3Production Process Design

This chapter contains the following:

A manufacturing engineer can use the work definitions feature in Oracle Fusion Manufacturing to design and manage production processes. In the case of discrete manufacturing, an Assembly could be a standard item or configured item that's based on an Assemble to Order (ATO) model that's completed in discrete units, at the final operation. In the case of process manufacturing, this will be a batch production where manufacturing involves moving batch quantities through each stage of the production process instead of the individual discrete units. You can design a work definition that represents the production operations, materials, outputs, and resources needed to make a product or a production batch.

In mixed-mode manufacturing, producing bulk intermediate material that's packaged into finished goods typically requires a hybrid of process and discrete manufacturing capabilities within the same plant. This is achieved through the plant setup with the help of two plant parameters; Enable Process Manufacturing and Default Work Method. If you select the Enable Process Manufacturing attribute in plant parameters, the capabilities for process manufacturing work definitions become available. If the plant is enabled for process manufacturing, you can optionally set the default work method to process manufacturing.

Oracle Application Development Framework Desktop Integrator (ADFdi) enables you to mass create and update the work definitions using Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The work definitions are uploaded into and downloaded from the Oracle Fusion Manufacturing.

You can import process manufacturing work definitions through FBDI or using the REST services. Separate FBDI templates are available to import discrete and process manufacturing work definitions.

Based on planning and costing priorities, you can define primary and alternate manufacturing processes. The manufacturing lead times are calculated based on the primary work definition. Work definition versions are used to monitor and implement the changes that occur in the manufacturing process. The work definition report includes information on all the operations and their associated materials, outputs and resource requirements. This report can be shared internally within the enterprise or externally with the contract manufacturers, as in the case of a discrete manufacturing.

For discrete manufacturing work definitions, the item structure changes implemented by a product engineer in Product Information Management are notified through the worklist notifications to the manufacturing engineer and the cost accountant. Any users who perform this role receive these notifications for the manufacturing plants to which they have the access. The manufacturing engineer can then assess the item structure change impact on the work definitions and make the necessary changes.

To summarize, you can perform the following tasks in the Work Definition work area:

  • Manage the work definition names

  • Manage the work definitions in user interface

  • Assess the item structure change impact on the work definitions and make changes accordingly

  • Create the work definition versions

  • Calculate the manufacturing lead times

  • Mass create and update work definitions using ADFdi

  • Import manufacturing work definitions using FBDI templates

Note: You must set up the organization as a manufacturing plant in order to perform the tasks in the Work Definition work area. For more information about mandatory setups of plant parameters, refer to the topic Set Up a Manufacturing Plant of the Oracle SCM Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

The Work Definition Overview page is the landing page for you if you have the required role and privileges of a manufacturing engineer. It provides you a quick view of key setup matrix for a manufacturing plant and quick access to the daily tasks you need to perform.

The following panels are shown in the Work Definition Overview page:

  • Recently Updated Work Definition: Shows the most recent work definitions that were last updated either automatically or manually.

  • Plant Resources: Shows the total number of resources that are of equipment type and the total number of resources that are of labor type.

  • Work Centers by Work Area: Shows the five work areas with the most number of work centers.

  • Work Center Resources: Shows the five work centers with the most number of resources.

  • Tasks: Shows the primary tasks you need to perform as a manufacturing engineer.

  • Additional Tasks: Shows the less frequent tasks you need to perform as a manufacturing engineer.

The work definition names are used to define the different ways of making a given product and are used in both discrete manufacturing and process manufacturing work definitions. There may be a primary manufacturing process and other alternate manufacturing processes to make a product. A predefined work definition name with display name as Main and internal name as ORA_MAIN can be used to create the primary work definition for an item. If you need to define an additional work definition for the same item, you have to first create a work definition name, for example, Alternate.

In addition, work definition names Rework and Transform (internal names ORA_REWORK and ORA_TRANSFORM) are predefined and can be used to define a rework work definition and a transform work definition. In the case of Transform or Rework work definitions, you can create a circular reference or loop between the work definition item and operation items referenced in the work definitions by specifying different work definition names.

Note: The process to create work definition names should be centralized and controlled. The work definition names can be referenced by multiple products.

The following table lists all the fields and their corresponding descriptions which helps you to choose or select values in order to create a work definition name:

Field Description

Display Name

The name of the work definition that's shown.

Internal Name

The unique identifier of a work definition name. The value can't be edited once the name is used in a work definition.

Description

The description of the work definition name.

Type

Determines the work definition type as Standard, Rework, or Transform. The default value is Standard.

Used in Planning

If selected, you can assign a production priority for the work definition that references the work definition name. As a result, supply chain planning will plan for the materials and resources based on the work definition. You can't edit the value after the work definition name is used in a work definition.

Start Date

The date on which the work definition name becomes effective.

End Date

The date on which the work definition is no longer effective.

Note: The work definition name is used in aligning lower-level phantom work definitions in the work definition explosion process while creating the work order for the product. To explode a component that has been defined as phantom, the work definition explosion process selects the work definition of the phantom with the same name as the work definition of the finished good.
Note: You can also query work definition names using a REST API.

You can define discrete work definitions and process work definitions in a single manufacturing plant only if Enable Process Manufacturing is selected in the plant parameter. A work definition defines the manufacturing process for a product. It is essentially a template to create a work order for the work execution.

Note: You can define both discrete and process work definitions for a given item.

A discrete work definition defines the manufacturing process for a product that consists of operations, materials, and resources. The work definition effectively combines an item structure and routing into a single view. It corresponds to a single buildable level of the item structure. If a product consists of several subassemblies that are also manufactured, then you define a work definition for the product and a work definition for the subassemblies.

A process work definition consists of operations, outputs, materials, and resources. There's no reference to an item structure. You can define multiple outputs, but you must designate one output as a primary output. The manufacturing process moves in batch quantity instead of discrete unit.

You can define more than one work definition for a product. A primary work definition of an item is the work definition using work definition name of type Standard with the production priority equal to 1. The primary work definition is used by the supply chain planning applications to generate the planned orders and create the standard work orders of the item. You can also define alternate work definitions to account for variations in the operations, components, and resources. When there are more than one work definitions for an item, you can rearrange their priority; however there must always be a work definition with production priority equal to 1.

If you have a prescribed way of reworking a product, you can define a rework work definition using work definition name of type Rework. If the Rework work definition item is serial-controlled, then the work definition is always serial-tracked. If you perform upgrade or downgrade to a product to produce a finished good that's of higher or lower specifications, you can define a transform work definition using work definition name of type Transform.

Note: Rework and Transform are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

You can define a work definition that enables the serial tracking through the manufacturing process, provided that the item's serial generation attribute is to Predefined. You identify the work definition operation from which serial-tracking must be enabled. Throughout the execution process, the serial-tracking is enforced in operation completions, material and resource transactions.

Note: Serial tracked work definitions are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

The table summarizes some key differences between discrete work definitions and process work definitions.

Feature Supported in Discrete Work Definitions Supported in Process Work Definitions

ATO Model

Yes

No

Rework, Transform

Yes

No

Work Definition Header: Item Structure Reference

Yes

No

Work Definition Header: Serial Tracked

Yes

No

Work Definition Operation: Serialization

Yes

No

Work Definition Operation Outputs

Not applicable

Yes ad hoc items

Work Definition Operation Items

Item structure components

Ad hoc items

Ad hoc items

Process Item Structure Changes

Yes

Not applicable

ADFdi

Yes

No

A work definition consists of the following elements:

  • Header

  • Operations

  • Operation Outputs (applicable to process work definitions)

  • Operation Items

  • Operation Resources

Header

The work definition header captures details such as the work method, the product being produced, the production priority, and optionally costing priority. In a discrete work definition, completion subinventory and completion locator are captured at the header level, but in a process work definition, they're captured at the operation output level.

Operations

The work definition operations define the sequence of manufacturing steps to be performed in making the item. The operations are executed in a linear path based on the operation sequence. A work definition must have at least one operation. An operation must be associated to a work center. You can use either standard operations, or you can manually enter the operations. If an operation isn't indicated as a count point or an automatically transact operation, then it's considered as an optional operation. You can define descriptive flexfields for an operation.

Operations Outputs

In a process work definition, the operation outputs are the products and by-products that are yielded by the process. Product is materials of value that are desired and intentionally produced, whereas By-product is materials of value that are produced as a residual of, or incidental to, the production process. Outputs are assigned as ad hoc items. You can define descriptive flexfields for an operation output.

Operation Items

The operation items define the material requirements for operations. In a discrete work definition, the components of the item structure of the product are assigned to the operations where they're required. You can also assign existing items to operations. Such an item is considered an ad hoc item. Assigning ad hoc items requires the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege. In a process work definition, you assign ad hoc items as operation items, and it doesn't require a privilege. You can define descriptive flexfields for an operation item.

Operation Resources

The operation resources define the resource requirements for operations. The pool of resources available comes from the work center assigned to the operation. A resource represents either a labor or equipment that adds value to the manufacturing process. You can define descriptive flexfields for an operation resource.

Tip: If you use a referenced standard operation, you wouldn't be able to add, edit, or delete the resources, as the resources are a part of the standard operation definition. You must update the resources on the Manage Standard Operations page.

You can use the Manage Work Definitions page in the Work Definition work area as a starting point to create a new work definition and manage the existing work definitions. You can have your key work definitions shown automatically by creating a saved search and setting it as a default. The Search Results region shows the work definitions matching the search criteria.

Search for a Work Definition

You can use the basic search or the advanced search to search for the existing work definitions on the Manage Work Definitions page. Advanced search enables you to use search operators other than equal to, and add additional search fields. You have the option of saving the search criteria and it will be shown in the Saved Search list.

Create a Work Definition

You can create a new work definition or copy an existing work definition.

The reasons for copying a discrete work definition can be:

  • To define the same manufacturing process to make a different product

  • To define the same manufacturing process for an alternate item structure that makes the same product (the product is the same, but the structure name is different

  • To define an alternative manufacturing process to make the same product (the product and structure name are the same, but the work definition name is different

The reasons for copying a process work definition can be:

  • To define the same manufacturing process to make the same primary output for a different batch quantity

  • To define the same or similar manufacturing process to make a different primary output with variations in materials and other products or by-products

Edit a Work Definition

You can edit a work definition by clicking on the work definition name link in the search results table to take you to the details page of the work definition. You can update some attributes of the work definition header, operations, operation outputs (applicable to process manufacturing), operation items, and operation resources.

Note: You can query, create, and update a work definition using a REST API.

Delete a Work Definition

You can delete a work definition that you created by mistake. You can use the Manage Work Definitions page to delete either manual or automatic work definitions. It will delete all versions of the work definition name for an item. You can't delete a work definition, which is referenced by work orders or is used in published cost scenarios. Deleting a work definition removes its visibility in planning, work execution, and costing.

Note: Deleting a work definition is currently supported only by using the user interface, and not by using ADFdi, FBDI, or REST.

Deactivate a Work Definition

You can deactivate a work definition as a mechanism to make it obsolete. For example, you must deactivate a work definition if the manufacturing process it represents is no longer valid. You can deactivate a specific work definition from the Manage Work Definitions page, using file-based data import, or a REST service.

Deactivating a work definition deactivates all the versions of the work definition and it becomes inactive immediately. The end date for the last version of the work definition is left as null. The work definition status changes from Active to Inactive. The Inactive On date is populated with the system date when you deactivate the work definition, or when the import work definitions scheduled process is completed. You can't update or reactivate an inactive work definition. You also can't update the work definition version end date and inactive on date.

You can search and view an inactive work definition, and create a new work definition by copying an inactive work definition. However, inactive work definitions aren't available for use by consuming applications. You can't create a work order using an inactive work definition in Manufacturing. However, any existing work orders using an inactive work definition can continue. Planning wouldn't create planned orders using inactive work definitions. Costing wouldn't use inactive work definitions in cost rollup if the cost scenario effective date is greater than the inactive on date. In the event that a work definition that has been used in an existing unpublished cost scenario is deactivated, the status of the cost scenario will be updated to indicate to the user that cost rollup has to be re-run.

If E-Signature for the Work Definition Management transaction is enabled, you can deactivate only approved work definitions. Deactivating a work definition initiates the approval process and updates the work definition status to Pending Inactivation. After the last required approver approves, the work definition status becomes Inactive. Inactive On date is the date on which the last required approver approves.

You can create a work definition using the Manage Work Definitions page in the Work Definition work area. You can create a work definition in two ways: by creating a new work definition, or by copying from an existing work definition. You can create a discrete work definition or a process work definition based on the work method you choose.

Here's how you can create a discrete work definition:

  1. Enter the discrete work definition header details.

  2. Create the operations.

  3. Assign items to the operations.

  4. Assign resources to the operations.

Here's how you can create a process work definition:

  1. Enter the process work definition header details.

  2. Create the operations.

  3. Assign outputs to the operations.

  4. Assign items to the operations.

  5. Assign resources to the operations.

Enter Discrete Work Definition Header Details

On the Manage Work Definitions page, click the Add icon or from the Actions menu, select: Add. This opens the Create Work Definition dialog box. Retain the option as New work definition.

Here are a list of the work definition header related fields and their descriptions:

Field Description

Work Method

If an organization is enabled for process manufacturing, then both Process Manufacturing and Discrete Manufacturing work methods are available The value in the Work Method drop-down list is defaulted from what's specified in the plant parameter Default Work Method. If an organization isn't enabled for process manufacturing, then only work method Discrete Manufacturing is available.

Product section:

The product area.

Item

The product for which you're creating the work definition.

Description

The description of an item. The item description is automatically populated after you enter an item.

Structure Name

This is an optional field. If the item has a primary item structure, then that item structure is referenced. If you don't enter an item structure, then the item structure isn't shown on the Edit Work Definition Details page.

Structure Item Type

The value is automatically populated after you enter an item structure. The item structure type is Standard for a standard item and Model for an assemble-to-order model item.

Preassign Lots

You can enable preassign lots for work definition if the product is lot controlled, or lot and serial controlled.

Note: The preassign lots attribute is applicable only for standard and transform work definitions, but not applicable for rework work definition.

Serial Tracked

You can create a serial tracked work definition if the item's serial generation is set up as Predefined serial number.

Completion Subinventory

The value is derived from the plant parameter and can be overridden.

Completion Locator

The value is derived from the plant parameter and can be overridden.

Work Definition section

The work definition area.

Name

Select a work definition name that hasn't been used in an existing work definition for the item. A work definition name is either predefined or defined prior to creating a work definition.

Type

Based on the selected work definition name, the work definition type is displayed.

Note: If the work definition type is Transform, then you must specify the Transform-from Item. This is the item being transformed to the work definition item.

Version

The value is set to 1 and can be overridden.

Start Date

The value is set to the application date and can be overridden.

Production Priority

The production priority value for the first work definition of an item, that uses a work definition name for which the Used in Planning check box is selected, is enforced as 1. The value for subsequent work definition for the same item is derived sequentially.

Costing Priority

This is an optional field. The value is used in costing planning scenario to determine which work definition to use when rolling up costs.

Costing Batch Output Size

This is an optional field. The value is the assumed batch size for the purposes of computing a standard cost. For discrete manufacturing, it's defaulted from the Standard Lot Size, if defined for the work definition item. If not, Costing considers the value of 1.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL in the work definition. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order header.

You can perform a mass upload of attachments for work definition headers and operations if your enterprise has implemented the needed SOAP service, the ERP Object Attachment service. For more information about this SOAP service, refer to the How You Upload Work Definition and Work Definition Operation Attachments Using a SOAP Service chapter in the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

Enter Process Work Definition Header Details

On the Manage Work Definitions page, click the Add icon or from the Actions menu, select: Add. This opens the Create Work Definition dialog box. Retain the option as New work definition.

Field Description

Work Method

If an organization is enabled for process manufacturing, then both Process Manufacturing and Discrete Manufacturing work methods are available. The value in the Work Method drop-down list is defaulted from what's specified in the plant parameter Default Work Method. If an organization isn't enabled for process manufacturing, then only work method Discrete Manufacturing is available.

Process section

The process work method area.

Name

A unique identifier of a process work definition. Name must be unique within the manufacturing plant.

Primary Output

The intended product to be produced.

Description

The description of the primary output. It's automatically populated after you enter a primary output.

Preassign Lots

You can enable preassign lots in process work definition only if the primary output is lot controlled. This attribute enables preassigning of lot numbers to products and by-products.

Batch Quantity

The quantity of the production batch used for batch sizing and scaling, where all input and output quantities are defined in terms of the batch quantity.

UOM

The UOM of batch quantity. It's defaulted to the primary output item's primary UOM.

Work Definition section

The work definition area.

Name

Select a work definition name that hasn't been used in an existing work definition for the item. A work definition name is either predefined or defined prior to creating a work definition.

Type

Based on the selected work definition name, the work definition type is displayed.

Version

The value is set to 1 and can be overridden.

Start Date

The value is set to the application date and can be overridden.

Production Priority

The production priority for the first work definition of an item that uses a work definition name for which the Used in Planning check box is selected, is enforced as 1. The value for subsequent work definition for the same item is derived sequentially.

Costing Priority

This is an optional field. The value is used in costing planning scenario to determine which work definition to use when rolling up costs.

Costing Batch Output Size

This is an optional field. The value is the assumed batch size for the purposes of computing a standard cost. For process manufacturing, it's defaulted from Batch Quantity. If not defined, Costing considers the value as 1.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL in the work definition. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order header.

You can perform a mass upload of attachments for work definition headers and operations if your enterprise has implemented the needed SOAP service, the ERP Object Attachment service. For more information about this SOAP service, refer to the How You Upload Work Definition and Work Definition Operation Attachments Using a SOAP Service chapter in the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

Create Operations

After specifying the details of the work definition header, click Next to create the work definition operations.

There are three ways to create a work definition operation:

  • Reference a standard operation: You can reference a standard operation by selecting the code of the standard operation and retaining the Referenced check box as selected. You can't edit any attributes in this case.

    Note: When you reference a standard operation, you can't edit the resources assigned to the standard operation in the work definition. Referencing also ensures that any future changes to the standard operation are reflected in the work definition operation.
  • Copy a standard operation: You can copy a standard operation by selecting the code of the standard operation and deselecting the Referenced check box. You can edit and update the attributes. After you remove the reference to a standard operation, you can't reference it again.

    Note: When you remove the reference to a standard operation, you can add or delete the resources assigned to the standard operation in the work definition. Any future changes to the standard operation aren't reflected in the work definition operation.
  • Manually enter an operation: You can create an operation by manually entering the name, work center, and specifying whether it's a count point or automatically transact operation. To enter a description and add attachments, expand the operation row.

The following are the operation related fields:

Field Description

Sequence

The value is derived from the plant parameters Starting Operating Sequence and Operation Sequence Increment. The value can be overridden but must be unique.

Standard Operation Code

The code of the standard operation when you choose to reference or copy a standard operation.

Standard Operation Referenced

Indicates that the standard operation definition is referenced in the work definition operation. Any future changes to the standard operation are reflected in the work definition operation. Once you deselect the Referenced check box, you can't select it again.

Operation Type

Indicates if an operation is executed in-house or outsourced to suppliers.

Name

The name of the operation.

Description

The description of the operation.

Work Center

The work center that's associated to the operation.

Work Center Inactive Date

The inactive date of the work center that's associated to the operation.

Start Date

The start date of the operation, which is aligned to the work definition version start date.

End Date

The end date of the operation, which is null initially.

Count Point

Indicates that the operation completion needs to be explicitly reported. The last operation in a work definition has to be a count point operation. The Count Point and Automatically Transact attributes are mutually exclusive.

Automatically Transact

Indicates that the operation is automatically completed, the pull components are backflushed, and the resources are automatically charged when the next count point operation is completed. The Count Point and Automatically Transact attributes are mutually exclusive.

Serialization

Indicates that the operation is a serialization start operation. It can be selected only if the work definition item is set up as serial-tracked. Serialization is applicable to only discrete work definitions.

Note: Currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

Lead Time Percent

The offset of a given operation as a percentage of the manufacturing lead time considering all operations of the work definition. These lead time percent values are used as an input in the calculation of cumulative lead times.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL for the work definition operation. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order operation.

You can perform a mass upload of attachments for work definition headers and operations if your enterprise has implemented the needed SOAP service, the ERP Object Attachment service. For more information about this SOAP service, refer to the How You Upload Work Definition and Work Definition Operation Attachments Using a SOAP Service chapter in the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

Additional Manual Material Issue

Specifies if operators can manually issue additional materials that aren't defined in the work order with push supply type, or manually issue quantities greater than those specified in the work order. The possible values are Allow and Don't allow.

Completions with Under Issues

Specifies if operators can report operation completions when materials with push supply type haven't been issued. The possible values are Allow, Allow with warning, and Don't allow.

Completions with Open Exceptions

Specifies if operators can report operation completions when there are open exceptions. The possible values are Allow, Allow with warning, and Don't allow.

Supplier Operation Details

The defining characteristics of a supplier operation is that it's always a count point operation, and it can't have resources. You can define one or more supplier operations and they can be consecutive. A supplier operation can be the last operation sequence in a work definition.

In an assemble-to-order model work definition, a supplier operation can be defined either as a mandatory or option-dependent operation. If it's defined as a mandatory operation, then the supplier operation will always be included in the resulting configured item work definition and work order. If it's defined as an option-dependent operation, then the supplier operation will be included in the resulting configured item work definition and work order if the option associated to the operation is selected by you. This is the same behavior as an in-house operation.

The following are the supplier operation related fields:

Field Description

Outside Processing Item

An item that represents the value-added service being performed on the assembly in outside processing. The item is defined in the Product Information Management work area. For discrete manufacturing, the primary UOM of the outside processing item must be the same as the primary UOM of the work definition item. For process manufacturing, the primary UOM of the outside processing item must be the same as the unit of measure of the batch quantity.

If the finished goods item is a dual units of measure item, which means the Tracking Unit of Measure is set to primary and secondary, then the outside processing item should be defined as a dual units of measure item as well.

Note: For more information about setting up items for outside processing, refer to the Implementing Outside Processing chapter in the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management Guide.

Item Description

The description of the outside processing item.

Supplier

The recommended supplier used in creating the requisition. The supplier is an external party who provides specialized manufacturing services to manufacture a product. The field is mandatory if the prior operation is also a supplier operation.

Supplier Site

The recommended supplier site. The field is mandatory if the prior operation is also a supplier operation.

Generate Shipment

This is used to indicate if shipment needs to be created to print the shipping documents for the outside processing item. The default value is based on the outside processing item's Shippable attribute. It's unchecked if the prior operation is a supplier operation or if the supplier operation is the first operation in sequence.

Note: If you check the Generate Shipment check box, Manufacturing sends a request to Supply Chain Orchestration, to create a shipment line to ship the goods to the supplier once the goods are reported as completed at the operation prior to the supplier operation. Supply Chain Orchestration creates a supply order line based on the request sent by manufacturing and orchestrates the automatic creation of a shipment line in Shipping.

Lead Time UOM

The unit of measure for the lead time of a supplier operation.

Fixed Lead Time

The fixed lead time for the operation and is independent of the order quantity.

Variable Lead Time

The variable lead time for the operation and is dependent on the quantity.

Assign Outputs to Operations

After creating operations, click Save and Edit. The Edit Work Definition Details page opens. The operations are shown in the work definition region. If you're creating a process work definition, the Outputs vertical tab will be shown where the primary output item card is displayed. After you assign the primary output to an operation, a check mark is shown on the primary output item card. The primary output must be assigned to an operation in order to have a valid process work definition.

You can assign multiple outputs to an operation. To assign an output to an operation, perform a search for the item in the Outputs vertical tab. An item card for the output that you search is displayed in the search results. You can assign an output to an operation either by performing drag and drop or right-click Assign action. The Assign Operation Output dialog box opens, where you can enter the output attributes, and then click the OK button.

Assign Items to Operations in a Discrete Work Definition

After creating operations, click Save and Edit. The Edit Work Definition Details page opens. The operations are shown in the work definition region. The item structure is shown in the Item Structure vertical tab. A count badge is shown against the components indicating their assigned quantity out of total quantity.

There are multiple ways to assign an item structure component to an operation:

  • Drag and drop: You can drag and drop an item structure component to an operation for which the component is required. The entire quantity of the component is assigned. After a successful assignment, the component is shown in the work definition region against the operation. A check mark is shown against the component on the item structure indicating that all of the quantity is assigned.

  • Right-click Assign action: You can right-click an item structure component and from the Actions menu, select Assign. The Assign Operation Item dialog box opens. You can edit the operation item attributes if needed, and then click the OK button.

  • Multiselect item structure components: You can click the Collect icon in the Item Structure vertical tab. The Not Collected icon is shown against the item structure components. The component is now collected as indicated by the count against the Collected Items icon. Select the other components that you want to assign. You can do this by either dragging and dropping the Collected Items to an operation for which they're required or by right-clicking the Collected Items and from the Actions menu, select Assign. The Assign Operation Items dialog box opens. You can edit the operation item attributes if needed and then click the OK button.

To assign an ad hoc item to an operation, click the Items vertical tab. Perform a search for the item. Then, from the search results, either drag and drop the item card to an operation or right-click the item and from the Actions menu, select Assign.

Note: The Items vertical tab isn't shown if you don't have the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege.

Assign Items to Operations in a Process Work Definition

As there is no item structure reference in a process work definition, you assign ad hoc items as inputs to operations. To assign an item to an operation, click the Items vertical tab. Perform a search for the item. Then, from the search results, either drag and drop the item card to an operation or right-click the item and from the Actions menu, select Assign. The Assign Operation Item dialog box opens, where you can enter the input attributes, and then click the OK button.

Assign Resources to Operations

The resource tree hierarchy is shown in the Resources vertical tab. It shows the work center and the resources available in the work center.

There are multiple ways to assign a resource to an operation:

  • Drag and drop: You can drag and drop a resource to an operation for which it's required. The Assign Operation Resource dialog box opens. You can edit the operation resource attributes if needed and then click the OK button. After a successful assignment, the resource is shown in the work definition region against the operation.

  • Right-click Assign action: You can right-click a resource and from the Actions menu, select: Assign. The Assign Operation Resource dialog box opens. You can edit the operation resource attributes if needed and then click the OK button.

  • Multiselect resources: You can click Collect in the Resources vertical tab. The Not Collected icon is shown against the resources. When you click the Not Collected icon to select a resource, the icon is activated. The resource is now collected as indicated by the count against the Collected Items icon. Select the other resources that you want to assign. Drag and drop the basket icon to an operation for which they're required. Or right-click the basket icon and from the Actions menu, select: Assign. The Assign Operation Resources dialog box opens. You can edit the operation resource attributes if needed and then click the OK button.

Copy an Existing Discrete Work Definition

On the Manage Work Definitions page, click on the Add icon or from the Actions menu, select: Add. The Create Work Definition dialog box opens. Select the Existing work definition option. The Create Work Definition dialog box opens with Existing Work Definition region and New Work Definition region. Select Discrete Manufacturing as the Work Method. Enter the Item and Work Definition Name of the existing work definition. Enter the Item, Structure Name, and Work Definition Name of the new work definition.

Rules for creating a new discrete work definition from an existing discrete work definition:

  • Operations and operation resources are copied.

  • If the item and structure name are the same, then the operation items are copied.

  • If the item is changed in the new work definition, then the operation items aren't copied.

  • If the item is the same, but the structure name is changed in the new work definition, then the operation items aren't copied.

  • Based on the work definition type selected for the existing work definition, only the work definition names of the same type can be selected for the new work definition.

Copy an Existing Process Work Definition

On the Manage Work Definitions page, click on the Add icon or from the Actions menu, select: Add. The Create Work Definition dialog box opens. Select the Existing work definition option. The Create Work Definition dialog box opens with Existing Work Definition region and New Work Definition region. Select Process Manufacturing as the Work Method. Enter the Process Name of the existing work definition. Enter the Process Name, Primary Output, Batch Quantity, UOM, and Work Definition Name of the new work definition. Determine whether you want to copy operation items and operation outputs from the existing work definition to the new work definition.

Rules for creating a new process work definition from an existing process work definition:

  • Operations and operation resources are copied

  • Operation items are copied if Copy items is checked

  • Operation outputs are copied if Copy outputs is checked

  • If the primary output of the existing work definition is the same as the primary output of the new work definition, then the primary output item and the primary output indicator is copied

  • If the primary output of the existing work definition is different from the primary output of the new work definition, then the primary output item is copied, but the primary output indicator isn't copied. You will have to assign the primary output explicitly in the new work definition.

Note: You can update the lot control dates such as Lot origination date, Expiration date, and Hold Until date at the time of product completion using user interface, REST services and file-based data import (FBDI).

As a Manufacturing Engineer, you can create a work definition for discrete manufacturing that includes a supplier operation.

For more information about the supplier operation, see the Supplier Operation Details section in the How You Create Work Definitions topic.

Video

Watch: In this tutorial, with a Manufacturing Engineer role, you can create a work definition for discrete manufacturing that includes a supplier operation. The content of this video is also covered in this text topic.

Procedure

Here's how you can create a work definition with three work definition operations, starting with an in-house operation, followed by a supplier operation, and then another in-house operation.

  1. Navigate to the Work Definition work area.

  2. On the Overview page, click the Tasks panel.

  3. Click the Manage Work Definitions link.

  4. On the Manage Work Definitions page, click the Add icon.

    Now, let's add a new work definition.

  5. On the Create Work Definition dialog, the work definition option defaults to the New Work Definition option.

  6. Search and select the item as AS4751100.

  7. Though optional, select the structure name as Production from the drop-down list.

  8. Select the work definition name as Main from the drop-down list and click Next.

    You have now created a work definition. Now, let's create three operations.

  9. On the Create Work Definition Operations dialog, click on the Add icon.

  10. For the first operation 10, from the standard operation code drop-down list, click Search.

  11. In the Search and Select: Code pop up, provide the code name as Tablet Assembly and click OK.

  12. On the Create Work Definition Operations dialog, click Add to add another row.

  13. For the second operation 20, select the Supplier Testing standard operation code for a supplier operation.

    Since, you selected a supplier operation, this row expands and populates more information.

    You can collapse the operation 20 row.

  14. Click Add to add last row.

  15. Select the Tablet Packing standard operation code for an in-house operation.

  16. Click Save and Edit.

    Now that you saved the work definition operations, proceed to edit the work definition.

    Now, let's assign items to the work definition operations.

  17. On the Edit Work Definition page, in the Item Structure vertical tab, click the Collect icon and multiselect the following components:

    • CM4751101

    • CM4751103

    • SB4751105

    • SB4751108

  18. In the Item Structure vertical tab, click the Collected Items icon and drag and drop them on the first operation, 10 Tablet Assembly.

  19. Similarly, select the CM6530007 component from the Item Structure vertical tab, right-click, then click Actions, and then click Assign.

  20. On the Assign Operation Item dialog, select the operation as 30 Tablet Packing.

    Now, edit the operation item attributes, such as the supply type.

  21. Select the Push supply type and click OK.

    Resources associated with standard in-house operations are automatically assigned. Note that the product is completed in the last operation in a discrete manufacturing work definition. But, it is not explicitly shown as assigned to the last operation.

  22. Click the Expand All icon to show the entire work definition.

  23. Now that you have assigned the required items and resources to the standard operations, click Save and Close.

    Now, let's review the work definition that you created.

  24. In the Search region, provide the AS4751100 item and select the Main work definition name, and click Search.

    The Main work definition that you created with three work order operations now appears in the search results.

  25. Click the work definition name link Main to view the work definition details.

    On the Edit Work Definition page, you can review the discrete manufacturing work definition with in-house and supplier operations.

Now, you have created a work definition for discrete manufacturing that includes a supplier operation.

When a work definition is created, certain header information, operations, operation outputs, operation items, and operation resource attributes can be updated. However, you can't add or delete an operation in the current effective work definition version. You will have to create a new version in order to add or delete an operation. The start date of a work definition is set to the application date. While creating the work definition, you can update the start date to a future date so that you can continue adding or deleting operations while designing the work definition.

The manufacturing work definition is a social object. If you enable it for use in Oracle Social Networking, the Social icon will appear on the Edit Work Definition page. For more information about Oracle Social Networking setups, refer to the Implementing Manufacturing chapter of the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

Note: Dual units of measure isn't supported for work definition operation items and outputs. The user can add a dual unit of measure item as an operation item or an output item, but the secondary unit of measure and quantity aren't displayed in the work definition user interface.

Edit Discrete Work Definition Header Details

You can update Completion Subinventory, Completion Locator, Costing Batch Output Size, and Attachments in the Edit Work Definition Details dialog box. You can also update the production priority and costing priority on Edit Priorities dialog box, which can be accessed either from the Search Results region on the Manage Work Definitions page or in the Edit Work Definition Details dialog box from the Edit Work Definition Details page.

Edit Process Work Definition Header Details

You can update Process Name, Batch Quantity, UOM, Costing Batch Output Size, and Attachments in the Edit Work Definition Details dialog box. You can also update the production priority and costing priority on Edit Priorities dialog box, which can be accessed either from the Search Results region on the Manage Work Definitions page or in the Edit Work Definition Details dialog box from the Edit Work Definition Details page.

Edit Operations

You can rename an operation and associate it to a different work center. You can rearrange the operations by updating the operation sequence. If you use a referenced standard operation whose definition no longer reflects how the operation is performed, you can deselect the Referenced check box. Now, the Count Point and Automatically Transact attributes can be edited. For example, a count point operation can now be made an automatically transact operation by deselecting the Count Point check box and selecting the Automatically Transact check box.

To add a new operation, click the Operations vertical tab, and drag and drop the new operation card into the work definition region. You can also right-click on the work definition region and select Assign to add a new operation. The Add Operation dialog box opens. Enter the details of the operation. You can also search for a standard operation, then drag and drop the standard operation card into the work definition region.

To copy an operation, right-click the operation card in the work definition region, and then from Actions menu, select: Duplicate. The Create Operation dialog box opens. The operation items and operation resources from the existing operation are copied to the new operation.

To delete an operation, right-click the operation card in the work definition region, and then from the Actions menu, select: Delete.

Note: You can't add or delete an operation in the current effective work definition version. You have to create a new version to add or delete an operation.

Edit Operation Outputs

Most of work definition operation output attributes can be updated, with the exception of Primary output indicator and Costing Priority of the primary output.

The following are the operation outputs related fields:

Field Description

Operation

The operation to which the output is assigned.

Sequence

The material sequence of the operation output. The value must be unique in an operation.

Output

The item which you're producing in the production process.

Description

The description of the output.

Output Type

The possible values are Product and By-product. A product is a material that's intentionally produced in the production process and it can be a primary or a co-product. Co-products are produced in the production process due to product or process similarities. Both are defined with an output type of Product. A by-product is a material that's produced as a residual of, or incidental to, the production process. It is defined with an output type of By-product.

Primary Output

The indicator that an output is the primary product, produced in the production process. This is a Read-Only field. It's enabled only for the primary output identified on the work definition header and disabled for a co-product.

Quantity

The quantity of the output produced in an operation.

UOM

The unit of measure of the operation output quantity. It's defaulted to the item's primary unit of measure, and can be updated to a convertible UOM.

Completion Type

Completion type of an output can either be automatic or manual. Automatic is when the output completion is reported automatically when a work order operation is completed. Manual is when the output completion must be manually reported by the user independent of when a work order operation is completed.

Relationships between completion type and a count point, automatically transact, or optional operation:

  • Count point operation can have completion type Automation or Manual

  • Automatically transact operation can have completion type Automatic only

  • Optional operation can have completion type Manual only

Completion Subinventory

The completion subinventory where the output is expected to be completed to.

Completion Locator

The completion locator where the output is expected to be completed to.

Cost Allocation

This field specifies whether the cost of an output is rolled up or manually entered. The possible values are Percentage and Fixed value. Cost allocation percentage represents the percentage of costs that will be allocated to the output up through the operation where it's being produced. Total cost allocation percentage can't exceed 100 percent for all outputs in an operation. If the cost of an output is manually entered, then select fixed value.

Costing Priority

This is an optional field. The value is used to identify a priority for cost rollup of an output when the output can be produced by multiple work definitions. For a primary output, the field is disabled, because its costing priority is the costing priority on the work definition header.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL for the work definition operation output. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order operation output.

Edit Operation Items in a Discrete Work Definition

The value for several of the work definition operation item attributes is derived from the item structure. Certain attributes require the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege to update the value that's derived from the item structure.

The following are the operation item related fields:

Field Description

Operation

The operation to which the item is assigned.

Sequence

The material sequence of the operation item. The value must be unique in an operation.

Item

The name of the item.

Item Description

The description of the item.

Basis

Determines whether the quantity of the component that's used, is a fixed amount or varies linearly with the quantity produced. The value is either Fixed or Variable.

Note: Basis is always referenced from the item structure and hence, can't be updated.

Quantity

The quantity of the operation item required in an operation. In a standard item work definition, you can split the quantity of an item structure component to multiple operations. For example, if component A123 has quantity of 10, you can assign quantity of 6 to one operation and the remaining quantity of 4 to another operation.

The quantity can be negative if the work definition type is Rework or Transform.

Note: You need the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege to update the total quantity of an operation item to exceed the quantity on the item structure.

Inverse Quantity

Inverse Quantity is equal to 1 divided by quantity. If a value for the Quantity attribute is entered, then value for the Inverse Quantity attribute is calculated automatically. If a value for the Inverse Quantity attribute is entered, then value for the Quantity attribute is calculated automatically.

Note: Inverse quantity is typically used in situations where the component quantity per assembly is a large fractional number that's difficult to enter and maintain while it's easy to enter the inverse of the fractional number. After you enter the inverse of fractional quantity in the Inverse Quantity field, the application automatically calculates and stores the desired component quantity per assembly. Storing the exact fractional quantity per assembly prevents any undesirable material usage variances that might occur in work orders with large build quantities.

UOM

The unit of measure of the operation item quantity. The value is derived from the item structure.

Note: You need the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege to update the unit of measure. The UOM drop-down list shows all the units of measure that have the standard UOM conversions and the item specific UOM conversions, including the inter-class and intra-class UOM conversions.

Item Yield

The amount of good or acceptable material available after the completion of a process. A yield factor of 0.90 means that only 90% of the usage quantity of the component is acceptable to be included into the finished good. The value is derived from the item structure.

Note: You need the Override Item Structure Components in Work Definition privilege to update the item yield.

Supply Type

Controls how the materials are consumed in the work orders. The hierarchy to default the supply type is in the following order: item structure, item master. If the supply type isn't defined in the item master, then it's set to Push. You can update the default value. A list of supply types and their uses:

  • Assembly pull: The material is backflushed when the product is completed into inventory.

  • Operation pull: The material is backflushed when a subsequent count point operation is completed.

  • Push: The material is manually issued.

  • Phantom: The components under a phantom are exploded and added to a work order.

  • Bulk: Bulk materials requirement can be viewed. These materials aren't automatically backflushed or defaulted while manually issuing the materials.

  • Supplier: Represents the materials supplied by supplier. These materials aren't automatically backflushed or defaulted while manually issuing the materials.

Supply Subinventory

The supply subinventory from which the material is supplied. The hierarchy to default the supply subinventory is in the following order: work center, item structure, item master, plant parameter. You can update the default value.

Supply Locator

The supply locator from which the material is supplied from. The hierarchy to default the supply locator is in the following order: work center, item structure, item master, plant parameter. You can update the default value.

Start Date

The start date of the component in the item structure. This field is read only and the start date is referenced from the Product Information Management work area.

End Date

The end date of the component in the item structure. This field is read only and the end date is referenced from the Product Information Management work area.

Ad hoc item

The indicator that an operation item is an ad hoc item, which means that the item doesn't come from the item structure.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL for the work definition operation item. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order operation item.

Substitutes

If an item structure component has substitutes defined in Product Information Management, then the substitutes are automatically pulled to the work definition. You can't add, delete, or edit substitutes in the work definition. If the primary component quantity is split across multiple operations, the substitute quantity is proportionally distributed among the operations.

Tip: For more information about how changes in item structure affect the work definition operation items including substitutes, refer to the Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions: Explained topic in this guide.

Edit Operation Items in a Process Work Definition

As there's no item structure reference in a process work definition, the operation items are always of type ad hoc items. Unlike discrete work definition, you don't need a privilege to update operation item attributes.

The following are the operation item related fields:

Field Description

Operation

The operation to which the item is assigned.

Sequence

The material sequence of the operation item. The value must be unique in an operation.

Item

The name of the item.

Item Description

The description of the item.

Basis

Determines whether the quantity of the material that's used, is a fixed amount or varies linearly with the quantity produced. The value is either Fixed or Variable.

Quantity

The quantity of the operation item required in an operation.

Inverse Quantity

Inverse Quantity is equal to 1 divided by quantity. If a value for the Quantity attribute is entered, then value for the Inverse Quantity attribute is calculated automatically. If a value for the Inverse Quantity attribute is entered, then value for the Quantity attribute is calculated automatically.

UOM

The unit of measure of the operation item quantity. it's defaulted to the item's primary unit of measure, and can be updated to a convertible UOM.

Item Yield

The amount of good or acceptable material available after the completion of a process. A yield factor of 0.90 means that only 90% of the usage quantity of the component is acceptable to be included into the finished good. The value is derived from the item structure.

Supply Type

Controls how the materials are consumed in the work orders. The hierarchy to default the supply type is in the following order: item structure, item master. If the supply type isn't defined in the item master, then it's set to Push. You can update the default value. A list of supply types and their uses:

  • Assembly pull: The material is backflushed when the product is completed into inventory.

  • Operation pull: The material is backflushed when a subsequent count point operation is completed.

  • Push: The material is manually issued.

  • Phantom: The components under a phantom are exploded and added to a work order.

  • Bulk: Bulk materials requirement can be viewed. These materials aren't automatically backflushed or defaulted while manually issuing the materials.

  • Supplier: Represents the materials supplied by supplier. These materials aren't automatically backflushed or defaulted while manually issuing the materials.

Supply Subinventory

The supply subinventory from which the material is supplied. The hierarchy to default the supply subinventory is in the following order: work center, item structure, item master, plant parameter. You can update the default value.

Supply Locator

The supply locator from which the material is supplied from. The hierarchy to default the supply locator is in the following order: work center, item structure, item master, plant parameter. You can update the default value.

Start Date

As this is an ad hoc item, there's no start date.

End Date

As this is an ad hoc item, there's no end date.

Ad hoc item

The indicator that an operation item is an ad hoc item. it's checked.

Attachments

Attachments of they file, text, or URL for the work definition operation item. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order operation item.

Note: You can associate components to a supplier operation in a work definition to represent and track the usage of the Original Equipment Manufacturer-supplied components at the supplier operation.

Edit Operation Resources

You can edit operation resource attributes if the work definition operation is manually entered or created by removing the reference to a standard operation. You can only view operation resource attributes if the work definition operation is created by referencing a standard operation.

The following the operation resource related fields:

Field Description

Operation

The operation to which the resource is assigned.

Sequence

The resource sequence of the operation resource.

Resource

The name of the resource.

Resource Code

The code of the resource.

Units Assigned

The assigned units can't exceed the available units for the resource as defined in the resource definition.

Basis

The valid values are: Fixed and Variable. Select Fixed if the resource usage is fixed per product quantity produced. Select Variable if the resource usage varies with the product quantity produced.

Usage

The usage amount of the operation resource.

Inverse Usage

Inverse Usage is equal to 1 divided by Usage. If the Usage attribute is entered, then the Inverse Usage attribute is calculated automatically. If the Inverse Usage attribute is entered, then the Usage attribute is calculated automatically.

UOM

The usage unit of measure as defined in the resource definition.

Scheduled

The indicator that the resource is a scheduled resource. A resource can be scheduled if the Usage UOM belongs to the UOM class defined in the profile option RCS_DEFAULT_UOM_SRVICE_DURATION_CLASS.

Principal

The indicator that a resource is the principal resource within a group of simultaneous resources (resources sharing the same resource sequence number).

Charge Type

The valid values are: Automatic and Manual. Select Manual if it's an optional operation.

Activity

The predefined values are: Setup, Run, and Tear Down. The lookup can be extended by adding new values.

Costing enabled

The indicator that the resource cost is charged to the work order.

Inactive On

The date on which the resource becomes inactive.

Attachments

Attachments of type file, text, or URL for the work definition operation resource. The attachments are automatically carried over to the work order operation resource.

Alternates

Alternate resources are ranked by priority. Basis, Scheduled, and Charge Type are inherited from the primary resource and can't be updated. Usage, Inverse Usage and Units Assigned are defaulted from the primary resource definition and can be updated.

Item Revision and Date in a Discrete Work Definition

On the Edit Work Definition Details page, the Item Revision list displays the item revisions that fall within the date range of the work definition version being viewed or edited. The Date list shows the distinct component effective start dates that correspond to the item revision selected in the Item Revision list. In an ATO model work definition, the Date list includes the distinct component effective start dates of the lower level components also. If the date was introduced through an Engineering Change Order, the Change Order Number, and the Change Order Line Number will be appended to the Date.

Selecting an item revision in the Item Revision drop-down list and a date in the Date drop-down list does the following:

  • Updates the item structure view and shows the effective components as of that date.

  • Updates the work definition region and shows the effective work definition as of that date.

Consider the following example:

The following table lists the fields and their respective values for Item A123 Revision A dated 1/1/16.

Component Quantity Start Date End Date Change Order Number Change Order Line Number

C123

1

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C124

3

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C125

6

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C126

1

3/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

The following table lists the fields and their respective values for Item A123 Revision B dated 6/1/16.

Component Quantity Start Date End Date Change Order Number Change Order Line Number

C123

1

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C124

4

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C125

8

1/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C126

1

3/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

C127

2

6/1/16

Blank

MFG-1040

10

C128

2

8/1/16

Blank

Blank

Blank

The following table shows the work definition Version 1 of the item A123. The start date of the version is 1/15/16. The end date of the version is 5/31/16.

Field Value

Item Revision

Revision A

Date

  • 1/15/16

  • 3/1/16

The following table shows the details of work definition Version 2 of the item A123. The start date of the version is 6/1/16. The end date of the version isn't specified.

Field Value

Item Revision

Revision B

Date

  • 6/1/16 MFG-1040.10

  • 8/1/16

Note: If the work definition version start date is later than the item revision date, then the work definition version start date is shown in the Date drop-down list.

Item Revision and Date in a Process Work Definition

On the Edit Work Definition Details page, the Item Revision list displays the item revisions that fall within the date range of the work definition version being viewed or edited. As there's no item structure in a process work definition, the Date list only shows the Start Date of the Item Revision.

Search Within a Work Definition

On the Edit Work Definition Details page, expand the Search: Work Definition region to access the search functionality within a work definition. The Contains search is conducted across the operations, operation outputs (applicable for only process work definitions), operation items, and operation resources based on the keywords, such as item name, output name, item description, output description, and supply type. The search result cards for the matching entities are displayed in the search results pane and they're also highlighted in the work definition region. You can then drag and drop the same type of objects to the Collected Items icon for updating. You can also right-click the search result card to perform an action, such as edit.

Oracle Manufacturing Cloud supports configured item fulfillment flow for a make-to-order configured product. The customer order is created with the Assemble to Order (ATO) model as the ordered item. When an ATO model is ordered, the customer has the ability to configure the model and select the options. The selected options result in a configuration and for each unique configuration, the application creates a configured item. Then, the work order to fulfill the customer order is created against the configured item.

Note: Assemble to Order work definitions are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

To create a work order for a configured item, a primary work definition for the ATO model must be defined first. There are a few traits about an ATO model work definition that are different from a standard item work definition. The specifics are highlighted and discussed here in more detail.

ATO Model Work Definition Operations

In an ATO model work definition, the Create Operation, Assign Operation, and Edit Operation dialog boxes display the Option Dependent Details region.

The following table lists all the fields and their corresponding descriptions which helps you to choose or select values in order to create an ATO model work definition:

Field Description

Option dependent

Indicates that an operation is an option dependent operation. An option dependent operation is included in the configured item work order in case of either of the following:

  • The optional components that are assigned to the operation are selected in the configuration.

  • The criteria, as defined in the applicability rule, are met.

If the option dependent check box isn't selected, then the operation is considered a mandatory operation. A mandatory operation is always included in the configured item work order.

Applicability Rule

Defines the criteria to include an option dependent operation in the configured item work order. There can be only one applicability rule for an option dependent operation.

Planning Percentage

The percentage of the nominal resource usage that's applied when planning the resource capacity requirements to satisfy a demand forecast of the parent model item.

ATO Model Work Definition Operation Items

You can create an ATO model work definition only for the ATO model item structure with the structure name as Primary. The item structure visualization displays the multilevel ATO model item structure. You can expand option classes to view the options. You can also expand standard item phantoms to view the components that make up the phantoms. However, you can't expand child ATO models.

Note: The supply type of option classes and standard item phantoms must be set to Phantom at the item structure component level. This setup is required to expand option classes and standard item phantoms to see options and lower level components respectively, when viewing the item structure in the work definition.

The count badge that you see against an item structure component card indicates the number of components for a single parent node. The count badge, shown only for a leaf node, indicates the assigned quantity over the component total quantity. The count badge turns into a check mark after the component is assigned to an operation. If you hover over the check mark icon, you can view the operation sequence to which the component is assigned to.

You can assign any component from any level to an operation. The rules governing this feature:

  • If the parent is assigned, the children can't be assigned.

  • If the children are assigned, assigning the parent automatically deletes the children's assignments.

This means for an option class, you can choose whether to assign the option class or the options. Similarly for a standard item phantom, you can choose whether to assign the parent phantom or the components. Assigning an option class to an option-dependent operation means that the operation is included in the configured item work order if any of the options of the specific option class is selected.

Note: There are no enforcements between the type of operations, that's, mandatory or option dependent, and the type of the component that can be assigned, that's, mandatory or optional. If you assign an optional component to a mandatory operation, then the operation is always included in the configured item work order. But the optional component isn't included if it'sn't selected in the configuration.

There are two operation item attributes that are specific to ATO model work definitions. These attributes are referenced from Oracle Fusion Product Model and hence, can't be updated. The operation item attributes specific to ATO model work definitions are:

  • Planning Percentage: The percentage that's used by Planning in forecast explosions. A planning percent can be greater than 100 to plan for a component in excess.

  • Optional: Indicator that a component is an optional component. If the Optional check box isn't selected, then the component is considered as a mandatory component.

Note: In an ATO model work definition, you must assign the entire component quantity to an operation. You can't update the quantity, inverse quantity, unit of measure, and yield. You also can't assign ad hoc items, which are existing items that aren't components of the ATO model item structure.
Tip: The item structure visualization displays a multilevel ATO model item structure with a maximum of 10,000 components. If you have a large ATO model item structure that exceeds 10,000 components, and the operation item assignments are done at the first level components of the ATO model, then it's recommended that you model the first level option classes as child ATO models. Else, you can also create a child ATO model, and make the child ATO model as the parent of the first level option class. You must set the supply type of the child ATO model to phantom. A child ATO model isn't exploded in the work definition user interface.

For more information, refer to the How You Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions topic in this chapter.

Applicability Rule

An applicability rule can be assigned to an option dependent operation. The rule defines the criteria to include the operation in the configured item work order. The operation is included in the work order only if the criteria are met. You can define an applicability rule using optional components, option classes, transactional item attributes (TIA), or any of the combinations.

Consider an example, in which, there are two types of performance tests as a part of building tablets. Depending on the selected CPU option, one of the performance test operation is executed. You can model this by doing the following:

  • Create two option dependent operations for the two types of performance tests.

  • Assign an applicability rule defining the criteria to select the performance test based on which CPU option is selected.

If you want to use the TIAs in the applicability rule to determine when to include the option dependent operations, then while defining the TIAs, the TIAs must be assigned to application scope Configuration Matching. The TIAs are used in the configuration matching process to determine if a configuration already exists. The TIAs are also leveraged by Oracle Fusion Manufacturing to determine the operations that are to be executed to build a configured item.

Transactional item attributes are defined in Oracle Fusion Product Hub. Because TIA is associated with an item class, all items that belong to the item class will inherit the TIA. Based on the item class setup, you can define TIA for the top-level ATO model, optional components, or child ATO models. You can define an applicability rule using transactional item attributes with either numeric or string data type, as long as the associated value sets have a validation type of either independent or subset.

Note: Assign either the optional components or an applicability rule to an option-dependent operation. If you assign both, then the applicability rule isn't evaluated.

Create an Applicability Rule

To create an applicability rule, you must select the Option dependent check box in the Option Dependent Details region. This enables the Add icon. Click the Add icon to open the Add Applicability Rule dialog box. Unlike the Edit Work Definition Details page, the item structure visualization in the Add Applicability Rule dialog box shows the multilevel item structure of an ATO model. However, only the optional components are displayed. The current and future effective components and TIAs are shown based on the date selected in the Date list on the Edit Work Definition Details page. From the first-level components, you can expand the option classes to view the lower-level optional components. You can't expand a child ATO model. If you have defined the transactional item attributes, then they appear as the child nodes of a component. And expanding the transactional item attribute node shows the attribute values.

In the item structure, once you locate the item or TIA value that you need for defining the rule, you can do either of the following:

  • Drag and drop the item or TIA card to the Rule Text region.

  • Right-click the item or TIA card, from Actions menu, select: Insert into Rule Text.

After you drag and drop or insert the rule text, the Rule Text region shows the component hierarchy of the item or transactional item attribute. A component hierarchy is the relative path of the item node to the top-level ATO model node.

The following example shows the item structure and component hierarchy of ATO MODEL 1:

  • OPTION CLASS 1: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 1

    • OPTION 11: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 1.OPTION 11

    • OPTION 12: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 1.OPTION 12

  • OPTION CLASS 2: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 2

    • OPTION 21: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 2.OPTION 21

    • OPTION 22: ATO MODEL 1.OPTION CLASS 2.OPTION 22

The Rule Text region has various operators that can be used to define an applicability rule. You can have a combination of items and TIAs in a rule, and build a complex expression using AND and OR conditions. Click the Validate button to validate the rule you're defining. If the rule fails to meet the valid syntax, an appropriate error message is shown. You have to correct the error before you can save the rule.

For numeric attributes, the valid operators are:

  • Equal to

  • Not equal to

  • Less than

  • Less than or equal to

  • Greater Than

  • Greater than or equal to

For string attributes, the valid operators are:

  • Equal to

  • Not equal to

  • STARTSWITH

  • ENDSWITH

  • CONTAINS

  • DOESNOTCONTAIN

Valid rule syntax:

  • Keyword ITEM is used to specify an item, that's, ITEM is equal to 'ATO MODEL 1'.'OPTION CLASS 1'

  • Keyword TRANSACTIONALATTRIBUTE is used to specify a transactional item attribute, that's, 'ATO MODEL 1'.'OPTION CLASS 1'.'OPTION 11'. TRANSACTIONALATTRIBUTE ["Finish"] is equal to "Matte"

  • Item numbers are wrapped within single quotes

  • Transactional item attribute name and value are wrapped within double quotes

  • Dot is used as a separator in the component hierarchy

  • Operators are in upper case and aren't translatable

The Add Applicability Rule dialog box shows the display name of a transactional item attribute, which is translatable. If the value set used by a TIA is translatable, then the item structure visualization shows the internal name of the value and the translated value next to it in parenthesis. The applicability rule is evaluated against the value of the internal name and not the translated value.

Note: Using drag and drop or selecting Insert into Rule Text from the Actions menu ensures that the rule syntax is valid. However, you can also create or edit a rule in the Rule Text region by entering the syntax manually.

Export Operation Item Assignments

The Export Operation Item Assignments action is available in the Actions menu in the Edit Work Definition page. It enables you to export the complete multilevel ATO model item structure to Excel in an indented view. The Excel captures the following information:

  • Displays the operations to which components are assigned.

  • Indicates if there is pending work in the Assignment Status column.

  • Lists other relevant item and item structure attributes such as User Item Type, Item Revision, and Structure Item Type.

Assignment status can be Complete, Incomplete, Explicit, or Implicit. An Explicit assignment status shows to which operation a component is directly assigned to. An Implicit assignment status applies to the children when their parent is directly assigned to an operation. Incomplete and Complete assignment status is derived by the application. In a parent-child scenario, if you have assigned all the children, then the assignment status for the parent is Complete, but if you haven't assigned all the children, then the assignment status for the parent is Incomplete.

You can quickly find out whether or not there is pending work by looking at the assignment status of the top level ATO model. If it's Incomplete, then it means you still have pending work in terms of operation item assignments. If it's Complete, then it means you have fully completed operation item assignments.

How You Create a Configured Item Work Definition

Configure to Order (CTO) is the process of ordering and fulfilling configured products. The configured products, also referred as configured items, are either procured or made to order. The configured item work definition defines the manufacturing process to build the configured item.

Note: Configured item work definitions are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

Process to Create a Configured Item Work Definition

When Oracle Fusion Manufacturing receives a request to create a work order for the configured item:

  • First, it creates the configured item work definition.

  • Then, based on the configured item work definition, it creates the configured item work order

A configured item work definition is created dynamically using the primary ATO model work definition, selected options, and transactional item attributes. Unlike the ATO model work definition, the configured item work definition isn't saved in the database. Also, you can't create a work definition for a configured item manually or search for it in the user interface.

The following figure illustrates the steps to create a configured item work definition dynamically. First, the application retrieves the configuration details that include the selected options, TIA, and mandatory components. Then, the application creates the configured item work definition header based on the base ATO model work definition header. It includes all the mandatory operations, mandatory components, and related resources. Based on the options and transactional item attributes that are selected during the configuration process, it includes the corresponding option-dependent operations along with the optional components and related resources. The application also explodes standard items with supply type as phantom for the ATO model and includes the components that make up the phantom according to the item structure. A configured item work order is then created based on the configured item work definition.

Note: The parameter Phantom Operation Inheritance is applicable for standard item work order creation and not for configured item work order creation.

Steps to create a configured item work definition
dynamically

Example to Create a Configured Item Work Definition

The following example illustrates how a configured item work definition is created.

The following shows how a configured item is created from the item structure:

  • ATO MODEL 1

    • OPTION CLASS 1

      • OPTION 11: (selected option: Y)

      • OPTION 12

      • MANDATORY COMP 13

    • OPTION CLASS 2

      • OPTION 21: (selected option: Y)

      • OPTION 22

      • MANDATORY COMP 23 (Phantom)

  • MANDATORY COMP 23

    • COMP 231

    • COMP 232

The following table illustrates the various attributes of the work definition for ATO Model 1:

Operation Sequence Operation Name Option Dependent Operation Item Applicability Rule

10

Assembly

N

MANDATORY COMP 3

OPTION CLASS 1

Blank

20

Hand insertion

Y

OPTION CLASS 2

Blank

30

Performance Test A

Y

Blank

If OPTION 21 is selected

40

Performance Test B

Y

Blank

If OPTION 22 is selected

50

Pack

N

MANDATORY COMP 4

Blank

The following table illustrates the various attributes of the work definition for configured item ATO Model 1:1:

Operation Sequence Operation Name Operation Item

10

Assembly

MANDATORY COMP3

OPTION 11

20

Hand insertion

OPTION 21

COMP 231

COMP 232

30

Performance Test A

Blank

50

Pack

MANDATORY COMP 4

Note: The component quantity is calculated in the configured item work definition based on the following points:
  • The quantity recorded on the sales order is the quantity that's used for selected options and child ATO models.

  • The quantity defined in Oracle Fusion Product Model is the quantity that's used for mandatory component.

Contract manufacturing is a business process in which an organization, known as the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), outsources manufacturing to another organization, known as the contract manufacturer to manufacture a specific part or a full product. The contract manufacturer manufactures the product to exact specifications of the original equipment manufacturer's label. The original equipment manufacturer may supply some or all components to the contract manufacturer. Contract manufacturing allows the original equipment manufacturer to completely outsource their manufacturing process to the contract manufacturer.

Note: Work definitions for contract manufacturing are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

The contract manufacturing business flow in Oracle Manufacturing Cloud involves two types of items:

  • Contract Manufacturing Finished Good: Refers to the item that's in demand. It is the ordered item on the customer sales order. The work definition and work order in manufacturing is created for this item.

  • Contract Manufacturing Service Component: Refers to the item with which the supply is fulfilled. It is the item on the purchase order. This item is issued to the manufacturing work order as a component.

In contract manufacturing scenarios, the work definition is the source document, business object that's used internally by the Oracle Fusion Supply Chain Orchestration to create the work order and communicate with the contract manufacturer. The following figure is a quick overview of the manufacturing related business processes that are involved:

The following figure explains how the various applications are involved in completion of the contract manufacturing business flow. This diagram partially depicts the flow, starting with creation of a sales order in Order Promising and ending in creation of a purchase order in Purchasing.

Creation of a Purchase Order.

The following figure is a continuation of the previous diagram and explains the contract manufacturing business flow after a purchase order has been created in Purchasing. The flow ends with the work order completion notification sent to supply orchestration and then notifying supply availability for the service item.

Work Order Completion from a Purchase Order.

The following table summarizes key setup aspects in a contract manufacturing flow:

Setup Considerations

Define the Contract Manufacturer

Do the following:

  • Set up a supplier and supplier site for the supplier who represents the contract manufacturer.

  • Setup a manufacturing plant that represents the facility of contract manufacturer.

In the Plant Parameters page, ensure you have set the plant as a contract manufacturer with the supplier and supplier site as defined.

Grant access to the manufacturing plant modeled as the contract manufacturer

Same as that for an in-house manufacturing plant.

Define the contract manufacturing service item

Use the Contract Manufacturing Service Component item template provided in Oracle Fusion Product Information Management.

If the contract manufacturing finished goods item is a dual units of measure item, which means the Tracking Unit of Measure is set to primary and secondary, then the contract manufacturing service item should be defined as a dual units of measure item as well.

For more information about setting up items for outside processing, refer to the Implementing Contract Manufacturing chapter in the Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management Guide.

Define the contract manufacturing finished goods item and complete the item structure in Oracle Fusion Product Information Management

Use the Contract Manufacturing Finished Goods item template provided in Oracle Fusion Product Information Management.

The finished product for the contract manufacturing should be a standard product and not a configured product.

Complete the definition of the contract manufactured item by defining the item structure

Ensure that the service item is included as a component in the item structure or bill of materials. Also, ensure that the supply type of the component items is correct. For example, Supplier for the supplier provided components and Push for the OEM provided components.

Attachment categories and the related item setup in Oracle Fusion Product Information Management

Optional and is to ensure that the attachment of the work definition document is possible if used at the item definition level against the service item. In most of the scenarios, the work definition report is attached to the Blanket Purchase Agreement in Oracle Fusion Purchasing.

In order for Supply Chain Orchestration to create a work order for a Contract Manufacturing Finished Good item, a primary work definition must be defined first. The contract manufacturing work definition has a few different business rules compared to a standard item work definition. The specifics are highlighted and discussed here in more detail.

In the context of a contract manufacturing work definition operation, the following simple business rules are reinforced:

  • The contract manufacturing service item must have a supply type of Assembly Pull. It is also recommended that there is only one service component on the work definition and consumed as such on the last count point operation of the work definition.

  • All other operation items on the work definition can use the following supply types only: Phantom, Assembly Pull, or Operation Pull for Original Equipment Manufacturer provided items and Supplier for Supplier provided items.

  • Contract manufacturing isn't applicable for supplier operations.

Note: It is important that the work definition is printed as a report after the production definition is complete. This report can then be made available in the business process flow, so that it's sent as an attachment to the contract manufacturer.

While Oracle Fusion Manufacturing maintains the manufacturing process, that's the work definition, for a product; an item structure, which is maintained in the Product Information Management work area, defines the product bills of materials. It is recommended that a business keeps these two structures aligned.

Note: Processing of item structure changes to work definitions is applicable for only discrete manufacturing.

Based on the successful completion of the Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions scheduled process, the manufacturing engineer gets notified through a worklist notification of any item structure changes implemented in Product Information Management that require a manual user action. To reflect these changes in work definition, the enterprises typically implement one of the following:

  • Edit an existing work definition version to reflect these item structure changes. The exact version to update mostly depends on the time from which these changes become effective.

  • Create a new effective work definition version to implement the item structure changes. A few such scenarios would involve adding new operations for a change order implemented in Product Information Management OR for component changes that introduce a meaningful change to the production process.

The Notification Detail page provides a summary and detailed view of the item structure changes. If the component changes in the item structure were initiated due to implementation of an Engineering Change Order in Product Information Management, an attribute with the label Change Order is displayed on the page which shows the change order number and the change order line number. You can click the Impacted work definitions link to navigate to the Manage Work Definitions page, the search results of which show the pre-queried work definitions that were impacted by these changes. For item structure changes that aren't completed through an Engineering Change Order, the notification consolidates all the component changes for a given item that have occurred at the time, the Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions scheduled process was executed.

A worklist notification is generated when all the following conditions are met:

  • At least one change to the item structure components.

  • Product Information Management publishes the business events generated for item structure component changes.

  • The Process Item Structure Changes to work definitions delivered by Manufacturing picks up the business events published by Product Information Management and the scheduled process completes successfully.

  • There's at least one work definition in manufacturing referencing the item structure for which the component changes were completed in Product Information Management.

Note: If you're a manufacturing engineer but prefer not to receive the notifications, your user account must exclude the function privilege Receive Item Structure Change Notification for Work Definitions. The recommended action is to create a custom job role and assign it to users with such a need. For more information about how to create your own job roles, refer to the Security Reference for Common Features guide.

The following table summarizes the item structure component changes that are automated and those that aren't automated, and hence require a manual user action.

Item Structure Changes Standard Item ATO Model

Quantity/Inverse Quantity

Automated if the whole quantity is assigned to one operation. Not automated if the quantity is assigned to multiple operations.

Automated. The whole quantity must be assigned to one operation.

UOM

Automated if it wasn’t overridden in the work definition. Not automated if overridden.

Automated

Yield

Automated if it wasn’t overridden in the work definition. Not automated if overridden.

Automated

Basis

Automated

Automated

Optional

Not Applicable

Automated

Planning Percent

Not Applicable

Automated

Supply Type

Not Automated

Not Automated

Add a Component

Not Automated

Not Automated

Disable or End Date a Component

No user action is required. You don't need to delete the operation item.

No user action is required. You don't need to delete the operation item.

This example demonstrates how to review the worklist notification and make changes to the production process for a standard product.

Note: Synchronizing item structure changes to work definitions is applicable for only discrete manufacturing.

In this scenario, the manufacturing plant in Atlanta for Computer Service and Rentals has an effective work definition as of Aug 01 2015 to manufacture the standard item Vision Tablet. For compliance reasons, a change order ECO-2015-Tabs-204 is initiated for the Vision Tablet to add a new component SD20011, which is effective from Oct 30 2015. The change order is already Scheduled to be implemented. Another item structure change effective immediately, on Sept 01 2015, is the update to the component quantity for CM86324, from 1 to 4.

The following table lists components and their attributes for which a change order has been initiated. The table also lists the original values for each component and attribute and the corresponding updated values after the change order is approved.

Component Attribute Original Value Updated Value

CM86324

Check ATP

No

Yes

CM86324

Basis

Variable

Fixed

CR40002

Required to Ship

No

Yes

The following table summarizes key considerations in this scenario:

Consideration In this Example

You have been granted access to the manufacturing plant that's in context.

Yes

You have been granted the function privilege Receive Item Structure Change Notification for Work Definitions so as to receive the manufacturing worklist notifications.

Yes

You have successfully completed the item structure change in the Product Information Management work area.

Yes

A work definition for the item structure already exists in the manufacturing plant that's in context.

Yes

The scheduled program Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions has been successfully completed for the manufacturing plant that's in context.

Yes

After reviewing the item structure changes in the worklist notification, you decided to make the corresponding changes to the manufacturing work definitions.

Yes

As a response to the implemented item structure changes, the manufacturing engineer must perform the following tasks:

  • Review the worklist notification to identify the impacted work definitions.

  • Make the changes in the work definitions, either by creating a new work definition version or editing an existing work definition version.

Review the Worklist Notification

Let us suppose that the scheduled program Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions, which ran successfully on Sept 02 2015, finds both the eligible changes to process. That is, the changes through change order number ECO-2015- Tabs-204, and the changes completed on Sept 01 2015.
  1. Changes completed through the Change Order, ECO-2015-Tabs-204.10: The change order detail, ECO-2015-Tabs-204.10 is displayed in the notification header whereas the details section captures the newly added component SD20011 that requires a manual user action for the work definition.

  2. Changes completed with immediate effect on Sept 01 2015: CM86324 is not captured in the Notification. Since the component was assigned to a single work definition operation, the scheduled program Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions, automatically synchronizes the quantity changes.

Make Changes to the Work Definition

The manufacturing engineer decides to create a new work definition version to implement the change order ECO-2015-Tabs-204 for the Vision Tablet. The user models this change by creating a new operation and assigning the component SD20011 to it along with an operation resource, as needed.

The manufacturing engineer performs the following steps to make the necessary changes to the work definitions:

  1. On the Notification Detail page, the manufacturing engineer clicks the Impacted Work Definitions link. The Manage Work Definitions page opens in a new browser session.

  2. The manufacturing engineer clicks the prequeried work definition version for editing.

    The following table lists certain attributes for different operation items and their corresponding values assigned by the change order:

    Operation Operation Item Attribute Assigned Value

    10 (Assemble)

    CM86324

    Check ATP

    Not Applicable

    10 (Assemble)

    CM86324

    Basis

    Fixed

    10 (Assemble)

    CR40002

    Required to Ship

    Not Applicable

    Not Applicable

    SD20011

    Not Applicable

    Not Assigned

  3. There is no user action required for any of the attribute changes to the currently assigned components. Updates to the Basis and Quantity attributes for CM86324 are synchronized automatically whereas the changes to Check ATP and Required to Ship attributes are also reflected automatically, since these are not tracked in the Manufacturing Work Definition.

  4. For the newly added component SD20011, the manufacturing engineer creates a new work definition version 1.1, with an effective start date of Oct 30 2015, to add a new operation, Operation 25. The manufacturing engineer then assigns the operation items and resources for the operation.

    The following table lists certain attributes of different operation items after a new work definition is created based on the change order:

    Operation Operation Item Attribute Assigned Value

    10 (Assemble)

    CM86324

    Quantity

    4

    10 (Assemble)

    CM86324

    Check ATP

    Not Applicable

    10 (Assemble)

    CM86324

    Basis

    Fixed

    10 (Assemble)

    CR40002

    Required to Ship

    Not Applicable

    25 (Testing-Dest)

    SD20011

    Quantity

    1

  5. The manufacturing engineer clicks Save and Close.

A work definition version defines the dates for which a production process is effective. A work definition always has an effective start date, whereas the effective end date can be null. A work definition with an effective end date as null means that it's open ended and is effective.

The following table explains the predefined rules that govern the creation of a work definition version

Change Predefined Business Rule

Adding a new operation

A new version is mandatory only if the work definition being edited is currently effective, that's, the version start date is earlier than or equal to the system date.

Deleting an existing operation

A new version is mandatory only if the work definition being edited is currently effective, that's, the version start date is earlier than or equal to the system date.

Any other changes

A new version is optional. Changes to an existing version would make them applicable from the effective start date of that version.

Note: If an operation is effective across multiple work definition versions, then any changes to the operation such as adding or deleting operation items, operation outputs, or operation resources, will be applicable in the work definition versions where that operation is effective.

Create a Work Definition Version

You can use either of the following navigational flows to create a work definition version:

  • On the Manage Work Definitions page, click the Versions icon. The Manage Versions dialog box opens. Click the Add icon and a new row with pre-populated data is shown. You can modify this data as per your needs.

  • On the Edit Work Definition page, from the Actions menu, select Manage Versions.

Note: When you create a version, the current system date and time is set as the start date of the work definition version. You must ensure the correct start date before saving the version. Once saved, the start date can't be updated. Additionally, if the start date of the prior version is a future date. The default start date is Null.

Typically, upcoming production process changes are modeled by creating a future effective work definition version.

The following table lists the fields and their corresponding values which you must choose to create a work definition version:

Field Description

Version

Enter a version number to uniquely identify the work definition version.

Start Date

Date from which the work definition version becomes effective.

Edit a Work Definition Version

Once you save a version, you can't edit the Version and Start Date attributes. These are the unique identifiers of the version and hence, can't be edited. Editing a work definition version is same as explained in the Edit Work Definitions: Explained topic.

Delete a Work Definition Version

You can delete a work definition version by clicking the Version icon on the Manage Work Definitions page. You can't delete past and current effective work definition versions. You can delete a future effective version if it's not the first version created. To maintain data integrity, you can't delete a future effective version if it's referenced by work orders or used in published cost scenarios.

Automatic Work Definitions

Considerations for Generating Automatic Work Definitions

If you have an applicable manufacturing scenario in your enterprise, you can choose to have your work definitions generated automatically. For example, there are some kitting and light assembly manufacturing scenarios that require minimum shop floor control and capacity requirements planning.

Note: Automatic work definitions are applicable for only discrete manufacturing.

After the work definition is created automatically, you can use it to create a standard work order for execution.

The main advantage of creating a work order from an automatic work definition is that you do not have to manually maintain the work definition in case of item structure changes.

Automatic Work Definition Setup in the Work Definition Work Area

Some steps must be completed in the Work Definition work area before product management takes the action to create an automatic work definition.

The following are the required steps:

  • Ensure that the predefined work definition name ORA_MAIN is active. This predefined work definition name is used to create the automatic work definition.

  • Select a standard operation that is to be used in automatic work definitions by enabling the attribute Default for automatic work definition.

    When a standard operation is selected as the default, the standard operation is enforced as count point enabled. You can update the default standard operation, but there can be only one default at a given point in time.

  • Ensure that you don't create manual work definitions prior to creating an automatic work definition. When the application creates an automatic work definition, it is assigned production priority 1. If a manual work definition already exists with production priority 1, the automatic work definition creation fails.

Using Work Definitions Created Automatically

If your enterprise uses automatically created work definitions, the work definitions inherit certain specific characteristics.

They are as follows:

  • On the Manage Work Definitions page, a column attribute named automatic indicates that a work definition is created automatically.

  • You can update the production priority and costing priority, but you cannot drill down to the detailed view of the work definition.

  • You cannot search for your automatic work definitions using ADFdi.

  • You cannot print a work definition report for an automatic work definition.

If the production process changes and you require more shop floor control you can create a manual work definition to use instead. Swap the manual work definition as the primary work definition by updating its production priority to 1.

How Automatic Work Definitions Are Created

Automatic work definitions can be created using either the user interface or a scheduled process. You can access the user interface from the Product Information Management work area. You can access the scheduled process from the Create Automatic Work Definitions task in the Work Definition work area.

How Automatic Work Definitions Are Created in the User Interface

The product manager must follow these steps to create an automatic work definition:

  1. Navigate to the Product Information Management work area and select the Manage Items task.

  2. Search for the item and navigate to the Edit Item page.

  3. On the Structures tab of the Edit Items page, click the Actions menu.

  4. Select the option Create Automatic Work Definition.

    Note: The option is enabled only if the organization is set up as a manufacturing plant.
  5. Save the changes.

The product manager can create an automatic work definition for only the primary item structure of an approved standard item.

The following table lists all the values for the attributes you can find on the automatic work definition header.:

Attribute Value

Automatic

Yes

Item

Item Name

Structure Name

Primary

Structure Item Type

Standard

Serial-Tracked

Enabled if the item serial generation is set to Predefined, otherwise not enabled.

Completion Subinventory

From plant parameters

Completion Locator

From plant parameters, otherwise not defined

Work Definition Name

Main (internal name ORA_MAIN)

Version

1

Start Date

SYSDATE

End Date

Not defined

Production Priority

1

Costing Priority

Not specified

Costing Batch Output Size

From item master, otherwise not defined

Note: The action to create an automatic work definition must be performed once for each item. Changes to the item structure are synchronized automatically to the work definition.

How Automatic Work Definitions Are Created Using a Scheduled Process

You can create an automatic work definition for a set of items using Create Automatic Work Definitions scheduled process. The parameters of the scheduled process are Organization, User Item Type, Item Category, From Item, and To Item.

You can use a scheduled process to create a large number of automatic work definitions for a given user item type, or item category, or both. You can also schedule the process to run periodically so that as new items are created, automatic work definitions are subsequently created.

The Oracle Application Development Framework Desktop Integration (ADFdi) enables you to combine the third party desktop productivity applications with the Oracle web applications. So, you can use a program like Microsoft Excel as an interface to access the Oracle web application data.

Note: Managing work definitions in a spreadsheet is currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

In the Navigator, in the Tools, select the Download Desktop Integration Installer to install the desktop integration installer. After installing it, on Work Definition Overview page, in the Tasks pane, click the Manage Work Definitions in Spreadsheet link to download the worksheets. Then, you can log in and start working.

You can mass create and update the work definitions and their operations, items, and resources by using the ADFdi. There are five worksheets representing the Work Definitions and Operations, Operation Items for Standard Assemblies, Operation Items for ATO Model, Operation Items - Multilevel ATO,and Operation Resources. You can search for the work definition details based on the search criteria available in each spreadsheet. To update the data, you can overwrite the data in the search results table. After the update, an icon appears in the Changed column for each updated row. The cells that are read only fields and aren't included in the upload process. Press the Upload button when you're ready to synchronize the changes with the Oracle Fusion applications. Any data validation errors will be shown after the upload. And the success or failure of each row being uploaded is reflected in the Row Status column.

Note: The attributes Basis, Quantity, Inverse Quantity, UOM, Yield, Optional, and Planning Percent in Operation Items for ATO Model worksheet are referenced from Product Information Management and they're read-only.

During creation, you must identify the product and work definition details, and then define the sequence of the operations. You must separately build the associations between the operations and the components and resources used in each operation. During update, you must first search for the work definitions, operations, operation items, or operation resources before you can update any of the attributes. You must not run a blind report with values not specified for any of the parameters.

As a manufacturing engineer, you can use the Application Development Framework Desktop Integration (ADFdi) Operation Items - ATO Model spreadsheet to upload and download Assemble to Order (ATO) model work definitions with visibility to the first level of the model structure in order to assign items to operations.To build the operation item assignments in a multilevel Assemble to Order (ATO) model work definition, a separate spreadsheet Operation Items - Multilevel ATO tab is available.

The spreadsheet tab enables you to do the following:

  • View all the levels of the option class and phantom structures, including the hierarchy from a component to the top parent item.

  • Build the operation item assignments for an ATO model work definition and provides you the same flexibility in assigning items to operations as in the user interface.

  • Assign an item from any level in the item structure, such as child ATO model, option class, option, phantom, or mandatory component, to a work definition operation. For example, lower level components, such as options can inherit their operation assignment based on their parent's assignment, such as option class.

  • Search for ATO model work definitions and operations that use a specific material and perform a mass update, such as replacing an option that appears under different option classes.

  • Create and update the expanded levels of ATO model work definitions using the ADFdi spreadsheet enables more accurate data setups and easier change management for the work definitions of product configurations created through the Configure to Order (CTO) business process.

To assign the components to different operations the following sequence must be followed:

  1. Query based on Organization and ATO Model in Operation Items - Multilevel ATO worksheet.

  2. Review Component Hierarchy and Level in addition to other details before assigning the component.

  3. After completing the component assignments, requery based on Organization and ATO Model and check the assignment status of all components.

Tip: You can define operation applicability rules based on selected options and Transactional Item Attributes (TIA) only in the user interface.

If you have same work area, resources, work centers and standard operations defined in two organizations, you can use ADFdi to copy the work definitions from one organization to another organization. In the Work Definitions and Operations worksheet, create the work definition header and operations. Copy all the details of the organization from which you want to copy the work definition and paste them in the same worksheet. Modify the dates as required and change the organization to the organization in which you want the copied work definition. Then, upload all the details.

Caution: The standard item and Assemble to Order (ATO) model work definitions are supported in ADFdi. However, you can't create, query, or update configured item work definitions in the user interface or ADFdi. Also, you can't create Rework and Transform work definitions using ADFdi.
Note: You can upload, query, or update the descriptive flexfields details in the work definitions using ADFdi. However, while uploading or updating the descriptive flexfields in the work definitions using ADFdi, only data type validations are performed.

Using the ADFdi feature is beneficial for you in the following ways:

  • Once you have downloaded the work definition data hosted on the Oracle Manufacturing Cloud application to a spreadsheet, you can modify it even when you're disconnected from the application.

  • You can perform bulk entry and update of data with ease through a spreadsheet.

  • You can use the Microsoft Excel features, such as macros and calculation.

You can use the work definition import method to create and update work definitions through the cloud import framework using spreadsheets. You can also provide the descriptive flexfields information during the work definition import. To import discrete work definitions using the cloud import framework, you can download and use the WorkDefinitionTemplate.xlsm. The .xlsm template organizes the work definition information in these tabs:

  • Instructions and CSV Generation: The procedure to import work definitions using the .xlsm template.

  • Import Batch: The batch identifies the group of work definitions that are being imported.

  • Work Definition Headers: The work definition header information is identified uniquely by a Header Number within a batch. You can import work definitions across plants within a batch.

  • Work Definition Operations: You can optionally specify work definition operation information against the Batch Code and Header Number. For an ATO model work definition, you can define operation applicability rules for option-dependent operations only in the user interface.

  • Work Definition Operation Items - Standard Items: You can optionally specify work definition operation items information for standard items against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation Items - ATO Model: You can optionally specify work definition operation items information for ATO models against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation Resources: You can optionally specify work definition operation resources information against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation - Alternate Resources: You can optionally specify work definition operation alternate resources information against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

You can import discrete work definitions in batches using create and update modes either by providing the basic work definition header details or by providing the complete details of work definition header, operation requirements, operation item requirements, operation resource and alternate resource requirements. You can create or update discrete work definitions using the modes of import documented in the table.

Here are the modes of import you can use to create or update work definitions:

User Preference Header Action Operations Action Operation Items Action Operation Resources and Alternate Resources

To create work definition with header and a minimum of one operation

CREATE

CREATE

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

To create work definition with header and details

CREATE

CREATE

CREATE

CREATE

To update work definition

UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

You can see the successfully imported discrete work definitions as well as the errors if any, in the Schedule Process output.

Note: For more information about file-based data imports to import or update legacy and other data into Supply Chain Management Cloud from external applications, refer to the File-Based Data Import for Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Development Guide.

You can use the work definition import method to create and update work definitions through the cloud import framework using spreadsheets. You can also provide the descriptive flexfields information during the work definition import. To import process work definitions using the cloud import framework, you can download and use the ProcessWorkDefinitionTemplate.xlsm. The .xlsm template organizes the work definition information in these tabs:

  • Instructions and CSV Generation: The procedure to import work definitions using the .xlsm template.

  • Import Batch: The batch identifies the group of work definitions that are being imported.

  • Work Definition Headers: The work definition header information is identified uniquely by a Header Number within a batch. You can import work definitions across plants within a batch.

  • Work Definition Operations: You can optionally specify work definition operation information against the Batch Code and Header Number.

  • Work Definition Operation Items: You can optionally specify work definition operation items information for standard items against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation Outputs: You can specify work definition operation outputs information for products and by-products against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation Resources: You can optionally specify work definition operation resources information against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

  • Work Definition Operation - Alternate Resources: You can optionally specify work definition operation alternate resources information against the Batch Code, Header Number, and Operation Sequence.

You can import process work definitions in batches using create and update modes either by providing the basic work definition header details or by providing the complete details of work definition header, operation requirements, operation item requirements, operation resource and alternate resource requirements. You can create or update process work definitions using the modes of import documented in the table.

Here are the modes of import you can use to create or update work definitions:

User Preference Header Action Operations Action Operation Items Action Operation Resources and Alternate Resources

To create work definition with header and a minimum of one operation and a primary output

CREATE

CREATE

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

To create work definition with header and details

CREATE

CREATE

CREATE

CREATE

To update work definition

UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

CREATE, UPDATE

You can see the successfully imported process work definitions as well as the errors if any, in the Schedule Process output.

For more information about file-based data imports to import or update legacy and other data into Supply Chain Management Cloud from external applications, refer to the File-Based Data Import for Oracle Supply Chain Management Cloud Development Guide.

Note: Dual units of measure isn't supported for work definition operation items and outputs. The user can add a dual unit of measure item as an operation item or as an output item, but the secondary unit of measure and quantity aren't displayed in the work definition user interface.

You can run the Purge Records from Interface scheduled process, for interface name work definition, to remove records with status COMPLETED_ERRORS from the work definition interface tables. These records are populated through file-based data import (FBDI) or REST. In case of FBDI, they fail validations during the Import Work Definitions process, and in case of REST, they fail the REST request validations. Correcting file-based data import (FBDI) records that resulted in errors using ADFdi spreadsheet isn't supported for work definitions.

Calculation of Lead Times

Lead time represents the duration in days required to manufacture or buy an item used in manufacturing a product. Lead times of make items are calculated using the work definition. Supply chain planning uses lead times of items to plan for material requirements. The lead time calculation determines requirement dates for available-to-promise calculations in order promising.

Note: Available-to-promise calculations are currently supported for only discrete manufacturing.

The following table illustrates all the key concepts related to lead time calculation.

Attribute Description

Lead Time Lot Size

Quantity of an item used to calculate manufacturing lead times. The default lead time lot size is 1 but you can modify it to represent the typical lot size in which the item is manufactured or purchased.

Note: For process manufacturing items, the lead time lot size is considered from the expected output quantity of the standard batch size of the primary work definition

Fixed Lead Time

This represents the time to process all the manufacturing steps which are independent of the lot size of an item. You can either manually enter the fixed lead time value, or it can be calculated as part of the lead time scheduled process. It's expressed in days.

Variable Lead Time

This represents the time to process all the manufacturing steps which are dependent on the lot size. You can either manually enter the variable lead time value, or it can be calculated as part of the lead time scheduled process. It's expressed in days per unit.

Note: For process manufacturing items, the variable lead time is converted to days per unit in the item's primary unit of measure.

Processing Lead Time

The time required to make or buy an item.

  • For a make item, it represents the number of working days taken to manufacture the lot size of an item while considering the shift duration of the plant. It's calculated by summing the fixed lead time, and the variable lead time multiplied by the lot size.

    Processing lead time = Fixed lead time + (Variable lead time * lead time lot size)

  • For a buy item, it represents the time required by the supplier to supply the item. It represents the lead time from the time the purchase order is released to the time when the item is received. You must manually assign a value.

It's expressed in days.

Preprocessing Lead Time

Component of the lead time that represents the time required to release a purchase order or create a work order from the time you learn of the requirement. You can manually enter preprocessing lead time for both make and buy items. It's expressed in days.

Postprocessing Lead Time

For buy items, it's the component of the lead time that represents the time to have a buy item available in inventory from the time you receive it.

For make items, it's the lead time of activities performed after manufacturing operations are completed, but before the item is available for shipping or the next stage of the manufacturing process.

You must manually assign a value for each item. It's expressed in days.

Cumulative Manufacturing Lead Time

Total time required to make an item if you had all raw materials in stock, but had to make all subassemblies level by level. It's expressed in days.

Cumulative Total Lead Time

Total time required to make an item if no inventory existed, and you had to order all the raw materials and make all subassemblies level by level. It's expressed in days.

The manufacturing lead time calculation calculates the fixed and variable lead times in order to calculate the processing lead times. It's calculated based on the primary work definition of the item. The plant calendar shift exception and the work center resource exception aren't considered in the calculation.

The lead time percent value is calculated and updated for each operation in the primary work definition. The lead time percent represents the offset of a given operation as a percentage of the manufacturing lead time considering all operations of the work definition. These lead time percent values are used as an input in the calculation of cumulative lead times to compute the cumulative manufacturing lead time and cumulative total lead time.

In discrete manufacturing, manufacturing lead times can be computed optionally for assemble-to-order models. However, this will represent inflated lead time values for all possible configurations within that assemble-to-order model item. Manufacturing lead time calculation isn't supported for assemble-to-order configured items. The calculation of the cumulative lead times aren't supported for assemble-to-order model items and configured items

For computation of cumulative lead times, the hierarchy to roll up lead times are calculated using the primary work definitions at each level.

Note: Lead times aren't computed for items in a reference organization.

Submit the Scheduled Process to Calculate Lead Times

The following section explains the procedure to submit the scheduled process to calculate lead times.

Perform these actions to submit the scheduled process that calculates the manufacturing lead times and rolls up the cumulative manufacturing and total lead times. Based on the manufacturing lead time calculation, the lead time percent will be calculated and updated at the operation level in the primary work definition. The lead time percent will also be used as an input to calculate the cumulative manufacturing and cumulative total lead times.

  1. In the Work Definition work area, in the Tasks pane, click the Calculate Lead Times and Roll Up Cumulative Lead Times link. This will direct you to the scheduled process page.

    You can also initiate the scheduled process from the Navigator> Tools> Scheduled Processes.

  2. On the Calculate Lead Times and Roll Up Cumulative Lead Times page, you must specify certain values.

    The following table lists the fields and the corresponding values you must specify in the Parameters tab to calculate lead times:

    Field Value

    Scope

    You can specify whether you want to calculate only single-level manufacturing lead time, or only cumulative lead times, or both. The default value is Calculate Manufacturing Lead Time. Alternatively, you can choose Calculate Cumulative Lead Times or Calculate Manufacturing and Cumulative Lead Times.

    If you are running the scheduled process for the first time, or for new items, it is recommended that you first calculate the manufacturing lead times, followed by calculating the cumulative lead times. Alternatively, you can select the Calculate Manufacturing and Cumulative Lead Times option to run a combined scheduled process.

    Organization

    Select the unique code of your manufacturing plant.

    Item Catalog

    Select the item catalog which may be striped by any of the functional areas in the application.

    From Item

    Enter the name of the item that defines the start of the range of items that you want to include.

    To Item

    Enter the name of the item that defines the end of the range of items that you want to include.

    Item Category

    Select the item category that includes the items you have specified.

    Calculation Date

    Enter the date on which the lead time is to be computed for the selected items. This date should have a valid work definition version existing prior to this date.

    Planner

    Enter the planner responsible for the items. If specified, the lead time calculation is restricted to the items belonging to the specified planner.

    Include ATO Model

    Select whether or not items of the ATO model category should be included in the lead time calculation for discrete manufacturing. The default value is No.

    • If set to No: The calculation process excludes ATO model items from the manufacturing lead time calculation.

    • If set to Yes: The calculation process includes only the ATO model items in the manufacturing lead time calculation.

  3. Click Submit. A scheduled process request is submitted. Note the process request ID and click OK.

  4. Navigate to the Scheduled Processes work area.

  5. Review the progress of the submitted scheduled process. The Calculate Lead Times and Roll Up Cumulative Lead Times program will calculate the lead times based on the primary work definition and then trigger a child scheduled process called Item Import, which in turn may spawn off more child scheduled processes. Track the completion of all the scheduled processes till the status changes to Succeeded

  6. Click the Succeeded status link to view additional information. You can click the (1 more) link and open the text file which lists all details for the calculated lead times of the selected items.

After you have reviewed all calculation details, you can verify if the lead times have been correctly updated in the item. Follow these steps:

  1. In the Product Information Management work area, in the Tasks pane, select the Manage Items task.

  2. Search for the required item. Select the item corresponding to the organization you based your search on.

  3. Click the Specifications tab, and click the Planning link.

  4. In the Lead Times region, verify the values of the following lead times, depending on what was the scope of your lead time calculation when you submitted the scheduled process:

    • Processing Days

    • Fixed

    • Variable

    • Cumulative Manufacturing

    • Cumulative Total

    • Lead Time Lot Size (only for process manufactured items)

You can also search for the primary work definition and check if the lead time percent, as determined by the manufacturing lead time calculation, is updated at the operation level.

Considerations for Calculating Lead Times

When you run the Calculate Lead Times and Roll Up Cumulative Lead Times scheduled process to calculate the manufacturing lead times, cumulative total lead times, and cumulative manufacturing lead times for certain items, there are a few validations that the application performs which you must consider:

Key Considerations for Lead Time Calculation

The following points are key considerations for lead time calculations in manufacturing:

  • The application only considers the primary work definition with production priority of 1 of an item when calculating its lead times. The calculation is done considering whether the work method selected for production priority of 1 at each level is discrete manufacturing and process manufacturing.

  • The item must be set up either as a make or a buy item in the Product Information Management work area.

  • For any level in the item hierarchy, if a phantom item is encountered, then the application explodes it till no further lower-level phantoms can be exploded and the flattened list of component items are included as part of that particular level.

  • While calculating, if any of the values are not available because either you did not specify or if the scheduled process was never run previously for the manufacturing lead times, the application treats the empty values as zero.

  • If a same component is assigned more than once to different operations, the component is evaluated twice because it is consumed twice in two operations.

  • The precision of the lead time values are displayed in the output text file based on the value set in the profile Time Duration Decimal Precision. The precision of the final lead time values stored in Item definition is based on the precision set in Oracle Product Information Management.

  • For process manufacturing, manufacturing lead time calculation considers all operations of the primary work definition irrespective in which operation the output item is yielded.

  • For process manufacturing, the manufacturing lead time of the primary product is copied over to the co-product or the by-product if:

    • the co-product or by-product is within the domain of items selected in the scheduled process

    • the co-product or by-product does not have a primary work definition of its own

    • the manufacturing lead time for the co-product or by-product wasn't calculated previously in the current scheduled process.

      Once the lead time of a co-product or by-product is computed, it is not overwritten by a subsequent calculation.

  • For process manufacturing, the cumulative manufacturing lead time of the primary product is copied over to the co-product or the by-product if:

    • the co-product or by-product does not have a primary work definition of its own

    • the cumulative manufacturing lead time for the co-product or by-product wasn't calculated previously in the current scheduled process.

      Once the lead time of a co-product or by-product is computed, it is not overwritten by a subsequent calculation.

Example of How Lead Times are Calculated in Discrete Manufacturing

This topic provides you a detailed illustration of how lead times are calculated for items whose primary work definition has a work method as discrete manufacturing. The example covers the calculation logic for manufacturing lead times, cumulative total lead times, and cumulative manufacturing lead times for a simple item hierarchy.

For brief descriptions on the various types of lead times used in manufacturing, take a look at the topic Concepts Related to Lead Times Used in Manufacturing: Explained.

In this example, the total number of days as per the manufacturing calendar is 5 days, with an 8 hour shift for each work day. We are also assuming that the lot size for all items is 1 each.

In this example, we are taking a simple item hierarchy of two levels for calculation purposes. The top-level at the hierarchy is item A which is a make item. A is made up of B which is a buy item, and C which is a make item. C is again made up of item D which is a buy item.

The following table provides you the sample values of the various user-defined lead times for the two buy items, B and D that we are going to use in this example.

Item Lot Size Processing Lead Time Preprocessing Lead Time Postprocessing Lead Time

Item B

1

2

1

1

Item D

1

0

1

3

The following table provides you the sample values of the various user-defined lead times for the two make items, A and C that we are going to use in this example.

Item Lot Size Preprocessing Lead Time Postprocessing Lead Time

Item A

1

2

2

Item C

1

1

2

Manufacturing Lead Time Calculation

In this item hierarchy, there are two make items for which we need to calculate their manufacturing lead times: A and C.
  1. Let's first look at the Work Definition of Item A to determine the lead times:

    Operation Sequence Resource Basis Usage Items Assigned Lead Time Percentage

    10

    RES1

    Fixed

    8 hours

    Item B

    0

    20

    RES2

    Variable

    8 hours

    Item C

    50

  2. Fixed lead time for A: usage of the fixed resource divided by the total shift duration. In this example, that can be calculated as 8/8 = 1 day. The fixed lead time is independent of lot size.

  3. Variable lead time for A: (usage of the variable resource divided by the total shift duration)/lot size. In this example, that can be calculated as (8/8)/1 = 1 day/unit.

  4. Processing lead time for A: fixed lead time (1) + {variable lead time (1)*lot size (1)} = 2 days.

  5. The lead time percentage is calculated as the offset percentage value of the start of a given operation to the total manufacturing lead time for all the operations of the work definition. The calculated values are shown in the table.

  6. Now let's look at the Work Definition of Item C to determine the processing lead time:

    Operation Sequence Resource Basis Usage Items Assigned Lead Time Percentage

    10

    RES1

    Fixed

    8 hours

    None

    0

    20

    RES2

    Variable

    16 hours

    Item D

    33.33

  7. Fixed lead time for C: usage of the fixed resource divided by the total shift duration. In this example, that can be calculated as 8/8 = 1 day. The fixed lead time is independent of lot size.

  8. Variable lead time for C: (usage of the variable resource divided by the total shift duration)/lot size. In this example, that can be calculated as (16/8)/1 = 2 days/unit.

  9. Processing lead time for C: fixed lead time (1) + {variable lead time (2)*lot size (1)} = 3 days.

  10. The lead time percentage is calculated as the offset percentage value of the start of a given operation to the total manufacturing lead time for all the operations of the work definition. The calculated values are shown in the table.

Cumulative Manufacturing Lead Time Calculation

Now let's find out the cumulative manufacturing lead time for both the make items. For calculating the cumulative manufacturing lead times for a make item, here is the calculation logic:

Cumulative manufacturing lead time for a make item at any level= processing lead time + Maximum [0, preprocessing lead time, (cumulative manufacturing lead time - offset days)] + postprocessing lead time.

  1. The application first calculates the cumulative manufacturing lead time for the make item at the lowest level of the hierarchy and then it traverses to higher levels. First let's calculate the cumulative manufacturing lead time for Item C.

    For Item C, the processing lead time is 3 days. The maximum would be 1 the preprocessing lead time is 1 and because there is no make item below C in the item hierarchy. The postprocessing lead time is 2 days, as defined by the user. Therefore, the cumulative manufacturing lead time is calculated as 3 + 1 + 2= 6 days.

  2. For Item A, the processing lead time is 2 days. Item C is the only make item under A and is used in operation 20, which has an lead time percent of 50% causing the offset to be 0.5 * 2 = 1 day. The maximum therefore would be cumulative manufacturing lead time of Item C minus the offset days , which is 6 - 1 = 5 days. The postprocessing lead time is 2 days, as defined by the user. Therefore, the cumulative manufacturing lead time is calculated as 2 + Maximum [0, 2, (6-1)] + 2 = 2 + 5 + 2 = 9 days.

Cumulative Total Lead Time Calculation

  1. First let's calculate the cumulative total lead time for the buy items B and D using this formula:

    Preprocessing lead time + processing lead time + postprocessing lead time.

    Here are the lead times for items B and D, defined in their work definitions.

    Item Processing Lead Time Preprocessing Lead Time Postprocessing Lead Time

    Item B

    2

    1

    1

    Item D

    0

    1

    3

    For item B, the cumulative total lead time is 2 + 1 + 1 = 4 days.

    For item D, the cumulative total lead time is 0 + 1 + 3 = 4 days.

  2. Now let us calculate the cumulative total lead time for both the make items, A and C. For calculating the cumulative total lead time calculation for a make item, here is the calculation logic:

    Cumulative total lead time of a make item at any level = processing lead time + maximum [0, preprocessing lead time, (cumulative total lead time - offset days) for any make or buy component] + postprocessing lead time

    For item C, the processing lead time is 3 days. The preprocessing lead time is 1 day, as defined by the user. The number of offset days is 1 because the component D is required at the end of day 1. The cumulative total lead time is 4 days as derived from the cumulative total lead time for the buy item component item D. The postprocessing lead time is 2 days, as defined by the user. Therefore, the cumulative manufacturing lead time is calculated as 3 + Maximum [ 0, 1, (4-1) ] + 2 = 3+3+2 = 8 days.

    For item A, the processing lead time is 2 days. The preprocessing lead time is 2 days as defined by the user. The number of offset days is 0 for component B as it's required on the first day itself, and 1 for component C because it's required at the end of day 1. The cumulative total lead time is 4 days as derived from the cumulative total lead time for the item component B, and 7 days as derived from the cumulative total lead time of the item component C. The postprocessing lead time is 2 days, as defined by the user. Therefore, the cumulative manufacturing lead time is calculated as 2 + Maximum [ 0, 2, (4-0), (8-1)] + 2 = 2+7+2 = 11 days.

  3. Based on all the calculations and derivations, here's a final summary of all the lead time values:

    Item Type Lot Size Fixed Lead Time Variable Lead Time Processing Lead Time Preprocessing Lead Time Postprocessing Lead Time Cumulative Manufacturing Lead Time Cumulative Total Lead Time

    Item A

    Make

    1

    1

    1

    2

    2

    2

    9

    11

    Item B

    Buy

    1

    Not applicable

    Not applicable

    2

    1

    1

    Not applicable

    4

    Item C

    Make

    1

    1

    2

    3

    1

    2

    6

    8

    Item D

    Buy

    1

    Not applicable

    Not applicable

    0

    1

    3

    Not applicable

    4

Example of Calculation of Process Manufacturing Lead Times

This topic provides you a detailed illustration of how lead times are calculated for for items whose primary work definition has a work method as process manufacturing. The example covers the calculation logic for manufacturing lead times. The cumulative total lead times and cumulative manufacturing lead times follows the same logic as the example for discrete manufacturing.

For brief descriptions on the various types of lead times used in manufacturing, take a look at the topic Concepts Related to Lead Times Used in Manufacturing: Explained.

In this example, we are taking a simple item hierarchy of two levels for calculation purposes. The top-level at the hierarchy is item A which is a make item and the primary output of the work definition. A1 is a co-product yielded from the same work definition. A is made up of C, which is a buy item, and B, which is a make item. In the work definition of B, B is the primary output item and B1 is a by-product. B is made up of items D and E, both of which are buy items.

Manufacturing Lead Time Calculation

In this item hierarchy, there are two make items for which we need to calculate their manufacturing lead times: A and B. We will copy the calculated manufacturing lead times to the co-product and by-product: A1 and B1. For item A, the primary UOM is drums, where 1 drum = 10 Liters and for item A1, the primary UOM is Dz. For items B and B1, the primary UOM is Liters.
  1. Let's first look at the work definition of Item A. The standard batch size of the work definition is 100 Ga, in which 70 Liters of item A and 30 Ea of item A1 are expected to be yielded.

    Operation Sequence Output Items Input Items Resource Usage Lead Time Percentage

    10

    N/A

    N/A

    Resource: RES 1

    Basis type: Fixed

    Usage: 1

    UOM: Days

    0

    20

    Item: A1

    Quantity: 30

    UOM: Ea

    Item: B

    Quantity: 50

    UOM: Liters

    Resource: RES 2

    Basis type: Variable

    Usage: 1

    UOM: Days

    33

    30

    Item: A

    Quantity: 70

    UOM: Liters

    Item: C

    Quantity: 50

    UOM: Ea

    Resource: RES 3

    Basis type: Variable

    Usage: 1

    UOM: Days

    66

  2. Fixed lead time for A: The fixed lead time is independent of lot size. In this example, it is 1 day.

  3. Variable lead time for A: Since the basis type is variable, it takes 1+1 = 2 days to manufacture 70 Liters of A, which is 7 drums (as 1 drum = 10 Liters), the variable lead time is 2/7 = 0.2857 days/drum.

  4. Lot size for A: The lot size for process manufacturing items is determined from the primary work definition. In this example, the primary work definition yields 70 Liters of item A. However since the primary UOM is drums, the lot size is updated as 7 drums.

  5. Processing lead time for A: fixed lead time (1) + {variable lead time (0.2857)*lot size (7)} = 3 days.

  6. The lead time percentage is calculated as the offset percentage value of the start of a given operation to the total manufacturing lead time for all the operations of the work definition. The calculated values are shown in the table.

  7. Let us now calculate the manufacturing lead time of the co-product A1.

  8. Fixed lead time A1: The fixed lead time is copied over from A, which is 1 day.

  9. Variable lead time for A1: The variable lead time of 2 days is copied over to and restated considering the primary unit of measure of item A1. The primary work definition is expected to yield 30 Ea, which when restated in primary UOM is 2.5 Dz (1 Dz = 12 Ea). So the variable lead time is 2/2.5 = 0.8 days/Ea.

  10. Lot size for A1: The lot size for process manufacturing items is determined from the primary work definition. In this example, the primary work definition yields 30 Ea of item A1. However since the primary UOM is Dz, the lot size is updated as 2.5 Dz..

  11. Processing lead time for A1: The processing lead time is copied from A, which is 3 days

  12. Now, let us look at the work definition of item B to determine the processing lead time:

    Operation Sequence Output Items Input Items Resource Usage Lead Time Percentage

    10

    Item: B1

    Quantity: 40

    UOM: Liters

    Item: D

    Quantity: 80

    UOM: Liters

    Resource: RES 1

    Basis type: Fixed

    Usage: 2

    UOM: Days

    0

    20

    N/A

    N/A

    Resource: RES 2

    Basis type: Variable

    Usage: 1

    UOM: Days

    40

    30

    Item: B

    Quantity: 60

    UOM: Liters

    Item: E

    Quantity: 20

    UOM: Liters

    Resource: RES 3

    Basis type: Variable

    Usage: 2

    UOM: Days

    60

  13. Fixed lead time for B: The fixed lead time is independent of lot size. In this example, it is 2 days.

  14. Variable lead time for B: Since the basis type is variable, it takes 2+1 = 3 days to manufacture 60 Liters of B, the variable lead time is 3/60 = 0.05 days/Liter.

  15. Lot size for B: The lot size for process manufacturing items is determined from the primary work definition. In this example, the primary work definition yields 60 Liters of item B.

  16. Processing lead time for B: fixed lead time (2) + {variable lead time (0.05)*lot size (60)} = 5 days.

  17. The lead time percentage is calculated as the offset percentage value of the start of a given operation to the total manufacturing lead time for all the operations of the work definition. The calculated values are shown in the table.

  18. Let us now calculate the manufacturing lead time of the by-product B1.

  19. Fixed lead time B1: The fixed lead time is copied over from A, which is 2 days.

  20. Variable lead time for B1: The variable lead time of 3 days is copied over to and stated in the primary unit of measure of item B1. The primary work definition is expected to yield 40 Liters, So, the variable lead time is 3/40 = 0..075 days/Liter.

  21. Lot size for B1: The lot size for process manufacturing items is determined from the primary work definition. In this example, the primary work definition yields 40 Liters of item B1.

  22. Processing lead time for B1: The processing lead time is copied from B, which is 5 days

Overview of Electronic Signatures and Electronic Records for Work Definition Management

Oracle Electronic Records and Electronic Signatures is a framework you can configure for securely capturing, storing, retrieving, and printing electronic records and signatures. Using this framework, you can review electronic records for work definitions and capture electronic signatures.

A work definition is available for use in production after the first version for that work definition is in Approved status. A work definition version that is not in Approved status is not available for creating a work order or be used in Planning or Costing. When you submit a work definition version for approval, the process of generating electronic records is initiated. The Submit action is available after creating and updating a work definition version. Note that you cannot update an existing approved version.

Note: You cannot initiate the Electronic Records and Electronic Signatures process when you create or update a work definition through the ADF desktop integration (ADFdi) or the supported web services.

To capture electronic signatures and generate electronic records for work definition management in an organization, you need to set up the following:

  • Enable Manufacturing Work Definition Management for the Organization. Follow these steps:

    1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

      • Offering: Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management

      • Functional Area: Facilities

      • Task: Configure Electronic Signature Preferences

    2. Enable the E-Signature for the Work Definition Management transaction.

    Note: You cannot disable E-Signatures for work definitions when one or more work definition versions exist in draft or pending approval status.
  • Configure the Business Process Rules to Determine the Approvers for Work Definition Management. Follow these steps:

    1. In the Setup and Maintenance work area, go to the following:

      • Offering: Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management

      • Functional Area: Facilities

      • Task: Manage Task Configurations for Supply Chain Management

    2. Define approval rules for Work Definition Management.

Note: For more information about implementing E-Signatures and generating E-Records, refer to the Implementing E-Signatures and E-Records chapter of the Oracle SCM Cloud Implementing Manufacturing and Supply Chain Materials Management guide.

How You Capture E-Signatures and Generate E-Records for Standard Operation Management

You can enable the ability to capture electronic signatures and generate electronic records for work definition creation, and work definition update.

The electronic record that you automatically generate for a work definition has the following information:

  • Work Definition Details

  • Attachment Details

  • Operation Details

  • Operation Item Details

  • Operation Output Details, for a process work definition

  • Substitute Details for an Operation Item, for a discrete work definition

  • Operation Resource Details

  • Alternate Resource Details for an Operation Resource

After you enable electronic signatures for a manufacturing work definition, the created work definition has a version in Draft status. You can continue to save changes to a Draft work definition version.

Work definition version status works simultaneously with the workflow for the deferred approval and can have one of the following statuses:

  • Draft

  • Pending Approval

  • Approved

You can initiate the deferred electronic signature capture process when you submit the work definition for approval. Approvers can access notifications in the Oracle Cloud application. They can review the electronic records before adding their electronic signature. Approvers can also enter comments, indicate their approval or rejection, and sign the electronic record by using a password. Approvers also have the visibility to the current status of the approval process in the approval History region in the approval workflow notification. Electronic records are generated and the electronic signatures are captured during this approval process. The work definition version is updated as Approved for an approved outcome and Draft for a rejected outcome.

The behavior for the work definition operations, operation materials and resources for an approved work definition version is the same as the work definition that is pending approval. The only exceptions are when:

  • Further changes can be made by creating a new work definition version.

  • Work definition priorities can be changed without requiring a new electronic signature.

  • In the case of a discrete work definition, the item structure component changes approved and completed in the Oracle Fusion Product Model are processed by the Process Item Structure Changes to Work Definitions scheduled process.

A new work definition version and any changes introduced including the deletion of any operations go through the same electronic signature process. The deleted operation or any changes are only available for use in production after these are approved.

You can search and retrieve electronic records in the electronic records work area using multiple search criteria like the contents of the report title, the transaction type, organization, signed date, and status. The electronic records are stored in secured document repository and cannot be modified or deleted. Oracle E-Signatures and E-Records store both the approved and rejected records.

Note: For more information about capturing E-Signatures and generating E-Records, refer to the Oracle SCM Cloud Using E-Signatures and E-Records guide.

Signature History

You can enable the ability to capture electronic signatures and generate electronic records for work definition creation and work definition update.