Chapter 4 Technology Preview

The following features of Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager are currently still under development, but are made available for testing and evaluation purposes:

Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

  • Automate configuring of Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager using the Ansible roles provided in the ovirt-ansible-roles package.

  • Data warehouse service and history database and engine database installation or migration to a separate host.

  • Full sampling scale for data warehouse.

  • Dashboard migration to a separate host.

  • Additional functionality to the Admin Portal through custom user interface plugins.

  • External providers that provide external resources to Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

  • The ovirt-engine-rename command (the oVirt Engine Rename Tool) changes the fully qualified DNS name of Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

  • The engine-config command (the Engine Configuration Tool) changes to global configuration settings for Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

  • USB Filter Editor used to create the usbfilter.txt policy file for filtering USB devices on Windows client devices.

  • Quotas and service level agreements to control access to resources.

  • Custom hooks to extend the functionality of the host agent (VDSM).

    Configuring additional internal local user domains for Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

  • External directory server apart from Active Directory and OpenLDAP Standard Schema (options 3 and 9 when you use the ovirt-engine-extension-aaa-ldap-setup command).

  • Users log in automatically to the Administration Portal or VM Portal using the credentials obtained from a Kerberos or LDAP server (single sign-on).

  • moVirt Android client for the Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

Compute

  • Data center or cluster with compatibility version 4.2 or previous.

  • CPU quality of service (QoS) entries to control the amount processing capability virtual machines can access on hosts.

  • Trusted compute pools to deploy virtual machines on clusters that use Intel Trusted Execution Technology (Intel TXT).

  • Existing Gluster storage cluster.

  • GPU passthrough that attaches host GPUs directly to virtual machines.

Network

  • Host network interfaces configured to use ethtool or Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) custom properties.

  • PCI network cards attached directly to virtual machines (PCI passthrough or SR-IOV).

  • Network bonds that use bond modes 0 (round-robin policy), 2 (XOR policy), 3 (broadcast policy), and 5 (adaptive transmit load balancing policy).

  • Host quality of service entries that to control the bandwidth a logical network uses on a physical interface.

  • Virtual machine quality of service entries to control to the input/output of VNICs.

  • External network providers, including the Open Virtual network (OVN) provider.

  • Network security groups provided by the OpenStack Neutron service.

  • Networks and interfaces managed with the Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS).

Storage

  • Wipe after delete functionality to zero out used blocks in virtual disks.

  • Storage quality of service (QoS) entries to control the maximum throughput and I/O operations for virtual disks in a storage domain.

  • Disk profiles to define the maximum throughput and I/O for virtual disks in a storage domain.

Virtual Machines (Guests)

  • Seal and automate the initialization of Windows guests using sysprep.

  • Automatic installs of guest additions in Windows guests using the Application Provisioning Tool (APT).

  • User log in automatically to virtual machines using their Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager credentials (single sign-on).

  • User log in automatically to virtual machines using the credentials obtained from a Kerberos or LDAP server (single sign-on).

  • Host devices directly attached to virtual machines, including SCSI devices such as disks, PCI devices such as NICs and GPUs, and USB devices such as webcams (passthrough or SR-IOV).

  • Virtual machine authentication using smart cards on client devices (smart card authentication).

  • Multiple displays with virtual machines.

  • Remote access to USB devices on Windows client devices using the usbdk driver (USB redirection).

  • Virtual NUMA nodes configured on virtual machines and pinned them to NUMA nodes on a physical host.

  • SAP monitoring in virtual machines enabled through the Administration Portal.