5 Network Data Model Graph Overview

This chapter explains the concepts and operations related to the network data model for representing capabilities or objects that are modeled as nodes and links (vertices and edges) in a graph. This model is called the Oracle Spatial and Graph Network Data Model Graph feature, or simply Network Data Model Graph. This chapter assumes that you are familiar with the main Oracle Spatial and Graph concepts, data types, and operations, as documented in Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's Guide.

Although this chapter discusses some network-related terms as they relate to Oracle Spatial and Graph, it assumes that you are familiar with basic network data modeling concepts.

This chapter contains the following major sections:

Introduction to Network Modeling

In many applications, capabilities or objects are modeled as nodes and links in a network. The network model contains logical information such as connectivity relationships among nodes and links, directions of links, and costs of nodes and links. With logical network information, you can analyze a network and answer questions, many of them related to path computing and tracing. For example, for a biochemical pathway, you can find all possible reaction paths between two chemical compounds; or for a road network, you can find the following information:

  • What is the shortest (distance) or fastest (travel time) path between two cities?

  • What is the closest hotel to a specific airport, and how can I get there?

In addition to logical network information, spatial information such as node locations and link geometries can be associated with the network. This information can help you to model the logical information (such as the cost of a route, because its physical length can be directly computed from its spatial representation).

The Spatial and Graph Network Data Model Graph feature can be used for large, complex networks. For example, Figure 5-1 shows San Francisco and links, which have been defined using the Network Data Model Graph feature, displayed in a demo web-based application for network analysis. (You can install this demo using the NDM tutorial described in Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources.)

Figure 5-1 San Francisco Nodes and Links

Description of Figure 5-1 follows
Description of "Figure 5-1 San Francisco Nodes and Links"

The generic data model and network analysis capability can model and analyze many kinds of network applications in addition to traditional geographical information systems (GIS). For example, in biochemistry, applications may need to model reaction pathway networks for living organisms; and in the pharmaceutical industry, applications that model the drug discovery process may need to model protein-protein interaction.

The network modeling capabilities of Spatial and Graph include schema objects and an application programming interface (API). The schema objects include metadata and network tables. The API includes a server-side PL/SQL API (the SDO_NET package) for creating and managing networks in the database, and a middle-tier (or client-side) Java API for network editing and analysis.

Main Steps in Using the Network Data Model Graph

This section summarizes the main steps for working with the Network Data Model Graph feature in Oracle Spatial and Graph. It refers to important concepts, structures, and operations that are described in detail in other sections.

There are two basic approaches to creating a network:

With each approach, you must insert the network data into the network tables. You can then use the Network Data Model Graph PL/SQL and Java application programming interfaces (APIs) to update the network and perform other operations. (The PL/SQL and Java APIs are described in Network Data Model Graph Application Programming Interface.)

Letting Spatial Perform Most Operations

To create a network by letting Spatial and Graph perform most of the necessary operations, follow these steps:

  1. Create the network using a procedure with a name in the form CREATE_<network-type>_NETWORK, where <network-type> reflects the type of network that you want to create:

    Each of these procedures creates the necessary Network Data Model Graph tables (described in Network Data Model Graph Tables) and inserts a row with the appropriate network metadata information into the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views).

    Each procedure has two formats: one format creates all Network Data Model Graph tables using default names for the tables and certain columns, and other format lets you specify names for the tables and certain columns. The default names for the Network Data Model Graph tables are <network-name>_NODE$, <network-name>_LINK$, <network-name>_PATH$, and <network-name>_PLINK$. The default name for cost columns in the Network Data Model Graph tables is COST, and the default name for geometry columns is GEOMETRY.

  2. Insert data into the node and link tables, and if necessary into the path and path-link tables. (The node, link, path, and path-link tables are described in Network Data Model Graph Tables.)
  3. Validate the network, using the SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NETWORK function.
  4. For a spatial (SDO or LRS) network, insert the appropriate information into the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view, and create spatial indexes on the geometry columns.

    If you plan to use a view as a node, link, or path table, you must specify the view name for the TABLE_NAME column value when you insert information about the node, link, or path table in the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view.

Performing the Operations Yourself

To create a network by performing the necessary operations yourself, follow these steps:

  1. Create the node table, using the SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE procedure. (The node table is described in Node Table.)
  2. Insert data into the node table.
  3. Create the link table, using the SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE procedure. (The link table is described in Link Table).
  4. Insert data into the link table.
  5. Optionally, create the path table, using the SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_TABLE procedure. (The path table is described in Path Table).
  6. If you created the path table, create the path-link table, using the SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_LINK_TABLE procedure. (The path-link table is described in Path-Link Table).
  7. If you created the path table and if you want to create paths, insert data into the table.
  8. If you inserted data into the path table, insert the appropriate rows into the path-link table.
  9. Insert a row into the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view with information about the network. (The USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view is described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views.)

    If you plan to use a view as a node, link, path, or path-link table, you must specify the view name for the relevant columns when you insert information about the network in the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view.

  10. For a spatial (SDO or LRS) network, insert the appropriate information into the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view, and create spatial indexes on the geometry columns.

    If you plan to use a view as a node, link, or path table, you must specify the view name for the TABLE_NAME column value when you insert information about the node, link, or path table in the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view.

  11. Validate the network, using the SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NETWORK function.

You can change the sequence of some of these steps. For example, you can create both the node and link tables first, and then insert data into each one; and you can insert the row into the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view before you create the node and link tables.

Network Data Model Graph Concepts

A network is a type of mathematical graph that captures relationships between objects using connectivity. The connectivity may or may not be based on spatial proximity. For example, if two towns are on opposite sides of a lake, the shortest path based on spatial proximity (a straight line across the middle of the lake) is not relevant if you want to drive from one town to the other. Instead, to find the shortest driving distance, you need connectivity information about roads and intersections and about the "cost" of individual links.

A network consists of a set of nodes and links. Each link (sometimes also called an edge or a segment) specifies two nodes.

A network can be directed (that is, by default, the start and end nodes determine link direction) or undirected (that is, links can be traversed in either direction).

The following are some key terms related to the Network Data Model Graph: feature

  • A node, also called a vertex, is a point where links can join each other. An isolated node is a node that is not included in any links. (A non-isolated node will become isolated if all links that include that node are deleted.)

  • A link represents a relationship between two nodes. Within a directed network, any link can be undirected (that is, able to be traversed either from the start node to the end node or from the end node to the start node) or directed (that is, able to be traversed only from the start node to the end node). Within an undirected network, all links are undirected.

  • A network element is a node or a link.

  • A path is an alternating sequence of nodes and links, beginning and ending with nodes, and usually with no nodes and links appearing more than once. (Repeating nodes and links within a path are permitted, but are rare in most network applications.)

  • A subpath is a partial path along a path, created either as a result of a network analysis operation or explicitly by a user. Subpaths are explained and illustrated in Subpaths.

  • A logical network contains connectivity information but no geometric information. This is the model used for network analysis. A logical network can be treated as a directed graph or undirected graph, depending on the application.

  • A spatial network contains both connectivity information and geometric information. In a spatial network, the nodes and links are SDO_GEOMETRY geometry objects without LRS information (an SDO network) or with LRS information (an LRS network), or SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY objects (a topology geometry network).

    In an LRS network, each node includes a geometry ID value and a measure value, and each link includes a geometry ID value and start and end measure values; and the geometry ID value in each case refers to an SDO_GEOMETRY object with LRS information. A spatial network can be directed or undirected, depending on the application.

  • A feature is an object of interest in a network application that is associated with a node or link. Features and feature layer types are explained in Features and Feature Layers

  • Cost is a non-negative numeric attribute that can be associated with links or nodes for computing the minimum cost path, which is the path that has the minimum total cost from a start node to an end node. You can specify a single cost factor, such as driving time or driving distance for links, in the network metadata, and network analytical functions that examine cost will use this specified cost factor.

  • Duration is a non-negative numeric attribute that can be associated with links or nodes to specify a duration value for the link or node. The duration value can indicate a number of minutes or any other user-determined significance. You can specify a single duration factor, such as driving time for links, in the network metadata; however, if you use duration instead of cost to indicate elapsed time, network analytical functions that examine cost will not consider the specified duration factor.

  • State is a string attribute, either ACTIVE or INACTIVE, that is associated with links or nodes to specify whether or not a link or node will be considered by network analysis functions. For example, if the state of a node is INACTIVE, any links from or to that node are ignored in the computation of the shortest path between two nodes. The state is ACTIVE by default when a link or node is created, but you can set the state INACTIVE.

  • Type is a string attribute that can be associated with links or nodes to specify a user-defined value for the type of a link or a node.

  • Temporary links, nodes, and paths exist only in a network memory object, and are not written to the database when the network memory object is written. For example, during a network analysis and editing session you might create temporary nodes to represent street addresses for shortest-path computations, but not save these temporary nodes when you save the results of editing operations.

  • Reachable nodes are all nodes that can be reached from a given node. Reaching nodes are all nodes that can reach a given node.

  • The degree of a node is the number of links to (that is, incident upon) the node. The in-degree is the number of inbound links, and the out-degree is the number of outbound links.

  • A connected component is a group of network nodes that are directly or indirectly connected. If node A can reach node B, they must belong to the same connected component. If two nodes are not connected, it is concluded that there is no possible path between them. This information can be used as a filter to avoid unnecessary path computations.

  • A spanning tree of a connected graph is a tree (that is, a graph with no cycles) that connects all nodes of the graph. (The directions of links are ignored in a spanning tree.) The minimum cost spanning tree is the spanning tree that connects all nodes and has the minimum total cost.

  • A partitioned network is a network that contains multiple partitions. Partitioning a large network enables only the necessary partitions to be loaded on demand into memory, thus providing better overall performance.

    Network partitions are sub-networks, each covering a subset of nodes and links of the entire network. Network partitions are the basic processing units for load on demand analysis. They are created by assigning every node in the network to only one partition ID. Network partition information is stored in a partition table.

  • Load on demand (load on demand analysis) is an approach that divides large networks into manageable partitions and only loads needed partitions during analysis, thus removing memory limitation as a consideration and providing better overall performance.

  • Partition BLOBs are binary representations for network partitions. They provide faster partition loading time. They are stored in a partition BLOB table.

  • The load on demand partition cache is an in-memory placeholder for network partitions loaded into memory during network analysis. You can configure the partition cache.

  • User-defined data is the information (not related to connectivity) that users want to associate with a network representation. User-defined data can be defined at the node, link, path, and subpath level, and is stored in columns in the node, link, path, and subpath tables.

Subpaths

A subpath is a partial path along a path, created either as a result of a network analysis operation or explicitly by a user. The start and end points of a subpath are defined as link indexes and the percentage of the distance from the previous node in the path, as shown in Figure 5-2.

Figure 5-2 Path and Subpaths

Description of Figure 5-2 follows
Description of "Figure 5-2 Path and Subpaths"

A subpath refers to an existing path (the reference path) using the following parameters:

  • Reference path ID: the path ID of the reference path.

  • Start link index: the start link index on the reference path. (Link index 0 refers to the link between the first and second nodes on the path.) In Figure 5-2, link index 0 is the start link index.

  • Start percentage: the percentage of the distance along the start link for the start node of the subpath. In Figure 5-2, the subpath starts at 65 percent of the distance between the start and end of link index 0.

  • End link index: the end link index on the reference path. In Figure 5-2, link index 6 is the end link index.

  • End percentage: the percentage of the distance along the end link for the end node of the subpath. In Figure 5-2, the subpath ends at 50 percent of the distance between the start and end of link index 6.

Features and Feature Layers

A feature is an object of interest in a network application that is associated with a node or link. For example, in a transportation network, features include exits and intersections (mapped to nodes), and highways and streets (mapped to links).

A feature consists of one or more feature elements. A feature element is a point or line along the network. If it is a point, it can lie on a node or along a line; if it is a line, it can be a full link or a partial link.

Depending on the types of feature elements in the feature, a feature can have any of the feature types shown in Table 5-1.

Table 5-1 Feature Types

Type Number Type Name Feature Elements Consist of:

1

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_PON

A single point on a node

2

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_POL

A single point on a link

3

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_POINT

A single point, but whether it is on a node or a link is unknown

4

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_LINE

A single line

5

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MPON

One or more points on one or more nodes

6

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MPOL

One or more points on one or more links

7

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MPOINT

One or more points, but the points can be on nodes or links (or a combination)

8

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MLINE

One or more lines

9

SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_COLL

A collection of both points and lines, or the types of the feature elements are unknown

A feature layer corresponds to a table containing features that have the same set of attributes. For example, in a roads network, there may be separate feature layers for restaurants and hotels (and perhaps other feature layers for other kinds of things of interest to travelers).

Depending on the types of features in the feature layer, a feature layer can have any of the feature layer types shown in Table 5-2, which maps each feature layer type to the associated feature type or types from Table 5-1.

Table 5-2 Feature Layer Types

Layer Type Number Features in the Layer Are of (type from ):

1

Type 1 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_PON)

2

Type 2 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_POL)

3

Type 3 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_POINT)

4

Type 4 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_LINE)

5

Type 5 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MPON) or 1 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_PON)

6

Type 6 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MPOL) or 2 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_POL)

7

Type 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, or 7

8

Type 8 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_MLINE) or 4 (SDO_NET.FEAT_TYPE_LINE)

9

Potentially a mixture of any number of feature types

A parent feature consists of features from one or more feature layers. For example, in an electrical network, substation is a parent feature for the feature layers for all its associated parts, such as joints, switches, and cables.

Network Applications

Networks are used in applications to find how different objects are connected to each other. The connectivity is often expressed in terms of adjacency and path relationships. Two nodes are adjacent if they are connected by a link. There are often several paths between any two given nodes, and you may want to find the path with the minimum cost.

This section describes some typical examples of different kinds of network applications.

Road Network Example

In a typical road network, the intersections of roads are nodes and the road segments between two intersections are links. The spatial representation of a road is not inherently related to the nodes and links in the network. For example, a shape point in the spatial representation of a road (reflecting a sharp turn in the road) is not a node in the network if that shape point is not associated with an intersection; and a single spatial object may make up several links in a network (such as a straight segment intersected by three crossing roads). An important operation with a road network is to find the path from a start point to an end point, minimizing either the travel time or distance. There may be additional constraints on the path computation, such as having the path go through a particular landmark or avoid a particular intersection.

Subway (Train) Network Example

The subway network of any major city is probably best modeled as a logical network, assuming that precise spatial representation of the stops and track lines is unimportant. In such a network, all stops on the system constitute the nodes of the network, and a link is the connection between two stops if a train travels directly between these two stops. Important operations with a train network include finding all stations that can be reached from a specified station, finding the number of stops between two specified stations, and finding the travel time between two stations.

Multimodal Network and Temporal Examples

Multimodal networks are networks that consist of multiple modes, such as a network consisting of driving and walking routes. They are usually modeled as individual networks (of the specific mode) and are treated as an aggregate network so that routes of single mode as well as multiple modes can be represented and computed. In general, multimodal networks are "connected" by schedules of different modes, and in such cases they are also temporal networks. An example is to compute an itinerary with walking to nearest bus stop, taking the fastest bus route, getting off at the stop that is closest to the destination, then walking to your destination. You could also add modes like driving or flight to be taken into consideration.

Temporal modeling and analysis adds a temporal (time) dimension to network modeling and analysis. The time factor provides cost and/or constraints on top of static (non-temporal) networks. An example is to consider traffic patterns (time-dependent travel time costs) instead of static travel-time costs.

Many metropolitan transportation networks consist of multiple modes such as buses, subways, and commuter rail lines, where transfers across modes are possible (for example, from a bus to the subway). Each transportation mode has a component network within the larger transportation network. The component networks can be modeled using nodes and links, and the transfers across modes can be modeled as links that connect the stops where transfers are possible.

An important feature of such multimodal transportation networks is their schedule-based operation. When performing common network operations such as computing the fastest route from a start point to an end point, the schedule information and possible transfers across modes must be considered. The schedule information at stops can be represented as user-defined data at the nodes representing these stops. Examples of operations that use schedule information in a multimodal network are (A) finding the fastest route (minimum travel time) from a start point to an end point for a specified start time, and (B) finding the latest departure time at a start point to reach an end point by a specified arrival time.

Utility Network Example

Utility networks, such as power line or cable networks, must often be configured to minimize the cost. An important operation with a utility network is to determine the connections among nodes, using minimum cost spanning tree algorithms, to provide the required quality of service at the minimum cost. Another important operation is reachability analysis, so that, for example, if a station in a water network is shut down, you know which areas will be affected.

Biochemical Network Example

Biochemical processes can be modeled as biochemical networks to represent reactions and regulations in living organisms. For example, metabolic pathways are networks involved in enzymatic reactions, while regulatory pathways represent protein-protein interactions. In this example, a pathway is a network; genes, proteins, and chemical compounds are nodes; and reactions among nodes are links. Important operations for a biochemical network include computing paths and the degrees of nodes.

Network Hierarchy

Some network applications require representations at different levels of abstraction. For example, two major processes might be represented as nodes with a link between them at the highest level of abstraction, and each major process might have several subordinate processes that are represented as nodes and links at the next level down.

A network hierarchy enables you to represent a network with multiple levels of abstraction by assigning a hierarchy level to each node. (Links are not assigned a hierarchy level, and links can be between nodes in the same hierarchy level or in different levels.) The lowest (most detailed) level in the hierarchy is level 1, and successive higher levels are numbered 2, 3, and so on.

Nodes at adjacent levels of a network hierarchy have parent-child relationships. Each node at the higher level can be the parent node for one or more nodes at the lower level. Each node at the lower level can be a child node of one node at the higher level. Sibling nodes are nodes that have the same parent node.

Links can also have parent-child relationships. However, because links are not assigned to a hierarchy level, there is not necessarily a relationship between link parent-child relationships and network hierarchy levels. Sibling links are links that have the same parent link.

Figure 5-3 shows a simple hierarchical network, in which there are two levels.

Figure 5-3 Network Hierarchy

Description of Figure 5-3 follows
Description of "Figure 5-3 Network Hierarchy"

As shown in Figure 5-3:

  • The top level (level 2) contains two nodes. Each node is the parent node of several nodes in the bottom level. The link between the nodes in the top level is the parent link of two links between nodes in the bottom level.

  • The bottom level (level 1) shows the nodes that make up each node in the top level. It also shows the links between nodes that are child nodes of each parent node in the top level, and two links between nodes that have different parent nodes.

  • The links between nodes in the bottom level that have different parent nodes are shown with dark connecting lines. These links are child links of the single link between the nodes in the top level in the hierarchy. (However, these two links in the bottom level could also be defined as not being child links of any parent link between nodes in a higher level.)

  • The parent-child relationships between each parent node and link and its child nodes and links are shown with dashed lines with arrowheads at both ends.

Although it is not shown in Figure 5-3, links can cross hierarchy levels. For example, a link could be defined between a node in the top level and any node in the bottom level. In this case, there would not be a parent-child relationship between the links.

Given certain grouping of nodes in a network, a parent network can be defined. The group IDs in the child network are used as node IDs in the parent network. The aggregated links between groups in the child network represent the links in the parent network, with arbitrary link IDs assigned.

A network can have multiple ways of grouping its nodes based on different criteria; therefore, it can have multiple parent networks. In addition, nodes in a parent network can be further grouped to form a higher-level parent network. For example, in a social network, members can be grouped by city, profession, income, or other criteria. Members grouped by city, for example, can be further grouped into higher-level county, state, or country networks.

The parent-child network relationship is defined through the CHILD_NETWORK and HIERARCHY_TABLE_NAME columns in the network metadata.

Note:

Do not confuse a hierarchical network with a multilevel network, which is a network with multiple link levels. A multilevel network does not necessarily have parent-child relationships between nodes; that is, a multilevel network may also be a hierarchical network or may also not be a hierarchical network. In a multilevel network, a higher-level network (such as level 2) is just a subnetwork of a lower-level network (such as level 1), with link levels greater than or equal to the higher-level link.

Network User Data

For user data defined through the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views, the default user data I/O implementation (LODUserDataIOSDO) is used to access the user data during network analysis. However, some user data is not included in the node or link table, and thus cannot be registered through xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views. For such user data, users must provide their own custom implementation of the user data I/O interface. A typical way of implementing a custom data I/O interface is to generate BLOBs corresponding to node and link user data, one BLOB for each partition, and then retrieve user data information from the BLOBs during network analysis.

Network Data Model Graph also allows you to associate multiple categories of user-defined data (categorized user data) with a single network. For example, in a multimodal network, if you need to associate driving-related attributes (such as speed limit) with a link in addition to the link's multimodal attributes, user-defined data can be organized in two categories, one for driving-related attributes and the other for multimodal attributes.

This section contains the following subsections:

User-Defined Data Example (PL/SQL and Java)

This section presents an example of using network user-defined data, which is the information (not related to connectivity) that users want to associate with a network representation. The USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA and ALL_SDO_ NETWORK_USER_DATA metadata views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA Views) contain information about user-defined data.

To use user-defined data, you must set the USER_DEFINED_DATA column value to Y in the appropriate xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views (described in Section xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views).

Example 5-1 inserts link-related user-defined data into the network metadata.

Example 5-1 Inserting User-Defined Data into Network Metadata

-- Insert link user data named 'interaction' of
-- type varchar2 (50) in network 'bi_test'.
--'interaction' is a column of type varchar2(50) in the link table of network 'bi_
test'.
insert into user_sdo_network_user_data (network, table_type, data_name, data_type, data_length, category_id) 
                  values ('bi_test', 'LINK', 'interaction', 'VARCHAR2', 50, 0) ;
-- insert link user data named 'PROB' of type Number.
--'PROB' is a column of type NUMBER in the link table of network 'bi_test'.
insert into user_sdo_network_user_data (network, table_type, data_name, data_type, category_id)
                  values ('bi_test','LINK','PROB','NUMBER', 0) ;
 
After a network or network partition is loaded, user-defined data is available in Java representations. You can access user-defined data through the getCategorizedUserData and setCategorizedUserData methods for the Node, Link, Path, and SubPath interfaces. For example:
 
//The user data index is the sequence number of a user data within a category sorted by data name.
 
int interactionUserDataIndex = 0;
int probUserDataIndex = 1;
 
String interaction = (String)link.getCategorizedUserData().getUserData(0).
                                get(interactionUseDataIndex);
 
double prob = ((Double)link.getCategorizedUserData().getUserData(0).
                       get(probUserdataIndex)).doubleValue();

User-Defined Data Example (Custom User Data I/O Implementation)

This section presents an example of a custom user data I/O implementation (nondefault implementation) of the LODUserDataIO interface. In Example 5-2, user data associated with links is written to BLOBs (one BLOB per partition) and read from BLOBs during analysis. It is assumed that the user-defined data BLOB for multimodal data for each partition has the partition ID and number of links associated with the partition, followed by <Link ID, link route ID> for each link.

Example 5-2 Implementation of writeUserData method of LODUserDataIO

//Method getLinksInPartition(partitionId) computes a vector that
// consists of  the ID and the route ID of each link associated with a partition
// with ID = partitionId
LinkVector = getLinksInPartition(partitionId);

ObjectOutputStream dout = null;

//Insert an empty blob for the partition with ID = partition_id
String insertStr = "INSERT INTO " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                             " (partition_id, blob) " + " VALUES " + " (?, EMPTY_LOB())" ;

PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(insertStr);
stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
int n = stmt.executeUpdate();
stmt.close();

//lock the row for blob update
 String lockRowStr = "SELECT blob FROM " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                                  " WHERE partition_id = ? " + " FOR UPDATE";
 stmt = conn.prepareStatement(lockRowStr);
 stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
 ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();

 rs.next();
oracle.sql.BLOB userDataBlob = (oracle.sql.BLOB) rs.getBlob(1);
stmt.close();

 OutputStream blobOut = ((oracle.sql.BLOB) userDataBlob).setBinaryStream(1);
 dout = new ObjectOutputStream(blobOut);

 //write partition ID
 dout.writeInt(partitionId);
 int numLinks = linkVector.size()

  for (int i=0; i<linkVector.size(); i++) {
        //MultimodalLink is a class with variables link ID and route ID
        MultimodalLink link = (MultimodalLink) linkVector.elementAt(i);
         //write link ID 
        dout.writeLong(link.getLinkId());

        // write route ID into file
        dout.writeInt(link.getRouteId());
   }
   dout.close();
    blobOut.close();
    rs.close();

The subsections that follow describe the implementations of the writeUserData and readUserData methods of the LODUserDataIO interface.

Implementation of writeUserData method of LODUserDataIO

In the implementation of the writeUserData method of LODUserDataIO, the user-defined data BLOB table name is assumed to be MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA.

//Method getLinksInPartition(partitionId) computes a vector that
// consists of  the ID and the route ID of each link associated with a partition
// with ID = partitionId
LinkVector = getLinksInPartition(partitionId);

ObjectOutputStream dout = null;

//Insert an empty blob for the partition with ID = partition_id
String insertStr = "INSERT INTO " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                      " (partition_id, blob) " + " VALUES " + " (?, EMPTY_BLOB())" ;

PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(insertStr);
stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
int n = stmt.executeUpdate();
stmt.close();

//lock the row for blob update
 String lockRowStr = "SELECT blob FROM " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                                  " WHERE partition_id = ? " + " FOR UPDATE";
 stmt = conn.prepareStatement(lockRowStr);
 stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
 ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();

 rs.next();
oracle.sql.BLOB userDataBlob = (oracle.sql.BLOB) rs.getBlob(1);
stmt.close();

 OutputStream blobOut = ((oracle.sql.BLOB) userDataBlob).setBinaryStream(1);
 dout = new ObjectOutputStream(blobOut);

 //write partition ID
 dout.writeInt(partitionId);
 int numLinks = linkVector.size()

  for (int i=0; i<linkVector.size(); i++) {
        //MultimodalLink is a class with variables link ID and route ID
        MultimodalLink link = (MultimodalLink) linkVector.elementAt(i);
         //write link ID 
        dout.writeLong(link.getLinkId());

        // write route ID into file
        dout.writeInt(link.getRouteId());
   }
   dout.close();
    blobOut.close();
    rs.close();

Implementation of readUserData method of LODUserDataIO

The user-defined data is accessed through the getCategorizedUserData and setCategorizedUserData methods for the Node, Link, Path, and SubPath interfaces and getUserData and setUserData methods of the CategorizedUserData interface.

//Read the blob for the required partition from the user data blob table
// In this example,
// MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA  is the name of user –defined data blob table
BLOB multimodalBlob = null;
String queryStr = "SELECT blob FROM " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA                                
                             " WHERE partition_id = ?";
PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(queryStr);
stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();
if (rs.next())   {
     multimodalBlob = (oracle.sql.BLOB)rs.getBlob(1);
}
 
// Materialize the blob value as an input stream        
InputStream is = multimodalBlob.getBinaryStream();
 
//Create an ObjectInputStream that reads from the InputStream is
ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(is);
 
//Read the values of partition ID and number of links from the blob
int partitionId = ois.readInt();
int numLinks = ois.readInt();
 
for (int i=0; i<numLinks; i++)  {
 
    //Read link ID and route ID for each link
     long linkId = ois.readLong();
     int routeId = ois.readInt();
 
     //MultimodalLinkUserData is an implementation of NDM LOD UserData interface
     //Implementation is provided at the end of the example 
     linkUserData = new MultimodalLinkUserData(routeId);
 
     //Get the link object corresponding to the link ID
     LogicalNetLink link = partition.getLink(linkId);
 
     //Get the (categorized) user data associated with the link. 
     CategorizedUserData cud = link.getCategorizedUserData();
    
     // If the link does not have categorized user data associated with it,
     // initialize it to linkUserData
     // Else, set the user data for category USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL 
     // to linkUserData 
     if (cud == null) {
            UserData [] userDataArray = {linkUserData};
            cud = new CategorizedUserDataImpl(userDataArray);
             link.setCategorizedUserData(cud);
     }
     else {                   
            cud.setUserData(USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL,linkUserData);
     }
}

The following segment shows how to read the user-defined data, specifically the route ID associated with a link during analysis.

//info is an instance of LODAnalysisInfo 
LogicalLink currentLink = info.getCurrentLink();
 
//Read the user-defined data (in this case, route ID) 
int linkRouteId   = (Integer)currentLink.getCategorizedUserData().
                           getUserData(USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL).                                      
                           get(INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID);
        
 
Implementation of MultimodalLinkUserData :
 
class MultimodalLinkUserData implements UserData
{
    private int routeId;
 
    protected MultimodalLinkUserData(int routeId)
   {
        this.routeId = routeId;
   }
 
  public Object get(int index)
  {
    switch(index)
    {
         case INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID:
              return routeId;
    }
    return null;
  }
 
  public void set(int index, Object userData)
  {
    switch(index)
    {
         case INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID:
            this.routeId = (Integer) userData;
    }
  }
 
  public int getNumberOfUserData()
  {
       return 1;
  }
 
  public Object clone()
{
    return new MultimodalLinkUserData(routeId);
  }
}

Feature Modeling

You can model objects of interest on the network as features. A feature consists of one or many feature elements. A feature element can be a point, a link, or a partial link along the network. You can define feature layers on top of a network. For example, restaurants and hotels can each be defined as a feature layer on a road network, and switches can be defined as a feature layer on an electrical network.

The following are the typical steps for using feature modeling.

  1. Create a feature layer.

    For example, the points of interest (POIs) on a road network can be modeled as features. Each type of POI (hotels, restaurants, hospitals, schools, and so on) corresponds to one feature layer. The following example adds a feature layer for hotels:

    sdo_net.add_feature_layer(
       'US_ROAD_NETWORK', --network name
       'HOTEL',           --feature layer name
       2,                 --feature layer type: point on link
       'HOTEL_TAB',       --feature table or view name
       'HOTEL_NET_REL',   --relation table or view name
       null);             --hierarchy table or view name
    
  2. Register feature user data, if any application-specific feature attributes are potentially useful in feature analysis.

    Feature user data is registered by adding an entry in the XXX_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA view, just like registering the user data for network nodes or links, except that the TABLE_TYPE column is set to the name of the feature table. The following example adds hotel name as user data for hotel features:

    INSERT INTO USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA(
       network, table_type, data_name, data_type, category_id)
    VALUES(
       'US_ROAD_NETWORK',  --network name
       'HOTEL_TAB',                --feature table or view name
       'NAME',             --user data name, i.e., name of the user data column
       'VARCHAR2',         --user data type
       3);                 --user data category
    
  3. Add, update, or delete features on the feature layer.

    If the content of feature tables, feature element relationship table, and feature hierarchy table (all described in Feature Layer Tables) -- or any combination of these tables -- is managed by the data provider, then you can skip this step. Otherwise, you can call procedures in the SDO_NET package, such as ADD_FEATURE, UPDATE_FEATURE, DELETE_FEATURES, to add, update or delete features in a feature layer. (The SDO_NET subprograms are described in SDO_NET Package Subprograms.)

  4. Perform feature analysis using NetworkAnalyst. The feature analysis functions include:

    • Shortest paths between features

    • Nearest (reaching) features

    • Within (reaching) cost features

Data Types Used for Feature Modeling

This section describes the following PL/SQL data types that are used for parameters and return values of some SDO_NET package subprograms related to feature modeling:

  • SDO_NET_FEAT_ELEM_ARRAY

  • SDO_NET_FEAT_ELEM

  • SDO_NET_LAYER_FEAT_ARRAY

  • SDO_NET_LAYER_FEAT

  • SDO_NETWORK_NVP_TAB

  • SDO_NETWORK_NVP

SDO_NET_FEAT_ELEM_ARRAY is defined as VARRAY(1024) OF MDSYS.SDO_NET_FEAT_ELEM.

SDO_NET_FEAT_ELEM is defined as:

FEAT_ELEM_TYPE    NUMBER
NET_ELEM_ID       NUMBER
START_PERCENTAGE  NUMBER
END_PERCENTAGE    NUMBER

SDO_NET_LAYER_FEAT_ARRAY is defined as VARRAY(1024) OF MDSYS.SDO_NET_LAYER_FEAT.

SDO_NET_LAYER_FEAT is defined as:

FEATURE_LAYER_ID  NUMBER
FEATURE_ID        NUMBER

SDO_NETWORK_NVP_TAB is defined as TABLE OF MDSYS.SDO_NETWORK_NVP.

SDO_NETWORK_NVP is defined as:

NAME   VARCHAR2(128)
VALUE  VARCHAR2(1024)

Network Constraints

Network constraints are restrictions defined on network analysis computations. For example, a network constraint might list a series of prohibited turns in a roads network due to one-way streets and "No Left Turn" signs, with each prohibited turn represented as a pair of links (a start link and an end link onto which a turn cannot be made from the start link). As another example, a network constraint might require that driving routes must not include toll roads or must not include expressways.

To create a network constraint, you must create a Java class that implements the constraint, and you must register the constraint by using the SDO_NET.REGISTER_CONSTRAINT procedure. To apply a network constraint to a network analysis operation, you must specify that constraint.

Examples of Java classes to implement network constraints are provided in the Network Data Model Graph demo files, which are described in Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources. For example, the ProhibitedTurns.java file creates a network constraint that defines a series of prohibited turns, and it then returns the shortest path between two nodes, first without applying the constraint and then applying the constraint.

Network Analysis Using Load on Demand

Load on demand means that during network analysis, a network partition is not loaded into memory until the analysis has reached this partition while exploring the network. With load on demand, Oracle Spatial and Graph performs most partitioning and loading operations automatically, and this usually results in more efficient memory utilization with very large networks.

Load on demand analysis involves the following major steps: network creation, network partition, partition cache configuration, and network analysis.

  1. Create the network, using one of the approaches described in Main Steps in Using the Network Data Model Graph.

  2. Partition the network using the SDO_NET.SPATIAL_PARTITION procedure, as explained in Partitioning a Network.

  3. Optionally, generate partition BLOBs, as explained in Generating Partition BLOBs.

  4. Configure the load on demand environment, including the partition cache, as explained in Configuring the Partition Cache.

  5. Analyze the network, as explained in Analyzing the Network.

Note:

Load on demand analysis also works with nonpartitioned networks by treating the entire network as one partition. For a small network, there may be no performance benefit in partitioning it, in which case you can skip the partitioning but still use load on demand APIs.

For examples of performing load on demand network analysis and configuring the partition cache, see Partitioning and Load on Demand Analysis Examples (PL/SQL_ XML_ and Java).

Additional examples of partitioning and load on demand analysis are included on the Oracle Database Examples media (see Oracle Database Examples Installation Guide). For more information about Network Data Model Graph example and demo files, see Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources.

Partitioning a Network

You can partition a network using the SDO_NET.SPATIAL_PARTITION procedure, specifying the maximum number of nodes in each partition. The partition result is stored in a partition table, which is automatically generated, and partition metadata information is inserted into the network metadata. (As an alternative to using the procedure, you can partition a network by creating and populating a partition table.) You can use other SDO_NET subprograms to query the partitioning metadata.

A good partition strategy is to minimize the number of links between partitions, which reduces the number of partitions that need to be loaded and the probable number of times that the same partitions need to be reloaded. Moreover, partitions that are too small require excessive loading and unloading of partitions during analysis.

The recommended maximum number of nodes per partition, assuming 1 GB of memory, is between 5,000 and 10,000. You can tune the number and see what is best for your applications, considering the available memory, type of analysis, and network size. You should also consider configuring the partition caching size.

Generating Partition BLOBs

To enhance the performance of network loading, you can optionally store partitions as BLOBs in a network partition BLOB table. This information needs to be stored in the network metadata view in order to take advantage of faster partition loading time. Note that if a network or partition information is updated, the partition BLOBs need to be regenerated as well.

A partition BLOB is a binary stream of data containing the network partition information, such as number of nodes, number of links, properties of each node, properties of each link, and so on. If a partition BLOB exists, Spatial and Graph uses it to read information during the load operation, rather than performing time-consuming database queries.

To generate partition BLOBs, use the SDO_NET.GENERATE_PARTITION_BLOBS procedure. The partition BLOBs and their metadata are stored in the partition BLOB table, which is described in Partition BLOB Table.

Configuring the Partition Cache

Before you perform network analysis, you can configure the network partition cache to optimize performance, by modifying an XML configuration file to override the default configuration. You can specify the following:

  • Cache size: the maximum number of nodes in partition cache

  • Partitions source: from network tables or partition BLOBs

  • Resident partitions: IDs of partitions that will not be flushed out of the cache, but will stay in memory once they are loaded

  • Cache flushing policy: class name of the CachingHandler implementation

    The default caching policy is LeastRecentlyUsed, which flushes out the oldest partition out of memory when the cache is full. You can specify other caching policies by implementing the CachingHandler interface.

A copy of the default load on demand configuration file is included in the supplementary documentation, described in Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources.

Analyzing the Network

After you have created and partitioned the network, and optionally configured the partition cache, you can issue analysis queries. Analysis results are returned in Java representation or XML responses, depending on whether you used the Java or XML API. For details, see the load on demand (LOD) Javadoc and XML schemas (the latter described in Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources).

You can write the analysis results to the database using the load on demand Java API.

Using Link Levels for Priority Modeling

Although the load on demand approach reduces the effect of memory limitations in analyzing large networks, analysis operations still can sometimes be very slow. For example, shortest path analysis of two nodes diagonally across the entire network is likely to require traversing almost every link in the network, and this will take a significant amount of time for a network with more than, for example, two million nodes.

To further reduce network analysis time, you can perform analysis on different link levels. Link level is a positive integer assigned to a link indicating the level of preference of this link. The higher the link level, the higher the preference. For example, a road network may consist of two link levels, level 1 for local roads and level 2 for highways. During network analysis, highways are preferred to local roads, and the minimum link level is 1. (If no link level is assigned to a link, the default link level of 1 is used for the link.)

Link levels have an implicit inheritance property, which means that a network at higher link levels must be a subnetwork of a network at a lower link level. That is, link level 2 is a subnetwork of link level 1, link level 3 is a subnetwork of link level 2, and so on.

You can specify a link level when you load a network or a partition, which causes links at that level and higher levels to be loaded. Using the road network example, with link level 1 for local roads and link level 2 for highways, specifying link level 1 on a load operation loads links at link levels 1 and 2 (that is, local roads and highways), but specifying link level 2 on a load operation loads only the highways links. If you wanted to perform analysis using only highways links, you could optimize the performance by specifying link level 2 for the load operation.

Precomputed Analysis Results

Some analysis operations, such as connected component analysis, can be time consuming. To improve runtime performance, you can call the SDO_NET.FIND_CONNECTED_COMPONENTS procedure, which computes the connected components in the network and stores the results in the connected component table, which is described Connected Component Table.

At runtime, before calling shortest path analysis or reachability analysis, you can check whether the nodes of interest belong to the same connected component by querying the connected component table. If precomputed component information does not exist, it may take a long time for shortest path and reachability analysis to discover that two nodes are, in fact, not connected.

Network Data Model Graph Tables

The connectivity information for a spatial network is stored in two tables: a node table and a link table. In addition, path information can be stored in a path table and a path-link table. You can have Spatial and Graph create these tables automatically when you create the network using a CREATE_<network-type>_NETWORK procedure; or you can create these tables using the SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE, SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE, SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_TABLE, and SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_LINK_TABLE procedures.

These tables contain columns with predefined names, and you must not change any of the predefined column names; however, you can add columns to the tables by using the ALTER TABLE statement with the ADD COLUMN clause. For example, although each link and path table is created with a single COST column, you can create additional columns and associate them with other comparable attributes. Thus, to assign a driving time, scenic appeal rating, and a danger rating to each link, you could use the COST column for driving time, add columns for SCENIC_APPEAL and DANGER to the link table, and populate all three columns with values to be interpreted by applications.

The following considerations apply to schema, table, and column names that are stored in any Oracle Spatial and Graph metadata views. For example, these considerations apply to the names of node, link, path, and path-link tables, and to the names of any columns in these tables that are stored in the network metadata views described in Network Data Model Graph Metadata Views.

  • The name must contain only letters, numbers, and underscores. For example, the name cannot contain a space ( ), an apostrophe ('), a quotation mark ("), or a comma (,).

  • All letters in the names are converted to uppercase before the names are stored in metadata views or before the tables are accessed. This conversion also applies to any schema name specified with the table name.

Network Layer Tables

The metadata tables in this section are not related to feature modeling.

Node Table

Each network has a node table that can contain the columns described in Table 5-3. (The specific columns depend on the network type and whether the network is hierarchical or not.)

Table 5-3 Node Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

NODE_ID

NUMBER

ID number that uniquely identifies this node within the network

NODE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the node

NODE_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

User-defined string to identify the node type

ACTIVE

VARCHAR2(1)

Contains Y if the node is active (visible in the network), or N if the node is not active.

PARTITION_ID

NUMBER

(Not used. Instead, node and partition relationships are stored in the partition table, which is described in Partition Table.)

<node_geometry_column>, or GEOM_ID and MEASURE

SDO_GEOMETRY, or SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY, or NUMBER

For a spatial (SDO, non-LRS) network, the SDO_GEOMETRY object associated with the node

For a spatial topology network, the SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY object associated with the node

For a spatial LRS network, GEOM_ID and MEASURE column values (both of type NUMBER) for the geometry objects associated with the node

For a logical network, this column is not used.

For a spatial SDO or topology network, the actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the geom_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE procedure.

<node_cost_column>

NUMBER

Cost value to be associated with the node, for use by applications that use the network. The actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the cost_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE procedure. The cost value can represent anything you want, for example, the toll to be paid at a toll booth.

HIERARCHY_LEVEL

NUMBER

For hierarchical networks only: number indicating the level in the network hierarchy for this node. (Network Hierarchy explains network hierarchy.)

PARENT_NODE_ID

NUMBER

For hierarchical networks only: node ID of the parent node of this node. (Network Hierarchy explains network hierarchy.)

Link Table

Each network has a link table that contains the columns described in Table 5-4.

Table 5-4 Link Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

LINK_ID

NUMBER

ID number that uniquely identifies this link within the network

LINK_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the link

START_NODE_ID

NUMBER

Node ID of the node that starts the link

END_NODE_ID

NUMBER

Node ID of the node that ends the link

LINK_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

User-defined string to identify the link type

ACTIVE

VARCHAR2(1)

Contains Y if the link is active (visible in the network), or N if the link is not active.

LINK_LEVEL

NUMBER

Priority level for the link; used for network analysis, so that links with higher priority levels can be considered first in computing a path

<link_geometry_column>; or GEOM_ID, START_MEASURE, and END_MEASURE

SDO_GEOMETRY, or SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY, or NUMBER

For a spatial (SDO, non-LRS) network, the SDO_GEOMETRY object associated with the link

For a spatial topology network, the SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY object associated with the link

For a spatial LRS network, GEOM_ID, START_MEASURE, and END_MEASURE column values (all of type NUMBER) for the geometry objects associated with the link

For a logical network, this column is not used.

For a spatial SDO or topology network, the actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the geom_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE procedure.

<link_cost_column>

NUMBER

Cost value to be associated with the link, for use by applications that use the network. The actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the cost_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE procedure. The cost value can represent anything you want, for example, the estimated driving time for the link.

PARENT_LINK_ID

NUMBER

For hierarchical networks only: link ID of the parent link of this link. (Network Hierarchy explains parent-child relationships in a network hierarchy.)

BIDIRECTED

VARCHAR2(1)

For directed networks only: contains Y if the link is undirected (that is, can be traversed either from the start node to the end node or from the end node to the start node), or N if the link is directed (in one direction only, from the start node to the end node).

Path Table

Each network can have a path table. A path is an ordered sequence of links, and is usually created as a result of network analysis. A path table provides a way to store the result of this analysis. For each path table, you must create an associated path-link table (described in Path-Link Table). Each path table contains the columns described in Table 5-5.

Table 5-5 Path Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

PATH_ID

NUMBER

ID number that uniquely identifies this path within the network

PATH_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the path

PATH_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

User-defined string to identify the path type

START_NODE_ID

NUMBER

Node ID of the node that starts the first link in the path

END_NODE_ID

NUMBER

Node ID of the node that ends the last link in the path

COST

NUMBER

Cost value to be associated with the path, for use by applications that use the network. The cost value can represent anything you want, for example, the estimated driving time for the path.

SIMPLE

VARCHAR2(1)

Contains Y if the path is a simple path, or N if the path is a complex path. In a simple path, the links form an ordered list that can be traversed from the start node to the end node with each link visited once. In a complex path, there are multiple options for going from the start node to the end node.

<path_geometry_column>

SDO_GEOMETRY

For all network types except logical, the geometry object associated with the path. The actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the geom_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_TABLE procedure.

For a logical network, this column is not used.

Path-Link Table

For each path table (described in Path Table), you must create a path-link table. Each row in the path-link table uniquely identifies a link within a path in a network; that is, each combination of PATH_ID, LINK_ID, and SEQ_NO values must be unique within the network. The order of rows in the path-link table is not significant. Each path-link table contains the columns described in Table 5-6.

Table 5-6 Path-Link Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

PATH_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the path in the network

LINK_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the link in the network

SEQ_NO

NUMBER

Unique sequence number of the link in the path. (The sequence numbers start at 1.) Sequence numbers allow paths to contain repeating nodes and links.

Subpath Table

Each path can have one or more associated subpaths, and information about all subpaths in a network is stored in the subpath table. A subpath is a partial path along a path, as explained in Network Data Model Graph Concepts. The subpath table contains the columns described in Table 5-7.

Table 5-7 Subpath Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

SUBPATH_ID

NUMBER

ID number that uniquely identifies this subpath within the reference path

SUBPATH_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the subpath

SUBPATH_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

User-defined string to identify the subpath type

REFERENCE_PATH_ID

NUMBER

Path ID number of the path that contains this subpath

START_LINK_INDEX

NUMBER

Link ID of the link used to define the start of the subpath. For example, in Figure 5-2 in Network Data Model Graph Concepts, the START_LINK_INDEX is 0, and the START_PERCENTAGE is 0.65.

END_LINK_INDEX

NUMBER

Link ID of the link used to define the end of the subpath. For example, in Figure 5-2 in Network Data Model Graph Concepts, the END_LINK_INDEX is 6, and the END_PERCENTAGE is 0.5.

START_PERCENTAGE

NUMBER

Percentage of the distance between START_LINK_INDEX and the next link in the path, representing the start point of the subpath. Can be a positive or negative number. For example, in Figure 5-2 in Network Data Model Graph Concepts, the START_LINK_INDEX is 0, and the START_PERCENTAGE is 0.65. ("Percentage" values in this case are expressed as between 0 and 1.0, so 0.65 is 65 percent.)

END_PERCENTAGE

NUMBER

Percentage of the distance between END_LINK_INDEX and the next link in the path, representing the end point of the subpath. Can be a positive or negative number. For example, in Figure 5-2 in Network Data Model Graph Concepts, the END_LINK_INDEX is 6, and the END_PERCENTAGE is 0.5. ("Percentage" values in this case are expressed as between 0 and 1.0, so 0.5 is 50 percent.)

COST

NUMBER

Cost value to be associated with the subpath, for use by applications that use the network. The cost value can represent anything you want, for example, the estimated driving time for the path.

GEOM

SDO_GEOMETRY

For all network types except logical, the geometry object associated with the subpath. The actual column name is either a default name or what you specified as the geom_column parameter value in the call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_SUBPATH_TABLE procedure.

For a logical network, this column is not used.

Partition Table

Each partitioned network has a partition table. For information about partitioned networks, see Network Analysis Using Load on Demand. Each partition table contains the columns described in Table 5-8.

Table 5-8 Partition Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

NODE_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the node

PARTITION_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the partition. Must be unique within the network.

LINK_LEVEL

NUMBER

Link level (Link level reflects the priority level for the link, and is used for network analysis, so that links with higher priority levels can be considered first in computing a path.)

Partition BLOB Table

Each partitioned network can have a partition BLOB table, which stores binary large object (BLOB) representations for each combination of link level and partition ID in the network. Having BLOB representations of partitions enables better performance for network load on demand analysis operations. To create the partition BLOB table, use the SDO_NET.GENERATE_PARTITION_BLOBS procedure, where you specify the partition BLOB table name as one of the parameters. For information about partitioned networks, see Network Analysis Using Load on Demand.

Note:

You should never directly modify the partition BLOB table. This table is automatically updated as a result of calls to the SDO_NET.GENERATE_PARTITION_BLOBS and SDO_NET.GENERATE_PARTITION_BLOB procedures.

Each partition table contains the columns described in Table 5-9.

Table 5-9 Partition BLOB Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

LINK_LEVEL

VARCHAR2(32)

Link level (Link level reflects the priority level for the link, and is used for network analysis, so that links with higher priority levels can be considered first in computing a path.)

PARTITION_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the partition

BLOB

BLOB

Binary large object (BLOB) representing the specified link level within the specified partition

NUM_INODES

NUMBER

Number of internal nodes in the BLOB (that is, total number of nodes in the BLOB)

NUM_ENODES

NUMBER

Number of external nodes. An external node is a node that is outside the BLOB, but is one end of a link in which the other node is inside the BLOB.

NUM_ILINKS

NUMBER

Number of internal links in the BLOB (that is, links completely inside the BLOB)

NUM_ELINKS

NUMBER

Number of external links. An external link is a link in which one node is internal (inside the BLOB) and one node is external (outside the BLOB).

NUM_INLINKS

NUMBER

Number of incoming links. An incoming link is an external link in which the start node is outside the BLOB and the end node is inside the BLOB.

NUM_OUTLINKS

NUMBER

Number of outgoing links. An outgoing link is an external link in which the start node is inside the BLOB and the end node is outside the BLOB.

USER_DATA_INCLUDED

VARCHAR2(1)

Contains Y if the BLOB can include user data, or N if the BLOB cannot include user data.

Connected Component Table

Each network can have a connected component table, which stores the component ID for each node. Nodes of the same connected component have the same component ID. Having this information in the table enables better performance for many network analysis operations. To create the connected component table, and to update the contents of the table at any time afterwards, use the SDO_NET.FIND_CONNECTED_COMPONENTS procedure, where you specify the connected component table name as one of the parameters. For more information about using the precomputed information about connected components, see Precomputed Analysis Results.

Each connected component table contains the columns described in Table 5-10.

Table 5-10 Connected Component Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

LINK_LEVEL

NUMBER

Link level of the component assignment. (Link level reflects the priority level for the link, and is used for network analysis, so that links with higher priority levels can be considered first in computing a path.)

NODE_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the node from which to compute all other components that are reachable.

COMPONENT_ID

NUMBER

ID number of a component that is reachable from the specified node.

Node Hierarchy Table (Optional)

Each network can have a node hierarchy table, which stores parent-child relationships if the network has a hierarchy (explained in Network Hierarchy).

If the node hierarchy table exists, it contains the columns described in Table 5-11.

Table 5-11 Node Hierarchy Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

PARENT_ID

NUMBER

Parent node ID, that is, the node ID in the parent network, or the group, cluster, or partition ID in the child network.

CHILD_ID

NUMBER

Child ID, that is, the node ID in the child network.

LINK_LEVEL

NUMBER

Link level on which the parent-child relationship is defined. A network on a higher link level is a subnetwork of that on a lower link level. A network on link level n consists of only links with link level greater than or equal to n.

Node Level Table (Optional)

Each network can have a node level table, which stores information on the maximum link level for each higher level node (that is, a node whose maximum link level is greater than 1). The node level table is only useful for multilevel networks; it makes loading partitions from node and link tables faster.

If the node level table exists, it contains the columns described in Table 5-12.

Table 5-12 Node Level Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

NODE_ID

NUMBER

ID of a node whose maximum link level is greater than 1

LINK_LEVEL

NUMBER

Maximum link level to which the node is connected.

Feature Layer Tables

The tables in this section are related to feature modeling (see Feature Modeling). These tables are used to describe each registered feature layer.

In most applications, the tables containing feature entity information, feature to network relationships, or feature hierarchy relationships already exist, although the table schema may be different from that of the NDM tables. In such cases, you can create views to map the existing table schema to the NDM table schema.

Feature Table

A feature table contains feature entity information. Each feature table must contain a FEATURE_ID column. Other feature attributes that are potentially useful during feature analysis can be registered as user data.

Each feature table contains the columns described in Table 5-13.

Table 5-13 Feature Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

FEATURE_ID

NUMBER

ID of the feature.

(Additional columns as needed)

(As appropriate)

(Other feature attributes that are potentially useful during feature analysis)

Feature Element Relationships Table

The feature element relationships table contains information about the relationships between feature elements and network elements (nodes and links).

The feature element relationships table contains the columns described in Table 5-14.

Table 5-14 Feature Element Relationships Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

FEATURE_ID

NUMBER

ID of the feature.

FEAT_ELEM_TYPE

NUMBER

Feature element type. One of the following: 1 for SDO_NET. FEAT_ELEM_TYPE_PON (point on node) ; 2 for SDO_NET. FEAT_ELEM_TYPE_POL (point on link); 3 for SDO_NET. FEAT_ELEM_TYPE_LINE (line).

NET_ELEM_ID

NUMBER

ID of the network element (node or link) associated with this feature element.

START_PERCENTAGE

NUMBER

Start percentage along NET_ELEM_ID for this feature element (ignored for point on node feature elements).

END_PERCENTAGE

NUMBER

End percentage along NET_ELEM_ID for this feature element (ignored for point on node and point on line feature elements).

SEQUENCE

NUMBER

Sequence number of the feature element.

Feature Hierarchy Table

The feature hierarchy table contains feature hierarchy information. Child features can belong to different feature layers.

The feature hierarchy table contains the columns described in Table 5-15.

Table 5-15 Feature Hierarchy Table Columns

Column Name Data Type Description

PARENT_ID

NUMBER

ID of the parent feature.

CHILD_LAYER_ID

NUMBER

Feature layer ID of the child feature.

CHILD_ID

NUMBER

ID of the child feature.

SEQUENCE

NUMBER

Sequence number of the child feature.

Network Data Model Graph Metadata Views

There is a set of network metadata views for each schema (user): xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA, where xxx can be USER or ALL. These views are created by Spatial and Graph.

xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views

The following views contain information about networks:

  • USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA contains information about all networks owned by the user.

  • ALL_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA contains information about all networks on which the user has SELECT permission.

If you create a network using one of the CREATE_<network-type>_NETWORK procedures, the information in these views is automatically updated to reflect the new network; otherwise, you must insert information about the network into the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view.

The USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA and ALL_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views contain the same columns, as shown Table 5-16, except that the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view does not contain the OWNER column. (The columns are listed in their order in the view definition.)

Table 5-16 Columns in the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views

Column Name Data Type Purpose

OWNER

VARCHAR2(32)

Owner of the network (ALL_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view only)

NETWORK

VARCHAR2(24)

Name of the network

NETWORK_ID

NUMBER

ID number of the network; assigned by Spatial and Graph

NETWORK_CATEGORY

VARCHAR2(12)

Contains SPATIAL if the network nodes and links are associated with spatial geometries; contains LOGICAL if the network nodes and links are not associated with spatial geometries. A value of LOGICAL causes the Network Data Model Graph PL/SQL and Java APIs to ignore any spatial attributes of nodes, links, and paths.

GEOMETRY_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

If NETWORK_CATEGORY is SPATIAL, contains a value indicating the geometry type of nodes and links: SDO_GEOMETRY for non-LRS SDO_GEOMETRY objects, LRS_GEOMETRY for LRS SDO_GEOMETRY objects, TOPO_GEOMETRY for SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY objects.

NETWORK_TYPE

VARCHAR2(24)

User-defined string to identify the network type.

NO_OF_HIERARCHY_LEVELS

NUMBER

Number of levels in the network hierarchy. Contains 1 if there is no hierarchy. (See Network Hierarchy for information about network hierarchy.)

NO_OF_PARTITIONS

NUMBER

(Not currently used)

LRS_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

If GEOMETRY_TYPE is SDO_GEOMETRY, contains the name of the table containing geometries associated with nodes.

LRS_GEOM_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If LRS_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the geometry column in that table.

NODE_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

If GEOMETRY_TYPE is SDO_GEOMETRY, contains the name of the table containing geometries associated with nodes. (The node table is described in Node Table.)

NODE_GEOM_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If NODE_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the geometry column in that table.

NODE_COST_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(1024)

If NODE_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the cost column in that table, or a PL/SQL function to compute the cost value.

NODE_PARTITION_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

(Not currently used).

NODE_DURATION_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If NODE_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the optional duration column in that table. This column can contain a numeric value that has any user-defined significance, such as a number of minutes associated with the node.

LINK_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

If GEOMETRY_TYPE is SDO_GEOMETRY, contains the name of the table containing geometries associated with links. (The link table is described in Link Table.)

LINK_GEOM_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If LINK_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the geometry column in that table.

LINK_DIRECTION

VARCHAR2(12)

Contains a value indicating the type for all links in the network: UNDIRECTED or DIRECTED.

LINK_COST_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(1024)

If LINK_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the optional numeric column containing a cost value for each link, or a PL/SQL function to compute the cost value.

LINK_PARTITION_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

(Not currently used)

LINK_DURATION_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If LINK_TABLE_NAME contains a table name, identifies the optional duration column in that table. This column can contain a numeric value that has any user-defined significance, such as a number of minutes associated with the link.

PATH_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Contains the name of an optional table containing information about paths. (The path table is described in Path Table.)

PATH_GEOM_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If PATH_TABLE_NAME is associated with a spatial network, identifies the geometry column in that table.

PATH_LINK_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Contains the name of an optional table containing information about links for each path. (The path-link table is described in Path-Link Table.)

SUBPATH_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Contains the name of an optional table containing information about subpaths. (The subpath table is described in Subpath Table.)

SUBPATH_GEOM_COLUMN

VARCHAR2(32)

If SUBPATH_TABLE_NAME is associated with a spatial network, identifies the geometry column in that table.

PARTITION_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

For a partitioned network: the name of the partition table. (The partition table is described in Partition Table.

PARTITION_BLOB_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

For a partitioned network for which any partition BLOBs have been generated: the name of the partition BLOB table. (The partition BLOB table is described in Partition BLOB Table.

COMPONENT_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

The name of the table containing information about precomputed connected components, as explained in Precomputed Analysis Results. (The connected component table is described in Connected Component Table.)

NODE_LEVEL_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

The name of the table containing information about node levels in a multilevel network. Specify this table as the node_level_table_name parameter with the SDO_NET.GENERATE_NODE_LEVELS procedure.

TOPOLOGY

VARCHAR2(32)

For a spatial network containing SDO_TOPO_GEOMETRY objects (creating using the SDO_NET.CREATE_TOPO_NETWORK procedure), contains the name of the topology.

USER_DEFINED_DATA

VARCHAR2(1)

Contains Y if the network contains user-defined data; contains N if the network does not contain user-defined data.

EXTERNAL_REFERENCES

VARCHAR2(1)

(Not currently used)

CHILD_NETWORK

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the child network, if a network hierarchy is involved.

HIERARCHY_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the hierarchy table, if a network hierarchy is involved.

xxx_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS Views

The following views contain information about network constraints (described in Network Constraints):

  • USER_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS contains information about all network constraints owned by the user.

  • ALL_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS contains information about all network constraints on which the user has SELECT permission.

These views are automatically maintained by the SDO_NET.REGISTER_CONSTRAINT and SDO_NET.DEREGISTER_CONSTRAINT procedures. You should not directly modify the contents of these views.

The USER_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS and ALL_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS views contain the same columns, as shown Table 5-17, except that the USER_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS view does not contain the OWNER column. (The columns are listed in their order in the view definition.)

Table 5-17 Columns in the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS Views

Column Name Data Type Purpose

OWNER

VARCHAR2(32)

Owner of the network constraint (ALL_SDO_NETWORK_CONSTRAINTS view only)

CONSTRAINT

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the network constraint

DESCRIPTION

VARCHAR2(200)

Descriptive information about the network constraint, such as its purpose and any usage notes

CLASS_NAME

VARCHAR2(4000)

Name of the Java class that implements the network constraint

CLASS

BINARY FILE LOB

The Java class that implements the network constraint

xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA Views

The following views contain information about network user-defined data, which is the information (not related to connectivity) that users want to associate with a network representation:

  • USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA contains information about all network user-defined data owned by the user.

  • ALL_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA contains information about all network user-defined data on which the user has SELECT permission.

The USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA and ALL_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views contain the same columns, as shown Table 5-17, except that the USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA view does not contain the OWNER column. (The columns are listed in their order in the view definition.)

Table 5-18 Columns in the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA Views

Column Name Data Type Purpose

OWNER

VARCHAR2(32)

Owner of the network constraint (ALL_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA view only)

NETWORK

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the network

TABLE_TYPE

VARCHAR2(12)

Type of the table containing the user-defined data: NODE, LINK, PATH, or SUBPATH

If feature user data is registered through the xxx_SDO_USER_NETWORK_USER_DATA views. TABLE_TYPE is set to the name of the feature table.

DATA_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of column containing the user-defined data

DATA_TYPE

VARCHAR2(12)

Data type of the user-defined data: VARCHAR2, INTEGER, NUMBER, DATE, TIMESTAMP, or SDO_GEOMETRY

DATA_LENGTH

NUMBER(38)

If DATA_TYPE is VARCHAR2, the length of the user-defined data

CATEGORY_ID

NUMBER

User data category ID (non-negative number, default 0). The category ID allows for grouping of user data for different applications. Category 0 is reserved for general-purpose user data that is useful for all applications. User data for different purposes can be grouped into different categories, so that during network analysis, only the relevant user data categories are loaded into memory, reducing memory consumption at runtime.

For example, for a road network, category 0 user data can include the speed limit and function class of links, and the x, y coordinates of nodes; trucking-related user data might belong to category 1; and traffic-related user data might belong to category 2.

To use user-defined data, you must set the USER_DEFINED_DATA column value to Y in the appropriate xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views).

For an example of using user-defined data, see User-Defined Data Examples (PL/SQL and Java).

For user data defined through the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views, the default user data I/O implementation (LODUserDataIOSDO) is used to access the user data during network analysis. However, some user data is not included in the node or link table, and thus cannot be registered through xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views. For such user data, you must provide your own implementation of the user data I/O interface. A typical way of implementing a custom user data I/O interface is to generate BLOBs corresponding to node and link user data , one BLOB for each partition, and then retrieve user data information from the BLOBs during network analysis.

You can also associate multiple categories of user-defined data (categorized user data) with a single network. For example, in a multimodal network (described in Multimodal Network and Temporal Examples), if you must associate driving-related attributes (such as speed limit) with a link in addition to the link's multimodal attributes, you can organize user-defined data in two categories: one for driving-related attributes and the other for multimodal attributes.

xxx_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE Views

The following views contain information about network feature layers (described in Features and Feature Layers):

  • USER_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE contains information about all network feature layers owned by the user.

  • ALL_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE contains information about all network feature layers on which the user has SELECT permission.

The USER_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE and ALL_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE views contain the same columns, as shown Table 5-17, except that the USER_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE view does not contain the OWNER column. (The columns are listed in their order in the view definition.)

Table 5-19 Columns in the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE Views

Column Name Data Type Purpose

OWNER

VARCHAR2(32)

Owner of the network feature layer (ALL_SDO_NETWORK_FEATURE view only)

NETWORK

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the network on which the feature layer is defined

FEATURE_LAYER_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the feature layer

FEATURE_LAYER_ID

NUMBER

ID of the feature layer (assigned by Oracle Spatial and Graph)

FEATURE_LAYER_TYPE

NUMBER

Type of the feature layer (see Table 5-2 in Features and Feature Layers)

FEATURE_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the feature table (see Feature Table)

RELATION_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the feature element relationships table, which maps feature elements with network elements (nodes and links) (see Feature Element Relationships Table)

HIERRCHY_TABLE_NAME

VARCHAR2(32)

Name of the feature hierarchy table, which defines parent-child relationships between features (see Feature Hierarchy Table)

To use user-defined data, you must set the USER_DEFINED_DATA column value to Y in the appropriate xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views).

For an example of using user-defined data, see User-Defined Data Examples (PL/SQL and Java).

For user data defined through the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views, the default user data I/O implementation (LODUserDataIOSDO) is used to access the user data during network analysis. However, some user data is not included in the node or link table, and thus cannot be registered through xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA views. For such user data, you must provide your own implementation of the user data I/O interface. A typical way of implementing a custom user data I/O interface is to generate BLOBs corresponding to node and link user data , one BLOB for each partition, and then retrieve user data information from the BLOBs during network analysis.

You can also associate multiple categories of user-defined data (categorized user data) with a single network. For example, in a multimodal network (described in Multimodal Network and Temporal Examples), if you must associate driving-related attributes (such as speed limit) with a link in addition to the link's multimodal attributes, you can organize user-defined data in two categories: one for driving-related attributes and the other for multimodal attributes.

Network Data Model Graph Application Programming Interface

The Oracle Spatial and Graph Network Data Model Graph feature includes two client application programming interfaces (APIs): a PL/SQL interface provided by the SDO_NET package and a Java interface. Both interfaces let you create and update network data, and the Java interface lets you perform network analysis. It is recommended that you use only PL/SQL or SQL to populate network tables and to create indexes, and that you mainly use Java for application development.

The following performance considerations apply to the PL/SQL and Java APIs:

  • If you plan to analyze or edit only nonspatial aspects of a spatial network, you can get better performance by setting the NETWORK_CATEGORY column value to LOGICAL in the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views) before performing the analysis or editing, and then changing the value back to SPATIAL afterward.

    For example, you could use this technique when finding the shortest path between two nodes, because the shortest-path computation considers cost values. However, you could not use this technique when setting the spatial geometry object or the end measure value for a link.

  • If you do not plan to modify any network objects (that is, if you plan to perform only network analysis operations or to retrieve network information), you can get better performance by creating the network memory object as read-only (that is, by specifying that updates are not allowed).

Network Data Model Graph PL/SQL Interface

The SDO_NET package provides subprograms for creating, accessing, and managing networks on a database server. Example 5-5 in Network Examples shows the use of SDO_NET functions and procedures.

The SDO_NET subprograms can be grouped into the following logical categories:

For reference information about each SDO_NET function and procedure, see SDO_NET Package Subprograms.

Network Data Model Graph Java Interface

The Network Data Model Graph feature includes the load on demand Java interface. Complete reference information about this interface is provided in Oracle Spatial and Graph Java API Reference. The classes of the load on demand Java interface are in the oracle.spatial.network.lod package and its subpackages.

The Spatial and Graph Java class libraries are in .jar files under the <ORACLE_HOME>/md/jlib/ directory.

Network Metadata and Data Management

You can use the Java API to perform network metadata and data management operations such as the following:

  • Insert, delete, and modify node and link data

  • Load a network from a database

  • Store a network in a database

  • Store network metadata in a database

  • Modify network metadata attributes

Network Analysis Using the Load on Demand Approach

You can use the oracle.spatial.network.lod.NetworkAnalyst class to perform network analysis operations, such as the following, using the load on demand approach:

  • Shortest path: typical transitive closure problems in graph theory. Given a start and an end node, find the shortest path.

  • Reachability: Given a node, find all nodes that can reach that node, or find all nodes that can be reached by that node.

  • Within-cost analysis: Given a target node and a cost, find all nodes that can be reached by the target node within the given cost.

  • Nearest-neighbors analysis: Given a target node and number of neighbors, find the neighbor nodes and their costs to go to the given target node.

  • Dynamic data input: Create and use a NetworkUpdate object with network update information.

  • User-defined link and node cost calculators: Define the method for computing the cost of a link or a node.

Network Data Model Graph XML Interface

You can use the Network Data Model Graph XML API to perform network analysis. Web service requests are supported through Oracle Spatial and Graph web services, which are described in Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's Guide.

HTTP requests can be sent to the web service from Java, PLSQL, or .NET programs or simply from a HTML form. The SDO_NET.POST_XML function (described in SDO_NET Package Subprograms) enables PL/SQL users to call the web service.

The XML schema of the Network Data Model Graph XML API is described in the following: $ORACLE_HOME/md/doc/sdondmxml.zip

User-Specified Implementations

The XML API can take user-specified constraints, cost calculators, or even network analysis algorithm settings, by letting you specify the Java class that implements the LOD interfaces. For any implementation that requires input parameters, such as truck weight or height in a trucking constraint implementation, the Java class must implement the oracle.spatial.network.lod.XMLConfigurable interface, that is, it must implement the following two methods:

  • void init(Element parameter);

  • String getXMLSchema();

The init method lets you pass in the input parameter as an XML element, which must follow the schema returned from the getXMLSchema method.

The following XML code segment is an example of how to configure the shortest path algorithm for a shortest path analysis request:

<startPoint>
  <nodeID>123</nodeID>
</startPoint>
<endPoint>
  <nodeID>456</nodeID>
</endPoint>
<shortestPathAlgorithm>
  <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.AStar</className>
  <parameters>
    <heuristicCostFunction>
      <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.GeodeticCostFunction</className>
      <parameters>
        <userDataCategory>0</userDataCategory>
        <xCoordUserDataIndex>0</xCoordUserDataIndex>
        <yCoordUserDataIndex>1</yCoordUserDataIndex>
      </parameters>
    </heuristicCostFunction>
    <linkLevelSelector>
      <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.DynamicLinkLevelSelector</className>
      <parameters>
        <maxLinkLevel>2</maxLinkLevel>
        <costThreshold linkLevel="1">40000</costThreshold>
        <numHighLevelNeighbors>8</numHighLevelNeighbors>
        <costMultiplier>1.5</costMultiplier>
        <costFunction>
          <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.GeodeticCostFunction</className>
          <parameters>
            <userDataCategory>0</userDataCategory>
            <xCoordUserDataIndex>0</xCoordUserDataIndex>
            <yCoordUserDataIndex>1</yCoordUserDataIndex>
          </parameters>
        </costFunction>
      </parameters>
    </linkLevelSelector>
  </parameters>
</shortestPathAlgorithm>

More examples of the XML API are provided with the NDM tutorial (see Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources).

Cross-Schema Network Access

If database users other than the network owner need to read a network into memory, you need to do one of the following:

The second approach requires the extra step of creating views, but the views provide you with flexibility in controlling the parts of the network that are accessible. Each view can provide access to all of the network, or it can use a WHERE clause to provide access to just one or more parts (for example, WHERE STATE_CODE='NY' to restrict the view users to rows for New York) .

Consider the following example scenario:

  • User1 creates (and thus owns) Network1.

  • User2 attempts to call the SDO_NET_MEM.NETWORK_MANAGER.READ_NETWORK procedure to read Network1, but receives an error. The error occurs even though User2 has the appropriate privileges on the Network Data Model Graph tables for Network1.

To work around this problem, you must use the approach in either Cross-Schema Access by Specifying Owner in Network Metadata or Cross-Schema Access by Using Views.

Cross-Schema Access by Specifying Owner in Network Metadata

To enable a non-owner user (with suitable privileges) to access a network, you can specify the network owner in the network metadata. For each non-owner user that will be permitted to access the network, follow these steps:

  1. Ensure that the user has SELECT or READ privilege access to the necessary Network Data Model Graph tables. If the user does not have this access, connect as the network owner and grant it. For example, connect as User1 and execute the following statements:

    GRANT select ON network1_node$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_link$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_path$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_plink$ TO user2;
    
  2. Connect as the non-owner user. For example, connect as User2.

  3. Use the schema name of the network owner to qualify the Network Data Model Graph tables for the network in the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view (explained in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views). For example, if the network is not already defined in this view, enter the following while connected as User2:

    INSERT INTO user_sdo_network_metadata 
      (network, network_category, geometry_type, 
       node_table_name,node_geom_column,
       link_table_name, link_geom_column, link_direction,
       path_table_name, path_geom_column,
       path_link_table_name)
    VALUES
      ('NETWORK1','SPATIAL', 'SDO_GEOMETRY',
       'USER1.NETWORK1_NODE$', 'GEOMETRY',
       'USER1.NETWORK1_LINK$', 'GEOMETRY', 'DIRECTED',
       'USER1.NETWORK1_PATH$', 'GEOMETRY',
       'USER1.NETWORK1_PLINK$');
    

    If the network is already defined in this view, update the definition to qualify each table name with the schema name. For example:

    UPDATE USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA
      SET node_table_name = 'USER1.NETWORK1_NODE$',
          link_table_name = 'USER1.NETWORK1_LINK$',
          path_table_name = 'USER1.NETWORK1_PATH$',
          path_link_table_name = 'USER1.NETWORK1_PLINK$'
      WHERE network = 'NETWORK1';
    

In this scenario, User2 can now read NETWORK1 into memory.

Cross-Schema Access by Using Views

To enable a non-owner user (with suitable privileges) to access a network, or specific parts of a network, you can create views. For each non-owner user that will be permitted to access the network, follow these steps:

  1. Ensure that the user has SELECT or READ privilege access to the necessary Network Data Model Graph tables. If the user does not have this access, connect as the network owner and grant it. For example, connect as User1 and execute the following statements:

    GRANT select ON network1_node$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_link$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_path$ TO user2;
    GRANT select ON network1_plink$ TO user2;
    
  2. Connect as the non-owner user. For example, connect as User2.

  3. Create a view on each of the necessary Network Data Model Graph nodes, with each view selecting all columns in the associated table. Qualify the table name with the schema name of the network owner. For example, while connected as User2:

    CREATE VIEW network1_node$ AS select * from user1.network1_node$;
    CREATE VIEW network1_link$ AS select * from user1.network1_link$;
    CREATE VIEW network1_path$ AS select * from user1.network1_path$;
    CREATE VIEW network1_plink$ AS select * from user1.network1_plink$;
    

    Note:

    Although this example shows views that include all data in the underlying tables, you can restrict the parts of the network that are available by using a WHERE clause in each view definition (for example, WHERE STATE_CODE='NY').

  4. Add a row specifying the newly created views to the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view (explained in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views). For example, while connected as User2:

    INSERT INTO user_sdo_network_metadata 
      (network, network_category, geometry_type, 
       node_table_name,node_geom_column,
       link_table_name, link_geom_column, link_direction,
       path_table_name, path_geom_column,
       path_link_table_name)
    VALUES
      ('NETWORK1','SPATIAL', 'SDO_GEOMETRY',
       'NETWORK1_NODE$', 'GEOMETRY',
       'NETWORK1_LINK$', 'GEOMETRY', 'DIRECTED',
       'NETWORK1_PATH$', 'GEOMETRY',
       'NETWORK1_PLINK$');
    

In this scenario, User2 can now read into memory those parts of NETWORK1 that are available through the views that were created.

Network Examples

This section presents several Network Data Model Graph examples. Most are simplified examples. All examples use the PL/SQL API, and some also use other APIs. This section includes the following subsections:

The examples refer to concepts that are explained in this chapter, and they use PL/SQL functions and procedures documented in SDO_NET Package Subprograms.

Simple Spatial (SDO) Network Example (PL/SQL)

This section presents an example of a very simple spatial (SDO, not LRS) network that contains three nodes and a link between each node. The network is illustrated in Figure 5-4.

Figure 5-4 Simple Spatial (SDO) Network

Description of Figure 5-4 follows
Description of "Figure 5-4 Simple Spatial (SDO) Network"

As shown in Figure 5-4, node N1 is at point 1,1, node N2 is at point 15,1, and node N3 is at point 9,4. Link L1 is a straight line connecting nodes N1 and N2, link L2 is a straight line connecting nodes N2 and N3, and link L3 is a straight line connecting nodes N3 and N1. There are no other nodes or shape points on any of the links.

Example 5-3 does the following:

  • In a call to the SDO_NET.CREATE_SDO_NETWORK procedure, creates the SDO_NET1 directed network; creates the SDO_NET1_NODE$, SDO_NET1_LINK$, SDO_NET1_PATH$, and SDO_NET1_PLINK$ tables; and updates the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views. All geometry columns are named GEOMETRY. Both the node and link tables contain a cost column named COST.

  • Populates the node, link, path, and path-link tables. It inserts three rows into the node table, three rows into the link table, two rows into the path table, and four rows into the path-link table.

  • Updates the Oracle Spatial and Graph metadata, and creates spatial indexes on the GEOMETRY columns of the node and link tables. (These actions are not specifically related to network management, but that are necessary if applications are to benefit from spatial indexing on these geometry columns.)

Example 5-3 does not show the use of many SDO_NET functions and procedures; these are included in Example 5-5 in Spatial (LRS) Network Example (PL/SQL).

Example 5-3 Simple Spatial (SDO) Network Example (PL/SQL)

-- Create the SDO_NET1 directed network. Also creates the SDO_NET1_NODE$, 
-- SDO_NET1_LINK$, SDO_NET1_PATH$, SDO_NET1_PLINK$ tables, and updates 
-- USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA. All geometry columns are named GEOMETRY. 
-- Both the node and link tables contain a cost column named COST. 
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_SDO_NETWORK('SDO_NET1', 1, TRUE, TRUE);
 
-- Populate the SDO_NET1_NODE$ table.
-- N1
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, geometry, cost)
  VALUES(1, 'N1', 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2001, NULL, SDO_POINT_TYPE(1,1,NULL), NULL, NULL),
    5);
-- N2
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, geometry, cost)
  VALUES(2, 'N2', 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2001, NULL, SDO_POINT_TYPE(15,1,NULL), NULL, NULL),
    8);
-- N3
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, geometry, cost)
  VALUES(3, 'N3', 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2001, NULL, SDO_POINT_TYPE(9,4,NULL), NULL, NULL),
    4);
 
-- Populate the SDO_NET1_LINK$ table.
-- L1
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, geometry, cost, bidirected)
  VALUES(1, 'L1', 1, 2, 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2002, NULL, NULL, 
      SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), 
        SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(1,1, 15,1)),
    14, 'Y');
-- L2
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, geometry, cost, bidirected)
   VALUES(2, 'L2', 2, 3, 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2002, NULL, NULL, 
      SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), 
        SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(15,1, 9,4)),
    10, 'Y');
-- L3
INSERT INTO sdo_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, geometry, cost, bidirected)
  VALUES(3, 'L3', 3, 1, 'Y',
    SDO_GEOMETRY(2002, NULL, NULL, 
      SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), 
        SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(9,4, 1,1)),
    10, 'Y');
 
-- Do not populate the SDO_NET1_PATH$ and SDO_NET1_PLINK$ tables now.
-- Do this only when you need to create any paths.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- REMAINING STEPS NEEDED TO USE SPATIAL INDEXES --
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Update the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view. This is required before the
-- spatial index can be created. Do this only once for each layer
-- (that is, table-column combination).

INSERT INTO user_sdo_geom_metadata
    (TABLE_NAME,
     COLUMN_NAME,
     DIMINFO,
     SRID)
  VALUES (
    'SDO_NET1_NODE$',
    'GEOMETRY',
    SDO_DIM_ARRAY(   -- 20X20 grid
      SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('X', 0, 20, 0.005),
      SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('Y', 0, 20, 0.005)
       ),
    NULL   -- SRID (spatial reference system, also called coordinate system)
  );
INSERT INTO user_sdo_geom_metadata
    (TABLE_NAME,
     COLUMN_NAME,
     DIMINFO,
     SRID)
  VALUES (
    'SDO_NET1_LINK$',
    'GEOMETRY',
    SDO_DIM_ARRAY(   -- 20X20 grid
      SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('X', 0, 20, 0.005),
      SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('Y', 0, 20, 0.005)
       ),
    NULL   -- SRID (spatial reference system, also called coordinate system)
  );
 
-- Create the spatial indexes
CREATE INDEX sdo_net1_nodes_idx ON sdo_net1_node$(geometry)
  INDEXTYPE IS MDSYS.SPATIAL_INDEX;
CREATE INDEX sdo_net1_links_idx ON sdo_net1_link$(geometry)
  INDEXTYPE IS MDSYS.SPATIAL_INDEX;

Simple Logical Network Example (PL/SQL)

This section presents an example of a very simple logical network that contains three nodes and a link between the nodes. The network is illustrated in Figure 5-5.

Figure 5-5 Simple Logical Network

Description of Figure 5-5 follows
Description of "Figure 5-5 Simple Logical Network"

As shown in Figure 5-5, link L1 is a straight line connecting nodes N1 and N2, link L2 is a straight line connecting nodes N2 and N3, and link L3 is a straight line connecting nodes N3 and N1. There are no other nodes on any of the links.

Example 5-4 calls the SDO_NET.CREATE_LOGICAL_NETWORK procedure, which does the following: creates the LOG_NET1 directed network; creates the LOG_NET1_NODE$, LOG_NET1_LINK$, LOG_NET1_PATH$, and LOG_NET1_PLINK$ tables; and updates the xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views. Both the node and link tables contain a cost column named COST. (Because this is a logical network, there are no geometry columns.) The example also populates the node and link tables.

Example 5-4 does not show the use of many SDO_NET functions and procedures; these are included in the logical hierarchical network example (Example 5-6) in Logical Hierarchical Network Example (PL/SQL).

Example 5-4 Simple Logical Network Example (PL/SQL)

-- Creates the LOG_NET1 directed logical network. Also creates the
-- LOG_NET1_NODE$, LOG_NET1_LINK$, LOG_NET1_PATH$,
-- and LOG_NET1_PLINK$ tables, and updates USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA.
-- Both the node and link tables contain a cost column named COST. 
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_LOGICAL_NETWORK('LOG_NET1', 1, TRUE, TRUE);
 
-- Populate the LOG_NET1_NODE$ table.
-- N1
INSERT INTO log_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, cost)
  VALUES (1, 'N1', 'Y', 2);
-- N2
INSERT INTO log_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, cost)
  VALUES (2, 'N2', 'Y', 3);
-- N3
INSERT INTO log_net1_node$ (node_id, node_name, active, cost)
  VALUES (3, 'N3', 'Y', 2);
 
-- Populate the LOG_NET1_LINK$ table.
-- L1
INSERT INTO log_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1, 'L1', 1, 2, 'Y', 1, 10);
-- L2
INSERT INTO log_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, link_level, cost)
  VALUES (2, 'L2', 2, 3, 'Y', 1, 7);
-- L3
INSERT INTO log_net1_link$ (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id,
     active, link_level, cost)
  VALUES (3, 'L3', 3, 1, 'Y', 1, 8);
 
-- Do not populate the LOG_NET1_PATH$ and LOG_NET1_PLINK$ tables now.
-- Do this only when you need to create any paths.

Spatial (LRS) Network Example (PL/SQL)

This section presents an example of a spatial (LRS) network that uses the roads (routes) illustrated in Figure 5-6. Each road is built from individual line segments (associated with links) taken from one or more road segment geometries, which are also shown in the figure.

Figure 5-6 Roads and Road Segments for Spatial (LRS) Network Example

Description of Figure 5-6 follows
Description of "Figure 5-6 Roads and Road Segments for Spatial (LRS) Network Example"

As shown in Figure 5-6:

  • Route1 starts at point 2,2 and ends at point 5,14. It has the following nodes: N1, N2, N3, N4, N5, N6, and N7. It has the following links: R1L1, R1L2, R1L3, R1L4, R1L5, and R1L6.

  • Route2 starts at point 8,4 and ends at point 8,13. It has the following nodes: N3, N6, and N8. It has the following links: R2L1 and R2L2.

  • Route3 starts at point 12,10 and ends at point 5,14. It has the following nodes: N5, N8, and N7. It has the following links: R3L1 and R3L2.

  • The four road segment geometries are shown individually on the right side of the figure. (The points on each segment are labeled with their associated node names, to clarify how each segment geometry fits into the illustration on the left side.)

Example 5-5 does the following:

  • Creates a table to hold the road segment geometries.

  • Inserts four road segment geometries into the table.

  • Inserts the spatial metadata into the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view.

  • Creates a spatial index on the geometry column in the ROAD_SEGMENTS table.

  • Creates and populates the node table.

  • Creates and populates the link table.

  • Creates and populates the path table and path-link table, for possible future use. (Before an application can use paths, you must populate these two tables.)

  • Inserts network metadata into the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view.

Example 5-5 Spatial (LRS) Network Example (PL/SQL)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- CREATE AND POPULATE TABLE --
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Create a table for road segments. Use LRS.
CREATE TABLE road_segments (
  segment_id  NUMBER PRIMARY KEY,
  segment_name  VARCHAR2(32),
  segment_geom  SDO_GEOMETRY, 
  geom_id NUMBER);
 
-- Populate the table with road segments.
INSERT INTO road_segments VALUES(
  1,
  'Segment1',
  SDO_GEOMETRY(
    3302,  -- line string, 3 dimensions (X,Y,M), 3rd is measure dimension
    NULL,
    NULL,
    SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), -- one line string, straight segments
    SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(
      2,2,0,   -- Starting point - Node1; 0 is measure from start.
      2,4,2,   -- Node2; 2 is measure from start. 
      8,4,8,   -- Node3; 8 is measure from start. 
      12,4,12) -- Node4; 12 is measure from start. 
  ), 1001
);
 
INSERT INTO road_segments VALUES(
  2,
  'Segment2',
  SDO_GEOMETRY(
    3302,  -- line string, 3 dimensions (X,Y,M), 3rd is measure dimension
    NULL,
    NULL,
    SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), -- one line string, straight segments
    SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(
      8,4,0,   -- Node3; 0 is measure from start. 
      8,10,6,  -- Node6; 6 is measure from start. 
      8,13,9)  -- Ending point - Node8; 9 is measure from start.
  ), 1002
);
 
INSERT INTO road_segments VALUES(
  3,
  'Segment3',
  SDO_GEOMETRY(
    3302,  -- line string, 3 dimensions (X,Y,M), 3rd is measure dimension
    NULL,
    NULL,
    SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), -- one line string, straight segments
    SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(
      12,4,0,     -- Node4; 0 is measure from start.
      12,10,6,    -- Node5; 6 is measure from start. 
      8,13,11,    -- Node8; 11 is measure from start. 
      5,14,14.16) -- Ending point - Node7; 14.16 is measure from start.
  ), 1003
);
 
INSERT INTO road_segments VALUES(
  4,
  'Segment4',
  SDO_GEOMETRY(
    3302,  -- line string, 3 dimensions (X,Y,M), 3rd is measure dimension
    NULL,
    NULL,
    SDO_ELEM_INFO_ARRAY(1,2,1), -- one line string, straight segments
    SDO_ORDINATE_ARRAY(
      12,10,0, -- Node5; 0 is measure from start.
      8,10,4,  -- Node6; 4 is measure from start.  
      5,14,9)  -- Ending point - Node7; 9 is measure from start.
  ), 1004
);
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- UPDATE THE SPATIAL METADATA --
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Update the USER_SDO_GEOM_METADATA view. This is required before the
-- spatial index can be created. Do this only once for each layer
-- (that is, table-column combination; here: road_segment and segment_geom).
INSERT INTO user_sdo_geom_metadata
    (TABLE_NAME,
     COLUMN_NAME,
     DIMINFO,
     SRID)
  VALUES (
  'ROAD_SEGMENTS',
  'SEGMENT_GEOM',
  SDO_DIM_ARRAY(   -- 20X20 grid
    SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('X', 0, 20, 0.005),
    SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('Y', 0, 20, 0.005),
    SDO_DIM_ELEMENT('M', 0, 20, 0.005) -- Measure dimension
     ),
  NULL   -- SRID (spatial reference system, also called coordinate system)
);
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
-- CREATE THE SPATIAL INDEX --
-------------------------------------------------------------------
CREATE INDEX road_segments_idx ON road_segments(segment_geom)
  INDEXTYPE IS MDSYS.SPATIAL_INDEX;
  
--------------------------------
-- USE SDO_NET SUBPROGRAMS
--------------------------------
 
-- This procedure does not use the CREATE_LRS_NETWORK procedure. Instead,
-- the user creates the network tables and populates the network metadata view.
-- Basic steps:
-- 1. Create and populate the node table.
-- 2. Create and populate the link table.
-- 3. Create the path table and paths and links table (for possible 
--    future use, before which they will need to be populated).
-- 4. Populate the network metadata (USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA).
--    Note: Can be done before or after Steps 1-3.
-- 5. Use various SDO_NET functions and procedures.
 
-- 1. Create and populate the node table.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE('ROADS_NODES', 'LRS_GEOMETRY', 'NODE_GEOMETRY', 'COST', 1);
 
-- Populate the node table.
 
-- N1
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure) 
  VALUES (1, 'N1', 'Y', 1001, 0);
 
-- N2
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (2, 'N2', 'Y', 1001, 2);
 
-- N3
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (3, 'N3', 'Y', 1001, 8);
 
-- N4
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (4, 'N4', 'Y', 1001, 12);
 
-- N5
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (5, 'N5', 'Y', 1004, 0);
 
-- N6
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (6, 'N6', 'Y', 1002, 6);
 
-- N7
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (7, 'N7', 'Y', 1004, 9);
 
-- N8
INSERT INTO roads_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, geom_id, measure)
  VALUES (8, 'N8', 'Y', 1002, 9);
 
-- 2. Create and populate the link table.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE('ROADS_LINKS', 'LRS_GEOMETRY', 'LINK_GEOMETRY', 'COST', 1);
 
-- Populate the link table.
 
-- Route1, Link1
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (101, 'R1L1', 1, 2, 'Y', 3, 1001, 0, 2);
 
-- Route1, Link2
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (102, 'R1L2', 2, 3, 'Y', 15, 1001, 2, 8);
 
 -- Route1, Link3
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (103, 'R1L3', 3, 4, 'Y', 10, 1001, 8, 12);
 
-- Route1, Link4
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (104, 'R1L4', 4, 5, 'Y', 15, 1003, 0, 6);
 
-- Route1, Link5
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (105, 'R1L5', 5, 6, 'Y', 10, 1004, 0, 4);
 
-- Route1, Link6
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (106, 'R1L6', 6, 7, 'Y', 7, 1004, 4, 9);
 
-- Route2, Link1 (cost = 30, a slow drive)
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (201, 'R2L1', 3, 6, 'Y', 30, 1002, 0, 6);
 
-- Route2, Link2
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (202, 'R2L2', 6, 8, 'Y', 5, 1002, 6, 9);
 
-- Route3, Link1
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (301, 'R3L1', 5, 8, 'Y', 5, 1003, 6, 11);
 
-- Route3, Link2
INSERT INTO roads_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active,
   cost, geom_id, start_measure, end_measure)
VALUES (302, 'R3L2', 8, 7, 'Y', 5, 1003, 11, 14.16);
 
-- 3. Create the path table (to store created paths) and the path-link 
--    table (to store links for each path) for possible future use,
--    before which they will need to be populated.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_TABLE('ROADS_PATHS', 'PATH_GEOMETRY');
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_LINK_TABLE('ROADS_PATHS_LINKS');
 
-- 4. Populate the network metadata (USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA).
 
INSERT INTO user_sdo_network_metadata 
    (NETWORK,
     NETWORK_CATEGORY,
     GEOMETRY_TYPE,
     NETWORK_TYPE,
     NO_OF_HIERARCHY_LEVELS,
     NO_OF_PARTITIONS,
     LRS_TABLE_NAME,
     LRS_GEOM_COLUMN,
     NODE_TABLE_NAME,
     NODE_GEOM_COLUMN,
     NODE_COST_COLUMN,
     LINK_TABLE_NAME,
     LINK_GEOM_COLUMN,
     LINK_DIRECTION,
     LINK_COST_COLUMN,
     PATH_TABLE_NAME,
     PATH_GEOM_COLUMN,
     PATH_LINK_TABLE_NAME)
  VALUES (
    'ROADS_NETWORK',  -- Network name
    'SPATIAL',  -- Network category
    'LRS_GEOMETRY',  -- Geometry type
    'Roadways',  -- Network type (user-defined)
    1,  -- No. of levels in hierarchy
    1,  -- No. of partitions
    'ROAD_SEGMENTS',   -- LRS table name
    'SEGMENT_GEOM' ,  -- LRS geometry column
    'ROADS_NODES',  -- Node table name
    'NODE_GEOMETRY',  -- Node geometry column
    'COST',  -- Node cost column
    'ROADS_LINKS',  -- Link table name
    'LINK_GEOMETRY',  -- Link geometry column
    'DIRECTED',  -- Link direction
    'COST',  -- Link cost column
    'ROADS_PATHS',  -- Path table name
    'PATH_GEOMETRY',  -- Path geometry column
    'ROADS_PATHS_LINKS'  -- Paths and links table
    );
 
-- 5. Use various SDO_NET functions and procedures.
 
-- Validate the network.
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NETWORK('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Validate parts or aspects of the network.
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_LINK_SCHEMA('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_LRS_SCHEMA('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NODE_SCHEMA('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_PATH_SCHEMA('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Retrieve various information (GET_xxx and some other functions).
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_CHILD_LINKS('ROADS_NETWORK', 101) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_CHILD_NODES('ROADS_NETWORK', 1) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_GEOMETRY_TYPE('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_IN_LINKS('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_INVALID_LINKS('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_INVALID_NODES('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_INVALID_PATHS('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_ISOLATED_NODES('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_COST_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_DIRECTION('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_GEOM_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_GEOMETRY('ROADS_NETWORK', 103) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_TABLE_NAME('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LRS_GEOM_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LRS_LINK_GEOMETRY('ROADS_NETWORK', 103) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LRS_NODE_GEOMETRY('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LRS_TABLE_NAME('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NETWORK_CATEGORY('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NETWORK_ID('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NETWORK_NAME(3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NETWORK_TYPE('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_HIERARCHY_LEVELS('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_LINKS('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_NODES('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_DEGREE('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_GEOM_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_GEOMETRY('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_IN_DEGREE('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_OUT_DEGREE('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_TABLE_NAME('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_COST_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_HIERARCHY_LEVEL('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_OUT_LINKS('ROADS_NETWORK', 3) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_PATH_GEOM_COLUMN('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_PATH_TABLE_NAME('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_COMPLEX('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_HIERARCHICAL('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_LOGICAL('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_SIMPLE('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_SPATIAL('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.LRS_GEOMETRY_NETWORK('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.NETWORK_EXISTS('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.SDO_GEOMETRY_NETWORK('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.TOPO_GEOMETRY_NETWORK('ROADS_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Copy a network.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.COPY_NETWORK('ROADS_NETWORK', 'ROADS_NETWORK2');
 
-- Create a trigger.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_DELETE_TRIGGER('ROADS_NETWORK');

Logical Hierarchical Network Example (PL/SQL)

This section presents an example of a logical network that contains the nodes and links illustrated in Figure 5-7. Because it is a logical network, there are no spatial geometries associated with it. (Figure 5-7 is essentially the same as Figure 5-3 in Network Hierarchy, but with the nodes and links labeled.)

Figure 5-7 Nodes and Links for Logical Network Example

Description of Figure 5-7 follows
Description of "Figure 5-7 Nodes and Links for Logical Network Example"

As shown in Figure 5-7:

  • The network is hierarchical, with two levels. The top level (level 2) consists of two nodes (HN1 and HN2), and the remaining nodes and links are in the bottom level (level 1) of the hierarchy.

  • Each node in level 1 is a child node of one of the nodes in level 2. Node HN1 has the following child nodes: N1, N2, N3, N4, N5, and N6. Node HN2 has the following child nodes: N7, N8, N9, N10, N11, N12, N13, and N14.

  • One link (HN1HN2) links nodes HN1 and HN2, and two links (N5N8 and N6N7) are child links of parent link HN1HN2. Note, however, that links are not associated with a specific network hierarchy level.

Example 5-6 does the following:

  • Creates and populates the node table.

  • Creates and populates the link table.

  • Creates and populates the path table and path-link table, for possible future use. (Before an application can use paths, you must populate these two tables.)

  • Inserts network metadata into the USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA view.

  • Uses various SDO_NET functions and procedures.

Example 5-6 Logical Network Example (PL/SQL)

-- Basic steps:
-- 1. Create and populate the node table.
-- 2. Create and populate the link table.
-- 3. Create the path table and paths and links table (for possible 
--    future use, before which they will need to be populated).
-- 4. Populate the network metadata (USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA).
--    Note: Can be done before or after Steps 1-3.
-- 5. Use various SDO_NET functions and procedures.
 
-- 1. Create and populate the node table.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_NODE_TABLE('XYZ_NODES', NULL, NULL, NULL, 2);
 
-- Populate the node table, starting with the highest level in the hierarchy.
 
-- HN1 (Hierarchy level=2, highest in this network)
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level)
  VALUES (1, 'HN1', 'Y', 2);
 
-- HN2 (Hierarchy level=2, highest in this network)
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level)
  VALUES (2, 'HN2', 'Y', 2);
 
-- N1 (Hierarchy level 1, parent node ID = 1 for N1 through N6)
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (101, 'N1', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N2 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (102, 'N2', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N3 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (103, 'N3', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N4 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (104, 'N4', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N5 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (105, 'N5', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N6 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (106, 'N6', 'Y', 1, 1);
 
-- N7 (Hierarchy level 1, parent node ID = 2 for N7 through N14)
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (107, 'N7', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N8 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (108, 'N8', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N9 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (109, 'N9', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N10 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (110, 'N10', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N11 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (111, 'N11', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N12 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (112, 'N12', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N13 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (113, 'N13', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- N14 
INSERT INTO xyz_nodes (node_id, node_name, active, hierarchy_level, 
     parent_node_id)
  VALUES (114, 'N14', 'Y', 1, 2);
 
-- 2. Create and populate the link table.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_LINK_TABLE('XYZ_LINKS', NULL, NULL, 'COST', 2);
 
-- Populate the link table.
 
-- HN1HN2 (single link in highest hierarchy level: link level = 2)
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level)
  VALUES (1001, 'HN1HN2', 1, 2, 'Y', 2);
 
-- For remaining links, link level = 1 and cost (10, 20, or 30) varies among links.
-- N1N2
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1101, 'N1N2', 101, 102, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N1N3
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1102, 'N1N3', 101, 103, 'Y', 1, 20);
 
-- N2N3
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1103, 'N2N3', 102, 103, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- N3N4
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1104, 'N3N4', 103, 104, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N4N5
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1105, 'N4N5', 104, 105, 'Y', 1, 20);
 
-- N4N6
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1106, 'N4N6', 104, 106, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- N5N6
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1107, 'N5N6', 105, 106, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N5N8 (child of the higher-level link: parent ID = 1001)
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost, parent_link_id)
  VALUES (1108, 'N5N8', 105, 108, 'Y', 1, 20, 1001);
 
-- N6N7 (child of the higher-level link: parent ID = 1001)
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost, parent_link_id)
  VALUES (1109, 'N6N7', 106, 107, 'Y', 1, 30, 1001);
 
-- N7N8
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1110, 'N7N8', 107, 108, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N7N9
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1111, 'N7N9', 107, 109, 'Y', 1, 20);
 
-- N8N9
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1112, 'N8N9', 108, 109, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- N9N10
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1113, 'N9N10', 109, 110, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- N9N13
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1114, 'N9N13', 109, 113, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N10N11
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1115, 'N10N11', 110, 111, 'Y', 1, 20);
 
-- N11N12
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1116, 'N11N12', 111, 112, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- N12N13
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1117, 'N12N13', 112, 113, 'Y', 1, 10);
 
-- N12N14
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1118, 'N12N14', 112, 114, 'Y', 1, 20);
 
-- N13N14
INSERT INTO xyz_links (link_id, link_name, start_node_id, end_node_id, active, 
     link_level, cost)
  VALUES (1119, 'N13N14', 113, 114, 'Y', 1, 30);
 
-- 3. Create the path table (to store created paths) and the path-link 
--    table (to store links for each path) for possible future use,
--    before which they will need to be populated.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_TABLE('XYZ_PATHS', NULL);
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_PATH_LINK_TABLE('XYZ_PATHS_LINKS');
 
-- 4. Populate the network metadata (USER_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA).
 
INSERT INTO user_sdo_network_metadata 
    (NETWORK,
     NETWORK_CATEGORY,
     NO_OF_HIERARCHY_LEVELS,
     NO_OF_PARTITIONS,
     NODE_TABLE_NAME,
     LINK_TABLE_NAME,
     LINK_DIRECTION,
     LINK_COST_COLUMN,
     PATH_TABLE_NAME,
     PATH_LINK_TABLE_NAME)
  VALUES (
    'XYZ_NETWORK',  -- Network name
    'LOGICAL',   -- Network category
    2,  -- No. of levels in hierarchy
    1,  -- No. of partitions
    'XYZ_NODES',  -- Node table name
    'XYZ_LINKS',  -- Link table name
    'BIDIRECTED',  -- Link direction
    'COST',  -- Link cost column
    'XYZ_PATHS',  -- Path table name
    'XYZ_PATHS_LINKS'  -- Path-link table name
  );
 
-- 5. Use various SDO_NET functions and procedures.
 
-- Validate the network.
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NETWORK('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Validate parts or aspects of the network.
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_LINK_SCHEMA('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_LRS_SCHEMA('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_NODE_SCHEMA('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.VALIDATE_PATH_SCHEMA('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Retrieve various information (GET_xxx and some other functions).
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_CHILD_LINKS('XYZ_NETWORK', 1001) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_CHILD_NODES('XYZ_NETWORK', 1) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_CHILD_NODES('XYZ_NETWORK', 2) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_IN_LINKS('XYZ_NETWORK', 104) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_COST_COLUMN('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_DIRECTION('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_LINK_TABLE_NAME('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NETWORK_TYPE('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_HIERARCHY_LEVELS('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_LINKS('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NO_OF_NODES('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_DEGREE('XYZ_NETWORK', 104) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_IN_DEGREE('XYZ_NETWORK', 104) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_NODE_OUT_DEGREE('XYZ_NETWORK', 104) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_OUT_LINKS('XYZ_NETWORK', 104) FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.GET_PATH_TABLE_NAME('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_HIERARCHICAL('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_LOGICAL('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.IS_SPATIAL('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
SELECT SDO_NET.NETWORK_EXISTS('XYZ_NETWORK') FROM DUAL;
 
-- Copy a network.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.COPY_NETWORK('XYZ_NETWORK', 'XYZ_NETWORK2');
 
-- Create a trigger.
EXECUTE SDO_NET.CREATE_DELETE_TRIGGER('XYZ_NETWORK');

Partitioning and Load on Demand Analysis Examples (PL/SQL, XML, and Java)

This section presents examples of partitioning a network, including related operations, and performing load on demand network analysis. The examples illustrate concepts and techniques explained in Network Analysis Using Load on Demand.

Additional examples of using load on demand analysis with partitioned networks are included in the demo files, described in Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources.

Example 5-7 Partitioning a Spatial Network

Example 5-7 partitions a spatial network named NYC_NET. (Assume that this network already exists and its metadata, node, and link tables are populated.)

Example 5-7 and Example 5-8 generate the necessary partition tables for the NYC_NET network. After executing these examples, you can check the .log file for the current status or any errors encountered during partitioning or BLOB generation.

exec sdo_net.spatial_partition(
  network->'NYC_NET', -- network name
  partition_table_name->'NYC_PART$', -- partition table name
  max_num_nodes->5000, -- max. number of nodes per partition
  log_loc->'MDDIR', -- partition log directory
  log_file->'nyc_part.log', --partition log file name
  open_mode->'w', -- partition log file open mode
  link_level->1); -- link level

Example 5-8 Generating Partition BLOBs

Example 5-8 generates partition BLOBs for the network.

exec sdo_net.generate_partition_blobs(
  network->'NYC_NET', ,-- network name
  link_level ->1, -- link level
  partition_blob_table_name->'NYC_PBLOB$', -- partition blob table name
  includeUserdata->FALSE, -- include user data in partition blobs?
  log_loc->'MYDIR',  -- partition log directory
  log_file->'nyc_part.log', --partition log file name
  open_mode->'a'); -- partition log file open mode

Example 5-9 Configuring the Load on Demand Environment, Including Partition Cache

Example 5-9 shows the XML for configuring the load on demand environment, including the partition cache.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<LODConfigs xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
            xmlns ="http://xmlns.oracle.com/spatial/network"
            version = "12.1">      
<!--The new xml configuration schema takes the version number. If the version attribute is missing, then we assume it is 11.2 or lower. -->
<!-- default configuration for networks not configured -->
  <LODConfig globalNetworkName="$DEFAULT$" networkName="$DEFAULT$">
    <networkIO>
      <geometryTolerance>0.000001</geometryTolerance>
      <readPartitionFromBlob>false</readPartitionFromBlob>
      <partitionBlobTranslator>
        <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.PartitionBlobTranslator11gR2</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </partitionBlobTranslator>
      <userDataIO categoryId="0">
        <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.LODUserDataIOSDO</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </userDataIO>
      <cachingPolicy linkLevel="1">
        <maxNodes>500000</maxNodes>
        <residentPartitions></residentPartitions>
        <flushRule>
          <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.LRUCachingHandler</className>
          <parameters></parameters>
        </flushRule>
      </cachingPolicy>
    </networkIO>
    <networkAnalysis>
      <linkLevelSelector>
        <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.DummyLinkLevelSelector</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </linkLevelSelector>
      <withinCostPolygonTolerance>0.05</withinCostPolygonTolerance>
    </networkAnalysis>
  </LODConfig>
  <LODConfig globalNetworkName="SAMPLE_NETWORK" networkName="SAMPLE_NETWORK">
    <networkIO>
      <geometryTolerance>0.000001</geometryTolerance>
      <readPartitionFromBlob>true</readPartitionFromBlob>
      <partitionBlobTranslator>
        <className>oracle.spatial.router.ndm.RouterPartitionBlobTranslator11gR2</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </partitionBlobTranslator>
      <userDataIO categoryId="0">
        <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.LODUserDataIOSDO</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </userDataIO>
      <userDataIO categoryId="1">
        <className>oracle.spatial.router.ndm.RouterUserDataIO</className>
        <parameters></parameters>
      </userDataIO>
      <cachingPolicy linkLevel="1">
        <maxNodes>200000</maxNodes>
        <residentPartitions></residentPartitions>
        <flushRule>
          <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.LRUCachingHandler</className>
          <parameters></parameters>
        </flushRule>
      </cachingPolicy>
      <cachingPolicy linkLevel="2">
        <maxNodes>800000</maxNodes>
        <residentPartitions>0</residentPartitions>
        <flushRule>
          <className>oracle.spatial.network.lod.LRUCachingHandler</className>
          <parameters></parameters>
        </flushRule>
      </cachingPolicy>
    </networkIO>
    <networkAnalysis>
    </networkAnalysis>
  </LODConfig>
</LODConfigs>

Example 5-10 Reloading the Load on Demand Configuration (Java API)

Example 5-10 and Example 5-11 show the Java and PL/SQL APIs, respectively, for reloading the load on demand configuration.

InputStream config = ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream(
                     "netlodcfg.xml");
LODNetworkManager.getConfigManager().loadConfig(config);

Example 5-11 Reloading the Load on Demand Configuration (PL/SQL API)

EXECUTE SDO_NET.LOAD_CONFIG('WORK_DIR', 'netlodcfg.xml');

Example 5-12 Getting Estimated Partition Size

Example 5-12 returns the estimated size in bytes for a specified network partition.

SELECT SDO_NET.GET_PARTITION_SIZE (
  NETWORK->'NYC_NET',
  PARTITION_ID->1,
  LINK_LEVEL ->1,
  INCLUDE_USER_DATA->'FALSE',
  INCLUDE_SPATIAL_DATA->'TRUE') FROM DUAL;

Example 5-13 Network Analysis: Shortest Path (LOD Java API)

Example 5-13 uses the load on demand Java API (oracle.spatial.network.lod) to issue a shortest-path query on a network.

Connection conn = LODNetworkManager.getConnection(dbUrl, dbUser, dbPassword);
// get LOD network IO Adapter
String networkName = "NYC_NET";
NetworkIO reader = LODNetworkManager.getCachedNetworkIO(conn, networkName, networkName, null);
// get analysis module
NetworkAnalyst analyst = LODNetworkManager.getNetworkAnalyst(reader);
// compute the shortest path
LogicalSubPath path = analyst.shortestPathDijkstra(new PointOnNet(startNodeId),
      new PointOnNet(endNodeId), null);
// print path result
PrintUtility.print(System.out, path, false, 0, 0);
. . .

Example 5-14 Network Analysis: Shortest Path (XML API)

Example 5-14 uses the XML API (oracle.spatial.network.xml) to issue a shortest-path query on a network. It includes the request and the response.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<ndm:networkAnalysisRequest
    xmlns:ndm="http://xmlns.oracle.com/spatial/network"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:gml="http://www.opengis.net/gml">
  <ndm:networkName>NYC_NET</ndm:networkName>
  <ndm:shortestPath>
    <ndm:startPoint>
      <ndm:nodeID>65</ndm:nodeID>
    </ndm:startPoint>
    <ndm:endPoint>
      <ndm:nodeID>115</ndm:nodeID>
    </ndm:endPoint>
    <ndm:subPathRequestParameter>
      <ndm:isFullPath> true </ndm:isFullPath>
      <ndm:startLinkIndex> true </ndm:startLinkIndex>
      <ndm:startPercentage> true </ndm:startPercentage>
      <ndm:endLinkIndex> true </ndm:endLinkIndex>
      <ndm:endPercentage> true </ndm:endPercentage>
      <ndm:geometry>false</ndm:geometry>
    <ndm:pathRequestParameter>
      <ndm:cost> true </ndm:cost>
      <ndm:isSimple> true </ndm:isSimple>
      <ndm:startNodeID>true</ndm:startNodeID>
      <ndm:endNodeID>true</ndm:endNodeID>
      <ndm:noOfLinks>true</ndm:noOfLinks>
      <ndm:linksRequestParameter>
        <ndm:onlyLinkID>true</ndm:onlyLinkID>
      </ndm:linksRequestParameter>
      <ndm:nodesRequestParameter>
        <ndm:onlyNodeID>true</ndm:onlyNodeID>
      </ndm:nodesRequestParameter>
      <ndm:geometry>true</ndm:geometry>
    </ndm:pathRequestParameter>
    </ndm:subPathRequestParameter>
  </ndm:shortestPath>
</ndm:networkAnalysisRequest>
 
<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'UTF-8'?>
<ndm:networkAnalysisResponse xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:ndm="http://xmlns.oracle.com/spatial/network" xmlns:gml="http://www.opengis.net/gml">
  <ndm:networkName>NYC_NET</ndm:networkName>
  <ndm:shortestPath>
    <ndm:subPathResponse>
      <ndm:isFullPath>true</ndm:isFullPath>
      <ndm:startLinkIndex>0</ndm:startLinkIndex>
      <ndm:startPercentage>0.0</ndm:startPercentage>
      <ndm:endLinkIndex>17</ndm:endLinkIndex>
      <ndm:endPercentage>1.0</ndm:endPercentage>
      <ndm:pathResponse>
        <ndm:cost>6173.212694405703</ndm:cost>
        <ndm:isSimple>true</ndm:isSimple>
        <ndm:startNodeID>65</ndm:startNodeID>
        <ndm:endNodeID>115</ndm:endNodeID>
        <ndm:noOfLinks>18</ndm:noOfLinks>
        <ndm:linkIDs>145477046 145477044 145477042 145477039 145476926 145476930 145480892 145480891 145476873 145476871 145477023 145489019 145489020 145476851 145488986 145488987 145476913 145476905         
        </ndm:linkIDs>
        <ndm:nodeIDs>65 64 60 57 58 61 71 70 73 87 97 95 91 101 102 104 117 120 115 
        </ndm:nodeIDs>
        <ndm:geometry>
          <gml:LineString>
            <gml:coordinates>-71.707462,43.555262 -71.707521,43.555601…
            </gml:coordinates>
          </gml:LineString>
        </ndm:geometry>
      </ndm:pathResponse>
    </ndm:subPathResponse>
  </ndm:shortestPath>
</ndm:networkAnalysisResponse>

User-Defined Data Examples (PL/SQL and Java)

This section presents examples of using network user-defined data, which is the information (not related to connectivity) that users want to associate with a network representation. The USER_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA and ALL_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA metadata views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_USER_DATA Views) contain information about user-defined data.

To use user-defined data, you must set the USER_DEFINED_DATA column value to Y in the appropriate xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA views (described in xxx_SDO_NETWORK_METADATA Views).

Example 5-15 Inserting User-Defined Data into Network Metadata

Example 5-15 uses the PL/SQL API to insert link-related user-defined data into the network metadata.

-- Insert link user data named 'interaction' of
-- type varchar2 (50) in network 'bi_test'.
--'interaction' is a column of type varchar2(50) in the link table of network 'bi_
test'.
insert into user_sdo_network_user_data 
         (network,table_type, data_name, data_type, data_length, category_id) 
          values ('bi_test', 'LINK', 'interaction', 'VARCHAR2', 50, 0) ;
-- insert link user data named 'PROB' of type Number.
--'PROB' is a column of type NUMBER in the link table of network 'bi_test'.
insert into user_sdo_network_user_data 
         (network,table_type,data_name,data_type, category_id)
          values ('bi_test','LINK','PROB','NUMBER', 0) ;

After a network or network partition is loaded, user-defined data is available in Java representations. You can access user-defined data through the getCategorizedUserData and setCategorizedUserData methods for the Node, Link, Path, and SubPath interfaces. For example:

// The user data index is the sequence number of a user data within a category
// sorted by data name.
 
int interactionUserDataIndex = 0;
int probUserDataIndex = 1;
 
String interaction = (String)link.getCategorizedUserData().getUserData(0).
                     get(interactionUseDataIndex);
 
double prob = ((Double)link.getCategorizedUserData().getUserData(0).
              get(probUserdataIndex)).doubleValue();

Example 5-16 Implementation of writeUserData method of LODUserDataIO Interface

Example 5-16 uses the Java API for a custom user data I/O implementation (non-default implementation) of the LODUserDataIO interface. User data associated to links is written to BLOBs (one BLOB per partition) and read from BLOBs during analysis. In this example it is assumed that:

  • The user-defined data BLOB for multimodal data for each partition has the partition ID and number of links associated with the partition followed by <Link ID, link route ID> for each link

  • The user-defined data BLOB table name is MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA

 //Method getLinksInPartition(partitionId) computes a vector that
 // consists of  the ID and the route ID of each link associated with a partition
 // with ID = partitionId
 LinkVector = getLinksInPartition(partitionId);
 
 ObjectOutputStream dout = null;
 
 //Insert an empty blob for the partition with ID = partition_id
 String insertStr = "INSERT INTO " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                              " (partition_id, blob) " + " VALUES " + " (?, EMPTY_BLOB())" ;
 
 PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(insertStr);
 stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
 int n = stmt.executeUpdate();
 stmt.close();
 
 //lock the row for blob update
  String lockRowStr = "SELECT blob FROM " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA +
                                   " WHERE partition_id = ? " + " FOR UPDATE";
  stmt = conn.prepareStatement(lockRowStr);
  stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
  ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();
 
  rs.next();
 oracle.sql.BLOB userDataBlob = (oracle.sql.BLOB) rs.getBlob(1);
 stmt.close();
 
  OutputStream blobOut = ((oracle.sql.BLOB) userDataBlob).setBinaryStream(1);
  dout = new ObjectOutputStream(blobOut);
 
  //write partition ID
  dout.writeInt(partitionId);
  int numLinks = linkVector.size()
 
   for (int i=0; i<linkVector.size(); i++) {
         //MultimodalLink is a class with variables link ID and route ID
         MultimodalLink link = (MultimodalLink) linkVector.elementAt(i);
          //write link ID 
         dout.writeLong(link.getLinkId());
 
         // write route ID into file
         dout.writeInt(link.getRouteId());
    }
    dout.close();
     blobOut.close();
     rs.close();

Example 5-17 Implementation of readUserData method of LODUserDataIO Interface

In Example 5-17, the user-defined data is accessed through the getCategorizedUserData and setCategorizedUserData methods for the Node, Link, Path, and SubPath interfaces and the getUserData and setUserData methods of the CategorizedUserData interface.

//Read the blob for the required partition from the user data blob table
// In this example,
// MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA  is the name of user –defined data blob table
BLOB multimodalBlob = null;
String queryStr = "SELECT blob FROM " + MULTIMODAL_USER_DATA                                
                             " WHERE partition_id = ?";
PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(queryStr);
stmt.setInt(1,partitionId);
ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();
if (rs.next())   {
     multimodalBlob = (oracle.sql.BLOB)rs.getBlob(1);
}
 
// Materialize the blob value as an input stream        
InputStream is = multimodalBlob.getBinaryStream();
 
//Create an ObjectInputStream that reads from the InputStream is
ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(is);
 
//Read the values of partition ID and number of links from the blob
int partitionId = ois.readInt();
int numLinks = ois.readInt();
 
for (int i=0; i<numLinks; i++)  {
 
    //Read link ID and route ID for each link
     long linkId = ois.readLong();
     int routeId = ois.readInt();
 
     //MultimodalLinkUserData is an implementation of NDM LOD UserData interface
     //Implementation is provided at the end of the example 
     linkUserData = new MultimodalLinkUserData(routeId);
 
     //Get the link object corresponding to the link ID
     LogicalNetLink link = partition.getLink(linkId);
 
     //Get the (categorized) user data associated with the link. 
     CategorizedUserData cud = link.getCategorizedUserData();
    
     // If the link does not have categorized user data associated with it,
     // initialize it to linkUserData
     // Else, set the user data for category USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL 
     // to linkUserData 
     if (cud == null) {
            UserData [] userDataArray = {linkUserData};
            cud = new CategorizedUserDataImpl(userDataArray);
             link.setCategorizedUserData(cud);
     }
     else {                   
            cud.setUserData(USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL,linkUserData);
     }
}

The following example shows how to read the user-defined data, namely the route ID associated with a link during analysis:

//info is an instance of LODAnalysisInfo 
LogicalLink currentLink = info.getCurrentLink();
 
//Read the user-defined data (in this case, route ID) 
int linkRouteId   = (Integer)currentLink.getCategorizedUserData().
                           getUserData(USER_DATA_MULTIMODAL).                                      
                           get(INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID);

The implementation of the MultimodalLinkUserData interface is as follows:

class MultimodalLinkUserData implements UserData
{
    private int routeId;
 
    protected MultimodalLinkUserData(int routeId)
   {
        this.routeId = routeId;
   }
 
  public Object get(int index)
  {
    switch(index)
    {
         case INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID:
              return routeId;
    }
    return null;
  }
 
  public void set(int index, Object userData)
  {
    switch(index)
    {
         case INDEX_LINK_ROUTEID:
            this.routeId = (Integer) userData;
    }
  }
 
  public int getNumberOfUserData()
  {
       return 1;
  }
 
  public Object clone()
{
    return new MultimodalLinkUserData(routeId);
  }
}

Network Data Model Graph Tutorial and Other Resources

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database-options/spatialandgraph on the Oracle Technology Network provides links to valuable resources to help you get started with Oracle Spatial and Graph technologies, including the Network Data Model Graph. The Network Data Model Graph resources include the following:

  • A Network Data Model Graph tutorial (ndm_tutorial.zip on http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/samplecode/spatial-1433316.html) outlines the steps to set up and configure a network, and to conduct the analysis. It also includes sample code and a web application that demonstrates how to use Oracle Maps to display analysis results.

  • An NDM white paper ("A Load-On-Demand Approach to Handling Large Networks in the Oracle Spatial and Graph Network Data Model Graph") provides detailed explanations and examples.

README File for Spatial and Graph and Related Features

A README.txt file supplements the information in the following manuals: Oracle Spatial and Graph Developer's Guide, Oracle Spatial and Graph GeoRaster Developer's Guide, and Oracle Spatial and Graph Topology Data Model and Network Data Model Graph Developer's Guide (this manual). This file is located at:

$ORACLE_HOME/md/doc/README.txt