2 Logdump Commands

This chapter contains an alphabetical reference for syntax and usage of the Logdump utility commands.

For Logdump usage instructions, see Chapter 1, "Using the Logdump Utility."

2.1 Logdump Command Summary

The following are category summaries of the Logdump commands.

Table 2-1 Working with Files

Commands Description

CD

Sets the default directory, volume or subvolume.

DATAFILE

Opens an Enscribe file from within Logdump.

 

LOG

Writes a session log.

NEXTTRAIL

Closes the current file and opens the next file in the trail sequence.

OPEN

Opens a trail file or extract file.

POSITION

Sets the read position in the file.

SAVE

Writes record data to another file.

WRITELOG

Writes text to a session log.

VOLUME

Sets the default directory, volume or subvolume.


Table 2-2 Viewing Information

Command Description

BULKIOSTATS

Displays bulk I/O statistics.

COUNT

Displays record count information.

FILES

Displays file names in the current directory or subvolume.

ENV

Displays current Logdump settings.

FILEHEADER

Displays file header information.

 
 

NOTIFY

Displays the number of records scanned, the trail position, and the record timestamp at specified intervals when using COUNT and records are being suppressed from display through filtering options.

SHOW

Displays internal information such as the current Logdump environment, a list of Oracle GoldenGate record types, and current filter settings.

TIME

Displays the current time in local and GMT formats.


Table 2-3 Selecting Data and Records

Command Description

BEGIN

Searches through a TMF or Oracle GoldenGate trail to locate a record at or near the specified time.

ARGETNONDATACHANGES | ARSTOPNONDATACHANGES

Includes or excludes records that did not result in a change to the database.

DUMP

Displays the specified number of bytes of data from the current position in the file.

FILTER

Filters the display of records.

NEXT

Displays the next record(s) in the file.

SCANFORENDTRANS

Finds a record that is the last record of, or the only record in, a transaction, and then displays the first record of the next transaction.

SCANFORHEADER

Finds the start of the next record header.

SCANFORRBA

Finds a specific relative byte address.

SCANFORTIME

Finds the next record with a specific timestamp.

SCANFORTYPE

Finds the next record of a specific type.

SKIP

Skips a specified number of records.

TMFBEFOREIMAGE

Sets the TMFARLIB to fetch the before image of a record and display it with the after image.


Table 2-4 Caking Conversions

Command Description

CALCTLFKEY

Calculates a unique key for TLF/PTLF records in ACI's BASE24 application.

COMPUTETIMESTAMP

Converts a datetime string to a Julian timestamp.

CTIME

Converts a C timestamp to an ASCII timestamp.

DECRYPT

Decrypts data before displaying it in Logdump.

ENCRYPT

Encrypts file data.

ESBLOCK

Displays NonStop entry-sequenced syskeys as a block number and record number.

FLOAT

Displays a number or hex string as a hex representation and a floating point number.

INTERPRETINTERVAL

Displays a 64-bit Julian interval as dd-hh:mm:ss:ms:us.

INTERPRETTIMESTAMP

Displays a 64-bit Julian timestamp in ASCII format.


Table 2-5 Controlling the Logdump Environment

Command Description

ASCIIDATA | EBCDICDATA

Controls whether data is displayed in ASCII or EBCDIC format on an IBM mainframe.

ASCIIDUMP | EBCDICDUMP

Sets the character set on an IBM mainframe.

ASCIIHEADER | EBCDICHEADER

Controls whether the table name is displayed in ASCII or EBCDIC format on an IBM mainframe.

DETAIL

Controls the display of detailed record information.

 

GGSTOKEN

Controls the display of automatically generated token data.

GHDR

Controls the display of header information.

HEADERTOKEN

Controls the display of header token indicators.

RECLEN

Sets the maximum data output length.

SCANSCROLLING

Controls whether a count notification displays on one line or multiple lines.

TIMEOFFSET

Sets the time offset from GMT.

TMFBEFOREIMAGE

Controls whether or not the before image is displayed for update operations from TMF audit.

TMFGETRECADDR | NOTMFGETRECADDR

Controls Logdump's ability to call the ARGETRECADDR() function of TMFARLIB.

TMFIGNORERECCOUNT

Sets the number of records that the TMFARLIB can ignore before returning a CURRENTPOSITION record.

TRAILFORMAT

Sets the trail format to the old version (pre-Oracle GoldenGate 6.0) or the new version.

TRANSBYTELIMIT

Sets a byte-count threshold for what is defined as a normal-sized transaction.

TRANSHIST

Sets the size of the transaction history table that is used for tracking transaction size.

TRANSRECLIMIT

Sets a record-count threshold for what is defined as a normal-sized transaction.

USERTOKEN

Controls the display of user token data.


Table 2-6 Miscellaneous Commands

Command Description
 

EXIT

Exits Logdump.

FC

Edits a previous command.

HELP

Shows syntax for Logdump commands.

HISTORY

Lists previously issued commands.

OBEY

Executes a series of commands stored in a file.

X

Executes a program from within Logdump.


ARGETNONDATACHANGES | ARSTOPNONDATACHANGES

Use ARGETNONDATACHANGES and ARSTOPNONDATACHANGES when reading TMF trails to direct TMFARLIB to include or exclude records that did not result in a change to the database.

Default

ARGETNONDATACHANGES

Syntax

ARGETNONDATACHANGES | ARSTOPNONDATACHANGES
ARGETNONDATACHANGES

Includes non-change records.

ARSTOPNONDATACHANGES

Suppresses non-change records.

ASCIIDATA | EBCDICDATA

Use ASCIIDATA or EBCDICDATA to control whether record data is displayed in ASCII or EBCDIC format on an IBM mainframe. You may need to use the ASCIIDUMP command to set the character set first.

Default

ASCIIDATA ON (same as EBCDICDATA OFF)

Syntax

ASCIIDATA {ON | OFF} | EBCDICDATA {ON | OFF}

ASCIIDUMP | EBCDICDUMP

Use ASCIIDUMP or EBCDICDUMP to set the character set for the output of the DUMP command on an IBM mainframe. The hex part of the dump display is not affected by this command.

Default

ASCIIDUMP ON (same as EBCDICDUMP OFF)

Syntax

ASCIIDUMP {ON | OFF} | EBCDICDUMP {ON | OFF}

ASCIIHEADER | EBCDICHEADER

Use ASCIIHEADER or EBCDICHEADER to control whether or not the table name in the record header is in ASCII or EBCDIC format on an IBM mainframe. You may need to use the ASCIIDUMP command to set the character set first.

Default

ASCIIHEADER ON (same as EBCDICHEADER OFF)

Syntax

ASCIIHEADER {ON | OFF} | EBCDICHEADER {ON | OFF}

BEGIN

Use BEGIN to do a binary search through a TMF or Oracle GoldenGate trail to locate a record at or near the specified time.

Default

None

Syntax

BEGIN timestamp
timestamp

The timestamp for which to search.

BULKIOSTATS

Use BULKIOSTATS to display statistics for bulk I/O records, including the number of physical and logical reads and current and average read times.

Default

None

Syntax

BULKIOSTATS

CALCTLFKEY

Use CALCTLFKEY to work around the @GETENV ("TLFKEY", SYSKEY "unique_key)" function when it generates duplicate keys. The TLFKEY option associates a unique key with TLF/PTLF records in ACI's BASE24 application. CALCTLFKEY performs the calculation and displays the value for each record.

Without an argument, CALCTLFKEY displays whether this feature is enabled or disabled.

Default

OFF

Syntax

CALCTLFKEY {ON | OFF}

CD

Use CD to set the default directory, volume, or subvolume. An alias for this command is VOLUME.

Default

None

Syntax

CD {directory | volume | subvolume}

COMPUTETIMESTAMP

Use COMPUTETIMESTAMP to convert a datetime string to Julian format.

Default

None

Syntax

COMPUTETIMESTAMP string
string

A datetime string in the format of:

[[yy]yy-mm-dd] [hh[:mm][:ss]]

Example

COMPUTETIMESTAMP 2005-01-01 12:00:00

This example returns the following:

2005-01-01 12:00:00 is JulianTimestamp 211971340800000000

COUNT

Use COUNT to produce a record count summary and other information related to the amount of data in the file. The basic output, without options, shows the following:

  • The RBA where the count began

  • The number of records in the file

  • The total data bytes and average bytes per record

  • Information about the operation types

  • Information about the transactions

When the DETAIL command is issued prior to issuing COUNT, the information includes a count for each table or data file. COUNT options allow you to show table detail without using the DETAIL command first, set a start and end time for the count, filter the count for a table, data file, trail file, or extract file, and specify a time interval for counts. You can use the DETAIL OFF command to turn off the collection of this detailed information.

For arguments that take a time string, use the following format:

[[yy]yy-mm-dd] [hh[:mm][:ss]]

Default

Produce a count summary of all records.

Syntax

COUNT
[, DETAIL]
[, END[TIME] time_string]
[, FILE specification]
[, INT[ERVAL] minutes]
[, LOG] wildcard]
[, START[TIME] time_string]
DETAIL

Adds a count for each table or data file that was processed by Extract to the summary count. The information includes the total and average number of data bytes and information about the operations that were performed. This data can also be obtained by using the DETAIL command before issuing COUNT.

END[TIME] time_string

Stops the count with the last record written at the specified time.

FILE specification

Specifies the count to be generated for the specified table or data file or group of names designated with a wildcard (*).

INT[ERVAL] minutes

Displays statistics for total bytes, average bytes, and number of each type of operation that occurred within a specified interval of time, in minutes. Then it displays the totals for those statistics.

LOG wildcard

Produces a count for multiple trail or extract files specified with a wildcard.

START[TIME] time_string

Begins the count with the first record written at the specified time.

Examples

Example 1   

COUNT START 2011-01-11 12:00:00 , END 2011-01-12 12:00:00
Example 2   

COUNT INTERVAL 4

This displays something similar to the following. Individual table or data file count has been truncated due to space constraints.

On Windows or UNIX (file names will differ):

Interval from 2011/02/28 11:30:00.000 to 2011/02/28 11:34:00.000, 
Recs                             3
Total Data Bytes               120
  Avg Bytes/Record              40
Delete                           3
Before Images                    3
LogTrail /home/ggs/dirdat/rt000000 has 304 records
Total Data Bytes             12120
Avg Bytes/Record                39
Delete                           3
Insert                         300
FieldComp                        1
Before Images                    3
After Images                   301

Average of 303 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....           88
    Records/Trans ...            1
    Files/Trans .....            1
HR.JOBS                                            Partition 4
Total Data Bytes              5911
  Avg Bytes/Record              68
Insert                          86
After Images                    86

HR.REGIONS                                         Partition 4
Total Data Bytes               512
  Avg Bytes/Record              32
Insert                          16
After Images                    16

On NonStop:

LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000 has 29656 records
Total Data Bytes           3561022
  Avg Bytes/Record             120
Delete                          50
Insert                       21221
Update                        8379
GSSPurgedata                     6
Before Images                   50
After Images                 29606

Average of 3621 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....       1376
    Records/Trans ...          8
    Files/Trans .....          1

\GGQA.$QA01.QAESRC.ACCTS                          Partition 0
Total Data Bytes            286414
  Avg Bytes/Record             142
Delete                          17
Insert                        2000
Before Images                   17
After Images                  2000

\GGQA.$QA01.QAESRC.ACCTN                          Partition 0
Total Data Bytes            281700
  Avg Bytes/Record             100
Delete                          17
Insert                        2000
Update                         800
Before Images                   17
After Images                  2800
Example 3   

COUNT LOG ls* 

This produces a count for all files whose names begin with LS. (Individual table or data file count has been truncated due to space constraints.)

On NonStop:

Current LogTrail is \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000
Bad record found at RBA 5287, format 5.50)
 2A56 623F                                         | *Vb?
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000 has 33 records
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000 closed
Current LogTrail is \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000001
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000001 has 99 records
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000001 closed
Current LogTrail is \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000002
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000002 has 0 records
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000002 closed
Current LogTrail is \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000003
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000003 has 0 records
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000003 closed
LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS* has 132 records

Total Data Bytes              9468
  Avg Bytes/Record              71
Insert                         132
After Images                   132

Average of 4 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....         3951
    Records/Trans ...           33
    Files/Trans .....            3

QAHRTS.JOBS                                            Partition 4
Total Data Bytes              5220
  Avg Bytes/Record              68
Insert                          76
After Images
                    76

On Windows or UNIX (file names will differ):

Current LogTrail is c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000000
Bad record found at RBA 5287, format 5.50)
 2A56 623F                                         | *Vb?
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000000 has 33 records
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000000 closed
Current LogTrail is c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000001
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000001 has 99 records
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000001 closed
Current LogTrail is c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000002
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000002 has 0 records
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000002 closed
Current LogTrail is c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000003
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000003 has 0 records
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls000003 closed
LogTrail c:\goldengate802\dirdat\ls* has 132 records

Total Data Bytes              9468
  Avg Bytes/Record              71
Insert                         132
After Images                   132

Average of 4 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....       3951
    Records/Trans ...         33
    Files/Trans .....          3

HR.JOBS                                            Partition 4
Total Data Bytes              5220
  Avg Bytes/Record              68
Insert                          76
After Images                    76
Example 4   
COUNT DETAIL

This produces something similar to the following:

On Windows or UNIX (file names will differ):

LogTrail /home/ggs/dirdat/rt000000 has 304 records
Total Data Bytes             12120
  Avg Bytes/Record              39
Delete                           3
Insert                         300
FieldComp                        1
Before Images                    3
After Images                   301

Average of 303 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....         88
    Records/Trans ...          1
    Files/Trans .....          1

GGS.TCUSTMER                                  Partition 4
Total Data Bytes             12120
  Avg Bytes/Record              39
Delete                           3
Insert                         300
FieldComp                        1
Before Images                    3
After Images                   301

Files      1, Coll      0, Chain      0

On NonStop:

LogTrail \GGQA.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000 has 29656 records
Total Data Bytes           3561022
  Avg Bytes/Record             120
Delete                          50
Insert                       21221
Update                        8379
GSSPurgedata                     6
Before Images                   50
After Images                 29606

Average of 3621 Transactions
    Bytes/Trans .....       1376
    Records/Trans ...          8
    Files/Trans .....          1

\GGQA.$QA01.QAESRC.ACCTS                          Partition 0
Total Data Bytes            286414
  Avg Bytes/Record             142
Delete                          17
Insert                        2000
Before Images                   17
After Images                  2000

CTIME

Use CTIME to convert a C timestamp to an ASCII timestamp.

Default

None

Syntax

CTIME C_timestamp_string

Example

CTIME 1109823330

This returns the following:

timestamp  = 1109823330 (0x42268f62)
localtime  = Wed Mar  2 20:15:30 2005
gmtime     = Thu Mar  3 04:15:30 2005

DATAFILE

Use DATAFILE to open an Enscribe data file from within Logdump

Note:

You can use the WRITEREC command to write a Oracle GoldenGate record to the Enscribe file.

Default

None

Syntax

DATAFILE file

Example

DATAFILE \SYSA.$DATA04.SALES.CUSTMER

DECRYPT

Use DECRYPT to decrypt data that was encrypted with Oracle GoldenGate trail encryption, so that it can be viewed with Logdump.

Default

OFF

Syntax

DECRYPT {OFF | ON [KEYNAME key_name]}
OFF

No decryption. This is the default.

ON [KEYNAME key_name]
  • ON without the KEYNAME clause decrypts data that was encrypted with the ENCRYPTTRAIL parameter without options (256-key byte substitution).

  • ON with the KEYNAME clause decrypts data that was encrypted with ENCRYPTTRAIL using an AES algorithm and a KEYNAME clause. For key_name, supply the logical name of the encryption key that was used in the KEYNAME keyname clause of ENCRYPTTRAIL.

    For more information about ENCRYPTTRAIL, see Reference for Oracle GoldenGate for Windows and UNIX.

Example

DECRYPT ON

Example

DECRYPT ON KEYNAME mykey

DETAIL

Use DETAIL to include additional information in the Logdump output. By default, Logdump only shows the hex and ASCII representation of the record.

Without options, DETAIL displays the status of record detail (ON or OFF). Options do the following:

  • DETAIL ON displays a list of columns that includes the column ID, length, and value in hex and ASCII.

  • DATA adds hex and ASCII data values to the column list.

  • DETAIL OFF turns off detailed display; OFF is the default.

DETAIL can be shortened to DET.

Default

Display a column list

Syntax

DETAIL {ON | OFF | DATA}
ON

Shows detailed column information.

OFF

Suppresses detailed column information.

DATA

Adds the hex and ASCII data values to the column information.

DUMP

Use DUMP to display a HEX/ASCII or HEX/EBCDIC dump of the specified number of bytes from the open trail or extract file, starting at the current RBA.

DUMP does not work when reading TMF audit trails, because I/O to the TMF trails is done by TMFARLIB.

Default

256

Syntax

DUMP bytes
bytes

The number of bytes forward to display. Valid values are from 1 through 28672.

Example

DUMP 300

This produces something similar to the following example. Note: This example shows only a few lines of the record.

Dump   300  Bytes at RBA 0
 4700 0047 4800 003B 4500 0041 0000 646D 02F1 3387 | G..GH..;E..A..dm..3.
 841D FE98 0000 0000 0000 0000 5EA8 DC3C 0352 0000 | ............^..<.R..
 0000 5C54 5249 4C4C 2E24 5141 3031 2E51 4153 5243 | ..\TRILL.$QA01.QASRC
 2E41 4343 544E 005A 0000 4747 0000 4748 0000 3B45 | .ACCTN.Z..GG..GH..;E

ENCRYPT

Use ENCRYPT to encrypt text supplied as an argument. The encryption method is 256-key byte substitution. The results are printed to screen.

Default

None

Syntax

ENCRYPT text

Example

ENCRYPT 123456789

This produces the following:

Before
 3132 3334 3536 3738 39 | 123456789
After
 EF2E C1DC E4A7 68B4 14 | ......h..

ENV

Use ENV to show current Logdump settings.

Default

None

Syntax

ENV

Example

The following shows typical ENV settings on Windows and on NonStop.

Windows (UNIX is similar except for file names):

Current Volume          : C:\GoldenGate 002
LogTrail                : C:\goldengate002\dirdat\jd000001
Trail Format            : New
End of File             : 15861
Current Position        : 0
Next Position           : 0
Last Modtime            : 2013/01/01 13:45:51.000.000
Display RecLen          : 140
Logtrail Filter         : On
Show Ghdr               : On
Detail                  : On
Trans History           : 0 Transactions, Records 100, Bytes 100000
LargeBlock I/O          : On, Blocksize 57344
Local System            : Little Endian
Logtrail Data           : Big Endian/ASCII
Logtrail Headers        : ASCII
Dump                    : ASCII
Timeoffset              : LOCAL
Scan Notify Interval    : 10000 records, Scrolling On

NonStop:

Current Volume          : $QU01.QAGGS
LogTrail                : \TRGGS.$QA01.QADAT.LS000000
Trail Format            : New
End of File             : 5831722
Current Position        : 0
Next Position           : 0
Last Modtime            : 2013/01/01 12:47:11.686.219
Display RecLen          : 140
Logtrail Filter         : On
Detail                  : On
Trans History           : 0 Transactions, Records 100, Bytes 100000
LargeBlock I/O          : On, Blocksize 57344
Local System            : Big Endian
Logtrail Data           : Big Endian/ASCII
Logtrail Headers        : ASCII
Dump                    : ASCII
Timeoffset              : LOCAL
Scan Notify Interval    : 10000 records, Scrolling On

ESBLOCK

Use ESBLOCK for debugging on a NonStop system. It displays an entry-sequenced syskey as a block number and record number.

Default

None

Syntax

ESBLOCK entry_sequenced_RBA

Example

ESBLOCK 4294967302

This produces the following. It shows that the syskey value 4294967302 evaluates to block 1, record 6.

Interpreted               4294967302   0x00000001000000060   1.6
64-bit Syskey             4294967302   0x00000001000000060
ES64_TO_RBA64                   4102   0x00000000000010060
RBA64_TO_ES64             4294967302   0x00000001000000060

EXIT

Use EXIT to exit Logdump and terminate the process. An alias for EXIT is QUIT.

Default

None

Syntax

EXIT

FC

Use FC to edit a previously issued Logdump command and then execute it again. Previous commands are stored in the memory buffer and can be displayed by issuing the HISTORY command (see "HISTORY"). Issuing FC without arguments executes the most recently used command. By using options, you can retrieve a specific command by specifying its line number or a text substring.

Using the Editor

The FC command displays the command and then opens an editor with a prompt containing a blank line starting with two dots. To edit a command, use the space bar to position the cursor beneath the character where you want the change to begin, and then enter one of the following arguments. Arguments are not case-sensitive and can be combined.

Table 2-7 FC Command Options

Argument Description
i text

Inserts text. For example:

Logdump 24> fc 9
> count
..     i detail
count detail
r text

Replaces text. For example:

Logdump 25> fc 10
> timeoffset local
..           rgmt
timeoffset gmt
d

Deletes a character. To delete multiple characters, enter a d for each one. For example:

Logdump 26> fc 11
> scanforrrbba
..        dd
scanforrba
replacement_text

Replaces the displayed command with the text that you enter on a one-for-one basis. For example:

Logdump 26> fc 10
> scanforrba 107
..           127
scanforrba 127

To execute the command, press Enter twice, once to exit the editor and once to issue the command. To cancel an edit, type a forward slash (/) twice.

Default

Execute the most recent command again

Syntax

FC [n | -n | string]
n

Returns the specified command line. Each Logdump command line is sequenced, beginning with 1 at the start of the session.

-n

Returns the command that was issued n lines before the current line.

string

Returns the last command that starts with the specified text string.

Examples

Example 1   
FC 9
Example 2   
FC -3
Example 3   
FC sca

FILEHEADER

Use FILEHEADER to display the contents of the header of the currently open trail file.

The file header is stored as a record at the beginning of a trail file preceding the data records. The information that is stored in the trail header provides enough information about the records to enable an Oracle GoldenGate process to determine whether the records are in a format that the current version of Oracle GoldenGate supports.

The trail header fields are stored as tokens, where the token format remains the same across all versions of Oracle GoldenGate. If a version of Oracle GoldenGate does not support any given token, that token is ignored. Deprecated tokens are assigned a default value to preserve compatibility with previous versions of Oracle GoldenGate.

The current FILEHEADER command applies globally to the Logdump session, until a different FILEHEADER command is issued.

To View the File Header

To view the file header:

  1. Position to the beginning of the trail file with the following Logdump command.

    pos 0
    
  2. Issue the following Logdump command to see the first record of the file, the one that contains the file header.

    next
    

To Retrieve the File Header Tokens

To retrieve file header values as input parameters, use the @GETENV function with the GGFILEHEADER option. See Reference for Oracle GoldenGate for Windows and UNIX.

Note:

The Logdump command HEADERTOKEN also shows trail tokens, but it shows a brief summary of each one. FILEHEADER shows actual token values.

Table 2-8 Oracle GoldenGate File Header Tokens

Token/subtoken Data Type Description

Signature

UINT32

Internal use.

Compatibility

UINT16

The version of the trail. The compatibility level of the Oracle GoldenGate software must be greater than, or equal to, that of the trail file for a process to be able to read the trail file.

Current valid values are 0 or 1.

CharSet

INT32

The global character set of the trail file, as defined in the parameter file or the default value. For example:

WCP1252-1

-3 indicates the system default.

CreationTime

Timestamp

The time that the trail file was created, in local GMT Julian time, INT 64.

URI

String

The universal resource identifier of the process that created the trail file, in the format of:

host_name:dir:[:dir][:dir_n]group_name

Where:

  • host_name is the name of the server that hosts the process

  • dir is a subdirectory of the Oracle GoldenGate installation path.

  • group_name is the name of the process group that is linked with the process.

Example:

sys1:home:oracle:v9.5:extora

Shows where the trail was processed and by which process. This includes a history of previous runs.

URIHistory

String array

List of the URIs of processes that wrote to the trail file before the current process.

  • For a primary Extract, this field is empty.

  • For a data pump, this field is URIHistory + URI of the input trail file.

FileName

String

Name of the trail file. Can be absolute or relative path, with forward or backward slash depending on the file system.

MultiPart

Boolean

True/False flag indicating whether the trail file is a single file (such as one created for a batch run) or a sequentially numbered file that is part of a trail for online, continuous processing. If False, the SeqNum subtoken is not valid.

SeqNum

UINT32

The sequence number of the file in the trail, if MultiPart is true. Invalid if multipart is false. The value is the numerical sequence number, without any zero padding.

FileSize

UINT64

Size of the trail file. Value is NULL until the trail file is completed. Non-NULL values are in bytes.

FirstRecordCSN

CSN

The commit sequence number (CSN) of the first record in the trail file.Value is NULL until the trail file is completed.

LastRecordCSN

CSN

The commit sequence number (CSN) of the last record in the trail file.Value is NULL until the trail file is completed.

FirstRecordIOTime

Timestamp

The time that the first record in the trail file was written.Value is NULL until the trail file is completed.

LastRecordIOTime

Timestamp

The time that the last record in the trail file was written.Value is NULL until the trail file is completed.

SysName

String

The name of the operating system, for example:

SunOS

Linux

Microsoft Windows

NodeName

String

The name of the machine, for example sys1.

Release

String

The release level of the operating system, for example:

5.10

2.6.9-11.ELsmp

Version

String

The version of the operating system, for example:

s10_69

#1 SMP Fri Feb 24 16:56:28 EST 2006

Hardware

String

The hardware type of the processor, for example:

sun4u

x86_64

x86

Vendor

UINT16

The name of the database vendor. Some (but not all) examples are:

DB2 ZOS
CTREE
MSSQL
MYSQL
ORACLE
SQLMX
SYBASE
TERADATA
TIMESTEN
NONSTOP
ENSCRIBE

Name

String

The name of the database, for example findb.

Instance

String

The name of the database instance, if applicable to the database type, for example ORA1022A.

Charset

INT32

The character set of the database. Currently, the valid value is -1 (unknown). (For some databases, this will be empty.)

MajorVersion

UINT16

The major version of the database.

MinorVersion

UINT16

The minor version of the database.

VerString

String

The maintenance (patch) level of the database.

ClientCharset

INT32

The character set of the database client. Currently, the valid value is -1 (unknown). (For some databases, this will be empty.)

ClientVerString

String

The maintenance (patch) level of the database client. (For some databases, this will be empty.)

Name

String

The group name that is associated with the process.

DataSource

UINT16

The data source that was read by the process. Can be one of:

  • DS_EXTRACT_TRAILS (source was an Oracle GoldenGate extract file, populated with change data)

  • DS_LOG_TABLE (source was an Oracle GoldenGate log table, used for trigger-based extraction)

  • DS_DATABASE (source was a direct select from database table written to a trail, used for SOURCEISTABLE-driven initial load)

  • DS_TRAN_LOGS (source was the database transaction log)

  • DS_INITIAL_DATA_LOAD (source was Extract; data taken directly from source tables)

  • DS_VAM_EXTRACT (source was a vendor access module)

  • DS_VAM_TWO_PHASE_COMMIT (source was a VAM trail)

MajorVersion

UINT16

The major version of the process (xx).

MinorVersion

UINT16

The minor version of the process (xx.xx).

MaintenanceLevel

UINT16

The maintenance version of the process (xx.xx.xx).

PatchLevel

UINT16

The patch version of the process (xx.xx.xx.xx).

BuildNumber

UINT16

The build number of the process.

VerString

String

The version string of the process. For example:

11.1.1.17A not for production

RecoveryMode

UINT16

Internal use

LastCompletedCSN

CSN

Internal use

LastCompletedXids

Xid

Internal use

LastSCN

CSN

Internal use

LastXid

Xid

Internal use


Default

OFF

Syntax

FILEHEADER {ON | OFF | DETAIL}
ON

Enables the display of the file header, showing the main header tokens.

OFF

Disables the display of the file header.

DETAIL

Provides detailed information that includes the sub-tokens.

Examples

Example 1   
FILEHEADER ON
TokenID x46 'F' Record Header    Info x00  Length  587
TokenID x30 '0' TrailInfo        Info x00  Length  303
TokenID x31 '1' MachineInfo      Info x00  Length  103
TokenID x32 '2' DatabaseInfo     Info x00  Length   88
TokenID x33 '3' ProducerInfo     Info x00  Length   85
TokenID x34 '4' ContinunityInfo  Info x00  Length    4
TokenID x5a 'Z' Record Trailer   Info x00  Length  587
2011/1/18 13:39:18.951.346 FileHeader           Len   587 RBA 0
Name: *FileHeader*
 3000 012f 3000 0008 660d 0a71 3100 0006 0001 3200 | 0../0...f..q1.....2.
 0008 0000 0016 3300 000c 02f1 7834 eac7 7f3f 3400 | ......3.....x4...?4.
 0037 0031 7572 693a 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e3a 3a68 | .7.1uri:tellurian::h
 6f6d 653a 6d63 6361 7267 6172 3a67 6773 3a67 6773 | ome:mccargar:ggs:ggs
 4f72 6163 6c65 3a73 6f75 7263 6536 0000 1700 112e | Oracle:source6......
 2f64 6972 6461 742f 6572 3030 3030 3030 3700 0005 | /dirdat/er0000007...
 0138 0000 0800 01e2 4039 0000 0c00 0000 0000 001d | .8......@9..........


GroupID x30 '0' TrailInfo        Info x00  Length  303
 3000 012f 3000 0008 660d 0a71 3100 0006 0001 3200 | 0../0...f..q1.....2.
 0008 0000 0016 3300 000c 02f1 7834 eac7 7f3f 3400 | ......3.....x4...?4.
 0037 0031 7572 693a 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e3a 3a68 | .7.1uri:tellurian::h
 6f6d 653a 6d63 6361 7267 6172 3a67 6773 3a67 6773 | ome:mccargar:ggs:ggs
 4f72 6163 6c65 3a73 6f75 7263 6536 0000 1700 112e | Oracle:source6......
 2f64 6972 6461 742f 6572 3030 3030 3030 3700 0005 | /dirdat/er0000007...
 0138 0000 0800 01e2 4039 0000 0c00 0000 0000 001d | .8......@9..........
 a33b 0000 450a 3634 3136 3138 3936 3932 0000 0000 | .;..E.6416189692....
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 3aff 0045 0000 0000 0000 | ..........:..E......
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 003d | ...................=
 0000 0c02 f178 34eb 556a 403c ff00 0c00 0000 0000 | .....x4.Uj@<........
 0000 00                                           | ...

GroupID x31 '1' MachineInfo      Info x00  Length  103
 3100 0067 3000 000b 0005 4c69 6e75 7831 0000 0f00 | 1..g0.....Linux1....
 0974 656c 6c75 7269 616e 3200 0014 000e 322e 362e | .tellurian2.....2.6.
 392d 3131 2e45 4c73 6d70 3300 0029 0023 2331 2053 | 9-11.ELsmp3..).##1 S
 4d50 2046 7269 204d 6179 2032 3020 3138 3a32 353a | MP Fri May 2018:25:
 3330 2045 4454 2032 3030 3534 0000 0c00 0678 3836 | 30 EDT 20054.....x86
 5f36 34                                           | _64

GroupID x32 '2' DatabaseInfo     Info x00  Length   88
 3200 0058 3000 0006 0007 3100 000e 0008 4f52 4131 | 2..X0.....1.....ORA1
 3032 3241 3200 000e 0008 6f72 6131 3032 3261 3300 | 022A2.....ora1022a3.
 0008 ffff ffff 3400 0006 0000 3500 0006 0000 3600 | ......4.....5.....6.
 0006 0000 3700 0008 ffff ffff 3800 0010 000a 3130 | ....7.......8.....10
 2e32 2e30 2e32 2e30                               | .2.0.2.0

GroupID x33 '3' ProducerInfo     Info x00  Length   85
 3300 0055 3000 000a 0004 4546 4152 3100 0006 0003 | 3..U0.....EFAR1.....
 3200 0006 0000 3300 0006 0000 3400 0006 0000 3500 | 2.....3.....4.....5.
 0006 0000 3600 0006 0017 3700 0023 001d 5665 7273 | ....6.....7..#..Vers
 696f 6e20 5374 2e20 416e 6472 6577 7320 4275 696c | ion St. Andrews Buil
 6420 3032 33                                      | d 023

GroupID x34 '4' ContinunityInfo  Info x00  Length    4
 3400 0004                                         | 4...
Example 2   
FILEHEADER DETAIL
TokenID x46 'F' Record Header    Info x00  Length  587
TokenID x30 '0' TrailInfo        Info x00  Length  303
TokenID x31 '1' MachineInfo      Info x00  Length  103
TokenID x32 '2' DatabaseInfo     Info x00  Length   88
TokenID x33 '3' ProducerInfo     Info x00  Length   85
TokenID x34 '4' ContinunityInfo  Info x00  Length    4
TokenID x5a 'Z' Record Trailer   Info x00  Length  587

2011/01/18 13:40:26.034.631 FileHeader           Len   587 RBA 0
Name: *FileHeader*
 3000 012f 3000 0008 660d 0a71 3100 0006 0001 3200 | 0../0...f..q1.....2.
 0008 0000 0016 3300 000c 02f1 7834 eac7 7f3f 3400 | ......3.....x4...?4.
 0037 0031 7572 693a 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e3a 3a68 | .7.1uri:tellurian::h
 6f6d 653a 6d63 6361 7267 6172 3a67 6773 3a67 6773 | ome:mccargar:ggs:ggs
 4f72 6163 6c65 3a73 6f75 7263 6536 0000 1700 112e | Oracle:source6......
 2f64 6972 6461 742f 6572 3030 3030 3030 3700 0005 | /dirdat/er0000007...
 0138 0000 0800 01e2 4039 0000 0c00 0000 0000 001d | .8......@9..........

GroupID x30 '0' TrailInfo        Info x00  Length  303
 3000 012f 3000 0008 660d 0a71 3100 0006 0001 3200 | 0../0...f..q1.....2.
 0008 0000 0016 3300 000c 02f1 7834 eac7 7f3f 3400 | ......3.....x4...?4.
 0037 0031 7572 693a 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e3a 3a68 | .7.1uri:tellurian::h
 6f6d 653a 6d63 6361 7267 6172 3a67 6773 3a67 6773 | ome:mccargar:ggs:ggs
 4f72 6163 6c65 3a73 6f75 7263 6536 0000 1700 112e | Oracle:source6......
 2f64 6972 6461 742f 6572 3030 3030 3030 3700 0005 | /dirdat/er0000007...
 0138 0000 0800 01e2 4039 0000 0c00 0000 0000 001d | .8......@9..........
 a33b 0000 450a 3634 3136 3138 3936 3932 0000 0000 | .;..E.6416189692....
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 3aff 0045 0000 0000 0000 | ..........:..E......
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 003d | ...................=
 0000 0c02 f178 34eb 556a 403c ff00 0c00 0000 0000 | .....x4.Uj@<........
 0000 00                                           | ...
TokenID x30 '0' Signature        Info x00  Length    8
 660d 0a71                                         | f..q
TokenID x31 '1' Compatibility    Info x00  Length    6
 0001                                              | ..
TokenID x32 '2' Charset          Info x00  Length    8
 0000 0016                                         | ....
TokenID x33 '3' CreationTime     Info x00  Length   12
 02f1 7834 eac7 7f3f                               | ..x4...?
TokenID x34 '4' URI              Info x00  Length   55
 0031 7572 693a 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e3a 3a68 6f6d | .1uri:tellurian::hom
 653a 6d63 6361 7267 6172 3a67 6773 3a67 6773 4f72 | e:mccargar:ggs:ggsOr
 6163 6c65 3a73 6f75 7263 65                       | acle:source
TokenID x36 '6' Filename         Info x00  Length   23
 0011 2e2f 6469 7264 6174 2f65 7230 3030 3030 30   | .../dirdat/er000000
TokenID x37 '7' MultiPart        Info x00  Length    5
 01                                                | .
TokenID x38 '8' Seqno            Info x00  Length    8
 0001 e240                                         | ...@
TokenID x39 '9' FileSize         Info x00  Length   12
 0000 0000 0000 1da3                               | ........
TokenID x3b ';' LastCSN          Info x00  Length   69
 0a36 3431 3631 3839 3639 3200 0000 0000 0000 0000 | .6416189692.........
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 00                                      | .....
TokenID x3a ':' FirstCSN         Info xff  Length   69
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 | ....................
 0000 0000 00                                      | .....
TokenID x3d '=' LastIOTime       Info x00  Length   12
 02f1 7834 eb55 6a40                               | ..x4.Uj@
TokenID x3c '<' FirstIOTime      Info xff  Length   12
 0000 0000 0000 0000                               | ........

GroupID x31 '1' MachineInfo      Info x00  Length  103
 3100 0067 3000 000b 0005 4c69 6e75 7831 0000 0f00 | 1..g0.....Linux1....
 0974 656c 6c75 7269 616e 3200 0014 000e 322e 362e | .tellurian2.....2.6.
 392d 3131 2e45 4c73 6d70 3300 0029 0023 2331 2053 | 9-11.ELsmp3..).##1 S
 4d50 2046 7269 204d 6179 2032 3020 3138 3a32 353a | MP Fri May 20 18:25:
 3330 2045 4454 2032 3030 3534 0000 0c00 0678 3836 | 30 EDT 20054.....x86
 5f36 34                                           | _64
TokenID x30 '0' Sysname          Info x00  Length   11
 0005 4c69 6e75 78                                 | ..Linux
TokenID x31 '1' Nodename         Info x00  Length   15
 0009 7465 6c6c 7572 6961 6e                       | ..tellurian
TokenID x32 '2' Release          Info x00  Length   20
 000e 322e 362e 392d 3131 2e45 4c73 6d70           | ..2.6.9-11.ELsmp
TokenID x33 '3' Version          Info x00  Length   41
 0023 2331 2053 4d50 2046 7269 204d 6179 2032 3020 | .##1 SMP Fri May 20
 3138 3a32 353a 3330 2045 4454 2032 3030 35        | 18:25:30 EDT 2005
TokenID x34 '4' Hardware         Info x00  Length   12
 0006 7838 365f 3634                               | ..x86_64

GroupID x32 '2' DatabaseInfo     Info x00  Length   88
 3200 0058 3000 0006 0007 3100 000e 0008 4f52 4131 |2..X0.....1.....ORA1
 3032 3241 3200 000e 0008 6f72 6131 3032 3261 3300 |022A2.....ora1022a3.
 0008 ffff ffff 3400 0006 0000 3500 0006 0000 3600 |......4.....5.....6.
 0006 0000 3700 0008 ffff ffff 3800 0010 000a 3130 |....7.......8.....10
 2e32 2e30 2e32 2e30                               | .2.0.2.0
TokenID x30 '0' Vendor           Info x00  Length    6
 0007                                              | ..
TokenID x31 '1' Name             Info x00  Length   14
 0008 4f52 4131 3032 3241                          | ..ORA1022A
TokenID x32 '2' Instance         Info x00  Length   14
 0008 6f72 6131 3032 3261                          | ..ora1022a
TokenID x33 '3' Charset          Info x00  Length    8
 ffff ffff                                         | ....
TokenID x34 '4' MajorVersion     Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x35 '5' MinorVersion     Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x36 '6' VerString        Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x37 '7' ClientCharset    Info x00  Length    8
 ffff ffff                                         | ....
TokenID x38 '8' ClientVerString  Info x00  Length   16
 000a 3130 2e32 2e30 2e32 2e30                     | ..10.2.0.2.0

GroupID x33 '3' ProducerInfo     Info x00  Length   85
 3300 0055 3000 000a 0004 4546 4152 3100 0006 0003 | 3..U0.....EFAR1.....
 3200 0006 0000 3300 0006 0000 3400 0006 0000 3500 | 2.....3.....4.....5.
 0006 0000 3600 0006 0017 3700 0023 001d 5665 7273 | ....6.....7..#..Vers
 696f 6e20 5374 2e20 416e 6472 6577 7320 4275 696c | ion St. Andrews Buil
 6420 3032 33                                      | d 023
TokenID x30 '0' Name             Info x00  Length   10
 0004 4546 4152                                    | ..EFAR
TokenID x31 '1' DataSource       Info x00  Length    6
 0003                                              | ..
TokenID x32 '2' MajorVersion     Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x33 '3' MinorVersion     Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x34 '4' MaintLevel       Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x35 '5' BugFixLevel      Info x00  Length    6
 0000                                              | ..
TokenID x36 '6' BuildNumber      Info x00  Length    6
 0017                                              | ..
TokenID x37 '7' VerString        Info x00  Length   35
 001d 5665 7273 696f 6e20 5374 2e20 416e 6472 6577 | ..Version St.Andrew
 7320 4275 696c 6420 3032 33                       | s Build 023

GroupID x34 '4' ContinunityInfo  Info x00  Length    4
 3400 0004                                         | 4...

FILES

Use FILES to display summary file information for files on the local system. The default command displays all files in the current directory or subvolume. To constrain the display to specific files, you can supply a wildcarded name.

This command can be shortened to FI. An alias for this command is DIR or FILEINFO.

Default

Show all files in current directory or subvolume

Syntax

FILES [directory | subvolume| volume.subvolume]
directory | subvolume | volume.subvolume

The name of a directory or subvolume or a wildcard for specific files.

If any file or directory in the specified path contains spaces, the entire path must be enclosed within double quotation marks.

Example

FILES "c:\goldengate ver802\dirdat\cc*"

Example

FILES $QAGG.QA01.*

FILTER

Use FILTER to filter the display based on one or more criteria.

  • You can string multiple FILTER commands together, separating each one with a semi-colon, as in:

    FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME fin.act*; FILTER RECTYPE 5; FILTER MATCH ALL
    

    Or...

    FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME $QA01.QAESRC.ACCTN; FILTER SYSKEY 4294967302; FILTER MATCH ALL
    
  • To avoid unexpected results, avoid stringing filter options together with one FILTER command. For example, the following would be incorrect:

    FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME fin.act*; RECTYPE 5; MATCH ALL
    

    Or...

    FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME $QA01.QAESRC.ACCTN; SYSKEY 4294967302
    

Without arguments, FILTER displays the current filter status (ON or OFF) and any filter criteria that are in effect.

Comparison Operators

For options that take comparison operators, the following standard operators may be used. The absence of an operator implies Equal.

Table 2-9 Filter Option Comparison Operators

Operator Example

Equal

=

EQ

==

Less than

<
LT

Less than or equal

<=
LE

Greater than

>
GT

Greater than or equal

>=
GE

Not equal

<>
NE
!=

Default

Shows current filter settings

Syntax

FILTER [INCLUDE] [EXCLUDE] filter_option

Where:

filter_option can be one of:

{
ANSINAME name [, name] |
AUDITRBA rba [comparison_operator] |
CLEAR {filter_spec | ALL} |
CSN | LogCSN [comparison_operator] [value]
ENDTIME time_string |
FILENAME name [, name] |
GGSTOKEN token_name [comparison_operator] [token_value] |
HEX "hex_string" [byte_range][, "hex_string" [byte_range]] [...] |
INT16 16_bit_integer |
INT32 32_bit_integer |
IOTYPE operation_type [, operation_type] |
MATCH {ANY | ALL} |
OFF |
ON |
PROCESS process_name |
RBA byte_address [comparison_operator] [...] |
RECLEN length [comparison_operator] |
RECTYPE {type_number | type_name} |
SHOW |
STARTTIME time_string |
STRING [BOTH] [B],text [  column_range  ]
    [[B],text [column_range]] [...] |
SYSKEY system_key [comparison_operator] [...] |
TRANSID transaction_identifier |
TRANSIND indicator [comparison_operator] |
TYPE type |
UNDOFLAG type [comparison_operator] |
USERTOKEN token_name [comparison_operator] [token_value]
}
ANSINAME name [, name]

Filters based on the ANSI name of a SQL/MX table or a table from a Windows or UNIX source system. For use on NonStop systems. The format for name is:

catalog.schema.table

Up to eight name specifications may be supplied. The command is case-sensitive.

To filter based on the name of a data file, use the FILENAME option.

AUDITRBA rba [comparison_operator]

Filters based on the relative byte address of a commit record. For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators".

CLEAR {filter_spec | ALL}

Removes filtering criteria.

  • ALL removes all filter criteria.

  • filter_spec removes only the specified criterion. Specify any FILTER option, but not the value. The following example is valid:

    FILTER CLEAR STRING
    

    The following example is not valid:

    FILTER CLEAR STRING "Denver"
    

An alias for CLEAR is RESET.

CSN | LogCSN [comparison_operator] [value]

Filters based on a commit sequence value.

For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators".

ENDTIME time_string

Ends the filter at the last record written at the specified time. For the time string, use the format of:

[[yy]yy-mm-dd] [hh[:mm][:ss]]

Example:

ENDTIME 2011-01-31 23:59:59

This command can be shortened to ENDTS or END.

FILENAME name [, name]

Filters based on the name of a SQL table, or a group of names, with the name format being:

[catalog.]owner.table
[catalog.]owner.string*

Also filters on the name of a NonStop data file, or a group of names, with the name format being:

volume.subvolume.file
volume.subvolume.string*

On Windows and UNIX, both types of objects are supported. On NonStop, only viewing NonStop files is supported. To view SQL tables on NonStop, use the ANSINAME option.

FILENAME is case-sensitive on Windows and UNIX systems. If the database requires quote marks around a name If opening a NonStop data file on Windows or UNIX, the file name is converted to upper case. FILENAME can be shortened to FILE or FI.

Up to eight name specifications may be supplied.

GGSTOKEN token_name [comparison_operator] [token_value]

Filters based on a specific Oracle GoldenGate token in the record header.

  • For token_name, provide the name of the token, such as TRANSID.

  • For token_value provide the actual value for this token that is to be the filter string.

For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators"

HEX "hex_string" [byte_range] [, "hex_string" [byte_range]] [...]

Filters based on a hex string and, optionally, a range of columns. To specify a range of columns, use the format of:

start_column:end_column 

Example:

10:35

This option allows up to eight hex string and column arguments. Hex strings must be enclosed within quotes.

Hex filter strings must be in double quotes.

INCLUDE

Specifies that the filter will include the information specified with other options in the current FILTER statement. Can be shortened to INC.

EXCLUDE

Specifies that the filter will exclude the information specified with other options in the current FILTER statement. Can be shortened to EXC.

INT16 16_bit_integer

Filters based on a 16-bit integer. Use with 16-bit processors.

INT32 32_bit_integer

Filters based on a 32-bit integer. Use with 32-bit processors.

IOTYPE operation_type [, operation_type]

Filters based on the type of operation. A list of record types can be viewed with the SHOW RECTYPE command in Logdump. Up to 32 operation types can be specified with IOTYPE.

MATCH {ANY | ALL}

Controls filtering response when multiple filters have been specified. Can be shortened to MAT or MA.

  • ANY includes a record for display or counts if the condition matches any of the filter conditions. This is the default.

  • ALL includes a record for display or counts only if the condition matches all of the filter conditions.

OFF

Disables record filtering. By default, filtering is disabled. An alias for this option is DISABLE.

ON

Enables record filtering. An alias for this option is ENABLE.

RBA byte_address [comparison_operator] [...]

Filters based on a relative byte address. Accepts either a 32-bit or 64-bit value. Up to 32 specifications can be supplied.

RECLEN length [comparison_operator]

Filters based on a record length, in bytes. For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators".

RECTYPE {type_number | type_name}

Filters based on the type of record. Can be either of the following:

  • The number assigned to the record type.

    FILTER RECTYPE 10
    
  • The name of the record type.

    FILTER RECTYPE Update
    

To view the record type names and numbers, issue the SHOW RECTYPE command. (See "SHOW".)

SHOW

Displays filter settings. Same as using FILTER without any options.

STARTTIME time_string

Starts the filter with the first record written at the specified time. For the time string, use the format of:

[[yy]yy-mm-dd] [hh[:mm][:ss]] 

Example:

STARTTIME 2011-01-01 00:00:00

Can be shortened to STARTTS or START.

STRING [BOTH] [B], "text" [column_range] [[B], text [column_range]] [...]
  • text filters based on a string. Enclose the string within double quotes.

  • column_range filters based on a range of columns. Use the format of:

    start_column:end_column

    Example:

    10:35
    
  • BOTH filters on both a string and a column range.

  • [B] specifies a case-insensitive match. You can match up to eight string and column arguments.

If the trail data is EBCDIC, issue the EBCDICDATA ON or ASCIIDATA OFF command before using FILTER STRING to ensure the correct matching.

STRING can be shortened to STR.

SYSKEY system_key [comparison_operator] [...]

Filters based on a NonStop source key. Accepts either a 32-bit or 64-bit value. Up to 32 specifications can be supplied.

TRANSIND indicator [comparison_operator]

Filters based on the TransInd field of the record header. Valid values:

0 = start of transaction

1 = middle of transaction

2 = end of transaction

3 = only record in transaction

For example, to filter for the end of a transaction, use the following command, including the spaces in the syntax:

FILTER INCLUDE TransInd > = 2

For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators"

TRANSID 'transaction_identifier'

Filters on the TMF transaction identifier when reading a TMF trail, for example:

FILTER INCLUDE TRANSID \GGQA(2).0.12792182.
UNDOFLAG type [comparison_operator]

Filters based on the NonStop undo flag. The undo flag is set for records that are undone when a TMF transaction is aborted. Normally, UndoFlag is set to zero, but if the record is the backout of a previously successful operation, then UndoFlag will be set to 1. An undo that is performed by the disc process because of a constraint violation is not marked as an undo.

For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators"

USERTOKEN token_name [comparison_operator] [token_value]

Filters based on a specific user token in the trail file header.

  • token_name is the name of any token that is defined with the TOKENS clause of a TABLE statement of the Extract parameter file. It is not case-sensitive.

  • token_value is either a constant that is enclosed within double quotes or the result of an Oracle GoldenGate column-conversion function, depending on what was specified in the TOKENS clause for token_name.

  • For comparison_operator, see "Comparison Operators"

The following shows filter options modified by comparison operators.

FILTER INCLUDE RECLEN > 400
FILTER INCLUDE RECLEN < 200
FILTER INCLUDE TRANSIND <> 1
FILTER INCLUDE SYSKEY > 202172700557313

The following filters for a data file name and for a relative key 19446, which has a hex value of 00004bf6. Because MATCH ALL is used, a record must meet all of the filter specifications to be included in the filter.

FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME $QA01.QAESRC.ACCT*
FILTER INCLUDE HEX "00004bf6" 0:3
FILTER MATCH ALL

The following filters for tables that start with ACC except for the ACCDET table, and for records that contain a timestamp between the specified start and stop times. By default, if a record matches any of the INCLUDE specifications, it is included in the filter.

FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME SALES.ACC*
FILTER EXCLUDE FILENAME SALES.ACCDET
FILTER INCLUDE STARTTIME 2011-01-11 17:00:00
FILTER INCLUDE ENDTIME 2011-01-11 19:00:00

The following shows filter options with multiple specifications. By default, a record that matches any of these specifications will be included in the filter. Note that in the STRING filter, two of the criteria are not case-sensitive, while one is, and the filter is confined to a column range.

FILTER INCLUDE IOTYPE insert,update,delete
FILTER INCLUDE STRING b"String1" "string2" b"String3" 25:50
FILTER INCLUDE FILENAME $QA01.QAESRC.ACCT1, $QA01.QAESRC.ACCT2, $QA01.QAESRC.ACCT3

FLOAT

Use FLOAT to display a number or hex string in both its hex representation and as a floating-point number. This command is useful when looking for a specific floating-point number and you need the hex representation of that number. This command does not require a trail file to be opened.

The output of this command is hex_value float_string.

FLOAT assumes the floating point representation is the default for the current platform. It will not make a conversion between a Tandem floating point number (which is not IEEE-754) and a IEEE-754 floating point number, which is supported on UNIX and Windows systems.

Default

None

Syntax

FLOAT input_string [format]
input_string

Can be one of the following:

  • A valid floating point number as a string in the format of the following: an optional sign character (+ or -), followed by a sequence of decimal digits, which can contain a decimal-point followed by an exponent (an e or E character, followed by an optional sign and a sequence of digits.

  • A valid hexadecimal number as a string formed by the following: 0x, %H, %h, X, x, H or h, followed by a sequence of hexadecimal digits (1-9, a-f).

format

Can be one of the following:

  • One of the following to specify the output format sizing: IEEE, TDM, TANDEM, NSK, 64bit, 64-bit, F64, 32bit, 32-bit or F32.

  • A format specifier formed by the string FMT followed by any valid C99 Print Format specifier (for example, %lx, %e, %g).

Example

The following examples are different results that can be obtained for the same values 2.1 and 2.2.

Logdump 58 >float 2.1
4000cccccccccccd  2.100000 
Logdump 59 >float 2.2
400199999999999a  2.200000
Logdump 60 >float 0x4000cccccccccccd
4000cccccccccccd  2.100000
Logdump 61 >float 0x400199999999999a
400199999999999a  2.200000 
Logdump 62 >float %H400199999999999a
400199999999999a  2.200000 
Logdump 63 >float 2.2 FMT %e
400199999999999a  2.200000e+00 
Logdump 64 > float 2.2 FMT %g
400199999999999a  2.2
Logdump 65 >float 0x4000cccccccccccd FMT %g
4000cccccccccccd  2.1
Logdump 66 >float 2.2e+01
4036000000000000  22.000000
Logdump 67 >float 2.2e-05
3ef711947cfa26a2  0.000022

GGSTOKEN

Valid for Oracle.

Use GGSTOKEN to control whether or not Oracle GoldenGate automatically generated token data is displayed with each record. It applies to the automatically generated tokens like the transaction id, row id, fetching status and tag value. These values are stored in the record header and can be mapped to a target column or used for some other purpose during Oracle GoldenGate processing.

Without arguments, GGSTOKEN displays the status of user token display (ON or OFF). With the ON option, the name of the token and its length are displayed. The DETAIL option shows the actual token data.

Default

Display token name and length.

Syntax

GGSTOKEN {ON | OFF | DETAIL}
ON

Enables the display of automatically generated tokens.

OFF

Disables the display of automatically generated tokens.

DETAIL

Displays the automatically generated tokens including the transaction ID (XID), the row id for DML operations, the fetching status (if applicable), and tag value.token data.

GHDR

Use GHDR to control whether or not the record header is displayed with each record. Each record contains a header that includes information about the transaction environment. Without arguments, GHDR displays the status of header display (ON or OFF).

Default

OFF

Syntax

GHDR {ON | OFF}

HEADERTOKEN

Use HEADERTOKEN to control whether or not header token indicators are displayed with each record. The header token indicators are the following:

G — record header (begin of record)

H — header area

D — data area

T — Oracle GoldenGate internal token

U — user token area (does not display if user tokens are not in use)

Z — end of record

Without arguments, HEADERTOKEN displays the status of header token indicators (ON or OFF).

Default

OFF

Syntax

HEADERTOKEN {ON | OFF | DETAIL}
ON

Enables the display of header tokens.

OFF

Disables the display of header tokens.

DETAIL

Provides detailed token values.

Examples

Example 1   

HEADERTOKEN, without DETAIL

TokenID G, Info 0, Length  117
TokenID H, Info 0, Length   45
TokenID D, Info 0, Length   28
TokenID T, Info 0, Length   24
TokenID Z, Info 0, Length  117
Example 2   

HEADERTOKEN with DETAIL

TokenID G, Info 0, Length 146
TokenID H, Info 0, Length 42
  4504 0041 3C00 05FF 402F AE6C 572A F102 F818 8F02 : E..A<...@/.1W*......
  0000 0000 1000 0000 0152 0000 0001 4852 2E4A 4F42 : .........R....FR.JOB
  5300
TokenID D, Info 0, Length   60
TokenID T, Info 0, Length   24
TokenID Z, Info 0, Length  146

HELP

Use HELP to view the syntax of Logdump commands.

Default

None

Syntax

HELP

HISTORY

Use HISTORY to view the most recently issued Logdump commands since the session started, or to reset the command count starting at line 1 again. HISTORY can be shortened to HIST.

Note:

You can use the FC command to re-execute a command in the list. See "FC"

Default

Display recent commands

Syntax

HISTORY [n] [CLEAR]
n

Returns the specified number of previously issued commands, where n is any positive number.

CLEAR

Deletes the command history buffer and reverts the command line to 1.

Example

HISTORY 3

The results of this command would be similar to:

1: ghdr on
2: detail on
3: scanforheader

INTERPRETINTERVAL

Use INTERPRETINTERVAL to display a 64-bit Julian time interval in the format of days-hh:mm:ss.ms.us.

Default

None

Syntax

INTERPRETINTERVAL interval_string
interval_string

A string representing the interval to be converted.

Example

INTERPRETINTERVAL 1234567

This produces the following result:

Interval 1234567 is 0-00:00:01.234.567

INTERPRETTIMESTAMP

Use INTERPRETTIMESTAMP to display a 64-bit Julian timestamp as an ASCII value.

Default

None

Syntax

INTERPRETTIMESTAMP timestamp
timestamp

A JULIANTIMESTAMP value.

Example

INTERPRETTIMESTAMP 211976584185800569

This produces the following result:

2005/03/03 04:29:45.800.569 GMT
2005/03/02 20:29:45.800.569 LCT

LOG

Use LOG to start and stop the logging of Logdump sessions. When enabled, logging remains in effect for all sessions of Logdump until disabled with the LOG STOP command. Without arguments, LOG displays the status of logging (ON or OFF). An alias for LOG is OUT.

Default

Disabled

Syntax

LOG {file_name | STOP}
file_name

Specifies the name of the log file. Specify a full path name to store the file in a directory other than the current working directory.

STOP

Stops logging.

Example

LOG /home/ggs/dirrpt/logdumpout.txt

Example

LOG $data01.glogggl.sesslog

NEXT

Use NEXT to display the next record or records in the file. The default displays only the next record. NEXT can be shortened to N. An alias for NEXT is RECORD.

Default

Display the next 1 record

Syntax

NEXT [n]
n

Displays the specified number of subsequent records.

Example

NEXT 10

NEXTTRAIL

Use NEXTTRAIL to close an open trail file and open the next one in the sequence. An alias for NEXTTRAIL is NT.

Default

None

Syntax

NEXTTRAIL

NOTIFY

Use NOTIFY to display the number of records scanned, the trail position, and the record timestamp at specified intervals when using COUNT and records are being suppressed from display through filtering options. An alias for NOTIFY is NOTIFYINTERVAL.

Instead of displaying each notify interval on a separate line, you can configure Logdump to simply update a single line with each new scan result. See "SCANSCROLLING".

Default

None

Syntax

NOTIFY interval
interval

The notification interval expressed as a number of records.

Example

The following shows the usage and result of this command.

Logdump 26> NOTIFY 1000
Logdump 27> FILTER INCLUDE FILE sales.res*
Logdump 28> COUNT
Scanned 1000 records, RBA 160380,2011/02/01 08:53:47.768.255
Scanned 2000 records, RBA 729961,2011/02/01 08:56:09.916.128
Scanned 3000 records, RBA 2032683,2011/02/01 08:56:09.916.128
Scanned 4000 records, RBA 3244585,2011/02/01 08:56:09.916.128
Scanned 5000 records, RBA 4568766,2011/02/01 08:56:09.916.128

OBEY

Use OBEY to process a file that contains a list of Logdump commands. OBEY is useful for executing commands that are frequently used in sequence.

OBEY can be shortened to O. An alias for OBEY is SOURCE.

Default

None

Syntax

OBEY file_name
file_name

The fully qualified name of the file containing the list of commands.

Example

This is a UNIX example.

OBEY ./ldcommands.txt

Example

This is a NonStop example.

OBEY $DATA01.GGSPARM.OBEY1

The preceding command executes a file that might look something like this:

ghdr on
usertoken on
detail
filter enable
filter clear
filter match all

OPEN

Use OPEN to open a trail file or extract file in Logdump. Without arguments, the command displays the name of the file that is currently open. Aliases for OPEN are FROM and LOGTRAIL.

Default

None

Syntax

OPEN file_name
file_name

The fully qualified path name of the trail file or extract file to be opened. To specify a trail file, specify the trail name (a two-character prefix) and the sequence number, for example jd000000.

Example

This is a UNIX example.

OPEN /home/ggs/dirdat/jd000000

Example

This is a NonStop example.

OPEN $data01.glogggl.aa000000

POSITION

Use POSITION to set the read position in the file. The position of a record in the file is noted in the record header in the AuditPos field.

Without options, POSITION displays the current read position. Options let you specify an exact position. After you set the position, issue the NEXT command to view the record at that position.

POSITION can be shortened to POS.

Default

None

Syntax

POSITION [bytes | {0 | FIRST}]
bytes

Specifies the number of bytes into the file at which to read. Use the NEXT command to view the specified record.

0 | FIRST

Positions Logdump at the beginning of the file.

Syntax

POS 77580548

RECLEN

Use RECLEN to control how much of the record data is displayed. You can use RECLEN to control the amount of scrolling that must be done when records are large, while still showing enough data to evaluate the record. Data beyond the specified length is truncated.

Default

140 bytes

Syntax

RECLEN n
n

The number of bytes of the record that is displayed.

Example

RECLEN 280

SAVE

Use SAVE to write a subset of the records to a new trail or extract file. By saving a subset to a new file, you can work with a smaller file that is easier to debug. Saving to another file also enables you to extract valid records that can be processed by Oracle GoldenGate, while excluding records that may be causing errors.

To set the version of the trail or file (to old or new format), use the TRAILFORMAT command.

Default

None

Syntax

SAVE file_name [!] {n records | n bytes}
[NOCOMMENT]
[OLDFORMAT | NEWFORMAT]
[TRANSIND indicator]
[TRUNCATE]
file_name

The name of the new file. To specify a trail file, specify the two-character trail name and a sequence number, for example rt000001.

!

Overwrites the specified file, if the same file already exists. First a purge is done, and then the specified records are saved to the file.

n records | n bytes

Specifies either a number of records or a number of data bytes to write to the new file. The n number of records or bytes are taken forward from the current position in the file. You can change the position with the POSITION command. See "POSITION".

EXT ( pri, sec [, max])

Specifies savefile extent sizes. This option is valid on NonStop only.

MEGABYTES n

Specifies the size of a savefile extent. This option is valid on NonStop only.

NOCOMMENT

Suppresses the leading and trailing comment records that are placed by default in the new file. These records describe the context of the file. The begin comment record contains source trail information and the position where the save started. The end comment record identifies the end of the saved data. These headers are useful to separate different sets of records that are saved to the same file, but can be omitted.

OLDFORMAT | NEWFORMAT

Writes the data in either the current trail format (NEWFORMAT, the default) or the format that was used for Oracle GoldenGate versions 6.0 and earlier (OLDFORMAT).

TRANSIND indicator

Sets the TransInd header field in the records written to one of the following:

FIRST
MIDDLE
END
ONLY

This allows you to reorder records in a transaction. TRANSIND applies to all records written by a SAVE command.

TRUNCATE

Purges an existing file before saving new information to it.

Example

SAVE /home/ggs/dirdat/rt000001 10 records nocomment

Example

SAVE $data01.glogggl.ss000000 100 records

SCANFORENDTRANS

Use SCANFORENDTRANS to scan for a record that has a transaction indicator of 2 or 3, as shown in the TransInd field of the header. When one of those indicators is found, Logdump displays the first record of the next transaction.

The indicators represent the following:

  • 2 — last record in the transaction

  • 3 — only record in the transaction

SCANFORENDTRANS can be shortened to SFET.

Default

None

Syntax

SCANFORENDTRANS

SCANFORHEADER

Use SCANFORHEADER to go to the next record header. Before using this command, use the GHDR ON command to show record headers (see "GHDR"). SCANFORHEADER can be shortened to SFH.

Default

None

Syntax

SCANFORHEADER [PREV]
PREV

Displays the previous record header.

SCANFORRBA

Use SCANFORRBA to scan for the record at a relative byte address specified by the AuditRBA field of the record header. Before using this command, use the GHDR command to show record headers (see "GHDR"). SCANFORRBA can be shortened to SFR.

Default

None

Syntax

SCANFORRBA relative_byte_address [file_name]
relative_byte_address

Specifies the relative byte address to find.

file_name

Constrains the search to an Enscribe or SQL data file. A file name is required even if you are searching a file that is open in Logdump.

Example

SCANFORRBA 321 /home/ggs/dirdat/rt000000

Example

SCANFORRBA 321 $data01.glogggl.rt000000

SCANFORTIME

Use SCANFORTIME to scan for a record that contains a specific timestamp. The timestamp is contained in the IO Time field of the record header. Before using this command, use the GHDR command to show record headers (see "GHDR"). SCANFORTIME can be shortened to SFTS.

Default

None

Syntax

SCANFORTIME time_string [, name]
time_string

Scans for a specific timestamp. For the time string, use the format of:

[[yy]yy-mm-dd] [hh[:mm][:ss]] 
name

Constrains the search to a specific table or data file name, or a group of names specified with a wildcard.

Example

SCANFORTIME 2011-01-27 14:33:57

SCANFORTYPE

Use SCANFORTYPE to scan for the next record of the specified type. SCANFORTYPE can be shortened to SFT.

Default

None

Syntax

SCANFORTYPE {type_name | type_number}
type_name | type_number

Specifies the type of record to search for, either by type name or type number. To view a list of record types and their associated numbers, use the SHOW RECTYPE command (see "SHOW").

Example

Both of the following commands return the same result: They display commit records.

SCANFORTYPE Commit
SFT 2

SCANSCROLLING

Use SCANSCROLLING to configure Logdump to update a single line after COUNT scans when NOTIFY is enabled. Otherwise, each scan notification appears on a different line. See "NOTIFY" for more information.

Default

OFF

Syntax

SCANSCROLLING {ON | OFF}
ON

Enables the use of a single line for count notification results.

OFF

Disables the use of a single line, causing a separate line to be used for each notification.

SHOW

Use SHOW to display internal Logdump information, including files that are open if the system is NonStop, the current Logdump environment, a list of Oracle GoldenGate record types, and current filter settings. SHOW can be shortened to SH or SHO.

Default

None

Syntax

SHOW
[ENV]
[FILTER]
[OPEN]
[RECTYPE]
ENV

Displays the current Logdump environment. Same as the ENV command (see "ENV").

FILTER

Displays current filter settings.

OPEN

Shows all NonStop files that are open in Logdump.

RECTYPE

Displays a list of Oracle GoldenGate record types that can be displayed with Logdump.

Examples

Example 1   
SHOW FILTER

This shows something similar to the following on Windows or UNIX:

Data filters are ENABLED
Include  Match ALL
Filename-0 : $QA01.QAESRC.ACCT*
HEX-0      : ( 4), Col 0:3
0000 4BF6
Exclude  Match ANY

It shows something similar to the following on NonStop:

Data filters are ENABLED
Include  Match ALL
Rectypes   : Delete
Filename-0 : hr.regions
Exclude  Match ANY
Example 2   
SHOW OPEN

This shows something similar to the following:

0 : $RECEIVE
1 : \GGS2.$ZTN2.#PTW6EUX
2 : \GGS2.$DATA4.#0009047
3 : \GGS2.$ZTN2.#PTW6EUX
4 : \GGS2.$DATA4.CPSDAT.TM000000
Example 3   
SHOW RECTYPE

This shows results similar to the following. (This list might not reflect all possible record types. New types are added when needed to support new functionality.)


1 - Abort
2 - Commit
3 - Delete
4 - EndRollBack
5 - Insert
6 - Prepared
7 - TMF-Shutdown
8 - TransBegin
9 - TransRelease
10 - Update
11 - UpdateComp
12 - FileAlter
13 - FileCreate
14 - FilePurge
15 - FieldComp
16 - FileRename
17 - AuxPointer
18 - NetworkCommit
19 - NetworkAbort
20 - CurrentPos
89 - SQL/MX DDL OP
90 - GGSSQLCol
100 - GGSPurgedata
101 - GGSPurgeFile
102 - GGSCreateFile
103 - GGSAlterFile
104 - GGSRenameFile
105 - GGSSetmode
107 - GGSControl
106 - GGSChangeLabel
160 - DDL OP
115 - GGSKeyFieldComp
117 - GGSKeyFieldComp32
161 - RecordFragment
116 - LargeObject
132 - GGSCreateSequence
133 - GGSAlterSequence
134 - GGSDropSequence
150 - RestartAbend
151 - RestartOK
152 - RecoveryEnd
200 - GGSBulkio
201 - GGSFileClose
202 - GGSLoggerTS
203 - GGSExtractTS
204 - GGSCollectTS
205 - GGSComment
250 - LibOpenTrace
251 - LibCloseTrace
252 - LoggerOpenTrace
253 - LoggerCloseTrace
254 - LoggerAddedInfo
249 - LoggerAddedStats

SKIP

Use SKIP to skip the specified number of records.

Default

None

Syntax

SKIP n
n

The number of records to skip.

Example

SKIP 50

TIME

Use TIME to display the current time in local and GMT formats.

Default

None

Syntax

TIME

TIMEOFFSET

Use TIMEOFFSET to set the Logdump time format. Without arguments, TIMEOFFSET displays the current time offset. Options enable you to set the time to the local time, Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), or a specific offset from GMT. The specified time format applies to the timestamps shown in records as well as any Logdump commands that accept a time string argument.

Default

LOCAL

Syntax

TIMEOFFSET {LOCAL | GMT | GMT + hh[:mm] | GMT - hh[:mm]}
LOCAL

Sets the time to that of the local system.

GMT

Sets the time to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

GMT + hh[:mm]

Sets the time ahead of GMT by the specified number of hours and, optionally, minutes.

GMT - hh[:mm]

Sets the time behind GMT by the specified number of hours and, optionally, minutes.

Example

TIMEOFFSET GMT -01

TMFBEFOREIMAGE

Use TMFBEFOREIMAGE to view the before image for update operations from TMF audit.

Default

OFF

Syntax

TMFBEFOREIMAGE {ON | OFF}
ON

Displays the before image for update operations from the TMF audit.

OFF

Displays only the after image for update operations from the TMF audit.

Example

A sample display for TMFBEFOREIMAGE ON is shown below.

2011/01/12 10:02:34.325.264 FieldComp          Len    38 RBA 615854956
Name: \NY.$DATA1.GGSDAT.TCUSTMER
Before Image:                                             Partition 0
0000 0004 414E 4E20 0002 0014 5345 4154 544C 4520 | ....ANN ....SEATTLE
2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 0003 0002 5741      |             ....WA
2011/01/12 10:02:34.325.264 FieldComp          Len    38 RBA 615854956
Name: \NY.$DATA1.GGSdat.TCUSTMER
After  Image:                                             Partition 0
TRANSID     : \NY(2).0.7022034  (7998393398406021122)
0000 0004 414E 4E20 0002 0014 4E45 5720 594F 524B | ....ANN ....NEW YORK
2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 0003 0002 4E59      |             ....NY

TMFBEFOREIMAGE

Use TMFBEFOREIMAGE to set the TMFARLIB to fetch the before image of the record and display it with the after image. Without an argument, this command displays whether the fetching of before images is on or off.

Default

OFF

Syntax

TMFBEFOREIMAGE {ON | OFF}

TMFGETRECADDR | NOTMFGETRECADDR

Use TMFGETRECADDR and NOTMFGETRECADDR to control the ability of Logdump to call the ARGETRECADDR() function of TMFARLIB. This function is used when examining a TMF audit trail.

Default

None

Syntax

TMFGETRECADDR | NOTMFGETRECADDR
TMFGETRECADDR

Enables the use of the ARGETRECADDR() function.

NOTMFGETRECADDR

Disables the use of the ARGETRECADDR() function.

TMFIGNORERECCOUNT

Use TMFIGNORERECCOUNT to set the number of records that the TMFARLIB can ignore before returning a CURRENTPOSITION record.

Default

None

Syntax

TMFIGNORERECCOUNT n

TRAILFORMAT

Use TRAILFORMAT to set the version of the Oracle GoldenGate trail or extract file that is being saved when using the SAVE command.

Default

NEW

Syntax

TRAILFORMAT {NEW | OLD}
NEW

Sets the format to that used by Oracle GoldenGate version 6.0 and later.

OLD

Sets the format to that used by Oracle GoldenGate versions earlier than 6.0.

TRANSBYTELIMIT

Use TRANSBYTELIMIT to prevent normal-sized transactions from being tracked in the transaction table specified with the TRANSHIST command. It sets a lower boundary for the number of bytes in a transaction and should be set to represent a normal-sized transaction for the environment being evaluated with Logdump. Setting a boundary reduces the amount of data that is stored and, consequently, the amount that must be reviewed when troubleshooting.

Default

10000 bytes

Syntax

TRANSBYTELIMIT n
n

The number of bytes in a normal-sized transaction.

Example

TRANSBYTELIMIT 9000

TRANSHIST

Use TRANSHIST to keep track of the size of transactions in a trail or file. Logdump tracks the transactions in an internal history table in descending order according to the number of bytes of data in each one. When the history table is full, the smallest transaction is removed to allow a larger transaction to be added to the list.

Use TRANSHIST in conjunction with other Logdump commands to determine whether or not your applications generate large transactions and to identify their relative size. This information can be used when deciding how to group tables into different processing groups for faster throughput. For more information, see "Evaluating Transaction Size".

Note:

You can use the SEND EXTRACT command with the SHOWTRANS option to view a list of long-running transactions. Other options enable you to control whether those transactions are ignored or processed by Oracle GoldenGate.

Default

0 (do not maintain history)

Syntax

TRANSHIST n
n

Sets the size of the history table, in bytes. Valid values are 0 through 200 bytes. A value of 0 means that no transaction history is maintained.

Example

TRANSHIST 150

TRANSRECLIMIT

Use TRANSRECLIMIT to prevent normal-sized transactions from being tracked in the transaction table specified with the TRANSHIST command. It sets a lower boundary for the number of records in a transaction and should be set to represent a normal-sized transaction for the environment being evaluated with Logdump. Setting a boundary reduces the amount of data that is stored and, consequently, the amount that must be reviewed when troubleshooting.

Default

100 operations

Syntax

TRANSRECLIMIT n
n

The number of records in a normal-sized transaction.

Example

TRANSRECLIMIT 90

USERTOKEN

Use USERTOKEN to control whether or not user token data is displayed with each record. A user token is data specified by an Oracle GoldenGate user that is stored in the record header and can be mapped to a target column or used for some other purpose during Oracle GoldenGate processing.

Without arguments, USERTOKEN displays the status of user token display (ON or OFF). With the ON option, the name of the token and its length are displayed. The DETAIL option shows the actual token data.

Default

Display token name and length.

Syntax

USERTOKEN {ON | OFF | DETAIL}
ON

Enables the display of user tokens.

OFF

Disables the display of user tokens.

DETAIL

Displays the token data.

VOLUME

Use VOLUME to set the default directory, volume or subvolume. An alias for this command is CD.

Default

None

Syntax

VOLUME {directory | volume | subvolume}

WRITELOG

Use WRITELOG to write text to the session log. Before using this command, start logging with the LOG command (see "LOG").

Default

None

Syntax

WRITELOG text
text

Any text string. Quotes are optional.

Example

WRITELOG "Customer name is ABC Company."

X

Use X to execute a program from within Logdump. When you exit the program, the Logdump prompt returns.

Default

None

Syntax

X program [string]
command

The program to run.

string

A character string, such as input arguments.

Example

The following series of commands and output shows how you can exit Logdump, issue other commands from the shell or within GGSCI, and then return to the Logdump command line.

Logdump 696 >x ggsci

GoldenGate Command Interpreter
Version .....

GGSCI (sysa) 1> status er *
GGSCI (sysa) 2> start er *
GGSCI (sysa) 3> info er *
GGSCI (sysa) 4> exit
Logdump 697 >