3.3 Server Pools Folder

The Server Pools navigation folder contains each server pool that has been configured within the environment. The structure of the navigation provided in the navigation tree is discussed in more detail in Section 3.2, “Summary”.

Clicking on the Server Pools navigation folder in the navigation tree allows you to access different perspectives in the management pane. Each perspective provides its own view of all of the server pools within Oracle VM Manager. Most of the perspectives also include separate perspective toolbars that enable you to perform various configuration or management tasks specific to the view currently displayed within the management pane. The Server Pools navigation folder offers the following perspectives within the management pane:

3.3.1 Server Pools Perspective

The Server Pools perspective lists the different server pools configured in your environment. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Name: The name that has been configured for the server pool.

  • Tag(s): Any tags that have been applied to the server pool.

  • Keymap: The configured keymap for the server pool.

  • Pool File System: The path location to the server pool file system.

  • Secure VM Migrate: Whether or not the server pool is configured to support secure virtual machine migration.

  • Description: A description entered for the server pool when it was created or edited.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.2 Server Pools Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Refresh All

Refresh All icon

Rediscovers all Oracle VM Server instances, file servers, and SAN servers. Use this to refresh information about all Oracle VM Server instances

Use this option after rebuilding your database, to ensure that all information stored within the database is up to date.

Create Server Pool...

Create Server Pool... icon

Displays the Create a Server Pool wizard. Use this option to create a server pool for Oracle VM Servers.

Create Virtual Machine...

Create Virtual Machine... icon

Displays the Create Virtual Machine wizard. Use this option to create a virtual machine in the selected server pool.

Import Virtual Machine...

Import Virtual Machine... icon

Displays the Import Virtual Machine dialog box. Use this option to import a virtual machine into Oracle VM Manager and optionally deploy it to an Oracle VM Server or server pools.

Edit Selected Server Pool...

Edit Selected Server Pool... icon

Displays the Edit Server Pool wizard. Use this option to edit a server pool.

Delete Server Pool

Delete Server Pool icon

Displays the Delete Confirmation dialog box. Use this option to delete the selected server pool.

Change Servers Agent Password

Change Servers Agent Password icon

Displays the Change Servers Agent Password dialog box. Use this option to change the Oracle VM Agent password used by all of the Oracle VM Servers in the selected server pool. Note that the Oracle VM Agent password is only used during the process of taking ownership of an Oracle VM Server, thereafter certificate based authentication is used.

Define Policy for Server Pool...

Define Policy for Server Pool... icon

Displays the Configure DRS/DPM wizard. Use this option to set or edit resource policies for the server pool.

Send VM Messages...

Send VM Message icon

Send one or more virtual machines a message. Use this option to send messages to virtual machines that have the Oracle VM Guest Additions installed.

Generate Report

Generate Report icon

Generate an XML report on one or more server pools.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.3.1.1 Refresh All

If there are either changes to the physical state of an Oracle VM Server or its attached storage, you should discover it again to update the configuration information in Oracle VM Manager. In order to cut load time within Oracle VM Manager, Oracle VM Server rediscovery is not performed at start-up, therefore there may be cases where you want to update the configuration information for all Oracle VM Server instances within the Oracle VM Manager. Note that in larger deployments this may be a resource consuming action.

Important

The Refresh All function does not pick up the contents of file systems that have never been refreshed before. Furthermore, it does not refresh repositories that are not already presented on at least one server. It is important to keep this in mind if you have restored a configuration from a backup, since some items may not have been refreshed before at the time that the backup was created.

To rediscover all Oracle VM Servers, file servers and SAN servers:

  1. On the Servers and VMs tab click on the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane.

  2. Select the Server Pools perspective from the drop-down selector.

  3. Click Refresh All Refresh All icon in the perspective toolbar.

The configuration information about all Oracle VM Server instances is updated in Oracle VM Manager.

3.3.1.2 Create Server Pool

To create a server pool:

  1. Click Create Server Pool Create Server Pool icon in the toolbar to start the Create Server Pool wizard.

  2. The Create Server Pool step is displayed in the wizard.

    Enter the server pool information:

    • Server Pool Name: The name of the server pool. The maximum length of a server pool name is 256 characters and may contain any character.

    • Virtual IP Address for the Pool: This option is deprecated, but is available for backward compatibility purposes. See What is a Master Server and a Virtual IP Address? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information on this parameter.

    • VM Console Keymap: The key mapping to be used when connecting to a virtual machine's console.

    • VM Start Policy: For each server pool you can define the default start-up policy for all of your virtual machines. It is possible to override the default policy within the configuration of each virtual machine. See Section 3.1.3, “Create Virtual Machine” for information on setting the start policy for an individual virtual machine. Note that as of Release 3.4, the VM Start Policy also applies to the VM Resume operation. Select one of:

      • Best Server: This is the legacy algorithm that optimizes virtual machine placement on Oracle VM Servers that are in use before moving to unused servers in the pool.

      • Balance Server: This algorithm distributes virtual machines across all the available Oracle VM Servers in the server pool, starting with the least utilized Oracle VM Server first. CPU and memory utilization statistics are used to balance the virtual machine distribution across the server pool, with CPU utilization taking precedence over memory utilization.

      • Current Server: The virtual machine is started on the current Oracle VM Server to which it is assigned.

      Note

      If the VM start policy for a server pool is set to Current Server, and the server pool contains a VM that has not been assigned to a particular server yet, then that VM is started on one of the available servers according to the Best Server policy.

    • Secure VM Migrate: Select whether to enable encrypted migration of virtual machines. When Secure VM Migrate is checked, virtual machines are migrated using SSL to protect the data during the migration process. Secure migration of a virtual machine may effect the time taken to perform the migration as the encryption and decryption of data requires more system resources and time.

    • Clustered Server Pool: Select whether to enable clustering of the Oracle VM Servers in the server pool to enable HA. See How do Server Pool Clusters Work? and How does High Availability (HA) Work?in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information on server pool clustering and on HA support and policies.

      Important

      If the Oracle VM Servers in your server pool are SPARC-based, you should be aware that clustering can only function if the distributed lock manager package is installed on all of the Oracle VM Servers that you intend to add to the server pool, as described in Installing the Distributed Lock Manager (DLM) Package in the Oracle VM Installation and Upgrade Guide. Furthermore, clustering is not supported for servers that have multiple control domains (shadow domains). Clustering for SPARC is only supported using NFS storage for the cluster file system. Failure to meet these requirements results in an error when attempting to create the clustered server pool, notifying you that the server lacks the ability to perform clustering.

    • Timeout for cluster: If clustering is enabled for the server pool, this option allows you to set the timeout parameter. The maximum cluster timeout setting is 300 seconds. The minimum cluster timeout is 30 seconds. The default cluster timeout is 120 seconds. The Disk heartbeat and network heartbeat are automatically derived from the cluster timeout value. The cluster timeout determines how long a server should be unavailable within the cluster before failover occurs. Setting this value too low can cause false positives, where failover may occur due to a brief network outage or a sudden load spike. Setting the cluster timeout to a higher value can mean that a server is unavailable for a lengthier period before failover occurs.

      The cluster timeout can only be changed when there are no servers in the server pool, therefore it is usually good to set this during the creation of your server pool. See Clustering for x86 Server Pools in Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information.

      SPARC-based server pools do not recognize the cluster timeout parameter. Setting this value for a server pool consisting of SPARC servers has no effect and the parameter is ignored by the Oracle VM Agent for SPARC.

      Note

      This option is greyed out if the Clustered Server Pool check box is unchecked.

    • Storage for Server Pool: Select the file system type to use for the server pool, either a Network File System, or a Physical Disk. The server pool file system is used to hold the server pool cluster data, and is also used for cluster heartbeating. Oracle recommends that you create this storage with a size of at least 12 GB, as a NAS export or LUN. Note that if you are creating a SPARC-based server pool, only NFS is supported for a server pool file system.

      A server pool file system is exclusive, just like other storage. That is, in the same way that you cannot create two storage repositories on the same export path, the server pool file system cannot be shared with other server pools, or with storage repositories. Each fully qualified export path (for example, /export/myexport/one, /export/myexport/two) must be used for one, and only one, purpose, that is, for a storage repository, or a server pool file system.

      Note

      This option is greyed out if the Clustered Server Pool check box is unchecked.

      For information on creating storage, see Chapter 6, Storage Tab.

    • Network File System: The file system to use as the pool file system. Click Search Search icon in the Storage Location field to search for a network file system. This field is displayed if you select Network File System in the previous field.

    • Physical Disk: The file system to use as the pool file system. Click Search Search icon in the Storage Location field to search for a physical disk. This field is displayed if you select Physical Disk in the previous field.

    • Description: A description of the server pool. This field is optional.

    Click Next.

  3. The Add Servers step is displayed in the wizard.

    The Hypervisor Filter field allows you to specify the hypervisor type to use for the server pool. Selecting the Oracle VM x86 hypervisor, limits the available servers to show only x86 systems; while selecting the Oracle VM SPARC hypervisor, limits the available servers to show only SPARC systems within your environment. If your environment does not contain systems of more than one hypervisor, the filter is greyed out and is automatically set to the hypervisor available within your environment. It is not possible to create a server pool consisting of servers that use different hypervisors.

    Select the Oracle VM Servers to add to the server pool from the Available Servers column and move them to the Selected Servers column.

    If you have defined tags and wish to add any to the server pool, click Next. Otherwise, click Finish.

  4. The Tags step is optional and displays in the wizard if you clicked Next in the previous step.

    If you have defined tags previously, they appear in the Available Tags column. You can select the tags that you wish to apply to the server pool and move them to the Selected Tags column.

    See Section 1.17, “Tags and Tag Filters” for more information on creating and managing tags.

    Click Finish.

The server pool is created.

3.3.1.3 Create Virtual Machine

This section explains how to create a virtual machine using a template, and creating a virtual machine from an ISO file, or from physical or virtual disks.

To create a virtual machine using a template:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Click Create Virtual Machine Create Virtual Machine icon in the toolbar.

  3. The Create Virtual Machine wizard is displayed.

    Select the Clone from an existing VM Template option and then click Next.

  4. The Create Virtual Machine wizard prompts you to specify details for the virtual machine.

    Enter or select the following details:

    • Clone Count: The number of virtual machines to create from the template.

    • Name Index: The start index number to use for the clone name suffix. The default is 0. This is used in conjunction with the VM Name field to create the name for each clone.

    • Repository: The repository in which to create the virtual machine configuration files.

    • VM Template: The template to use to create the virtual machines.

    • VM Name: An optional name for the virtual machines. The maximum name length is 256 characters and may contain any character. The name need not be unique. If no value is given, the default is the name of the virtual machine template being cloned. Each clone is suffixed with a dot (.) and the clone index number, starting with the value for the Name Index field. For example, if the VM Name field is set to MyVM, and the Name Index field is set to 1, the resulting clones would be named MyVM.1, MyVM.2 and so on.

    • Server Pool: The server pool in which to deploy the virtual machines.

    • Description: An optional description of the virtual machines.

  5. Click Finish. The virtual machines are created and deployed to the server pool.

To create a virtual machine using a virtual appliance:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Click Create Virtual Machine Create Virtual Machine icon in the toolbar.

  3. The Create Virtual Machine wizard is displayed.

    Click the Clone from an existing Virtual Appliance option and then click Next.

  4. The Create Virtual Machine wizard prompts you to specify details for the virtual machine.

    Enter or select the following details:

    • Repository: The repository in which to create the virtual machine configuration files.

    • Virtual Appliance: The virtual appliance from which you want to create the virtual machines.

    • Server Pool: The server pool in which to deploy the virtual machines.

      If you select None, the virtual machines are deployed into the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder.

    • Available Virtual Appliance VM(s): The virtual machines that are available to create from the virtual appliance.

    • Selected Virtual Appliance VM(s): The virtual machines to create from the virtual appliance.

      You can select multiple virtual machines if the virtual appliance contains more than one. Oracle VM Manager creates a separate virtual machine for each one that you select.

  5. Click Finish.

    Oracle VM Manager creates the selected virtual machines from the virtual appliance and deploys them to the server pool you specified.

    You can then migrate each virtual machine to a compatible server or server pool.

To create a virtual machine using all other media:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Click Create Virtual Machine Create Virtual Machine icon in the toolbar.

    The Create Virtual Machine wizard is displayed.

  3. Click the Create a new VM option and then click Next.

  4. The Create Virtual Machine step is displayed in the wizard.

    Enter or select the following details:

    • Server Pool: The server pool on which to create the virtual machine.

    • Server: The server that the virtual machine should be created on. The default option is Any, but the drop-down selection lists the servers that exist in the server pool that you have selected. Selecting a particular server forces the virtual machine to be created on that server. This has implications for the Start Policy discussed later.

    • Repository: The repository in which to create the virtual machine configuration file.

    • Name: A name for the virtual machine. The maximum name length is 256 characters and may contain any character. The name need not be unique.

    • Enable High Availability: Whether to enable High Availability (HA). See How does High Availability (HA) Work? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information on HA.

    • Enable Huge Pages: Whether to enable HugePages.

      • The HugePages feature is deprecated for virtual machines with a domain type of PVM in Oracle VM Release 3.4.1. You should not enable HugePages when creating or editing virtual machines. This feature will be removed in a future release of Oracle VM.

        If you have HugePages enabled for any PVM guests, Oracle recommends that you change the domain type for virtual machines from Paravirtualized (PVM) to Hardware virtualized, with paravirtualized drivers (PVHVM). If you cannot change the domain type for a virtual machine, you should disable the HugePages setting and then restart the virtual machine.

      • Huge Page support is enabled by default for virtual machines with a domain type of HVM or PVHVM. You cannot set this parameter for those virtual machines.

      • This option does not take effect on virtual machines deployed on SPARC-based server pools. Virtual machines running on SPARC-based servers can access the page sizes that the server platform supports, regardless of this setting.

      See How is the HugePages Feature Enabled for Virtual Machines?, in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide, for more information on Huge Page support.

    • Description: An optional description of the virtual machine.

    • Operating System: The operating system of the virtual machine. This setting enables or disables certain virtual machine settings that the guest operating system may require.

    • Enable Viridian: Whether to enable Viridian.

      • Viridian support enables the exposure of Windows virtualization compatible entitlements to Microsoft Windows guest operating systems. Enabling viridian support is strongly recommended to ensure improved performance for Microsoft Windows guest operating systems.

      • Enabling viridian support is permitted for all Microsoft Windows guest operating system types. However, it is only effective from Microsoft Windows Vista and Microsoft Windows Server 2008 onwards.

      • Viridian support is enabled by default when creating virtual machines running Microsoft Windows guest operating systems.

    • Mouse Device Type: The mouse type to use for the virtual machine. This option is not available for virtual machines in SPARC-based server pools.

    • Keymap: The keyboard mapping to use for the virtual machine. This option is not available for virtual machines in SPARC-based server pools.

    • Domain Type: The domain type of the virtual machine.

      • Xen HVM: Hardware virtualization, or fully virtualized. When you select this option you can supply an ISO file in a repository (in the Arrange Disks step of the wizard) from which to install an operating system on the virtual machine. See Section 4.5.1.1, “Import ISO” for information on importing an ISO file into a repository. Alternatively, you may consider setting up an environment to perform a network installation for the virtual machine.

      • Xen HVM PV Drivers: Identical to Xen HVM, but with additional paravirtualized drivers for improved performance of the virtual machine. See What are Virtualization Modes or Domain Types? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information about using paravirtualized drivers. This domain type is typically used to run Microsoft Windows guest operating systems with an acceptable performance level. Installation of the guest operating system is usually performed either using an ISO file in a repository or via a network installation.

      • Xen PVM: Paravirtualized. Enables you to select a location for the mounted ISO file from which to create the virtual machine. Before you create the virtual machine using the paravirtualized method, mount the ISO file on an NFS share, or HTTP or FTP server. You supply the location of the mounted ISO file in the Network Boot Path field in the Boot Options step of the wizard. For information on creating a mounted ISO file, see Provisioning ISO Files for PVM Guest Installations in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide. Do not select this option if the virtual machine Operating System is set to either Oracle Linux 7 or RedHat Enterprise Linux 7. These operating systems do not support the Xen PVM domain type.

        Important

        As of Oracle VM Release 3.4.6, support for PVM guests is removed. For more information, see Disabling Paravirtualized Guests on Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

      • OVM/SPARC: Specifies that the virtual machine is deployed on a server pool running on Oracle VM Server for SPARC.

      • Unknown: This option is informational in the event that Oracle VM Manager is unable to determine the domain type for an existing virtual machine. It is not possible to actually set a virtual machine's domain type to this value. Attempting to do so generates a rule violation when you try to save the virtual machine settings and an error message is returned.

    • Start Policy: The policy that should be used to start the virtual machine. Select one of:

      • Best Server: This is the legacy algorithm that optimizes virtual machine placement on Oracle VM Servers that are in use before moving to unused servers in the pool.

      • Balance Server: This algorithm distributes virtual machines across all the available Oracle VM Servers in the server pool, starting with the least utilized Oracle VM Server first. CPU and memory utilization statistics are used to balance the virtual machine distribution across the server pool, with CPU utilization taking precedence over memory utilization.

      • Current Server: The virtual machine is started on the Oracle VM Server to which it is assigned. If you selected a particular server to create the virtual machine on, then it is started on this server.

      • Use Pool Policy: The virtual machine is started using the start policy defined for the entire server pool. See Section 3.1.2, “Create Server Pool” for more information on setting the start policy for a server pool.

    • Max. Memory (MB): The maximum memory size the virtual machine can be allocated. This value must be between 32 and 512000. The default is 512.

      For x86-based virtual machines, this value is incremented by 32 each time you click the up arrow, and, conversely, decreased by 32 if you click the down arrow. For SPARC-based virtual machines, the up arrow adds 512, and the down arrow subtracts 512. If you have enabled Huge Pages, the value must be a multiple of 2 MB.

      Note

      For HVM and PVHVM guests, the maximum memory size value must equal the memory size value. If these values are different, the following job failure message is generated for HVM/PVHVM guests: "The memory limit cannot be different than the current memory size on an HVM/PVHVM Virtual Machine."

    • Memory (MB): The memory size the virtual machine is allocated. When creating a virtual machine, this is the memory allocation used when starting the virtual machine. This value must be between 32 and 512000. The default is 512.

      For x86-based virtual machines, this value is incremented by 32 each time you click the up arrow, and, conversely, decreased by 32 if you click the down arrow. For SPARC-based virtual machines, the up arrow adds 512, and the down arrow subtracts 512. If you have enabled Huge Pages, the value must be a multiple of 2 MB.

      You can change the memory allocated to a running virtual machine without the need to restart the virtual machine if the domain type is PVM or PVHVM and where the guest is running a Linux OS on an x86-based platform or an Oracle Solaris OS on a SPARC-based platform.

      Note

      For x86-based PVHVM guests running on Oracle Solaris OS, you cannot change the memory if the virtual machine is running.

      See the Oracle VM Paravirtual Drivers for Microsoft Windows documentation for information about the availability of hot memory modification on PVHVM guests that are running a Microsoft Windows OS. You must use a Windows PV Driver that supports hot memory modification or you must stop the guest before you modify the memory.

    • Max. Processors: The maximum number of processors the virtual machine can be allocated. The number of processors is expressed in number of physical CPU cores. The maximum number of processors depends on the domain type, as follows:

      • PVM: 256.

        Important

        As of Oracle VM Release 3.4.6, support for PVM guests is removed. For more information, see Disabling Paravirtualized Guests on Oracle VM Server in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

      • HVM: 128; or 32 for Microsoft Windows guests.

        Note

        As of Release 3.4.6, the HVM limit is 64 for Microsoft Windows guests.

      • PVHVM: 128; or 32 if using Oracle VM Paravirtual Drivers for Microsoft Windows.

        Note

        As of Release 3.4.6, the PVHVM limit is 64 if using Oracle VM Paravirtual Drivers for Microsoft Windows.

      • OVM/SPARC: Equivalent to the number of available CPUs on the server.

    • Processors: The number of processors the virtual machine is allocated. The number of processors is expressed in number of physical CPU cores, up to the value of Max. Processors.

    • Priority: The CPU priority of the virtual machine. The higher the priority value, the more physical CPU cycles are given to the virtual machine. This option is not available for virtual machines in SPARC-based server pools. This should be a number between 1 and 100. The default priority is set at 1.

    • Processor Cap %: Increase or decrease the percentage to which the virtual CPUs can receive scheduled time. This parameter defines the maximum percentage to which the virtual CPUs can receive scheduled time. Use this parameter to keep low priority virtual machines from consuming too many CPU cycles on a Virtual Machine Server. This option is not available for virtual machines in SPARC-based server pools.

    • Restart Action on Crash: The action to perform if a virtual machine crashes. This option is only available for virtual machines that are running on the Xen hypervisor and that have been configured to run on a particular Oracle VM Server. Options include the following:

      • Restart: Restarts the virtual machine operating system.

      • Stop: Stops the virtual machine. If Enable High Availability is selected, this option is not available.

      • Restart After Dump: Restarts the virtual machine operating system after first creating a core dump file for the virtual machine.

      • Stop After Dump: Stops the virtual machine after first creating a core dump file for the virtual machine. If Enable High Availability is selected, this option is not available.

      Core dump files are saved to /var/xen/dump on the Oracle VM Server where the virtual machine is hosted. Each core dump file is named uniquely so that files are not overwritten. This can use up disk space rapidly. You must make sure there is either enough disk space available at this path on the Oracle VM Server where the virtual machine will run; or you should mount additional storage at this path to avoid using up disk space required to host dom0.

      This option cannot be modified for a running virtual machine. You must stop the virtual machine before you are able to change this option, if you select to edit the virtual machine later.

    The Priority and Processor Cap% parameters are passed to the Xen hypervisor for use by the credit scheduler, which automatically load balances guest VCPUs across all available physical CPUs, using an algorithm that combines these two parameters. Therefore, these parameters are a key factor for the performance of the virtual machine on x86 hardware.

    Note

    For information on performance optimization goals and techniques for Oracle VM Server for x86, see Optimizing Oracle VM Server for x86 Performance, on Oracle Technology Network at: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/vm/ovm-performance-2995164.pdf.

    On SPARC, each virtual machine uses dedicated physical CPU threads, and CPUs are not shared between virtual machines, being exclusively assigned to a single virtual machine.

    Click Next.

  5. The Set up Networks step is displayed in the wizard.

    This step of the wizard allows you to add VNICs to the virtual machine.

    1. To specify the MAC address for a VNIC, select Specify MAC Address and enter the MAC address. Otherwise, leave the default Dynamically Assign MAC.

    2. Select a network with the virtual machine role from the Network drop-down list.

      If no networks are available, you must first create a network with the virtual machine role as a dedicated network for virtual machine traffic. See Section 5.1.1, “Create New Network” for information on creating a network.

    3. Click Add VNIC.

      • The VNIC order specified determines the order in which the VNICs are presented to the virtual machine. You can control the ordering of the VNICs using the up and down arrows on the right of the table.

      • If you are editing the networking of an existing stopped virtual machine, you can change the network to which the VNIC belongs using the Network drop-down list in the table. It is important that the VNIC belongs to a network already associated with the Oracle VM Servers on which it can run, or you cannot start the virtual machine. See Section 5.1.1, “Create New Network” and Section 5.1.2, “Edit Existing Network” for more information on associating Oracle VM Servers with networks.

      • If you are editing an existing running virtual machine, you can add VNICs to the virtual machine, but you cannot remove VNICs that are already in use. You also cannot reorder VNICs on a running virtual machine. If you choose to add a VNIC to a running machine you must ensure that the VNIC belongs to a virtual machine network already associated with the Oracle VM Servers on which it can run, by selecting the appropriate network from the Network drop-down list.

      • A virtual machine can have up to eight (8) VNICs for HVM guests and up to 31 for PVM guests. A PVM guest requires network connectivity to perform the operating system install and must have at least one VNIC.

    4. Click Next.

  6. The Arrange Disks step of the wizard is displayed.

    Select the desired storage configuration of your virtual machine, such as virtual disks, physical disks, and ISO files. On a separate slot, add one or more of the following disk types:

    • Empty: An empty slot.

    • Virtual Disk: This allows you to add or create a virtual disk. Virtual disks may be shared by virtual machines, or only available to a single virtual machine.

    • Physical Disk: The physical disks are the disks in a storage array. Physical disks may be shared by virtual machines.

    • CD/DVD: This adds an ISO file in a storage repository and can be used to create HVM and PVHVM virtual machines. When creating a virtual machine from an ISO file, you must use a single file. Installations that span multiple ISO files are not supported. ISO files cannot be used to create PVM virtual machines. You cannot add an empty CDROM on a SPARC-based server.

    Add or create any virtual disks to use as the virtual machine's hard disk, select any physical disks to add, and select any ISO files to use to create the virtual machine. Add the disks in the order they should appear in the virtual machine. The disk with the boot partition or installation media should be the first disk listed. An HVM guest can have up to four disks, including empty CD/DVD drives. A PVM guest can have up to 104 disks. A PVHVM guest can have up to 107 disks. An OVM/SPARC guest can have up to 1024 disks. Only one slot can contain an empty CD/DVD.

    Tip

    When editing a running virtual machine, you can change the CD/DVD using this dialog box and the CD/DVD is mounted in the operating system.

    To create or add a virtual disk:

    1. To create a virtual disk, select Virtual Disk from the Disk Type drop-down list and click Create a Virtual Disk Create a Virtual Disk icon .

    2. The Create Virtual Disk dialog box is displayed. Enter or select the following to create a virtual disk:

      • Repository: The repository in which the virtual disk is to be created.

      • Virtual Disk Name: The name of the virtual disk to be created and made available to the virtual machine. See How are Virtual Disks Managed? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information about using virtual disks.

      • Size (GiB): The disk size of the virtual disk, in GiB.

      • Description: A description of the virtual disk.

      • Shareable: Whether the virtual disk should be shareable (read/write) with other virtual machines.

      • Allocation Type: Whether to use a Sparse Allocation or Non-sparse Allocation. Sparse Allocation creates a sparse disk, so the size of the disk is initially small and increases as it is used. Sparse allocation is faster than using Non-Sparse Allocation when creating a virtual machine. Non-Sparse Allocation creates the entire disk when the virtual machine is created, and so is slower than creating a sparse disk.

      Click OK.

    3. To search for an existing virtual disk to add to the virtual machine, click Select a Virtual Machine Disk Select a Virtual Machine Disk icon . The Select a Virtual Machine Disk dialog box is displayed. The dialog box lists the available virtual disks in a table that indicates the following information:

      • Selected: Whether or not the disk has been selected. This is indicated using radio button.

      • Name: The name of the virtual disk as stored in Oracle VM Manager.

      • Size (GiB): The disk size of the virtual disk, in GiB.

      • Repository: The repository in which the virtual disk is located.

      • Shareable: Whether the virtual disk is configured to be shareable (read/write) with other virtual machines.

      • VM(s): A comma separated list of the names of any virtual machines that may already be using this virtual disk.

      Select the virtual disk to use and Click OK.

      Note

      If your virtual machine needs more than one disk, you can create the disk(s) afterwards in the repository, and add them to the virtual machine. See Section 4.9.1.1, “Create Virtual Disk” and Section 3.5.2.1, “Edit Virtual Machine” for more information on creating a virtual disk and editing a virtual machine. There are some limitations on mixing virtual disks of differing device types on a virtual machine. See How are Virtual Disks Managed? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information about how device types are allocated to virtual disks and what you may need to do to solve any issues surrounding this problem.

    To add a physical disk:

    1. To add a physical disk to the virtual machine, select Physical Disk from the Disk Type drop-down list. Click Select a Virtual Machine Disk Select a Virtual Machine Disk icon . The Select a Physical Disk dialog box is displayed. The dialog box lists the available physical disks in a table that provides the following information:

      • Selected: Whether or not the disk has been selected. This is indicated using radio button.

      • Name: The name of the physical disk as stored in Oracle VM Manager.

      • Size (GiB): The disk size of the physical disk, in GiB.

      • SAN Server: The SAN Server where the physical disk is located.

      • Volume Group: The volume group that the physical disk belongs to.

      • Shareable: Whether the physical disk is configured to be shareable (read/write) with other virtual machines.

      • VM(s): A comma separated list of the names of any virtual machines that may already be using this physical disk.

      Select a physical disk from the list of available disks. If you want to leave the slot empty, select Leave Slot Empty. Click OK.

    To add an ISO file:

    1. To add an ISO file to the virtual machine, select CD/DVD from the Disk Type drop-down list. Click Select a Virtual Machine Disk Select a Virtual Machine Disk icon . The Select an ISO dialog box is displayed. Select a Iso file from the list of available files. If you want to leave the slot empty, select Leave Slot Empty. Click OK.

      Note

      When adding an ISO file to an existing virtual machine, the ISO file is available to the operating system, but may not be mounted. To access the ISO file, you may need to mount it, for example:

      # mkdir /cdrom
      # mount -o loop /dev/xvdb /cdrom

    When you have set up the virtual machine's disks, click Next.

  7. The Boot Options step is displayed in the wizard.

    Select the boot media order for your virtual machine.

    If you are creating a hardware virtualized machine virtual machine (HVM), you can choose the PXE boot option. If so, remember to put PXE first in the Select your boot options field, and change the boot order again after installation and before rebooting the virtual machine. To use PXE, you must configure a PXE/tftp environment to offer the necessary boot media and instructions to the virtual machine.

    If you are creating a paravirtualized virtual machine (PVM), you also have the PXE option available. In this case, the PXE option refers to a network style boot. If the PXE option appears in the right-hand-side column, you must enter the location of the mounted ISO file from which to perform the operating system installation in the Network Boot Path field that is shown when editing or creating a PVM, for example

    http://example.com/EL6-x86

    For information on creating a mounted ISO file, see Provisioning ISO Files for PVM Guest Installations in the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

    You cannot use the Network Boot Path field to boot a virtual machine using PXE. This field can only be used to specify the path to a mounted ISO file to use when installing a PVM guest.

    If you have defined tags and want to add any to this virtual machine, click Next. Otherwise, click Finish to create and deploy the virtual machine to the server pool.

  8. The Tags step is optional and displays in the wizard if you clicked Next in the previous step.

    Note

    The virtual machine has already been created and deployed to the server pool at this point. This step is entirely optional. Cancelling the operation within this dialog does not prevent the virtual machine from being created.

    If you have previously created tags, they appear in the Available Tags column. Select the tags you want to apply to the virtual machine and move them to the Selected Tags column. See Section 1.17, “Tags and Tag Filters” for more information on creating and managing tags. Click Finish.

If you created a PVM, there are some steps you should take after the operating system installation is completed:

  1. Stop the virtual machine. See Section 3.5.2.4, “Stop Virtual Machines” for information on stopping a virtual machine.

  2. Edit the virtual machine and remove PXE from the Boot Order column in the Boot Options step of the Edit Virtual Machine wizard. See Section 3.5.2.1, “Edit Virtual Machine” for information on editing a virtual machine.

  3. Start the virtual machine and complete the installation if necessary. See Section 3.5.2.3, “Start Virtual Machines” for information on starting a virtual machine.

To edit the virtual machine configuration information, see Section 3.5.2.1, “Edit Virtual Machine”.

3.3.1.4 Import Virtual Machine

You can import a virtual machine into Oracle VM Manager and have it deployed to a server pool, or placed in the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder if you do not want to deploy it. The virtual machine must be located on an FTP or web server, either as separate files, or compressed into a single archive file (for example, a .tgz or .zip file). As an archive of a virtual machine is also known as a virtual machine template, you can also use this process to import older style Oracle VM virtual machine templates. This process does not work for the newer OVF/OVA style templates.

When you import a virtual machine into a server pool, you have the option of saving it to any storage repository that is presented to at least one Oracle VM Server in the server pool. When you import a virtual machine to the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder, you can save it into any storage repository.

To import a virtual machine:

  1. Place the files that make up a virtual machine, or an archive of those files, in a location accessible by Oracle VM Manager using any of these protocols: HTTP, HTTPS or FTP.

  2. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  3. If you want to import and deploy the virtual machine to a server pool, select Server Pools in the navigation tree, then select the server pool in the management pane table.

    If you do not want to deploy the virtual machine, select the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder.

  4. Select Import Virtual Machine... Import Virtual Machine... icon in the toolbar in the management pane.

  5. The Import Virtual Machine dialog box is displayed. Select or edit the following:

    • Destination Repository: The storage repository in which to save the virtual machine.

    • VM URLs: The URLs for the virtual machine. The URL schemes supported are HTTP, HTTPS, and FTP. For example:

      http://example.com/mytemplate.tgz

      To import a virtual machine using FTP, use the standard FTP syntax, for example:

      ftp://user:password@server/path/filename.tgz

      Each virtual machine component should be listed on a new line. Each URL must be a reference to a complete file. If your virtual machine files are split into multiple compressed files, concatenate those files and enter the URL for the concatenated file, for example to concatenate a number of compressed files to one compressed file, enter:

       $ cat vm.tgz.1of3 vm.tgz.2of3 vm.tgz.3of3 > vm.tgz

      Then enter the URL to the single compressed virtual machine file, in this case, vm.tgz.

      To import a virtual machine that is not compressed as a single file, each component must be a complete file (if not, concatenate them to one file), for example to enter a virtual disk image and a virtual machine configuration file that together make up a complete virtual machine, you could enter:

      http://myexample.com/System-sda.img
      http://myexample.com/vm.cfg
    • Proxy: The IP address or hostname of an optional proxy server to use when importing the virtual machine.

    Click OK to import the virtual machine. The virtual machine is deployed to the server pool in the stopped state. Alternatively, the virtual machine is imported to the Unassigned Virtual Machines folder.

See Section 3.5.2.3, “Start Virtual Machines” for information on starting a virtual machine, and Section 3.5.2.1, “Edit Virtual Machine” for information on editing a virtual machine.

3.3.1.5 Edit Server Pool

You can edit the configuration information of a server pool, including the server pool name, description, key mapping and secure migration of virtual machines.

To edit a server pool:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane. Ensure that you are in the Server Pools perspective. Click Edit Selected Server Pool... Edit Server Pool icon in the toolbar.

  3. The Edit Server Pool dialog box is displayed. Edit the server pool information:

    • Server Pool Name: The name of the server pool. The maximum length of a server pool name is 256 characters and may contain any character.

    • Description: A description of the server pool.

    • Virtual IP Address for the Pool: This deprecated field is not displayed if a virtual IP address was not configured when the server pool was created. The field is greyed out, as it is not possible to edit the virtual IP address for a server pool after it has been created.

    • Master Server: This deprecated option is not displayed if a virtual IP address was not configured when the server pool was created. In the case where a virtual IP address exists for a server pool, the option to select an Oracle VM Server within the server pool to take the role of the master server is available. This option is only significant if configuring a server pool that consists of Oracle VM Servers running software prior to the 3.4 release. Please see What is a Master Server and a Virtual IP Address? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information.

    • Pool File System: This field cannot be modified.

    • VM Console Keymap: The key mapping to use in the consoles for all virtual machines in the server pool.

    • VM Start Policy: Define the default start-up policy for all of your virtual machines handled by this server pool. It is possible to override the default policy within the configuration of each virtual machine. See Section 3.1.3, “Create Virtual Machine” for information on setting the start policy for an individual virtual machine.

    • Secure VM Migrate: Select whether to enable encrypted migration of virtual machines.

    • Override Global Server Update Group: Select whether to enable overriding of the global update repository. See Section 7.3, “Server Update Groups” and Section 3.4.6, “Server Update Repositories Perspective” for more information on update repositories.

    • Timeout for cluster: If clustering is enabled for the server pool, this option allows you to set the timeout parameter. The maximum cluster timeout setting is 300 seconds. The minimum cluster timeout is 12 seconds. The default cluster timeout is 120 seconds. The disk heartbeat and network heartbeat are automatically derived from the cluster timeout value.

      The cluster timeout can only be changed when there are no servers in the server pool, therefore it is usually good to set this during the creation of your server pool.

  4. To edit the Oracle VM Servers in the server pool, click the Servers tab. Using the controls provided, you can add or remove Oracle VM Servers that comprise the server pool.

  5. To edit the tags associated with the server pool, click the Tags tab. Using the controls provided, you can add or remove tags that can be used to identify the server pool and to group it with other objects within Oracle VM Manager. See Section 1.17, “Tags and Tag Filters” for more information on creating and managing tags.

  6. Click OK to apply your changes.

3.3.1.6 Delete Server Pool

Before you can delete a server pool, you must delete or remove all virtual machines and remove all Oracle VM Servers from the server pool.

To delete server pools:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the Server Pools folder in the navigation tree.

  3. Select Server Pools from the Perspective drop-down list.

  4. Select one or more server pools in the table in the management pane. Click Delete Delete icon in the toolbar.

  5. The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK to delete the server pools.

The server pools are deleted.

Tip

To delete a server pool which is HA-enabled, you must have an admin server assigned to any NFS file server-based storage.

3.3.1.7 Change Oracle VM Agent Passwords on Oracle VM Servers

Oracle VM Manager allows you to change the password for the Oracle VM Agent running on each Oracle VM Server. However, you must change the Oracle VM Agent password for all Oracle VM Servers in a server pool. This is why the password change can only be executed at the server pool level and is applied to all Oracle VM Servers in the server pool at the same time.

To change the Oracle VM Agent password for all Oracle VM Servers in a server pool:

  1. Select the Server Pools folder in the navigation tree.

  2. Select Server Pools from the Perspective drop-down list.

  3. Select one or more server pools in the table in the management pane. Click Change Servers Agent Password Change Servers Agent Password icon in the toolbar.

  4. The Change Agent Password for All Servers within the Server Pool dialog box is displayed. Enter the current password first. Then enter a new password and confirm it in the respective fields.

  5. Click OK to complete the operation. Oracle VM Manager logs into each Oracle VM Server in the server pool and changes the Oracle VM Agent password.

3.3.1.8 Define or Edit Server Pool Policies

It is possible to define server pool policies to improve power and resource usage across the servers within your server pool. The two policies you can set are for:

The policy is also able to be set for networks used in a server pool. You can set the server pool to use either DRS, or DPM, but not both at the same time.

See What are Server Pool Policies? in the Oracle VM Concepts Guide for more information on these server pool policies.

To set a server pool policy:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Select the server pool in the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane.

  3. From the Perspective field in the management pane, select Policies from the drop-down list. Click Edit Edit icon in the toolbar. The Configure Policy step of the Configure DRS/DPM wizard is displayed.

    Enter the server pool policy information:

    • Policy Control:

      • Policy Type: You can choose from either DRS, DPM, or none. You cannot set both DRS and DPM to be active at the same time.

      • Time Period (Minutes): The time period for the policy job to run. This sets the policy job to run every n minutes, for example, 10 sets the policy job to run every 10 minutes. You can enter a number between 2 and 60.

    • Server CPU:

      • Enable: Set whether to enable or disable logging of CPU performance and utilization.

      • Threshold (%): The maximum amount of CPU percentage usage allowed before the policy must be enacted. You can enter a number between 25 and 99.

        Note

        The Enable check box must be selected before a value can be specified for the Threshold (%) field.

    • Servers: Select the Oracle VM Servers for which the policy is to be enabled by moving the selected Oracle VM Servers from the Available Servers to the Selected Servers shuttle box.

    Click Next.

  4. The Select Networks step of the Configure DRS/DPM wizard is displayed.

    Select the networks to be included in the policy. Click Next.

  5. The Network Settings step of the Configure DRS/DPM wizard is displayed.

    Select whether to enable the policy on the network, and select the threshold at which the policy is to be enacted for the network. Click Finish.

The policy is set for the server pool.

3.3.1.9 Send VM Messages

You can select one or more virtual machines, Oracle VM Servers or server pools, to select which running virtual machines are populated in the dialog box used to send messages to virtual machines.

To send a virtual machine a message you must have first installed the Oracle VM Guest Additions in the virtual machine. For information on installing the Oracle VM Guest Additions, and a more detailed description of the virtual machine messaging mechanism and its uses, see the Oracle VM Administrator's Guide.

To send messages to virtual machines:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab.

  2. Determine the grouping of virtual machines that you wish to send a message to:

    1. If you wish to send a message to virtual machines distributed across one or more server pools, click on the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane. Select Server Pools from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more server pools in the management pane.

    2. If you wish to send a message to virtual machines distributed across one or more servers in a particular server pool, expand the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane and select the server pool where the servers reside. Select Servers from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more servers in the management pane.

    3. If you wish to send a message to one or more virtual machines on a particular server, expand the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane and select the server pool where the servers reside. Select Virtual Machines from the Perspective drop-down list. Select one or more virtual machines in the management pane.

  3. Click Send VM Messages... Send VM Messages... icon in the perspective toolbar.

    The Send Messages to Virtual Machines dialog box is displayed.

    This figure shows the Send Messages to Virtual Machine dialog box with the Messages tab displayed.
  4. To create a message, click Create Message... Create Message... icon in the perspective toolbar to display the Create VM Message dialog box.

    This figure shows the Create VM Message dialog box.

    Enter the message key value pair in the Key and Message fields. Check the Log Message field to retain a log of the message. Check the Hide Message field to hide the message of the key/value pair in the user interface. Click OK to save the message and return to the Send Messages to Virtual Machines dialog box.

  5. To edit a message, select the message and click Edit... Edit... icon in the dialog box toolbar. To delete a message, select it and click Delete Delete icon in the dialog box toolbar.

  6. Select the Virtual Machines tab to select which running virtual machines are to receive the messages.

    This figure shows the Create VM Message dialog box with the Virtual Machines tab displayed.

    Click OK to send the messages to the virtual machines.

3.3.1.10 Generate Report

You can generate an XML report on one or more server pools. For more information about object reporting, see Section 7.1, “Reports”.

To generate a report on server pools:

  1. Select the Server Pools folder in the navigation pane.

  2. Select one or more server pools in the management pane table.

  3. Click Generate Report icon Generate Report in the management pane toolbar.

  4. The report is generated and sent to the browser.

3.3.2 Server Processor Compatibility Perspective

The Server Processor Compatibility perspective lists the different server processor compatibility groups configured in your environment. The following columns are displayed in the management pane:

  • Name: The name that has been configured for the server processor compatibility group.

  • Description: A description entered for the server processor compatibility group when it was created or edited.

  • Servers: A comma-separated list of servers that belong to the server processor compatibility group.

This perspective includes a toolbar that consists of the following options:

Table 3.3 Server Processor Compatibility Perspective Toolbar Icon Options

Toolbar Icon Option

Icon

Description

Create New Server Processor Compatibility Group...

Create New Server Processor Compatibility Group... icon

Displays the Create a Server Processor Compatibility Group wizard.

Use this option, after adding servers to a server pool, to define which servers have processors belonging to the same family. This helps to improve the success of live virtual machine migration.

Edit Server Processor Compatibility Group...

Edit Server Processor Compatibility Group... icon

Displays the Edit Server Processor Compatibility Group wizard. Use this option to edit a server processor compatibility group.

Delete Server Processor Compatibility Group

Delete Server Processor Compatibility Group icon

Displays the Delete Confirmation dialog box. Use this option to delete the selected server processor compatibility group.

Help

Help icon

Displays context sensitive help.


3.3.2.1 Create Server Processor Compatibility Group

Warning

It is critical that all of the members of a server processor compatibility group have compatible processors. If you create a group that contains members with incompatible processor families or models, live migration and other migration related functions may fail.

To create a server processor compatibility group:

  1. Click the Servers and VMs tab. Select Server Pools in the navigation pane.

  2. From the Perspective field in the management pane, select Server Processor Compatibility from the drop-down list. Click Create New Server Processor Compatibility... Create New Server Processor Compatibility icon in the perspective toolbar.

  3. The Create a Server Processor Compatibility Group wizard is displayed.

    Enter the server processor compatibility group information:

    • Group Name: Enter the name of the server processor compatibility group.

    • Description: A description of the server processor compatibility group.

    Click Next.

  4. The Select Servers step of the Create a Server Processor Compatibility Group wizard is displayed.

    Select the servers to include in the server processor compatibility group and move them from the Available Servers column to the Selected Servers column.

    Click Finish.

The server processor compatibility group is created and listed in the Server Processor Compatibility Group table in the management pane.

3.3.2.2 Edit Server Processor Compatibility Group

Warning

You should not edit the default server processor compatibility groups created during Oracle VM Server discovery. You should also be aware that if you add members to a processor compatibility group, the server processor family and model must match the other members of the group or live migration and other migration related functions may fail.

To edit a server processor compatibility group:

  1. In the Servers and VMs tab, select Server Pools in the navigation pane.

  2. From the Perspective field in the management pane, select Server Processor Compatibility from the drop-down list. Select the server processor compatibility group in the Server Processor Compatibility table and click Edit Server Processor Compatibility... Edit Server Processor Compatibility icon in the perspective toolbar.

  3. The Edit Server Processor Compatibility Group dialog box is displayed. Edit the server processor compatibility group as required. To edit the Oracle VM Servers in the server processor compatibility group, click the Servers tab.

    Click OK.

The server processor compatibility group is edited and displayed in the Server Processor Compatibility Group table in the management pane.

3.3.2.3 Delete Server Processor Compatibility Group

To delete a server processor compatibility group:

  1. In the Servers and VMs tab, select Server Pools in the navigation pane.

  2. From the Perspective field in the management pane, select Server Processor Compatibility from the drop-down list. Select the server processor compatibility group in the Server Processor Compatibility table and click Delete Server Processor Compatibility Delete Server Processor Compatibility icon in the perspective toolbar.

  3. A confirmation dialog box is displayed. Click OK to delete the server processor compatibility group.

The server processor compatibility group is deleted.