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Oracle Solaris Administration: IP Services     Oracle Solaris 11 Information Library
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Document Information


Part I TCP/IP Administration

1.  Planning the Network Deployment

2.  Considerations When Using IPv6 Addresses

3.  Configuring an IPv4 Network

4.  Enabling IPv6 on the Network

5.  Administering a TCP/IP Network

6.  Configuring IP Tunnels

7.  Troubleshooting Network Problems

8.  IPv4 Reference

9.  IPv6 Reference


10.  About DHCP (Overview)

11.  Administering the ISC DHCP Service

12.  Configuring and Administering the DHCP Client

13.  DHCP Commands and Files (Reference)

Part III IP Security

14.  IP Security Architecture (Overview)

15.  Configuring IPsec (Tasks)

16.  IP Security Architecture (Reference)

17.  Internet Key Exchange (Overview)

18.  Configuring IKE (Tasks)

19.  Internet Key Exchange (Reference)

20.  IP Filter in Oracle Solaris (Overview)

21.  IP Filter (Tasks)

Part IV Networking Performance

22.  Integrated Load Balancer Overview

23.  Configuration of Integrated Load Balancer (Tasks)

24.  Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (Overview)

25.  VRRP Configuration (Tasks)

26.  Implementing Congestion Control

Part V IP Quality of Service (IPQoS)

27.  Introducing IPQoS (Overview)

28.  Planning for an IPQoS-Enabled Network (Tasks)

29.  Creating the IPQoS Configuration File (Tasks)

30.  Starting and Maintaining IPQoS (Tasks)

31.  Using Flow Accounting and Statistics Gathering (Tasks)

Setting Up Flow Accounting (Task Map)

Recording Information About Traffic Flows

How to Create a File for Flow-Accounting Data

Gathering Statistical Information

32.  IPQoS in Detail (Reference)



Recording Information About Traffic Flows

You use the IPQoS flowacct module to collect information about traffic flows. For example, you can collect source and destination addresses, number of packets in a flow, and similar data. The process of accumulating and recording information about flows is called flow accounting.

The results of flow accounting on traffic of a particular class are recorded in a table of flow records. Each flow record consists of a series of attributes. These attributes contain data about traffic flows of a particular class over an interval of time. For a list of the flowacct attributes, refer to Table 32-4.

Flow accounting is particularly useful for billing clients as is defined in their service-level agreements (SLAs). You can also use flow accounting to obtain flow statistics for critical applications. This section contains tasks for using flowacct with the Oracle Solaris extended accounting facility to obtain data on traffic flows.

The following information is contained in sources outside this chapter:

How to Create a File for Flow-Accounting Data

Before you add a flowacct action to the IPQoS configuration file, you must create a file for flow records from the flowacct module. You use the acctadm command for this purpose. acctadm can record either basic attributes or extended attributes in the file. All flowacct attributes are listed in Table 32-4. For detailed information about acctadm, refer to the acctadm(1M) man page.

  1. Create a basic flow-accounting file.

    The following example shows how to create a basic flow-accounting file for the premium web server that is configured in Example 29-1.

    # /usr/sbin/acctadm -e basic -f /var/ipqos/goldweb/ flow
    acctadm -e

    Invokes acctadm with the -e option. The -e option enables the arguments that follow.


    States that only data for the eight basic flowacct attributes is to be recorded in the file.


    Specifies the fully qualified path name of the file to hold the flow records from flowacct.


    Instructs acctadm to enable flow accounting.

  2. View information about flow accounting on the IPQoS system by typing acctadm without arguments.

    acctadm generates the following output:

    Task accounting: inactive
           Task accounting file: none
         Tracked task resources: none
       Untracked task resources: extended
             Process accounting: inactive
        Process accounting file: none
      Tracked process resources: none
    Untracked process resources: extended,host,mstate
                Flow accounting: active
           Flow accounting file: /var/ipqos/goldweb/
         Tracked flow resources: basic
       Untracked flow resources: dsfield,ctime,lseen,projid,uid

    All entries but the last four are for use with the Oracle Solaris Resource Manager feature. The next table explains the entries that are specific to IPQoS.

    Flow accounting: active
    Indicates that flow accounting is turned on.
    Flow accounting file: /var/ipqos/goldweb/
    Gives the name of the current flow-accounting file.
    Tracked flow resources: basic
    Indicates that only the basic flow attributes are tracked.
    Untracked flow resources: dsfield,ctime,lseen,projid,uid
    Lists the flowacct attributes that are not tracked in the file.
  3. (Optional) Add the extended attributes to the accounting file.
    # acctadm -e extended -f /var/ipqos/goldweb/ flow
  4. (Optional) Return to recording only the basic attributes in the accounting file.
    # acctadm -d extended -e basic -f /var/ipqos/goldweb/

    The -d option disables extended accounting.

  5. View the contents of a flow-accounting file.

    Instructions for viewing the contents of a flow-accounting file are in Perl Interface to libexacct in Oracle Solaris Administration: Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris 10 Zones, and Resource Management.

See Also