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System Administration Guide: Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris 10 Containers, and Resource Management     Oracle Solaris 11 Express 11/10
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Document Information


Part I Oracle Solaris Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Resource Management

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

Introduction to Resource Pools

Introduction to Dynamic Resource Pools

About Enabling and Disabling Resource Pools and Dynamic Resource Pools

Resource Pools Used in Zones

When to Use Pools

Resource Pools Framework

/etc/pooladm.conf Contents

Pools Properties

Implementing Pools on a System

project.pool Attribute

SPARC: Dynamic Reconfiguration Operations and Resource Pools

Creating Pools Configurations

Directly Manipulating the Dynamic Configuration

poold Overview

Managing Dynamic Resource Pools

Configuration Constraints and Objectives

Configuration Constraints

pset.min Property and pset.max Property Constraints

cpu.pinned Property Constraint

pool.importance Property Constraint

Configuration Objectives

wt-load Objective

The locality Objective

utilization Objective

Configuration Objectives Example

poold Properties

poold Features That Can Be Configured

poold Monitoring Interval

poold Logging Information

Configuration Information Logging

Monitoring Information Logging

Optimization Information Logging

Logging Location

Log Management With logadm

How Dynamic Resource Allocation Works

About Available Resources

Determining Available Resources

Identifying a Resource Shortage

Determining Resource Utilization

Identifying Control Violations

Determining Appropriate Remedial Action

Using poolstat to Monitor the Pools Facility and Resource Utilization

poolstat Output

Tuning poolstat Operation Intervals

Commands Used With the Resource Pools Facility

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

Part II Oracle Solaris Zones

15.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris Zones

16.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

17.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

18.  About Installing, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Overview)

19.  Installing, Booting, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

20.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

21.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

22.  Moving and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

23.  About Packages on an Oracle Solaris 11 Express System With Zones Installed

24.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

25.  Administering Oracle Solaris Zones (Tasks)

26.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Oracle Solaris Zones Problems

Part III Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

27.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

28.  Assessing an Oracle Solaris 10 System and Creating an Archive

29.  (Optional) Migrating an Oracle Solaris 10 native Non-Global Zone Into an Oracle Solaris 10 Container

30.  Configuring the solaris10 Branded Zone

31.  Installing the solaris10 Branded Zone

32.  Booting a Zone and Zone Migration

33.  solaris10 Branded Zone Login and Post-Installation Configuration



Resource Pools Framework

The /etc/pooladm.conf configuration file describes the static pools configuration. A static configuration represents the way in which an administrator would like a system to be configured with respect to resource pools functionality. An alternate file name can be specified.

When the service management facility (SMF) or the pooladm -e command is used to enable the resource pools framework, then, if an /etc/pooladm.conf file exists, the configuration contained in the file is applied to the system.

The kernel holds information about the disposition of resources within the resource pools framework. This is known as the dynamic configuration, and it represents the resource pools functionality for a particular system at a point in time. The dynamic configuration can be viewed by using the pooladm command. Note that the order in which properties are displayed for pools and resource sets can vary. Modifications to the dynamic configuration are made in the following ways:

More than one static pools configuration file can exist, for activation at different times. You can alternate between multiple pools configurations by invoking pooladm from a cron job. See the cron(1M) man page for more information on the cron utility.

By default, the resource pools framework is not active. Resource pools must be enabled to create or modify the dynamic configuration. Static configuration files can be manipulated with the poolcfg or libpool commands even if the resource pools framework is disabled. Static configuration files cannot be created if the pools facility is not active. For more information on the configuration file, see Creating Pools Configurations.

The commands used with resource pools and the poold system daemon are described in the following man pages:

/etc/pooladm.conf Contents

All resource pool configurations, including the dynamic configuration, can contain the following elements.


Properties affecting the total behavior of the system


A resource pool definition


A processor set definition


A processor definition

All of these elements have properties that can be manipulated to alter the state and behavior of the resource pools framework. For example, the pool property pool.importance indicates the relative importance of a given pool. This property is used for possible resource dispute resolution. For more information, see libpool(3LIB).

Pools Properties

The pools facility supports named, typed properties that can be placed on a pool, resource, or component. Administrators can store additional properties on the various pool elements. A property namespace similar to the project attribute is used.

For example, the following comment indicates that a given pset is associated with a particular Datatree database.


For additional information about property types, see poold Properties.

Note - A number of special properties are reserved for internal use and cannot be set or removed. See the libpool(3LIB) man page for more information.