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Solaris 64-bit Developer's Guide
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Document Information


1.  64-bit Computing

2.  When to Use 64-bit

3.  Comparing 32-bit Interfaces and 64-bit Interfaces

4.  Converting Applications

5.  The Development Environment

6.  Advanced Topics

SPARC V9 ABI Features

Stack Bias

Address Space Layout of the SPARC V9 ABI

Placement of Text and Data of the SPARC V9 ABI

Code Models of the SPARC V9 ABI

AMD64 ABI Features

Address Space Layout for amd64 Applications

Alignment Issues

Interprocess Communication

ELF and System Generation Tools

/proc Interface

Extensions to sysinfo(2)

libkvm and /dev/ksyms

libkstat Kernel Statistics

Changes to stdio

Performance Issues

64-bit Application Advantages

64-bit Application Disadvantages

System Call Issues

What Does EOVERFLOW Mean?

Beware ioctl()

A.  Changes in Derived Types

B.  Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


AMD64 ABI Features

64-bit applications are described using Executable and Linking Format (ELF64), which allows large applications and large address spaces to be described completely.

Following is a list of the AMD ABI features.

See the draft amd64 psABI document System V Application Binary Interface, AMD64 Architecture Processor Supplement, Draft Version 0.92.

Address Space Layout for amd64 Applications

For 64-bit applications, the layout of the address space is closely related to that of 32-bit applications, though the starting address and addressing limits are radically different. Like SPARC V9, the amd64 stack grows down from the top of the address space, while the heap extends the data segment from the bottom.

The following diagram shows the default address space provided to a 64–bit application. The regions of the address space marked as reserved might not be mapped by applications. These restrictions might be relaxed on future systems.

Diagram showing address space allocation for a typical amd 64-bit application

The actual addresses in the figure above describe a particular implementation on a particular machine, and are given for illustrative purposes only.