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Oracle Solaris Administration: IP Services     Oracle Solaris 11 Information Library
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Document Information


Part I TCP/IP Administration

1.  Planning the Network Deployment

2.  Considerations When Using IPv6 Addresses

3.  Configuring an IPv4 Network

4.  Enabling IPv6 on the Network

5.  Administering a TCP/IP Network

6.  Configuring IP Tunnels

7.  Troubleshooting Network Problems

8.  IPv4 Reference

9.  IPv6 Reference


10.  About DHCP (Overview)

11.  Administering the ISC DHCP Service

12.  Configuring and Administering the DHCP Client

13.  DHCP Commands and Files (Reference)

Part III IP Security

14.  IP Security Architecture (Overview)

15.  Configuring IPsec (Tasks)

16.  IP Security Architecture (Reference)

17.  Internet Key Exchange (Overview)

18.  Configuring IKE (Tasks)

19.  Internet Key Exchange (Reference)

IKE Service

IKE Daemon

IKE Configuration File

ikeadm Command

IKE Preshared Keys Files

IKE Public Key Databases and Commands

ikecert tokens Command

ikecert certlocal Command

ikecert certdb Command

ikecert certrldb Command

/etc/inet/ike/publickeys Directory

/etc/inet/secret/ike.privatekeys Directory

/etc/inet/ike/crls Directory

20.  IP Filter in Oracle Solaris (Overview)

21.  IP Filter (Tasks)

Part IV Networking Performance

22.  Integrated Load Balancer Overview

23.  Configuration of Integrated Load Balancer (Tasks)

24.  Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (Overview)

25.  VRRP Configuration (Tasks)

26.  Implementing Congestion Control

Part V IP Quality of Service (IPQoS)

27.  Introducing IPQoS (Overview)

28.  Planning for an IPQoS-Enabled Network (Tasks)

29.  Creating the IPQoS Configuration File (Tasks)

30.  Starting and Maintaining IPQoS (Tasks)

31.  Using Flow Accounting and Statistics Gathering (Tasks)

32.  IPQoS in Detail (Reference)



IKE Daemon

The in.iked daemon automates the management of cryptographic keys for IPsec on an Oracle Solaris system. The daemon negotiates with a remote system that is running the same protocol to provide authenticated keying materials for security associations (SAs) in a protected manner. The daemon must be running on all systems that plan to communicate securely.

By default, the svc:/network/ipsec/ike:default service is not enabled. After you have configured the /etc/inet/ike/config file and enabled the ike service, the in.iked daemon runs at system boot.

When the IKE daemon runs, the system authenticates itself to its peer IKE entity in the Phase 1 exchange. The peer is defined in the IKE policy file, as are the authentication methods. The daemon then establishes the keys for the Phase 2 exchange. At an interval specified in the policy file, the IKE keys are refreshed automatically. The in.iked daemon listens for incoming IKE requests from the network and for requests for outbound traffic through the PF_KEY socket. For more information, see the pf_key(7P) man page.

Two commands support the IKE daemon. The ikeadm command can be used to view and temporarily modify the IKE policy. To permanently modify the IKE policy, you modify properties of the ike service. To modify properties of the IKE service, see How to Manage IPsec and IKE Services. The ikeadm command can also be used to view Phase 1 SAs, policy rules, preshared keys, available Diffie-Hellman groups, Phase 1 encryption and authentication algorithms, and the certificate cache.

The ikecert command enables you to view and manage the public key databases. This command manages the local databases, ike.privatekeys and publickeys. This command also manages public key operations and the storage of public keys on hardware.