ships the item to your customer.

Supply Planning works just like it does for the make flow. It isn't in the diagram for brevity.

Supply Orchestration also uses the buy flow for procure-to-pay, Min-Max, and outside processing (OSP).

Other Flows

Supply Chain Orchestration supports other flows.

Supply Orchestration supports other flows.

  • Available-to-promise. Assume you ship a configured item, the AS54888 Desktop Computer. Your customer receives it, realizes they ordered the wrong configuration, and sends it back unused and unopened. You add the item back into inventory, so its now available to fulfill demand for another order.

  • Transfer. Create a transfer order to do an internal material transfer from one warehouse to another warehouse, then ship it. If Global Order Promising determines that the exact configured item is available in another warehouse, then it might recommend to transfer supply to the shipping warehouse, or ship it directly from the warehouse that contains the item. Supply Orchestration creates the supply request documents and sends them to Inventory Management.

  • Drop. Drop ship item AS54888, Sentinel Desktop, directly from your contract manufacturer to your customer. The flows goes from Order Management directly to Purchasing.

A More Detailed View

Supply Orchestration orchestrates and manages the flow between systems that request supply and systems that fulfill the supply request.

Supply Orchestration can receive a supply request from an Oracle Cloud Application, such as Planning, Order Promising, Order Management, or Inventory. It can fulfill supply in a fulfillment application, such as Purchasing, Manufacturing, Shipping, or Receiving.

Here's an example flow where Supply Orchestration receives a sales order from Order Management. Supply Orchestration does some or all steps, depending on what its processing.

  1. Receive a request to create supply.

    Application That Sends Request Description

    Supply Planning

    Receive a request for a planned order. The request might be for a make, buy, or transfer order, or for an inventory organization that you set up as a contract manufacturing organization.

    Order Management, Order Promising, or Oracle Transactional Business Intelligence

    Receive a recommendation from Order Promising.

    Receive demand data from Order Management after it schedules a back-to-back sales order.

    Supply Orchestration matches the data it receives from Order Promising and Order Management, treats it as one set of data, then uses it to start a make, buy, or transfer flow.

    Inventory Management

    Receive an internal transfer request for minimum or maximum replenishment.

    File-Based Data Import

    You use a spreadsheet to upload orders or requests for internal material transfers into Supply Orchestration.

  2. Supply Orchestration prepares to fulfill the request.

    Preparation Description

    Transform Attributes

    Attributes in the supply request might not match attributes in the fulfillment system. So a transformation rule transforms them. For example, a rule might transform the attribute that identifies the supplier in Supply Planning to the attribute that identifies the supplier in Procurement.

    The rule might transform the attribute name, data type, and so on.

    Create Supply Order

    Supply Orchestration creates the supply order so it can set default values in the order and so the orchestration process can process it.

    Set Default Values

    Run a rule that sets default values.

    Assign and Call Orchestration Process

    Run a rule that assigns and calls the orchestration process. Supply Orchestration comes predefined with different orchestration processes. Each process creates supply differently depending on flow. For example, one process optimizes the back-to-back flow, while another optimizes flow for contract manufacturing.

    Assume this example requests to make the item, so it calls the orchestration process that optimizes the make flow.

  3. Run the orchestration process.

    An orchestration process is a sequence of steps that automate fulfillment across fulfillment systems.

    The flow in this example is a make flow that uses back-to-back fulfillment. Here's a summary of what the orchestration process that optimizes the make flow does.

    • Send a request to Procurement to create a purchase order.

    • Send a request to Inventory Management to reserve demand for the purchase order.

    • Send supply that the purchase order created to the warehouse.

    Each orchestration process does quite a few fulfillment tasks. For example.

    • Plan the entire schedule, including the start and end date for each process step.

    • Make adjustments if supply or demand changes during fulfillment so it can meet the requested delivery date.

    • Track the status for each step across fulfillment systems.

    For details, see the Orchestration Processes topic.

    External Interface

    The orchestration process uses the external interface to run tasks that involve an application that resides outside of Supply Orchestration, such as Procurement or Inventory Management. Here's a summary of what Supply Orchestration does through the external interface.

    Step Description

    Integrate

    The integration accepts notifications, processes them, and manages exceptions.

    • Creates a payload that's specific for the fulfillment system, then calls it.

    • The fulfillment system notifies Supply Orchestration of changes that occur, such as a purchase order status or quantity decrease.

    Do fulfillment tasks

    • Identify the service or fulfillment system that will fulfill the request.

    • Use a connector to transform the data.

    • Send the supply request to the fulfillment system.

    Communicate status

    • Send request to get the supply request status or to update the fulfillment document.

    • The fulfillment system creates, updates, or cancels the document according to the request.

    • Record status responses that Orchestration receives from each fulfillment system.

    • Record exceptions in fulfillment systems and notify the application that's request supply that an exception occurred.

    Here are some of the fulfillment systems.

    • Inventory Management

    • Procurement

    • Manufacturing

    • Shipping

    • Receiving

Contract Manufacturing

Assume you contract out manufacturing to a contract. You create your own manufacturing work order, and the contract manufacturer uses a matching purchase order.

  • The purchase order serves as an agreement between you and the manufacturer.

  • The work order tracks the progress of the contract manufacturer in creating supply.

  • Supply Orchestration links the work order and purchase order documents to make sure the document parameters and the progress are synchronized.

  • Supply Orchestration provides visibility into the processes that your contract manufacturer uses. It also uses automated exception management to balance supply and demand, and to avoid excess supply or short supply.

Outside Processing

You outsource one or more manufacturing operations in the work order to a partner. For example, assume you're an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). You do some of your own manufacturing operations but also outsource other operations to a Manufacturing Partners (MP). You pay the partner for the work they do, which might include various value-added services.

For example, Supply Orchestration receives a supply request from Oracle Manufacturing Cloud, then.

  • Starts the purchase request to process the outside item.

  • Sends purchase requisition or purchase order details to Manufacturing, such as purchase order number, purchase order line number, and supplier.

  • Starts the shipment request for a partially finished assembly.

  • Receives shipment confirmation from Shipping.

    Sends shipment details to Manufacturing.

Supply Orchestration also monitors the outside processing operations, and automatically processes change orders.

The Outside Processing column on the Supply Lines Overview page indicates which supply orders include outsourced manufacturing operations.

Supply Chain Orchestration tracks transactions during the supply lifecycle of each buy, transfer, and make flow. Use it to view the supply request and supply status, including exceptions.

A deviation is a supply line that deviates from the promised delivery date or deviates from the promised item quantity.

Change or delay might cause a deviation. Here are some example changes.

  • Someone cancels the purchase order, work order, or transfer order.

  • Quality assurance rejects an item because of a quality problem.

  • A supplier can't meet the requested quantity or scheduled date.

  • Someone reassigns a reserved supply.

Use change management to manage change that occurs in the supply.

  • Create and manage alternate supply sources that meet demand.

  • Split an existing supply tracking line into more than one tracking line. Create a parallel flow in the orchestration process for each split line.

Assume you receive a tracking line for a buy request that includes 100 items.

  • Orchestration sends a buy request for a quantity of 100 to your procurement system.

  • Procurement creates a requisition and a purchase order that includes three schedules. One schedule with a quantity of 50, another 30, and another 20.

  • Procurement sends the purchase order to orchestration.

  • Orchestration tracks each schedule independently, so it splits the tracking line that contains a quantity of 100 into three tracking lines. One with a quantity of 50, another 30, and another 20. It uses a separate orchestration process instance to track each schedule.

  • You use the Supply Overview work area to manage the supply tracking lines.

  • You can also manage exceptions for each tracking line.