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Oracle Solaris 10 9/10 Installation Guide: Solaris Live Upgrade and Upgrade Planning
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Document Information


Part I Upgrading With Solaris Live Upgrade

1.  Where to Find Solaris Installation Planning Information

2.  Solaris Live Upgrade (Overview)

3.  Solaris Live Upgrade (Planning)

4.  Using Solaris Live Upgrade to Create a Boot Environment (Tasks)

5.  Upgrading With Solaris Live Upgrade (Tasks)

6.  Failure Recovery: Falling Back to the Original Boot Environment (Tasks)

7.  Maintaining Solaris Live Upgrade Boot Environments (Tasks)

8.  Upgrading the Solaris OS on a System With Non-Global Zones Installed

9.  Solaris Live Upgrade (Examples)

10.  Solaris Live Upgrade (Command Reference)

Part II Upgrading and Migrating With Solaris Live Upgrade to a ZFS Root Pool

11.  Solaris Live Upgrade and ZFS (Overview)

12.  Solaris Live Upgrade for ZFS (Planning)

13.  Creating a Boot Environment for ZFS Root Pools

14.  Solaris Live Upgrade For ZFS With Non-Global Zones Installed

Part III Appendices

A.  Troubleshooting (Tasks)

B.  Additional SVR4 Packaging Requirements (Reference)

Preventing Modification of the Current OS

Using Absolute Paths

Using the pkgadd -R Command

Differences Between $PKG_INSTALL_ROOT and $BASEDIR Overview

Guidelines for Writing Scripts

Maintaining Diskless Client Compatibility

Verifying Packages

Preventing User Interaction When Installing or Upgrading

Setting Package Parameters For Zones

For Background Information

C.  Using the Patch Analyzer When Upgrading (Tasks)



Preventing User Interaction When Installing or Upgrading

Packages must be added or removed without the user being prompted for information when using the following standard Solaris utilities.

To test a package to ensure that it will install with no user interaction, a new administration file can be set up with the pkgadd command -a option. The -a option defines an installation administration file to be used in place of the default administration file. Using the default file might result in the user being prompted for more information. You can create an administration file that indicates to pkgadd that it should bypass these checks and install the package without user confirmation. For details, see the man page admin(4) or pkgadd(1M).

The following examples show how the pkgadd command uses the administration file.

Example B-3 Installation Administration File

The following is an example of an installation administration file that requires very little user interaction with the pkgadd utility. Unless the package requires more space than is available on the system, the pkgadd utility uses this file and installs the package without prompting the user for more information.