3.5 Server Item

Each server configured within the environment is displayed as a server navigation item belonging to either a particular server pool navigation item, or to the Unassigned Servers folder. These server navigation items are labelled according to the server name that is configured within Oracle VM Manager. The structure of the navigation provided in the navigation tree is discussed in more detail in Section 3.2, “Summary”.

Clicking on a server navigation item in the navigation tree allows you to access different perspectives in the management pane. Each perspective provides its own view of the server within Oracle VM Manager. Most of the perspectives also include separate perspective toolbars that enable you to perform various configuration or management tasks specific to the view currently displayed within the management pane. A server navigation item offers the following perspectives within the management pane:

3.5.1 Info Perspective

The Info perspective is common to many elements within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. This perspective always shows the individually configured parameters for an item that is currently selected in the navigation tree. Some of these configured parameters may be automatically populated through a discovery process, while others may have been configured manually during the creation of the object that is selected.

The Info perspective or dialog contains a perspective toolbar with the following options:

Table 3.14 Info Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


This perspective includes the following information:

  • Server Name: The configured name for the server.

  • Host Name: The hostname of the server on the management network channel.

  • Status: The running status of the server. If the status is UNKNOWN, this may be because the server is not owned by the instance of Oracle VM Manager. To take ownership of an Oracle VM Server, see Section 3.4.2.2, “Edit Server”.

  • Processors: The number of processors on the server.

  • Ethernet Ports: The number of Ethernet ports detected on the server.

  • Maintenance Mode: Whether or not the server is configured in maintenance mode.

  • Inbound Migration Locked: Whether or not the server allows additional virtual machines to run.

  • Ownership: Whether or not the server is owned by the current Oracle VM Manager instance.

  • Server Pool: The name of the server pool that the server belongs to.

  • Roles: Whether the server has the Utility Server role, VM Server role, or both.

  • NTP Servers: A list of NTP servers that are configured for the server.

  • Description: The description provided for the server when it was created or edited.

  • IP Address: The configured IP address for the server.

  • Processor Speed (GHz): The speed of the processors on the server.

  • Memory (GiB): The memory on the server in GiB.

  • Bond Ports: The number of bond ports that are configured on the server.

  • CPU Compatibility Group: The name of the server processor compatibility group that the server belongs to.

  • Processor Type: The processor type used for the server.

  • Hypervisor Type: The hypervisor used for the server.

  • Up To Date: Whether or not the server has the most recent update from the server update repository.

  • Version: The version number of the Oracle VM Server software on the server.

  • Advanced:

    • ID: The UUID assigned to the server by Oracle VM Manager.

    • Manufacturer: The manufacturer of the server reported by the server BIOS.

    • Serial Number: The serial number of the server reported by the server BIOS.

    • Product Name: The product name of the server reported by the server BIOS.

    • Processor Family: The processor family reported by the server BIOS.

    • Processor Model: The processor model reported by the server BIOS.

    • Cache Size (KB): The processor cache size reported by the server BIOS.

    • BIOS Version: The BIOS version number for the server.

    • BIOS Release Date: The BIOS version release date for the server.

    • Sockets Filled: The number of processor sockets that are in use on the server.

    • Manager UUID: The UUID of the Oracle VM Manager instance that owns this server.

  • Server Abilities:

    • Cluster: Whether or not the server supports clustering.

    • Nfs: Whether or not the server is capable of mounting NFS shares.

    • iSCSI: Whether or not the server is capable of mounting iSCSI LUNs.

    • Fibre Channel: Whether or not the server is capable of mounting Fibre Channel LUNs.

    • HighAvailability: Whether or not the server supports high availability for virtual machines.

    • VMSuspend: Whether or not the server supports suspending a virtual machine.

    • Per VM CPUOverSubscribe: Whether or not each virtual machine can be configured to perform CPU over-subscription.

    • All VM CPUOverSubscribe: Whether or not all virtual machines on the server can be configured to perform CPU over-subscription.

    • Bondmode Active Backup: Whether or not the server supports active backup network bonds.

    • Bondmode Link Aggregation: Whether or not the server supports link aggregation network bonds.

    • Bondmode Load Balanced: Whether or not the server supports load balancing for a network bonds.

    • Mtu Configuration: Whether or not MTU settings for network interfaces can be configured on the server.

    • Local Storage Element: Whether or not a local disk be used for storage on a server.

    • VM Memory Alignment: The size of the data alignment block that is used for offsetting memory requirements for each virtual machine to ensure better performance.

    • Vnc Console: Whether or not the server supports VNC.

    • Serial Console: Whether or not the server supports Serial Console.

    • Migration Setup: An internal facility to perform setup requirements for virtual machine migration, typically used for SPARC deployments.

    • Vm Live Storage Migration: Whether or not the server supports migration of virtual machines that have virtual disks located on a repository hosted on local storage.

    • HVM Max Vnics: The maximum number of VNICs that can be assigned to a hardware virtualized virtual machine.

    • Server Package Update: Whether or not the server supports package updates.

    • PowerOn WOL: Whether or not the server supports Wake On LAN.

    • Repo On SharedDisk: Whether or not the server supports a repository on a shared disk, such as iSCSI or Fibre Channel.

    • Repo On LocalDisk: Whether or not the server supports a repository on a local disk.

    • ClusterFs On PhysicalDisk: Whether or not the server is capable of creating an OCFS2 file system on a physical disk, such as an iSCSI LUN or Fibre Channel LUN.

    • VmEmptyCdrom: Whether or not the server supports an empty virtual CDROM on a virtual machine. SPARC servers do not support an empty virtual CDROM.

    • Vm Restart Actions: Whether or not the server supports different restart actions in the event that a virtual machine crashes.

    • Vm Live Storage Migration: Whether or not the server supports migrating a running virtual machine and virtual disks from one local repository to another.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.15 Info Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.2 Virtual Machines Perspective

The Virtual Machines perspective lists the different virtual machines that belong to either a server pool or a server or the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, depending on the item selected in the navigation pane. Note that this perspective is not available for server items listed off the Unassigned Servers folder, since virtual machines cannot be assigned to servers that do not belong to a server pool. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Name: The name that has been configured for the virtual machine.

  • Status: The running status of the virtual machine.

  • Tag(s): Any tags that have been applied to the virtual machine.

  • Event Severity: What event severity level is currently indicated for the virtual machine.

  • Server: The actual Oracle VM Server that the virtual machine is currently residing on.

  • Max. Memory (MB): The maximum available memory (in megabytes) that the virtual machine is able to consume.

  • Memory (MB): The amount of memory (in megabytes) that the virtual machine is currently consuming.

  • Max. Processors: The number of processors that the virtual machine is allowed to make use of.

  • Processors: The number of processors that the virtual machine is currently using.

  • Keymap: The character keymap that has been configured for the virtual machine.

  • Operating System: The operating system that the virtual machine is running.

Clicking on the arrow to the left of a virtual machine in the table displays a set of subtabs that show more detailed information about the virtual machine. These tabs are Configuration, Networks, and Disks. Click on a tab to display the information:

Configuration

  • Name: The name that has been configured for the virtual machine.

  • Status: The running status of the virtual machine.

  • Operating System: The operating system type.

  • Keymap: The character keymap that has been configured for the virtual machine.

  • Max. Processors: The maximum number of CPUs that can be allocated.

  • Processors: The number of CPUs that are allocated.

  • Processor Cap: The percentage value configured for the processor cap.

  • Max. Memory (MB): The maximum memory that can be allocated.

  • Memory (MB): The memory that is allocated.

  • Priority: The CPU priority allocated for the virtual machine.

  • Mouse Type: The mouse type configured for the virtual machine.

  • Domain Type: The hypervisor and virtual machine type configured for the virtual machine.

  • Start policy: The start policy configured for the virtual machine.

  • High Availability: Whether or not the High Availability flag is set for the virtual machine.

  • Repository for Configuration File: The repository where the configuration file for the virtual machine is stored.

  • Huge Pages: Whether or not the Huge Pages flag is set for the virtual machine.

  • Boot Order: The configured boot order for disks attached to the virtual machine

  • Network Boot Path: The network boot path configured for the virtual machine.

  • Restart Action On Crash: The configured restart action in the instance that the virtual machine crashes.

  • Restart Action On Power Off: The configured restart action in the instance that the virtual machine receives the power-off signal.

  • Restart Action On Restart: The configured restart action in the instance that the virtual machine receives the restart signal.

  • ID: The ID allocated by Oracle VM Manager for the virtual machine.

  • Origin: The URL that was used to import the virtual machine or template, if it was imported.

  • Description: The description of the virtual machine.

  • Config File Absolute Path: The absolute path to the virtual machine configuration file.

  • Config File Mounted Path: The mount point where the virtual machine configuration file is located on an Oracle VM Server.

Networks

  • VNIC: The name of a VNIC configured for the virtual machine.

  • Ethernet Network: The name of the ethernet network that the VNIC is attached to.

  • IP Addresses: IP addresses configured for the VNIC. Note that the virtual machine must be running Oracle VM Guest Additions for this information to be populated. If no IP address is configured for this VNIC, the IP address is displayed as 0.0.0.0.

Disks

  • Slot: The slot number for the disk.

  • Disk Type: The type of disk that is attached.

  • Name: The name of the disk within Oracle VM Manager.

  • Size (GiB): The size of the disk.

  • Repository: The repository where the disk is located.

  • Absolute Path: The absolute path to the location of the disk.

  • Mounted Path: The mount point where the disk is located on an Oracle VM Server.

  • Location: The location of the disk as reported by Oracle VM Manager.

If this perspective is viewed from the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, some of the toolbar icons that are usually available for this perspective are not included in the toolbar. The table below lists all of the toolbar icons that are available for this perspective and indicates the items that are not available when the perspective is viewed from the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder.

Table 3.16 Virtual Machines Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Import Virtual Machine...

Import Virtual Machine... icon

Displays the Import Virtual Machine dialog box. Use this option to import a virtual machine into Oracle VM Manager.

This option is only available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Edit...

Edit... icon

Displays the Edit Virtual Machine wizard. Use this option to edit a virtual machine.

Delete
Delete icon

Displays the Delete Confirmation dialog box. Use this option to delete the selected virtual machines.

Start

Start icon

Starts up a stopped virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Stop

Stop icon

Shuts down a virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Launch Console

Launch Console icon

Launches the virtual machine VNC console in an x86-based server pool, which enables access to the virtual machine. Use this option to connect to a virtual machine's console and access the virtual machine directly.

Not available for virtual machines in the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, or virtual machines in a server pool, but not assigned to an Oracle VM Server.

Launch Serial Console

Launch Serial Console icon

Launches the virtual machine serial console, which enables access to the virtual machine. Use this option to connect to a virtual machine's serial console and access the virtual machine directly.

This service is commonly used for virtual machines running in a SPARC-based server pool, but is also available for virtual machines running on x86-based server pools.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Restart

Restart icon

Restarts a running virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Kill

Kill icon

Shuts down a running virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Suspend

Suspend icon

Suspends (pauses) a running virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Resume

Resume icon

Resumes (unpauses) a suspended virtual machine.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Migrate or Move a Virtual Machine...

Migrate or Move Virtual Machine... icon

Migrates a virtual machine to another Oracle VM Server, or moves the configuration and virtual disks for a virtual machine to an alternate repository.

Clone Virtual Machine...

Clone Virtual Machine... icon

Displays the Clone Virtual Machine dialog box. Use this option to clone a virtual machine to create another virtual machine.

Export to Virtual Appliance...

Export to Virtual Appliance... icon

Displays the Export to Virtual Appliance dialog box. Use this option to export a virtual machine as a virtual appliance.

Manage Clone Customizers...

Manage Clone Customizers... icon

Displays the Manage Clone Customizer dialog box. The clone customizer lets you set up clone parameters, such as networking, disks and ISO resources. Use this option to create, edit or delete a clone customizer.

Send VM Messages...

Send VM Messages... icon

Send one or more virtual machines a message. Use this option to send messages to virtual machines that have the Oracle VM Guest Additions installed.

Not available for Unassigned Virtual Machines.

Display VM Config File Content...

Display VM Config File Content... icon

Displays the VM Config File Content dialog box. Displays a read-only view of the configuration file for the selected virtual machine. Use this option to view the content of the virtual machine configuration file.

Display VM Hierarchy Viewer

Display VM Hierarchy Viewer icon

Displays a graphical report on a virtual machine.

Display Selected VM Events...

Display Selected VM Events... icon

Displays the Events dialog box. Displays events for the selected virtual machine. Use this option to view or acknowledge error events for the virtual machine.

Generate Report

Generate Report icon

Generate an XML report on one or more virtual machines.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.2.1 Edit Virtual Machine

Editing a virtual machine to changes the virtual machine configuration. If the virtual machine is running, you cannot edit specific settings such as the mouse device type, domain type, maximum amount of memory, maximum number of processors, restart action on crash, or huge pages support. To edit these settings, the virtual machine must be stopped so that the hypervisor can reload the virtual machine configuration when the virtual machine starts.

To edit a virtual machine:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine in the management pane, and click Edit... Edit... icon in the management pane toolbar

  4. The Edit Virtual Machine dialog box is displayed. Select each tab to edit the virtual machine configuration. See Section 3.1.3, “Create Virtual Machine” for the details of each tab. Click OK to save the changes.

    Note

    It is not possible to dynamically change resources such as the number or processors or allocated memory for an Oracle Solaris virtual machine without first enabling the drd service on the virtual machine itself. To allow for these changes, connect to the virtual machine and make sure that the drd service is enabled:

    # svcadm enable -s drd
    # svcs drd          

    These commands should notify you that the service is online. When you have performed these actions, you are able to use Oracle VM Manager to dynamically change the allocation of resources.

    Note

    It is not possible to change the number of virtual network interfaces or virtual disks for a virtual machine while the virtual machine is in a suspended state. Attempting to add or remove such a device results in an exception and an error is returned.

    Note

    It is not possible to remove a virtual CD-ROM from a running virtual machine. Doing so results in an exception and an error is returned. To remove virtual CD-ROMs from running virtual machines, you must first stop the virtual machine and then remove the virtual CD-ROM.

3.5.2.2 Delete Virtual Machines

When you delete a virtual machine, all the files and data associated with this virtual machine are removed from Oracle VM Manager. Before deleting a virtual machine, make sure you do not need it any longer. You can only delete a virtual machine when the virtual machine status is Stopped or Error.

To delete virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Delete Delete icon in the management pane toolbar.

  4. The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed. Select any virtual disks associated with the virtual machines to delete. The virtual machine's physical disks are listed if the storage on which they reside uses a non-generic Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in. Before any physical disks are deleted, they are removed from any access groups. Click OK to delete the virtual machines and the selected virtual and physical disks.

3.5.2.3 Start Virtual Machines

After a virtual machine is created, you can start it. Starting a virtual machine is analogous to starting a computer by pressing the Power On button.

To start virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Start Start icon .

The virtual machines are started.

3.5.2.4 Stop Virtual Machines

When a virtual machine is not in use, you should shut it down to release system resources. Stopping a virtual machine is analogous to a normal shutdown of a physical computer.

If you want to save the state of the virtual machine, you should suspend it. See Section 3.5.2.9, “Suspend Virtual Machines” for information on suspending virtual machines.

In some situations you may not be able to stop a virtual machine, for example, if you have tried to stop it while another job is in progress on the virtual machine such as a start virtual machine job. To resolve this type of situation, you should abort the job that is in progress, then kill the virtual machine. See Section 8.1.5, “Abort Jobs” for information on aborting jobs, and Section 3.5.2.8, “Kill Virtual Machines” for information on killing a virtual machine.

To stop virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Stop Stop icon .

Note

You can also shut down a virtual machine from within the virtual machine, the same way you shut down a physical computer.

After issuing the stop command, the status of the virtual machine is changed to Stopped. However, this only indicates that the command was acknowledged. There is no guarantee that the virtual machine is effectively shut down correctly. This is expected behavior since an operating system running on a physical PC may also hang during the shutdown sequence.

If the virtual machine fails to shut down, you can power it off using the kill virtual machine option, which is similar to unplugging the power cable from a physical machine. To perform a power off (kill) of virtual machines, see Section 3.5.2.8, “Kill Virtual Machines”.

3.5.2.5 Launch Console

Important

The VNC Console can only be used to connect to virtual machines running on an x86 Oracle VM Server. If you are attempting to connect to a virtual machine running on Oracle VM Server for SPARC you should use the serial console. The Launch Console Launch Console icon is greyed out when Oracle VM Manager detects that the virtual machine is running on an LDOM hypervisor. See Section 3.5.2.6, “Launch Serial Console”.

The VNC Console makes use of noVNC, that uses HTML5 (WebSockets, Canvas) to render a web-based VNC client accessible from any browser that properly supports HTML5. You can find out more about noVNC at http://kanaka.github.io/noVNC/.

The VNC Console is not available for virtual machines in the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, or virtual machines in a server pool, but not assigned to an Oracle VM Server.

The key mapping for each VNC session is set when you create or edit a virtual machine, in the Keymap field. See Section 3.1.3, “Create Virtual Machine” and Section 3.5.2.1, “Edit Virtual Machine” for information on creating and editing a virtual machine.

To connect to a virtual machine's console:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine in the management pane, and click Launch Console Launch Console icon in the perspective toolbar

  4. A new browser window or tab is opened.

    Tip

    If the console does not start, check that your web browser allows pop-ups to be displayed. If you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer, add the base URL of Oracle VM Manager (for example, http://example.com) to the list of trusted sites in the security settings. You may also need to downgrade the security level from medium to medium-low for the Trusted sites zone.

    If the virtual machine's console is in use by another user, a message is displayed asking if you want to take over the connection. If you take over the connection, the other user's session is disconnected and the VNC session is started on your client computer. If the VNC client has trouble taking over the connection, you may need to close it and launch the VNC console again.

    The virtual machine console is displayed. Log in and interact with the virtual machine as you would through any other VNC session.

Note that, if you open a virtual machine console to a running virtual machine and use the Ctrl-Alt-Delete button to restart the virtual machine, the virtual machine restarts and the console reconnects but the control buttons for the console move out of the visible area in the dialog. This is expected behavior, related to the size of the VNC display returned by Oracle VM Server and the way in which HTML5 canvases work.

To view the control buttons for the virtual machine console after the virtual machine has restarted, you may either extend the right side of dialog, or close the dialog and open it again.

3.5.2.6 Launch Serial Console

You must use the serial console to connect to virtual machines on a SPARC-based server pool instead of the VNC console.

For virtual machines running on x86-based server pools, you should use the VNC console instead of the serial console. Output from the serial console is read-only and non-interactive when you use it to connect to virtual machines running on an x86-based server pool. Additionally, virtual machines running on an x86-based server pool must support, and be configured for, redirecting serial output. See Section 3.4.3.5, “Launch Console” for more information about using the VNC console.

To connect to a virtual machine's serial console:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine in the management pane, and click Launch Serial Console Launch Serial Console icon in the management pane toolbar

  4. A new browser window or tab is opened.

    Tip

    If the console does not start, check that your web browser allows pop-ups to be displayed. If you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer, add the base URL of Oracle VM Manager (for example, http://example.com) to the list of trusted sites in the security settings. You may also need to downgrade the security level from medium to medium-low for the Trusted sites zone.

    If the virtual machine's console is in use by another user, a message is displayed asking if you want to take over the connection. If you take over the connection, the other user's session is disconnected and the terminal session is started on your client computer. If the terminal emulator has trouble taking over the connection, you may need to close it and launch the serial console again.

    The virtual machine console is displayed. Log in and interact with the virtual machine as you would through any other console session. If required, enter the user name and password of the guest operating system to log in to the operating system.

3.5.2.7 Restart Virtual Machines

Restarting a virtual machine is analogous to rebooting a computer. You may need to restart a virtual machine if an operating system update requires you to restart the virtual machine, for example Microsoft Windows™ updates.

To restart virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Restart Restart icon .

The virtual machines are restarted.

Note

If a virtual machine has not fully started, a restart request may not succeed as the virtual machine may not be ready to initiate the request. In this case, you may need to abort the restart job and try again later. Alternately, kill the virtual machine and start it again.

3.5.2.8 Kill Virtual Machines

Killing a virtual machine is equivalent to performing a power off of a virtual machine, similar to unplugging the power cable from a physical machine. This is not the recommended method of shutting down a virtual machine, but may be used if the shut down command fails to shut down the virtual machine.

To kill virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Kill Kill icon .

The virtual machines are powered off.

3.5.2.9 Suspend Virtual Machines

Suspending a virtual machine is analogous to putting a computer into sleep mode. When a virtual machine is suspended, the current state of the operating system, and applications is saved, and the virtual machine put into a suspended mode. When you resume the virtual machine, the operating system and applications continue from the same point you suspended the virtual machine.

Note

You cannot suspend virtual machines on SPARC-based server pools.

To suspend virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane, and click Suspend Suspend icon .

The virtual machine state is saved and the virtual machines suspended.

To resume the virtual machine, see Section 3.5.2.10, “Resume Virtual Machine”.

3.5.2.10 Resume Virtual Machine

Resuming a suspended virtual machine is analogous to waking up a computer that has been in sleep mode. When you resume a suspended virtual machine, the operating system and applications continue from the same point you suspended the virtual machine.

Note

You cannot resume virtual machines on SPARC-based server pools.

To resume a virtual machine:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine to start in the management pane, and click Resume Resume icon .

The virtual machine state is retrieved and the virtual machine started according to the VM Start Policy defined for the server pool.

3.5.2.11 Migrate or Move Virtual Machines

The Migrate or Move Migrate or Move icon option allows you to migrate and move virtual machines by opening the Migrate or Move Virtual Machine wizard that allows you to select and perform the appropriate actions depending on your requirements and the state of the virtual machine.

It is important to understand that migrating a virtual machine changes the Oracle VM Server or server pool where the virtual machine runs, while moving a virtual machine changes the repository where the virtual machine configuration or virtual disks are located.

A stopped virtual machine can be migrated to any Oracle VM Server, server pool, or to the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder. A running virtual machine can be migrated to any Oracle VM Server within the same server pool.

The steps below assume the virtual machine is deployed to an Oracle VM Server. If the virtual machine is located in the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, select it in that folder to perform the migration.

To migrate or move a virtual machine:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine to migrate in the management pane, and click Migrate or Move Migrate or Move icon .

    The Migrate or Move Virtual Machine dialog box is displayed.

  4. Choose the appropriate option from the Migrate or Move Virtual Machine dialog box. Different options are available, depending on if the virtual machine is running or stopped.

If the virtual machine is running, you can select from the following options:

  • Migrate a running VM to a different Server within the same Server Pool

    This option changes the server where the virtual machine runs. The destination server must be within the same server pool as the source server. Likewise, the destination server must be able to access the virtual machine configuration and storage. You should choose this option to migrate virtual machines between servers within a server pool that use a shared repository.

    Select this option and then click Next to proceed as follows:

    1. Select the destination server to which you want to migrate the virtual machine from the Specified Server drop-down list.

      Note

      Some options are disabled because they apply only if you are migrating a virtual machine that is stopped.

    2. Click Finish to complete the migration.

  • Migrate a running VM, and migrate its local storage, to a different Server within the same Server Pool

    This option changes the server where the virtual machine runs and moves its local storage. You can choose this option to migrate virtual machines between servers within the same server pool when:

    • At least one virtual disk resides in a repository that is local to the source server.

    • The destination repository is local to the destination server.

    Note

    If the virtual machine configuration file resides in a repository that is local to the source server only, the configuration file is copied to the destination repository. If the configuration file resides in a shared repository, it is not copied.

    Select this option and then click Next to proceed as follows:

    1. Select the destination server to which you want to migrate the virtual machine from the Server to Migrate to drop-down list.

    2. Select the destination repository to which you want to move the virtual machine configuration and storage from the Target Repository drop-down list.

      Note

      You can select only repositories that are hosted on an OCFS2 file system.

    3. Click Finish to complete the migration and move the virtual machine configuration and storage.

  • Move this VM to a different Repository

    This option changes the location of the virtual machine.

    Note

    Beginning in Oracle VM Manager 3.4.6, this option is available when the Migrate or Move Virtual Machine dialog box is displayed for a running virtual machine. This option makes it possible to move a vm.cfg file from one repository to another while the virtual machine is in running state by creating an empty clone customizer.

    Important

    When moving a running virtual machine, be sure to create an empty clone customer with no storage mappings attached. If a clone customizer is created with an attached virtual disk that is actively being used by the virtual machine, an error message is returned.

    Select this option and then click Next to proceed as follows:

    1. Click Create to create a new empty clone customizer with no storage mappings attached.

    2. Select the destination repository to which you want to move the virtual machine configuration from the Target Repository drop-down list.

    3. Click Finish to move the virtual machine.

If the virtual machine is stopped, you can select from the following options:

  • Migrate a VM to a different Server, Server Pool, or Unassigned State

    This option lets you change the virtual machine destination to either the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder or unassigned in the current server pool. This option also lets you change the server or server pool where the virtual machine runs as well as the location of the virtual machine configuration and storage.

    Select this option and then click Next to proceed as follows:

    1. Select one of the following destinations for the virtual machine:

      • Unassigned Virtual Machines Folder: Removes the virtual machine from the server pool and moves it to the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder.

      • Unassigned in Current Server Pool: Removes the virtual machine from the Oracle VM Server. The virtual machine stays in the same server pool; it is removed from the Oracle VM Server only.

      • Specified Server: Moves the virtual machine to the selected Oracle VM Server. Stopped virtual machines can be migrated to Oracle VM Servers in other server pools that share the same repository, so Oracle VM Servers from other server pools might be listed here.

      • Server Pool: Moves the virtual machine to the selected server pool. Stopped virtual machines can be migrated to other server pools. The virtual machine is not deployed to a particular Oracle VM Server within the destination pool; you must start the virtual machine in the destination server pool to deploy it to an Oracle VM Server.

    2. Click Finish to complete the migration.

  • Move this VM to a different Repository

    This option changes the location where the virtual machine, and its configuration and local storage, reside. You should choose this option to move the virtual machine between servers in different server pools.

    • Select this option and then click Next to proceed as follows:

      1. Select a clone customer from the Clone Customizer drop-down list or click Create to create a new clone customizer.

        Clone customizers can be used to determine storage mappings for the virtual machine so that you can define where the virtual disks for a virtual machine should be located.

        If you create a new clone customizer, the Create Clone Customizer wizard is displayed. You can read more on the options provided by this wizard in Create a Clone Customizer.

      2. Select the destination repository to which you want to move the virtual machine configuration and storage from the Target Repository drop-down list.

      3. Click Finish to move the virtual machine.

To migrate multiple virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machines to migrate in the management pane and drag and drop them to the Oracle VM Server, server pool or the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder in the navigation tree to which you want to migrate the virtual machines. See Section 1.13, “Drag and Drop” for information on using the drag and drop feature.

  4. The virtual machines are migrated.

3.5.2.12 Clone a Virtual Machine or Template

Cloning a virtual machine or a template means making a copy of it, so that you can create multiple virtual machines or templates from the original.

A clone can also be performed using two other file copy methods: sparse copy, and non-sparse copy. These two cloning methods can be used when cloning from and to different repositories, and when the storage used for the storage repository uses a generic Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in. These cloning methods are slower than thin cloning, but more versatile.

Note

The virtual machine cloning procedure below uses the same dialog box to clone a virtual machine and a template.

To create a clone of a virtual machine or template:

  1. Select the virtual machine or template to clone and display the Clone dialog box. You display this dialog box from different locations, depending on whether you are cloning a virtual machine or a template.

    • Virtual Machine: Click the Servers and VMs tab. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine to clone in the management pane, and click Clone Virtual Machine Clone Virtual Machine icon .

    • Virtual Machine Template: Click the Repositories tab. In the navigation tree, select the repository in which the template resides, then VM Templates. Select the template in the management pane and click Clone Template Clone Template icon .

  2. The Clone (Virtual Machine or Template) dialog box is displayed.

    This figure shows the Clone (Virtual Machine or Template) dialog box with the Clone to a Virtual Machine option selected.

    Select or enter the following:

    • Clone to a: Select the clone type, either Virtual Machine or Template, to specify the objects to create from the clone.

    • Clone Count: The number of clones to create.

    • Name Index: The start index number to use for the clone name suffix. The default is 0. This is used in conjunction with the Clone Name field to create the name for each clone.

    • Clone Name: An optional name for the virtual machines or templates. The maximum name length is 256 characters and may contain any character. The name need not be unique. If no value is given, the default is the name of the virtual machine or template being cloned. Each clone is suffixed with a dot (.) and the clone index number, starting with the value for the Name Index field. For example, if the Clone Name field is set to MyVM, and the Name Index field is set to 1, the resulting clones would be named MyVM.1, MyVM.2 and so on.

    • Target Server Pool: The server pool on which the clone is to be deployed.

      Note

      The list of server pools that are available in the drop-down is limited to valid server pools that are capable of handling the cloning process correctly. This helps you to prevent cloning to a server pool that may fail to process the request. If this list is empty, you should refer to the table presented under the Why don't I see other server pools to clone to? element in this dialog.

    • Description: A description for the virtual machines or templates.

    • Advanced Clone: Whether to use a clone customizer to set preferences for the clone operation.

    • Clone Customizer: The clone customizer to create the clones. This is used to set virtual disk mappings to enable you to copy disks to other storage locations. It also allows you to create network mappings so you can use new VNICs and other networks for the clone. Click Create... to create a new clone customizer. See Section 3.5.2.14, “Manage Clone Customizers” for information on creating a clone customizer. This field is enabled if Advanced Clone is checked.

    • Target Repository: The repository to store the cloned virtual machine configuration file. This does not affect any clone disk mappings you set using a clone customizer; this option is only for the virtual machine configuration file. This field is enabled if Advanced Clone is checked.

    • Why don't I see other server pools to clone to? A collapsed window element, providing a table of server pools that do not meet the requirements to accept a clone request. Expanding any of the entries in this table displays the reason that the server pool does not qualify.

    Tip

    If you clone a virtual machine or template without using a clone customizer, the storage repository is locked for the duration of the cloning job; this may be some time in some circumstances. To quickly create clones and not lock the storage repository, use a clone customizer.

    Click OK.

The virtual machines are created and deployed to the server pool. The templates are created in the storage repository.

It is important to understand that older templates may use a different device type to attach virtual disks. This may affect your ability to attach new virtual disks, such as a virtual CDROM device. There are some limitations on mixing virtual disks of differing device types on a virtual machine. See How are Virtual Disks Managed? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information about how device types are allocated to virtual disks and what you may need to do to solve any issues surrounding this problem.

3.5.2.13 Export to Virtual Appliance

Exporting a virtual appliance lets you reuse virtual machines with other instances of Oracle VM, or with other virtualization environments that support the Open Virtualization Format (OVA).

You can export one or more virtual machines to a virtual appliance. Exporting a virtual machine to a virtual appliance creates an OVA file in the storage repository. The OVA file contains the virtual disk file(s) in VMDK format, an OVF file that holds the virtual machine(s) configuration, and other files such as a manifest and certificate.

To export to a virtual appliance:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list.

  2. Make sure each virtual machine to export is in the Stopped state.

    See Section 3.5.2.4, “Stop Virtual Machines” for more information on stopping virtual machines.

  3. Select the virtual machine(s) to export in the management pane, and click Export to Virtual Appliance Export to Virtual Appliance icon .

  4. The Export Virtual Machine(s) to Virtual Appliance dialog box is displayed.

    This figure shows the Export Virtual Machine(s) to Virtual Appliance dialog box.

    Specify a name for the virtual appliance in the Virtual Appliance Name field and select the storage repository to which you want to save the virtual appliance from the Destination Repository menu and then click OK.

The virtual appliance is located under the Assemblies directory on the Oracle VM Server instance where the storage repository is presented to, as follows: /OVS/Repositories/repository_id/Assemblies/virtual-appliance_id/package.ova. See the Chapter 4, Repositories Tab for information about obtaining the repository and virtual appliance ID.

3.5.2.14 Manage Clone Customizers

Cloning a virtual machine or template means making a copy of it, so that you can create multiple virtual machines or templates from the original. You can create a clone customizer to set up the clone parameters, such as networking, and the virtual disk, and ISO resources. A clone customizer is also used when moving a virtual machine or template.

Create a Clone Customizer

To create a clone customizer:

  1. Select the virtual machine or template and display the Manage Clone Customizers for (Virtual Machine or Template) dialog box by:

    • Virtual Machine: Click the Servers and VMs tab. Select the server pool on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine to clone in the management pane, and click Manage Clone Customizers... Manage Clone Customizers... icon .

    • Virtual Machine Template: Click the Repositories tab. In the navigation tree, select the repository in which the template resides, then VM Templates. Select the template in the management pane and click Manage Clone Customizers Manage Clone Customizers icon .

  2. Select Create Clone Customizer... Create Clone Customizer... icon .

  3. The Create a Clone Customizer wizard is displayed.

    In the Name and Description step of the wizard, enter a Name and Description for the clone customizer, and click Next.

  4. The Storage Mappings step of the wizard is displayed.

    Select the following storage mappings:

    • Disk: The disks to include in the clone.

    • Clone Target Type: The type of storage location where the disk is to be created, either a Repository or a Physical Disk.

    • Clone Target: The location on the storage type where the disk is to be created.

    • Clone Type: Whether to use a sparse or non-sparse files for the disk.

      Caution

      When sparse virtual disk space allocation is used, the available space in a repository can be over-subscribed. Sparse allocation is useful to increase virtual machine density. However, errors occur if the space allocated to a storage repository becomes exhausted, so the administrator must carefully monitor disk space.

    Click Next.

  5. The Network Mappings step of the wizard is displayed.

    Select the Virtual NICss to include in the clone customizer, and the Ethernet Network to which they should belong.

    Note

    The network configuration is not changed when moving a virtual machine or template. It is only used when cloning a virtual machine or template.

    Click Finish.

The clone customizer is now available to use to create a virtual machine, or template. See Section 4.7.1.4, “Clone a Virtual Machine or Template” for information on using the clone customizer to create a virtual machine or template.

Edit a Clone Customizer

To edit a clone customizer:

  1. Select the object to which the clone customizer belongs, either a virtual machine, or a virtual machine template. Click Manage Clone Customizers... Manage Clone Customizers... icon .

  2. The Manage Clone Customizers for (VM or Template) dialog box is displayed. Select the clone customizer to edit and click Edit Clone Customizer... Edit Clone Customizer... icon .

  3. The Edit Clone Customizer dialog box is displayed. Edit the clone customizer.

    Click OK. The changes to the clone customizer are saved.

Delete a Clone Customizer

To delete a clone customizer:

  1. Select the object to which the clone customizer belongs, either a virtual machine, or a virtual machine template. Click Manage Clone Customizers... Manage Clone Customizers... icon .

  2. The Manage Clone Customizers for (VM or Template) dialog box is displayed. Select the clone customizer to delete and click Delete Clone Customizer Delete Clone Customizer icon .

  3. A dialog box is displayed to confirm you want to delete the clone customizer. Confirm you want to delete the clone customizer and click OK. The clone customizer is deleted.

3.5.2.15 Send VM Messages

You can select one or more virtual machines, Oracle VM Servers or server pools, to select which running virtual machines are populated in the dialog box used to send messages to virtual machines.

To send a virtual machine a message you must have first installed the Oracle VM Guest Additions in the virtual machine. For information on installing the Oracle VM Guest Additions, and a more detailed description of the virtual machine messaging mechanism and its uses, see the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

To send messages to virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Determine the grouping of virtual machines that you wish to send a message to:

    1. If you wish to send a message to virtual machines distributed across one or more server pools, click on the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane. Select Server Pools from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more server pools in the management pane.

    2. If you wish to send a message to virtual machines distributed across one or more servers in a particular server pool, expand the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane and select the server pool where the servers reside. Select Servers from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more servers in the management pane.

    3. If you wish to send a message to one or more virtual machines on a particular server, expand the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane and select the server pool where the servers reside. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane.

  3. Click Send VM Messages... Send VM Messages... icon in the perspective toolbar.

    The Send Messages to Virtual Machines dialog box is displayed.

    This figure shows the Send Messages to Virtual Machine dialog box with the Messages tab displayed.
  4. To create a message, click Create Message... Create Message... icon in the perspective toolbar to display the Create VM Message dialog box.

    This figure shows the Create VM Message dialog box.

    Enter the message key value pair in the Key and Message fields. Check the Log Message field to retain a log of the message. Check the Hide Message field to hide the message of the key/value pair in the user interface. Click OK to save the message and return to the Send Messages to Virtual Machines dialog box.

  5. To edit a message, select the message and click Edit... Edit... icon in the dialog box toolbar. To delete a message, select it and click Delete Delete icon in the dialog box toolbar.

  6. Select the Virtual Machines tab to select which running virtual machines are to receive the messages.

    This figure shows the Create VM Message dialog box with the Virtual Machines tab displayed.

    Click OK to send the messages to the virtual machines.

3.5.2.16 View Virtual Machine Configuration File

You can view the content of a virtual machine configuration file. The content is not editable but you can view and copy the text according to your needs.

To view a virtual machine configuration file:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool on which the virtual machines reside in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select the virtual machine to which the configuration file belongs. Click VM Config File Content... Display VM Config File Content... icon .

  4. The VM Config File Content dialog box is displayed with the content of the virtual machine configuration file. You can view and copy the text according to your needs.

  5. Click OK to close the dialog.

3.5.2.17 Display VM Hierarchy Viewer

You can generate a graphical report on a virtual machine. For more information about object reporting, see Section 7.1, “Reports”.

To generate a graphical report on a virtual machine:

  1. Select a server pool in the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane.

  2. Select the Virtual Machines perspective in the management pane.

  3. Select a virtual machine in the management pane table.

  4. Click Display VM Hierarchy Viewer icon Display VM Hierarchy Viewer in the management pane toolbar.

    The VM Hierarchy Viewer window is displayed. This window contains some extra controls to manipulate the report display. These controls are described in the following table.

    Table 3.17 Virtual machine graphical report controls

    Control

    Purpose

    Pan control

    Reposition the hierarchy viewer component within the viewport.

    Zoom to Fit control

    Zoom a hierarchy viewer component so that all nodes are visible within the viewport.

    Zoom control

    Zoom the hierarchy viewer component.

    Hide or Show control

    Hide or show the control panel.

    Layout Selector control

    Change the layout of the hierarchy viewer component from the layout you defined to one of the layout options.


  5. To create an XML report of the graphical report, click Generate Report. The report is generated and sent to the browser.

3.5.2.18 View Virtual Machine Events

The Events perspective is common to many elements within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. The Events perspective generally appears as an option within the Perspectives drop-down menu on the management pane of tabs that include a navigation tree. In this case, the Events perspective displays events specific to the item selected in the navigation tree and presents these in the management pane.

The Events perspective may also appear within a dialog that is triggered from a Display Selected Events... Display Selected Events... icon perspective toolbar option. In this case, the Events perspective dialog displays events specific to one or more elements selected in the management pane.

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them.

Since Oracle VM Manager attempts to resolve issues automatically as much as possible, not all events can be acknowledged by a user within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. Therefore, a flag is set for events that are user acknowledgeable. If an event does not have this flag set, you are unable to acknowledge it, since it is handled internally by Oracle VM Manager.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a table with the following columns of information for each event:

  • Severity: The severity level assigned to the event.

  • Timestamp: The date and time that the event occurred.

  • Modify Time: The last recorded date and time that the event was modified.

  • Type: The type of event according to Oracle VM Manager's event categorization model.

  • Summary: A summary description of the event.

  • Acknowledged: Whether an error event has been acknowledged.

  • User Acknowledgeable: Whether or not an event can be acknowledged by the user.

Event Descriptions

An arrow displays next to each event in the table. Click the arrow to expand and view the Description section that provides additional details for the event.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a perspective toolbar with the following options:

Table 3.18 Events Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Acknowledge

Acknowledge icon

Acknowledge a selected error event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. Note that this option is only available for user acknowledgeable events.

Acknowledge All

Acknowledge All icon

Acknowledge all error events associated with an object to clear the errors and return the object to normal operations. Note that only user acknowledgeable events are cleared. This button is always clickable, even if there are no user acknowledgeable events. Clicking it when there are no user acknowledgeable events results in an error dialog.

Display Count

 

A drop-down menu that allows you to select the number of events that should be displayed in the management pane, while you are currently in this perspective.


Acknowledging Events/Errors

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them. The following procedures show you how to clear errors and return the object to normal operations.

To acknowledge Oracle VM Server error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Oracle VM Server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.

To acknowledge virtual machine error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool, or Oracle VM Server on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the virtual machine in the management pane table. Click Display Selected VM Events... Display Selected VM Events... icon .

  5. The Events dialog box is displayed. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors. Click Close.

To acknowledge storage repository error events:

  1. Click the Repositories tab.

  2. Select the repository in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all errors.

To acknowledge storage error events:

  1. Click the Storage tab.

  2. Select File Servers, SAN Servers, or a storage server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.

3.5.2.19 Generate Report

You can generate an XML report on one or more virtual machines. For more information about object reporting, see Section 7.1, “Reports”.

To generate a report on virtual machines:

  1. Select a server pool in the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane.

  2. Select the Virtual Machines perspective in the management pane.

  3. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane table.

  4. Click Generate Report icon Generate Report in the management pane toolbar.

  5. The report is generated and sent to the browser.

3.5.3 CPUs Perspective

The CPUs perspective lists the CPUs configured on a server. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • CPU Number: The CPU number as reported by the BIOS for each CPU on the server.

  • Level Two Cache Size: The amount of memory in the level two cache.

  • Model Name: The model and name of the CPU as reported by the BIOS.

  • Name: The name of the CPU as an object within Oracle VM Manager.

  • Description: The description of the CPU object as stored in Oracle VM Manager.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.19 Edit CPUs Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Edit Selected CPU...
Edit Selected CPU icon

Displays the Edit CPU dialog box. Use this option to edit the selected CPU.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.3.1 Edit CPUs

To edit CPUs:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which you want to edit the CPUs. If the Oracle VM Server is already part of a server pool, it is listed under Server Pools. Otherwise, find and select the Oracle VM Server in the Unassigned Servers folder.

  3. Select CPUs from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the CPU to edit in the table in the management pane and click Edit Selected CPU... Edit... icon in the toolbar.

  5. The Edit CPU dialog box is displayed. You can edit the name and the description of the CPU.

  6. Click OK to save and apply your changes.

3.5.4 Ethernet Ports Perspective

The Ethernet Ports perspective lists the different Ethernet ports or physical NICs configured on a server. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Port: The port device name detected on the server.

  • Status: The interface status (whether the port is up or down).

  • Interface Name: The name of the interface as detected on the server.

  • MAC Address: The MAC address for the network port.

  • MTU: The MTU size set for the port.

  • Addressing:

    • Type: How the interface is configured to obtain an IP address (for example, DHCP).

    • IP Address: The current IP address configured on the interface.

    • Netmask: The netmask for the network that is configured on the interface.

  • Bond Name: The name of the network bond that this interface is attached to (if any).

  • Network: The name of the network that this interface belongs to (if any):

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.20 Ethernet Ports Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Edit Selected Port...

Edit Selected Port... icon

Displays the Edit Port dialog box. Use this option to edit the configuration of an Ethernet port on a server.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.4.1 Edit Port

To edit an Ethernet port:

  1. Select the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which the Ethernet port is to be edited. If the Oracle VM Server is already part of a server pool, it is listed under Server Pools. Otherwise, find and select the Oracle VM Server in the Unassigned Servers folder.

  3. In the management pane, set the Perspective to Ethernet Ports and select the Ethernet port to edit. Click Edit Selected Port Edit Selected Port icon in the toolbar. The Edit Port dialog box is displayed.

  4. You can set or change the IP addressing, the mask, the MTU or the description. The Addressing field provides a drop-down selector that allows you to choose either None, Static or Dynamic to specify how IP Addressing should be configured on this interface or port. If you select Static here, the IP Address and Mask fields become available to edit, otherwise they remain uneditable. Setting the Addressing field to None deletes any previous IP addressing configured for the port.

    Note

    The IP addressing must either be set to Dynamic or Static (and the IP addressing information completed) if you intend to use the network port for an Oracle VM network channel, such as for "Server Management", "Live Migrate","Cluster Heartbeat" or "Storage".

  5. Click OK to save and apply your changes.

3.5.5 Bond Ports Perspective

The Bond Ports perspective lists the different network bonds configured for the ports on a server. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Port: The bond port device name detected on the server.

  • Status: The bond interface status (whether the bond port is up or down).

  • Interface Name: The name of the bond interface as detected on the server.

  • MAC Address: The MAC address for the network bond port.

  • MTU: The MTU size set for the bond port.

  • Addressing:

    • Type: How the interface is configured to obtain an IP address (for example, DHCP).

    • IP Address: The current IP address configured on the interface.

    • Netmask: The netmask for the network that is configured on the interface.

  • Networking:

    • Network: The name of the network that this bond port belongs to (if any).

    • Bond Name: The name of the bond in the bond port.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.21 Bond Ports Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Create Bond Port...

Create Bond Port... icon

Displays the Create Bond Port wizard. Use this option to create a new bond port consisting of a number of physical Ethernet ports on a server.

Edit Selected Port...

Edit Selected Port... icon

Displays the Edit Bond Port dialog box. Use this option to change the configuration of the selected bond port on a server.

Delete Selected Port

Delete Selected Port icon
Displays the Delete Confirmation dialog box. Use this option to delete the selected bond port on a server.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.5.1 Create Bond Port

The management port on each Oracle VM Server is specified at installation time and is automatically configured as a bonded interface. You create additional bonds to add redundancy and if desired, load-balancing to your network environment. Once created, these bonds can be used as building blocks when building VLAN Interfaces or networks. This section discusses managing bonded interfaces.

To create a bond port:

  1. Select the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which the bond port is to be created. If the Oracle VM Server is already part of a server pool, it is listed under Server Pools. Otherwise, find and select the Oracle VM Server in the Unassigned Servers folder.

  3. In the management pane, set the Perspective to Ethernet Ports. Make sure that the selected Oracle VM Server's ports to be used for the bond port are not part of an existing bond, network or VLAN group. Verify that the ports are available. You cannot add a port to a bond if the port has an IP address.

  4. In the management pane, set the Perspective to Bond Ports. Click Create Bond Port Create Bond Port icon in the toolbar.

  5. The Create Bond Port dialog box is displayed.

    Enter or select the following:

    • Server: The name of the Oracle VM Server. You cannot edit this field.

    • Interface Name: An optional name for the bond in the format bondN, for example bond1, or bond2. If you do not enter a name, the default of bondN is used, where N is the next available bond number. This cannot be changed after the bond is created.

    • Addressing: The IP addressing type to use for the bond, either Dynamic (DHCP) or Static. You can assign an IP address to this bond now, or wait to assign an IP address later, when using the bond to create VLAN Interfaces or networks.

    • IP Address: The IP address to use for the bond. This is available if using Static addressing.

    • Mask: The netmask to use for the bond. This is available if using Static addressing.

    • MTU: The Maximum Transfer Unit size. If your network supports jumbo frames, increase the MTU value to the required size. The MTU is set to 1500 by default, and can be between 1500 and 9000 for a 1GbE NIC, and 1500 and 64000 for a 10GbE NIC. Setting the MTU field sets the maximum transmission rate, so a packet size of 5000 can be sent and received if the MTU is set to 9000 for a 1GbE NIC.

      Note

      If configuring a port on SPARC system, changing the MTU value may require that the interface is not currently in use. If you attempt to change the MTU value on an interface that is currently in use, an error message may be returned.

    • Description: An optional description for the bond.

    • Bonding: The bonding mode, either Active Passive, Link Aggregation, or Load Balanced. See How is Network Bonding Used in Oracle VM? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide, for more information about network bonding modes.

    • Available Ports: The available Ethernet ports on the Oracle VM Server. Select the ports to use from here and move them to the Selected Ports column.

    • Selected Ports: The ports to use for the bond.

    Click OK to create the bond.

When you have created the bond port, you can make changes to its configuration. You can update its bonding mode, and add or remove ports as well as changing its description and IP addressing.

3.5.5.2 Edit Bond Port

To edit a bond port:

  1. Select the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which the bond port is to be edited. If the Oracle VM Server is already part of a server pool, it is listed under Server Pools. Otherwise, find and select the Oracle VM Server in the Unassigned Servers folder.

  3. In the management pane, set the Perspective to Bond Ports and select the bond to edit. Click Edit Selected Port Edit Selected Port icon in the toolbar. The Edit Port dialog box is displayed.

  4. You can set or change the bonding mode, the IP addressing, the mask, the MTU, the description, or the ports that are part of the bond. The Addressing field provides a drop-down selector that allows you to choose either None, Static or Dynamic to specify how IP Addressing should be configured on this bond. If you select Static here, the IP Address and Mask fields become available to edit, otherwise they remain uneditable. Setting the Addressing field to None deletes any previous IP addressing configured for the bond.

    Note

    The IP addressing must either be set to Dynamic or Static (and the IP addressing information completed) if you intend to use the network bond for an Oracle VM network channel, such as for "Server Management", "Live Migrate","Cluster Heartbeat" or "Storage".

  5. Click OK to save and apply your changes.

3.5.5.3 Delete Bond Port

To delete a bond port:

  1. Select the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which the bond port is to be deleted. If the Oracle VM Server is already part of a server pool, it is listed under Server Pools. Otherwise, find and select the Oracle VM Server in the Unassigned Servers folder.

  3. In the management pane, set the Perspective to Bond Ports and select the bond to delete. Click Delete Selected Port Delete Selected Port icon in the toolbar.

  4. In the Delete Confirmation dialog box, click OK to delete the bond port.

3.5.6 Physical Disks Perspective

The Physical Disks perspective displays a list of the physical disks accessible by the Oracle VM Server in the table in the management pane. The following information is available:

  • Name: The name of the physical disk entry.

  • Event Severity: The current event severity status for the physical disk.

  • Size (GiB): The size, in GiB, of the physical disk.

  • Volume Group: The volume group that the physical disk belongs to.

  • SAN Server: The SAN server that the physical disk belongs to (if local storage, this is also indicated).

  • Type: The type of storage that the physical disk is a part of (for example, LUN, iSCSI, Fibre Channel, or Unknown).

  • File System: The name of the file system that is installed on the disk, if any.

  • Storage Plugin: The Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in that is used to access this physical disk.

  • Description: A configured description for the physical disk.

  • VM(s): Virtual machines using the physical disk.

An arrow displays next to each physical disk entry in the table. Click the arrow to expand the view for each entry and display the following information:

  • Name: The user-specified alias for the physical disk. The name can be changed without changing the name of the physical disk on the storage array.

  • User Friendly Name: The name of the physical disk on the storage array. The name was specified when the disk was created and cannot be changed.

  • Status: The status of the physical disk (whether or not the disk is online).

  • Shareable: Whether or not the physical disk can be shared.

  • Thin Provision: Whether or not thin provisioning is supported by the physical disk.

  • Reserved by Server(s): Whether or not the physical disk is unavailable for use by Oracle VM Manager.

  • Storage Targets: The endpoint provided by the storage server through which the server may direct commands to the physical disk. The storage target provides access to the physical disk.

  • Server Pool: The server pool that the physical disk belongs to.

  • Repository: The repository that the physical disk belongs to.

  • VM(s): Virtual machines using the physical disk.

  • ID: The UUID for the physical disk.

  • Page83 ID: The unique identifier for the physical disk.

  • Access Groups: The access groups that the physical disk belongs to.

  • Extra Information: Information that is passed to and from the Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in for use internally by the plug-in.

  • Absolute Path: The absolute path to the location of the disk.

The management functions you can perform on the disk are available as icons in the perspective toolbar. Some management options are only available to SAN server disks that use a non-generic Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in.

Table 3.22 Physical Disks Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Rescan Physical Disks

Rescan Physical Disks icon

Request an update of the all the physical disks available to the Oracle VM Server to determine if any disks have been changed, added, or removed.

Edit Physical Disk...

Edit Physical Disk... icon

Change the name, description and extra information of the physical disk, or make it shareable.

Delete Physical Disk

Delete Physical Disk icon

Stop using the selected physical disk in your Oracle VM environment.

Warning

If you effectively delete a LUN from a registered storage array, make sure that you delete it in Oracle VM Manager first, before you physically delete it from the storage server. If you do not respect this order of operations, the system goes into an unknown state, which can only be resolved by rebooting the Oracle VM Servers the deleted LUN is connected to.

Clone Physical Disk

Clone Physical Disk icon

Create a thin clone, sparse copy or non-sparse copy of the physical disk on the selected target.

Delete File System

Delete File System icon

Delete one or more file systems and contents of the physical disks.

Refresh Physical Disks

Refresh Physical Disk icon

Request an update of one or more physical disks to see if changes have been made to the size and configuration.

Display Selected Physical Disk Events...

Display Selected Physical Disk Events... icon

Display the Events dialog box which contains the job event associated with the physical disk.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.6.1 Rescan Physical Disks

You can rescan the physical disks available to an Oracle VM Server to determine if any disks have been changed, added, or removed.

To rescan the physical disks on Oracle VM Servers:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab, and select the server pool in which the Oracle VM Servers reside in the navigation tree. Select Servers in the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane. Select the Oracle VM Servers in the management pane table.

    Alternatively, on the Servers and VMs tab, expand the Server Pools or Unassigned Servers folder, to select a particular server in the navigation tree. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list.

  2. Click Rescan Physical Disks Rescan Physical Disks icon in the perspective toolbar.

  3. A confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK.

3.5.6.2 Edit Physical Disk

It is possible to edit the configuration for a physical disk either available on a SAN server or as local or shared storage. The steps and options to do so are described below.

To edit Physical Disk configuration:

  1. On the Storage tab, expand the SAN Servers folder in the navigation tree, select a SAN server item contained within the folder. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to edit in the table presented in the management pane.

    To edit the physical disk configuration for a physical disk used by a particular server, on the Servers and VMs tab, expand the Server Pools or Unassigned Servers folder, to select a particular server in the navigation tree. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to edit in the table presented in the management pane.

  2. Click on the Edit Physical Disk icon Edit Physical Disk icon in the toolbar.

  3. A dialog opens to allow you to reconfigure the Physical Disk. The dialog has the following options:

    • ID: A non-editable field containing the physical disk's UUID as it is stored within Oracle VM Manager.

    • Name: A field to change the name of the physical disk within Oracle VM Manager.

    • Current Size(GiB): A non-editable field containing the physical disk's current size, in GiB.

    • New Size(GiB): A field to change the size, in GiB, of the physical disk. The size of the physical disk can only be increased in size.

    • Description: A text field allowing a description of the physical disk.

    • Shareable: A check box that determines whether or not the disk can be shared.

    • Thin Provision: A non-editable field describing whether or not thin provisioning is supported by the disk.

  4. When you have finished editing the physical disk, click OK to save the changes, or Cancel to exit out of the dialog without saving any changes.

3.5.6.3 Delete Physical Disk

It is possible to delete an existing physical disk if it is no longer used in your Oracle VM environment and the Oracle VM Storage Connect plug-in that you are using supports this operation. Two types of physical disks are used in an Oracle VM environment:

  • Local physical disk - A physical disk installed locally on a specific Oracle VM Server.

  • SAN Server physical disk - A physical disk that is made available to the SAN Server during the discovery process.

Each physical disk type can be deleted using the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface.

To delete a registered physical disk that is no longer used:

  1. There are two options available that you can use to delete a physical disk from your Oracle VM environment:

    1. To delete a local physical disk:

      Expand the Servers and VMs tab, expand the Server Pools or Unassigned Servers folder, and select a particular server in the navigation tree. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you want to delete in the table presented in the management pane.

    2. To delete a SAN Server physical disk:

      Use the instructions in step a or alternatively, expand the Storage tab, expand the SAN Servers folder in the navigation tree, and select a SAN server item contained within the folder. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to delete in the table presented in the management pane.

  2. Click on the Delete Physical Disk icon Delete Physical Disk icon in the toolbar.

  3. The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK to delete the physical disk.

3.5.6.4 Clone Physical Disk

It is possible to clone a physical disk. The steps and options to do so are described below.

To clone a Physical Disk:

  1. On the Storage tab, expand the SAN Servers folder in the navigation tree, select a SAN server item contained within the folder. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to clone in the table presented in the management pane.

    To clone a physical disk used by a particular server, on the Servers and VMs tab, expand the Server Pools or Unassigned Servers folder, to select a particular server in the navigation tree. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to clone in the table presented in the management pane.

  2. Click on the Clone Physical Disk icon Clone Physical Disk icon in the toolbar.

  3. A dialog opens to allow you to clone the Physical Disk. The dialog has the following options:

    • Name: A field to set the name of the physical disk clone that you are going to create within Oracle VM Manager.

    • Clone Target Type: A drop-down menu allowing you to select the type of storage to be used for the physical disk clone:

      • Physical Disk: Copies the data from one physical disk to another.

      • Repository: Copies the data from the physical disk into a virtual disk image in an existing repository.

    • Clone Target: A searchable field to allow you to select the target location where the clone is to be stored.

    • Clone Type: A drop-down menu allowing you to select the type of clone to create:

      • Sparse Copy: Copies only the written data from the physical disk to the target clone.

      • Non-sparse Copy: Performs a block copy of the physical disk to the target clone.

  4. When you have finished setting the clone parameters for the physical disk, click OK to begin the clone job, or Cancel to exit out of the dialog without saving any changes.

3.5.6.5 Delete File System

It is possible to delete the file system on local and shared storage devices, and on a physical disk attached to an Oracle VM Server.

To delete a file system on local or shared storage:

  1. Select the Storage tab.

  2. Click on either the Local File Systems or Shared File Systems folder in the navigation tree.

  3. Select the file system to delete in the table in the management pane.

  4. Click the Delete File System icon Delete File System icon in the toolbar. If the icon is greyed out it means that the file system is used by a repository and it cannot be deleted. You must first delete the repository. See Section 4.3.1.3, “Delete Repository”.

  5. The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK to delete the file system.

To delete a file system on a physical disk attached to an Oracle VM Server:

  1. Select the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Oracle VM Server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Physical Disks in the Perspective drop-down list.

  4. Select the physical disk in the table in the management pane.

  5. Click on the Delete File System icon Delete File System icon in the toolbar. If the icon is greyed out, there is no file system on the disk so it cannot be deleted.

  6. The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK to delete the file system.

3.5.6.6 Refresh Physical Disk

When changes are made to the physical disks on a SAN server or Oracle VM Server, it is useful to refresh the configuration of your physical disks to make Oracle VM Manager aware of the changes.

To refresh physical disks:

  1. Expand the SAN Servers folder in the navigation tree, select a SAN server item contained within the folder. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk or disks that you wish to refresh in the table presented in the management pane.

    To refresh physical disks used by a particular server, on the Servers and VMs tab, expand the Server Pools or Unassigned Servers folder, to select a particular server in the navigation tree. Select the Physical Disks option in the Perspective drop-down list. Select the physical disk that you wish to refresh in the table presented in the management pane.

  2. Click on the Refresh Physical Disk icon Refresh Physical Disk option in the toolbar.

  3. The selected physical disks are refreshed and their configurations are updated within Oracle VM Manager.

Note

If you encounter an error, when refreshing a physical disk with a repository located on it, similar to the following:

OVMAPI_7281E Cannot perform operation on file system...

You may need to ensure that the repository is under the ownership of the Oracle VM Manager instance that you are using. See Section 4.3.1.2, “Edit Repository” for more information.

3.5.6.7 View Physical Disk Events

The Events perspective is common to many elements within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. The Events perspective generally appears as an option within the Perspectives drop-down menu on the management pane of tabs that include a navigation tree. In this case, the Events perspective displays events specific to the item selected in the navigation tree and presents these in the management pane.

The Events perspective may also appear within a dialog that is triggered from a Display Selected Events... Display Selected Events... icon perspective toolbar option. In this case, the Events perspective dialog displays events specific to one or more elements selected in the management pane.

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them.

Since Oracle VM Manager attempts to resolve issues automatically as much as possible, not all events can be acknowledged by a user within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. Therefore, a flag is set for events that are user acknowledgeable. If an event does not have this flag set, you are unable to acknowledge it, since it is handled internally by Oracle VM Manager.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a table with the following columns of information for each event:

  • Severity: The severity level assigned to the event.

  • Timestamp: The date and time that the event occurred.

  • Modify Time: The last recorded date and time that the event was modified.

  • Type: The type of event according to Oracle VM Manager's event categorization model.

  • Summary: A summary description of the event.

  • Acknowledged: Whether an error event has been acknowledged.

  • User Acknowledgeable: Whether or not an event can be acknowledged by the user.

Event Descriptions

An arrow displays next to each event in the table. Click the arrow to expand and view the Description section that provides additional details for the event.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a perspective toolbar with the following options:

Table 3.23 Events Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Acknowledge

Acknowledge icon

Acknowledge a selected error event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. Note that this option is only available for user acknowledgeable events.

Acknowledge All

Acknowledge All icon

Acknowledge all error events associated with an object to clear the errors and return the object to normal operations. Note that only user acknowledgeable events are cleared. This button is always clickable, even if there are no user acknowledgeable events. Clicking it when there are no user acknowledgeable events results in an error dialog.

Display Count

 

A drop-down menu that allows you to select the number of events that should be displayed in the management pane, while you are currently in this perspective.


Acknowledging Events/Errors

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them. The following procedures show you how to clear errors and return the object to normal operations.

To acknowledge Oracle VM Server error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Oracle VM Server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.

To acknowledge virtual machine error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool, or Oracle VM Server on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the virtual machine in the management pane table. Click Display Selected VM Events... Display Selected VM Events... icon .

  5. The Events dialog box is displayed. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors. Click Close.

To acknowledge storage repository error events:

  1. Click the Repositories tab.

  2. Select the repository in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all errors.

To acknowledge storage error events:

  1. Click the Storage tab.

  2. Select File Servers, SAN Servers, or a storage server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.

3.5.7 Storage Initiators Perspective

The Storage Initiators perspective lists the different storage initiators available on a server. It also allows you to add storage initiators to different access groups. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Name: The name of the storage initiator on the selected server.

  • Description: The configured description for the storage initiator.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.24 Storage Initiators Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

View Access Groups for Selected Initiator

View access groups for selected initiator icon

Displays the View Access Groups for Initiator dialog box. Use this option to add storage initiators on a particular server to any existing access groups that you have configured.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.7.1 View Access Groups for Selected Initiator

In order to access SAN server storage, an access group must be created, and a storage initiator configured on the Oracle VM Server. Storage initiators are added to an Oracle VM Server during discovery, based on your storage configuration. You configure access groups to bind storage initiators to physical disks. For information on creating access groups, see Section 6.6.4, “Access Groups Perspective”. You can also view and configure existing storage initiators for a particular Oracle VM Server.

To view access groups for storage initiators on an Oracle VM Server:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab, and select the Oracle VM Server in the navigation tree.

  2. Select Storage Initiators in the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane. The storage initiators configured on the Oracle VM Server are listed in the management pane table.

  3. Select a storage initiator in the table, and click View access groups for selected initiator View access groups for selected initiator icon .

  4. The View Access Groups for Initiator dialog box is displayed. Select the SAN Server and Access Groups from the drop-down lists and click Add. Click OK.

See Section 6.6.4, “Access Groups Perspective” for more information on managing SAN server access groups.

3.5.8 Control Domains Perspective

The Control Domains perspective displays information about the control domain (dom0), running on the Oracle VM Server, in the table in the management pane. The following information is available:

  • Name: The name of the domain

  • Processors: The number of processors available for use by the control domain.

  • Memory (MB): The amount of memory (in megabytes) used by the control domain.

  • Host OS Name: The host operating system name running within the control domain.

  • Host OS Type: The type of operating system running in the control domain (for example, Linux or Solaris).

  • OVM Version: The version number reported by the Oracle VM software running in the control domain.

An arrow displays next to each control domain entry in the table. Click the arrow to expand the view for each entry and display the following information:

  • Host OS Major Version: The major version number for the operating system version.

  • Host OS Minor Version: The minor version number for the operating system version.

  • Agent Version: The version number of the Oracle VM Agent software running in the control domain.

  • Kernel Release: The kernel version release numbering for the operating system running in the control domain.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.25 Control Domains Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.9 Repository Exports Perspective

An Oracle VM Server can be configured to enable third party applications to perform a back up of the contents of a storage repository. To enable this, an Oracle VM Server is configured to provide an NFS share that a third party back up tool can use to access the contents of the repository. Only local or shared OCFS2-based storage repositories can be exported as an NFS share.

Note

You cannot create a repository export for an NFS storage repository. When creating a repository export, you can only select an OCFS2 storage repository. An NFS storage repository is also an NFS share and can be exported without using the repository export functionality.

When you have created a repository export, use the Repository Path (displayed in the management pane table) and the Oracle VM Server hostname or IP address to connect to the NFS mount point from the third party back up software.

This perspective lists the currently available repository exports. The following columns are presented in the table within the management pane:

  • Client IP/Host Name: The IP address or hostname of the computer which has been granted access to the repository

  • Options: Additional NFS mount parameters

  • Repository: The repository being exported

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.26 Repository Exports Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Create Repository Export...

Create New Repository Export... icon

Displays the Create a Repository Export wizard.

Use this option to create repository exports to backup your repositories.

Edit Repository Export...

Edit Repository Export... icon

Displays the Edit Repository Export wizard. Use this option to edit the NFS parameters for a repository export.

Delete Repository Export...

Delete Repository Export icon

Displays the Delete Confirmation dialog box. Use this option to delete the selected repository export.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.5.9.1 Create Repository Export

To create a repository export:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which you want to create the repository export location.

  3. Select Repository Exports from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Click Create Repository Export.. Create Repository Export... icon in the toolbar.

  5. The Create Repository Export dialog box is displayed. Enter or select the following:

    • Client IP/Host Name: The IP address or hostname of the computer for which to grant access to the repository contents. This is likely to be the machine on which the third party back up and restore software is running.

    • Repository: An OCFS2 storage repository presented to the Oracle VM Server. This is the repository you want to back up.

      Note

      You cannot create a repository export for an NFS storage repository. When creating a repository export, you can only select an OCFS2 storage repository. An NFS storage repository is also an NFS share and can be exported without using the repository export functionality.

    • Options: The parameters to include in the NFS mount configuration, for example:

      rw, async, no_root_squash

      Click OK.

3.5.9.2 Edit Repository Export

To edit a repository export:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server on which you want to edit the repository export parameters.

  3. Select Repository Exports from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. To edit a repository export, select the entry in the table in the management pane and click Edit Repository Export.. Edit Repository Export... icon in the toolbar.

  5. The Edit Repository Export dialog box is displayed. Enter or select the following:

    • Client IP/Host Name: The IP address or hostname of the computer for which to grant access to the repository contents. This is likely to be the machine on which the third party back up and restore software is running. (Not editable)

    • Repository: An OCFS2 storage repository presented to the Oracle VM Server. This is the repository you want to back up. (Not editable)

    • Options: The parameters to include in the NFS mount configuration, for example:

      rw, async, no_root_squash

      Click OK.

3.5.9.3 Delete Repository Export

To delete a repository export:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. In the navigation pane, select the Oracle VM Server for which you want to delete the repository export.

  3. Select Repository Exports from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. To delete a repository export, select the entry in the table in the management pane and click Delete Repository Export Delete Repository Export icon in the toolbar.

  5. A confirmation dialog is displayed. Click OK to delete the repository export.

3.5.10 Events Perspective

The Events perspective is common to many elements within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. The Events perspective generally appears as an option within the Perspectives drop-down menu on the management pane of tabs that include a navigation tree. In this case, the Events perspective displays events specific to the item selected in the navigation tree and presents these in the management pane.

The Events perspective may also appear within a dialog that is triggered from a Display Selected Events... Display Selected Events... icon perspective toolbar option. In this case, the Events perspective dialog displays events specific to one or more elements selected in the management pane.

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them.

Since Oracle VM Manager attempts to resolve issues automatically as much as possible, not all events can be acknowledged by a user within the Oracle VM Manager Web Interface. Therefore, a flag is set for events that are user acknowledgeable. If an event does not have this flag set, you are unable to acknowledge it, since it is handled internally by Oracle VM Manager.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a table with the following columns of information for each event:

  • Severity: The severity level assigned to the event.

  • Timestamp: The date and time that the event occurred.

  • Modify Time: The last recorded date and time that the event was modified.

  • Type: The type of event according to Oracle VM Manager's event categorization model.

  • Summary: A summary description of the event.

  • Acknowledged: Whether an error event has been acknowledged.

  • User Acknowledgeable: Whether or not an event can be acknowledged by the user.

Event Descriptions

An arrow displays next to each event in the table. Click the arrow to expand and view the Description section that provides additional details for the event.

The Events perspective or dialog contains a perspective toolbar with the following options:

Table 3.27 Events Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Acknowledge

Acknowledge icon

Acknowledge a selected error event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. Note that this option is only available for user acknowledgeable events.

Acknowledge All

Acknowledge All icon

Acknowledge all error events associated with an object to clear the errors and return the object to normal operations. Note that only user acknowledgeable events are cleared. This button is always clickable, even if there are no user acknowledgeable events. Clicking it when there are no user acknowledgeable events results in an error dialog.

Display Count

 

A drop-down menu that allows you to select the number of events that should be displayed in the management pane, while you are currently in this perspective.


Acknowledging Events/Errors

If an object has an error event associated with it you must acknowledge the event to clear the error and return the object to normal operations. For example, this can occur if an Oracle VM Server or virtual machine appear as Stopped (Error) in the status. The object in error is flagged with a red icon in the navigation tree. Oracle VM Servers, virtual machines, repositories and storage objects can have error events associated with them. The following procedures show you how to clear errors and return the object to normal operations.

To acknowledge Oracle VM Server error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Oracle VM Server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.

To acknowledge virtual machine error events:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool, or Oracle VM Server on which the virtual machine resides in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the virtual machine in the management pane table. Click Display Selected VM Events... Display Selected VM Events... icon .

  5. The Events dialog box is displayed. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors. Click Close.

To acknowledge storage repository error events:

  1. Click the Repositories tab.

  2. Select the repository in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all errors.

To acknowledge storage error events:

  1. Click the Storage tab.

  2. Select File Servers, SAN Servers, or a storage server in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Events from the Perspective drop-down list in the management pane.

  4. Select the user acknowledgeable error event and click Acknowledge Acknowledge icon , or click Acknowledge All Acknowledge All icon to clear all user acknowledgeable errors.